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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 7, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. iraq's prime minister appeals for calm after surviving a drone attack on his home in baghdad. the family of an unvaccinated mother in the uk, who died from covid—19 before she could meet her newborn daughter, urge all mums—to—be to get the vaccine. for the sake of god and the sake of your loved ones, please get vaccinated. if she had the vaccine, she might have lived and might have had a chance of surviving. security forces in sudan tear—gas protesters marching against last month's military coup. and after eight people die in a crush at a music festival, texas police say they're also
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investigating whether an audience member was injecting people with drugs. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the iraqi prime minister, mustafa al—khadimi, has appealed for calm, after surviving a drone attack on his home in the high—security green zone of baghdad. president biden has strongly condemned the incident. it's not yet known who carried out the attack, which came after violent clashes in baghdad between the security forces and supporters of pro—iranian political groups. our middle east correspondent anna foster has this report. a strike at the heart of the iraqi government. two drones were shot down, but a third made contact, exploding at the prime minister's
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official residence. mr al—kadhimi escaped unharmed, but six of his personal bodyguards were injured. shortly after the attack, he appeared on national tv to reassure the nation that he had survived. translation: my house _ was the target of a cowardly attack. thanks to god, i and those who work with me are in good shape. - you heroic army and security forces are working on protecting _ iraq and its stability. cowardly rockets and cowardly drones do not build countries or futures. - less than a month ago, elections in iraq produced a record low turnout. now the country is struggling to build a ruling coalition. many voters do not see any prospect of meaningful change, and there has been violent unrest over the results. the influence of iran is also making things tough.
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the shi'ite cleric muktada al—sadr claimed victory in this election. he campaigns against foreign intervention in iraq, including from its neighbour. as his party gained votes, the pro—iranian alliance lost them. some analysts believe that could be the reason for the attack. the problem for them is that mr al—sadr wants to do a majority government. basically this means that they will not be part of the new government. this translates into a serious loss of privileges, the patronage system they have in place, and that is something that really worries them. no—one has yet claimed responsibility for the attempt on the prime minister's life, but it has been roundly condemned by world leaders and by iran's foreign ministry. they are hoping this will not mark the start of a dangerous new escalation. anna foster, bbc news.
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the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid—i9 without getting to meet her newborn daughter, are appealing to all mums—to—be to getjabbed. saiqa parveen, who was 37, died in intensive care after catching coronavirus while 8 months pregnant with her fifth child. she had an emergency caesarean and was on a ventilator until her death last monday. as the family prepare for her funeral tomorrow saiqa's brother, qyum mughal, implored pregnant women not to put off getting vaccinated. it was a tragic loss for all of us. for the sake of god and your loved ones, please get vaccinated. if she had the vaccine, she might live, she might have had a chance of surviving. so i request all pregnant women get their vaccine on time. otherwise you will lose everything.
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you will lose your loved ones, you will lose everything. we lost everything. our sister was a lady of principle. most caring member of our family. so, once again, i request all peoples, including pregnant women, they should have vaccine and save the pain of their loved ones. with more on the risks covid poses to pregnant women, here's lucy chapelle, chief scientific adviser to the uk's department of health and social care. we know covid is making mums sick and leaving — we know covid is making mums sick and leaving them in intensive care as saiqa _ and leaving them in intensive care as saiqa was. and one in five of their_ as saiqa was. and one in five of their babies need to go to the neonatal_ their babies need to go to the neonatal unit, so we are very clear about_ neonatal unit, so we are very clear about recommending vaccination for
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pregnant— about recommending vaccination for pregnant women and i recognise the strength— pregnant women and i recognise the strength and courage of her brother in speaking out like this. we have now vaccinated over 90,000 pregnant women _ now vaccinated over 90,000 pregnant women and _ now vaccinated over 90,000 pregnant women and we are recommending and urging— women and we are recommending and urging all_ women and we are recommending and urging all other pregnant women to come _ urging all other pregnant women to come forward for this. both from the experience _ come forward for this. both from the experience in the uk and from vaccinating pregnant women around the world, _ vaccinating pregnant women around the world, in the us and canada, we have got— the world, in the us and canada, we have got very good experience of this vaccine and pregnancy now. police in the united states have opened a criminal investigation after eight people died at a music festival in houston on friday. many others were hurt when the crowd surged forward. investigators are also looking into claims that someone in the crowd was injecting people with drugs. our north america correspondent nomia iqbal reports. i just want to send out prayers to the... ..to the ones that was lost last night. for the first time since the tragedy, travis scott addressed his fans. appearing sombre and distressed, he reflected on what went wrong
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at the festival he founded. i'm honestlyjust devastated, and i could never imagine anything like this just happening. i'm going to do everything i can to keep you guys updated. there were signs of trouble shortly after 9pm local time. as the crowd surged towards the stage, the party soon turned into panic. the venue's first—aiders were quickly overwhelmed. people were pushing and shoving to make their escape. by the end of the evening, eight people had died. more is now being heard about those who lost their lives in the crush. the youngest was 14. other victims include brianna rodriguez, just 16. she was a keen dancer. friends are fundraising to pay for her funeral. franco patino, 21. and danish baig, at 27, was the oldest victim.
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police in houston say this is now a criminal investigation after suggestions of foul play. one of the narratives was that some individual was injecting other people with drugs. we do have a report of a security officer according to the medical staff that was out and treated him last night that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen, and he felt a prick in his neck. several people were treated with an anti—drug medication. investigators will now be speaking to anyone who has at the event to find out exactly what happened and who, if anyone, is to blame. nomia iqbal, bbc news, north america. more protests have been taking place in sudan — two weeks after its military seized power in a coup. two days of civil disobedience are now planned by people angry at the army's action,
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two years after a military dictator — in powerfor decades — was toppled. sudan's civilian prime minister is under house arrest and protests calling for democracy are being met with force — as our africa correspondent andrew harding found in khartoum. blocking the roads today in khartoum. barricades going up across the city. civilians here taking big risks to protest, to show their fury at sudan's military coup. we want to change. we want something to do with the civilisation. you want democracy? we want democracy, of course. we don't like military at all. do you know what i'm saying? are you scared of the military? yeah. you're scared they will shoot? they are killing us. the protests began two weeks ago, when the generals seized power, halting this giant country's admittedly bumpy transition from dictatorship to democracy. so which side will prove stronger?
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the army or the street? in a khartoum hospital, we find an elderly tailor recovering from a savage beating by the military... can i see your leg? ..and this young student, shot in the leg. a lot of people were shot. his message to the soldiers... they're like animals. the animals are better. it's hard to find anyone here who supports the military takeover. it's heartbreaking, honestly. to see those young people, the ones that are being killed, just for asking what's rightfully theirs. for free country with the civilian government. so for me, it's very devastating. it makes me angry. the man leading sudan's coup is general burhan. his spokesman, an admiral, told me that the military had done nothing wrong. you've detained the prime minister
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and other politicians. your troops have killed protesters on the streets. why on earth would the sudanese people trust you for a second? translation: time will show this was not a coup. _ we will hold elections and the military will step aside. this was simply a course correction. but many people here are not convinced. even at night, the protests continue. the determination — the defiance — here is impressive. and it's possible that sudan's generals will back down under growing international pressure. but for now, this country's democratic revolution remains on hold. on a continent where it seems military coups are firmly back in fashion. andrew harding, bbc news, khartoum. uk opposition leader sir keir starmer has accused
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borisjohnson of "corrupt and contemptible" behaviour — saying he tried to protect a member of parliament in his party who was found to have broken the rules on lobbying. today one cabinet minister rejected that, and called the row a "storm in a teacup". here's our political correspondent, chris mason. mps are forever aware how many people don't much like politicians. it's why for so many who spend their weeks here, this row over the government's behaviour gets right up their nose. because it leaves a whiff of this being a self—serving place. for the opposition parties, it's also a chance to take aim at the prime minister. instead of upholding standards, he orders his mps to protect his mate and rip up the whole system. now, that is corrupt, it is contemptible, and it's not a one—off. and what makes me most angry is the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy
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and our country. at the heart of this is this man, the former cabinet minister, owen paterson — he was found to have broken the rules by making the case to ministers and others on behalf of companies that were paying him. he was due to be thrown out of the commons for 30 days and potentially face a by—election until the government ordered its mps to back a review of the system. then, under intense pressure, it changed its mind. today, this cabinet minister claimed it wasn't about getting mr paterson off the hook. the vote wasn't to reject the report that had been put together. the vote was to establish an appeals process so that mps in the sort of position that, yes, owen paterson was in, but others as well in future, would have a right of appeal, and i think that's right. it is still an important objective to have due process here, to have a right of appeal, but obviously, we can only take that forward with the agreement and cooperation of other parties. mps will return here tomorrow
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and spend around three hours debating parliamentary standards. there is still deep anger on all sides about what's happened here. the labour mp, chris bryant, who chairs the commons standards committee, still wants parliament to vote to condemn owen paterson's behaviour, even though mr paterson has now resigned. plenty feel there is something of a rebuilding job to be done here for the government and parliament to restore trust in how this place works. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. the headlines on bbc news... iraq's prime minister has appealed for calm after surviving a drone attack on his home in baghdad. the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid—i9 before she could meet her newborn daughter, urge all mums—to—be to get the vaccine. police in texas have opened a criminal investigation into a crush at a music festival in houston, in which eight people died.
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officers are also investigating unconfirmed reports of audience members being injected with drugs. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's karthi. we'll start with the english premier league and a dramatic game between west ham and liverpool. west ham delighted their manager, david moyes, and their fans with a 3—2 win ending liverpool's long 25 game unbeaten run which stretches back to april. it's a huge win for west ham which not only harms liverpool's title hopes but moves them into third place in the premier league table. we beat liverpool in this one and it was a great performance by the players, it really was. we want to challenge the top teams, and we can, i don't know if we will be able to but in a one—off game we can give them a game like we did today. i think we have been doing that for a
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good part of the season now and last year as well. we didn't do so well here last year, but we made our mind up here last year, but we made our mind up we were trying and do better. we didn't play so well in the first half but certainly did much better in the second half. it half but certainly did much better in the second half.— in the second half. it was one of the two teams _ in the second half. it was one of the two teams that _ in the second half. it was one of the two teams that could - in the second half. it was one of the two teams that could run i in the second half. it was one of. the two teams that could run away in the second half. it was one of- the two teams that could run away in the two teams that could run away in the moment, but we had a real run, and withoui— the moment, but we had a real run, and without the feet, we never thought — and without the feet, we never thought about it, we had many draws from that— thought about it, we had many draws from that perspective in this one, this one _ from that perspective in this one, this one is — from that perspective in this one, this one is over, good, let's have another— this one is over, good, let's have another run _ meanwhile, antonio conte's first premier league game in charge of tottenham ended in a draw. it finished nil—nil between his side and everton at goodison park. the point takes spurs up to ninth and, after only having a few days with his new spurs team, conte knows there will be plenty of work to do. this is a big challenge, a challenge for me, but i know that i am in the
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right place. i don't know, but i know that i am at the right place, and we have a fantastic stadium, the team is fantastic. i think it is the right place for me that i like to work. emile smith—rowe scored in a third successive premier league game as arsenal claimed victory over watford in manager mikel arteta's 100th match in charge. the day's other premier league game between leeds and leicester finished 1—1. var ruled out a second—half leicester goal, as the points were shared in an entertaining game at elland road. elsewhere across europe, there was a late equaliser for valencia against atletico madrid. substitute hugo duro scored a double in stoppage time to rescue a valuable point. atletico would have gone up to second in the standings with a win, but instead are left in fourth. real betis are drawing 0—0 with sevilla in the seville derby. robert andrich scored in the final minute to earn
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bayer leverkusen a 1—1 draw at hertha berlin, denying the home team what had looked like being theirfifth bundesliga win of the season. another late goal from anthony modeste rescued a point for cologne against union berlin. the final score was 2—2. the derby between ac milan and city rivals inter milan is level at 1—1 in the second half. unbeaten leaders napoli remain top but were held to a 1—1 draw by mid—table verona. max verstappen has won the mexico city grand prix to extend his lead in the title battle with lewis hamilton. verstappen started third but overtook both mercedes on the opening straight. he held on to win comfortably. lewis hamilton was second, with verstappen's red bull teammate sergio perez third. the dutchman leads the drivers championship by 19 points with four races left. and finally, saul "canelo" alvarez made history in las vegas by beating caleb plant to become the first undisputed world
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super—middleweight champion. the 31—year—old knocked out plant in the 11th round to unify all four major belts in fewer than 12 months. the win for alvarez means he becomes the first mexican and only the sixth fighter to hold all four belts from the separate governing bodies at the same time. that's all the sport for now. the people of nicaragua are going to the polls — in what the united states is calling a "sham" election. president daniel ortega is widely expected to maintain his grip on power after clamping down on his political opponents. journalists are not being allowed in to observe the vote. will grant sent this report from neighbouring costa rica. if this were a normal election, the people of nicaragua would be reflecting on a long, hard fought campaign and deciding who to install as the next president. however, this is far from a normal vote. nor, critics say, is
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it a legitimate one. this year, president daniel ortega has arrested more than 35 opposition figures, including seven presidential candidates under a draconian treason law. others have been forced into exile. in the toothless electoral fight that remains, he's all but guaranteed victory. president ortega and his wife, the vice president rosario murillo, say those arrested were guilty of terrorism and sedition, calling them criminals who attacked their country. from neighbouring costa rica, exiled opponents have urged their countrymen to boycott the vote, hoping abstention will send the sandinista government a message. translation: will say no to this electoral farce, no to ortega's - kidnappings, and as long l as our nicaraguan brothers still in our country close the door in the dictatorship, _ those of us in exile _
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will raise our voices for those who are kidnapped. and it's notjust exiled candidates who can't reach nicaragua, as daniel ortega essentially holds this vote behind closed doors. the government of daniel ortega has told us we are not allowed into nicaragua to cover this election. that's no meaningful opposition candidates, no international election observers and now no foreign media either. critics say this is an election in name only. while some can't enter nicaragua, others are desperate to leave. there's been a sharp rise in the numberfleeing ortega's autocratic rule, including hundreds whojoined a migrant caravan slowly making its way across southern mexico. since 2018, when more than 300 were killed in anti—ortega protests, the us has ramped up sanctions on the government, but many say they're ineffective in forcing change. this then will be a vote largely for ortega loyalists.
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when the president is surely re—elected in a landslide, his supporters will claim it was free and fair and dismiss criticism as an international plot against him. in reality, after 1a consecutive years of daniel ortega and his wife in power, this vote will consolidate their increasingly repressive and dynastic rule. will grant, bbc news, costa rica. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news. assisted dying has become legal in new zealand, just over a year after the country voted to allow it in a referendum. to be eligible, a person must have a terminal illness which is expected to end his or her life within six months and the procedure must have the approval of two doctors. a twitter poll launched by tesla billionaire elon musk, asking his followers if he should sell 10% of his shares, has resoundingly voted that he should. he promised to abide by the result of the poll, which he launched in response to a "billionaires tax" proposed by us democrats.
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the us navy has launched a ship named after a gay rights activist who was forced in the 1950s to resign from the service because of his sexuality. the oil tanker, harvey milk, was launched in san diego in a ceremony attended by navy secretary carlos del toro. tens of thousands of people in ethiopia have rallied in addis ababa to show support for the government in its fight against an alliance of rebel forces that is advancing towards the capital. the bbc�*s africa regional editor, will ross has more. i showed support for the ethiopian government and its fight against rebels from makati. this event in addis ababa was organised by the authorities. on show, signs of frustration at international media coverage of the year long war, and
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perceptions of interference. the us, the un and the african union have been calling for a ceasefire, and peace talks. translation: . ., , ., , ., translation: our country ethiopian will not be broken _ translation: our country ethiopian will not be broken apart. _ translation: our country ethiopian will not be broken apart. ethiopia - will not be broken apart. ethiopia always— will not be broken apart. ethiopia always nroves— will not be broken apart. ethiopia always moves forward. _ will not be broken apart. ethiopia always moves forward. i- will not be broken apart. ethiopia always moves forward. i came . will not be broken apart. ethiopia - always moves forward. i came protest against _ always moves forward. i came protest against terrorist — always moves forward. i came protest against terrorist groups _ always moves forward. i came protest against terrorist groups and _ always moves forward. i came protest against terrorist groups and joint - against terrorist groups and joint is against — against terrorist groups and joint is against those _ against terrorist groups and joint is against those who _ against terrorist groups and joint is against those who harassed i against terrorist groups and jointj is against those who harassed us against terrorist groups and joint - is against those who harassed us for the last— is against those who harassed us for the last 27 _ is against those who harassed us for the last 27 years. _ is against those who harassed us for the last 27 years. no _ is against those who harassed us for the last 27 years.— the last 27 years. no more negotiation, _ the last 27 years. no more negotiation, why _ the last 27 years. no more negotiation, why doesn't l the last 27 years. no more l negotiation, why doesn't the the last 27 years. no more - negotiation, why doesn't the us government negotiate with terrorists like al—shabab? they want to destroy this country— like al—shabab? they want to destroy this country like they did afghanistan. they will never succeed _ afghanistan. they will never succeed. we are ethiopians. the mood ofthe succeed. we are ethiopians. the mood of the rally was — succeed. we are ethiopians. the mood of the rally was one _ succeed. we are ethiopians. the mood of the rally was one of _ succeed. we are ethiopians. the mood of the rally was one of the fines - of the rally was one of the fines and optimism that it is a winnable war, but not everyone it seemed on message. this musician called for restraint, urging reconciliation, not more fighting. he was not allowed to speak for long. things have not gone well for the ethiopian
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military in recent months. a week ago, the tigrayan rebels captured two strategic cities. they are now thought to be around 300 kilometres from the capital. while the government has urged people to get ready to defend addis ababa, the tigrayan people's liberation front has played down talk of a fight for the capital and said that its main aim is to oust the prime minister. people will want justice, aim is to oust the prime minister. people will wantjustice, and the time for addis, it is absolutely ridiculous, but for us, fortunately, it is interested in making sure that they do not not present a threat to our people any more. fine
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they do not not present a threat to our people any more.— they do not not present a threat to our people any more. one year of war has disniaced — our people any more. one year of war has displaced more _ our people any more. one year of war has displaced more than _ our people any more. one year of war has displaced more than 2 _ our people any more. one year of war has displaced more than 2 million - has displaced more than 2 million people in ethiopia. despite growing international pressure, there is no sign that efforts to mediate an end to the fighting are making any progress. will ross, bbc news. you're watching bbc news. we'll take a look at tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining lukwesa tonight are parliamentaryjournalist tony grew and the journalist and broadcaster, caroline frost. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. hello. it could well take the first half of the night to get rid of the very strongest winds that have been battering the north—eastern quarter of scotland for a good part of sunday. this was the scene just a wee while ago across the north—eastern quarter, where some of the gusts were still touching around 60 mph or so. it is going to take time before that squeeze on the isobars gradually opens up as this little ridge of high pressure wanders
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in from the atlantic ahead of the next set of fronts we are expecting to see from the west during the course of the night. eventually, that cloud will thicken sufficiently to bring rain into northern ireland, the western fringes of scotland, maybe the cumbrian fells as well, but out east, the skies will be that much clearer and one or two spots on the eastern side of scotland, maybe in the heart of east anglia too, could well get temperatures down very close to freezing. that is going to be a pretty cold day, and a bright one away from these weather fronts, but a cold start to the new day on monday. now, these weather fronts again just wanting to squeeze up the isobars to bring a spell of fairly windy weather across this north—western quarter, but i think the thing you will notice from the word go into northern ireland, for example, is there will be rain in the thickening cloud. that eventually gets across the north channel into the western side of scotland, some moderate if not heavy bursts here over the high ground and eventually it spills down towards the north—west of england and into the north of wales as well. further to the south and east, it is a somewhat drier affair,
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never particularly warm in east anglia despite the presence of the sunshine after that chilly start. as we take you out of monday and push you through tuesday, on into wednesday, you see the same set of weather fronts are there or thereabouts at some point across the british isles. and eventually i think we'll see the cloud thickening up and producing perhaps a heavier spell of rain come wednesday, but throughout, close to those weather fronts, it will stay relatively mild, and just that little bit fresher without ever being really cold to the north of the weather fronts themselves. so here we are for the detail on tuesday. the fronts trying to meander their way that little bit further towards the south, brighter skies across scotland, northern ireland, with a rattle of showers in the far north and west. and further south, look at that. see what i mean about mild? 1a or 15 degrees or so. the temperatures in the second half of the week once that front gets away just tending to fall back without ever being cold, and little sign of night—time frosts. bye— bye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the family of an unvaccinated mother who died from covid—19 before she could meet her newborn daughter urge all mums—to—be to get the vaccine.

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