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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 7, 2021 4:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news the headlines at four: the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid before meeting her newborn daughter, appeal to all mums—to—be to get the vaccine saiqa parveen was eight months pregnant when she caught the virus — the mother of five died 5 weeks later if she had the vaccine she might live, she might have had a chance of surviving. borisjohnson is accused of "corrupt and contemptible behaviour" over his government's moves to change the system of upholding parliamentary standards and stop one of his mps being suspended:
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the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country and so this is far from a one off. police investigating a crush at a music festival in the us city of houston have opened a criminal inquiry following unconfirmed reports that people were being injected with drugs. another premier league manager gets the sack — aston villa's dean smith becomes the second to be fired this weekend. the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid without getting to meet her newborn daughter, are appealing to all mums—to—be to getjabbed. saiqa parveen, who was 37, died in intensive care after catching coronavirus while eight months pregnant with herfifth child. she underwent an emergency caesarean
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and was on a ventilator until her death last monday. as the family prepare for her funeral tomorrow saiqa's brother, qayum mughal, implored pregnant women not to put off getting vaccinated. for the sake of your loved ones please get vaccinated. if she had the vaccine, she might live, she might have had a chance of surviving. so i request all pregnant women get their vaccine on time. otherwise you will lose everything. you will lose your loved ones, you will lose everything. we lost everything.
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our sister was a lady of principle. most caring member of our family. so, once again, i request all peoples including pregnant women should have vaccine and save the pain of their loved ones. our condolences to you and it is clearly a very distressing time to you and behave your message to people to get vaccinated including pregnant women. did you talk to her about why she did not want to get vaccinated? basically in may and i thinkjune she told my wife that the nhs policy changed and they invited her to get a vaccine and she said, it is too late now but when i have the baby i will get my vaccine. but she didn't have the chance to get the vaccine again.
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but when i had covid back in march i waited at least six hours to get my pfizer vaccine and at that time we asked her, my wife asked her but she said the doctor were saying no, you can't get a vaccine because you are pregnant. and ijust told you that they change their mind in august but she refused. she said she would get the vaccine after the birth of the baby. we lost everything due to the circumstances. you must�*ve been very shocked because she was only 37 years of age. she was a relatively yes, i 37 years and she has five daughters. when her husband dot—mac good
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hope hospital doctor n allowed him to visit her. he spoke to her and when he told her that your daughter is missing you and waiting for a gift from you a big long table came from her eye and that was the first painful scene for us. a big long tea coming out from her eyes. that was the last contact we had since she went to the ventilator on the 26th of september. your message, having been through all this terrible trauma and grief, to anybody who is hesitating about having the vaccine whether they are pregnant or not, for whatever reason, you are saying, go out and get the vaccine, get both doses.
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i ask people, please, please, please get vaccine. whether you're pregnant or not. kids and younger people. it is very, very deadly. we observed big, big, big loss and we are seeing everything in front of our eyes. it destroyed my sister completely. my sister got sepsis and other infections and she died in front of my eyes. it was very, very painful for me. so please, please, i prayed to everybody please get vaccine and save yourself and your loved ones. joining us now is prof lucy chappell, chief scientific advisor for the department of health and social care. she s also the spokesperson for the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists. thank you very much for being with us. we werejust
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thank you very much for being with us. we were just hearing that very sad case. what is the latest advice on getting the vaccine to her pregnant? well, start by extending my condolences to the family and it is heartbreaking to lose a pregnant mum and a mum of five daughters. we know that covid is making and leading to them being in intensive care and it is also leading us to need to deliver one in three mums hospitalised with covid early and one in five of their babies need to go to the neonatal unit so we are now very clear about recommending the vaccination for pregnant women and i recognise the strength and courage of her brother and speaking out like this. we have now vaccinated over 90,000 pregnant women and we are recommending urgently all the other pregnant women to come forward for this. both experience in the uk and from vaccinating pregnant women around
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the world in the us and canada we have got very good experience of this vaccine in pregnancy now. is the difference on the data surrounding the different vaccines? we are recommending the pfizer or madonna based on the wider experience of those vaccines because those are the ones that were adopted in the us and canada. and now that is the vaccine being offered. as it has been for most of this year in the uk. ~ ., , ., ., ., the uk. what is the data on vaccine hesitancy among — the uk. what is the data on vaccine hesitancy among pregnant - the uk. what is the data on vaccine hesitancy among pregnant women, | hesitancy among pregnant women, women who have their doubts and to have had their doubts is that changing?— have had their doubts is that chanuuin? �* , ., ~ ., changing? i've been working as a consultant _ changing? i've been working as a consultant obstetrician _ changing? i've been working as a consultant obstetrician in - changing? i've been working as a consultant obstetrician in south i consultant obstetrician in south london really we have had ongoing conversations with women throughout this time and i have seen initially it was all about providing the right
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information to pregnant women. 0n it was all about providing the right information to pregnant women. on a one—to—one basis. and through as much good information as we can provide to as many sources and so we are seeing more and more pregnant women and i would urge, based on experience of this family that we see more pregnant women coming forward. of those women who are hospitalised with covid, over 90% of them are unvaccinated. we would really like to change that and to say that if you can get vaccinated it is never too late in the pregnancy to go and have that conversation with your midwife or obstetrician or gp so that you can feel ready to get vaccinated and so that we can reduce the numbers of pregnant women in intensive care units. ~ ., ., pregnant women in intensive care units. ., ., .,. units. what would you say to anyone reanant units. what would you say to anyone pregnant at — units. what would you say to anyone pregnant at the _ units. what would you say to anyone pregnant at the moment? _ units. what would you say to anyone pregnant at the moment? who - units. what would you say to anyone pregnant at the moment? who is - pregnant at the moment? who is wondering what is the scientific evidence either way? give them some reassurance right now on national television. , ., ., .,
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television. overwhelmingly our data on the safety _ television. overwhelmingly our data on the safety of _ television. overwhelmingly our data on the safety of the _ television. overwhelmingly our data on the safety of the vaccines - television. overwhelmingly our data on the safety of the vaccines in - on the safety of the vaccines in pregnancy is very positive from all the different groups shouldn't looking at uk data and the groups that we do and the international data. there are good sources of information on the royal college websites so go to a trusted source of information and speak to, encourage women to speak their own midwife or obstetrician or gp about this so that they are getting the best information to make the decision and i know that this family story really reminds us of how we want to get this right messaging across. . ~' want to get this right messaging across. . ~ , ., y want to get this right messaging across. . ~ , ., , . ., want to get this right messaging across. . ~ , . ., across. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. a leading government medical adviser is warning of a possible "long and difficult winter" if people don't get vaccinated against covid—i9. dr susan hopkins, from the uk health security agency, said the virus is circulating at high levels in communities. dr hopkins said although the covid—i9 booster rollout was going well, more people need to come forward to get their top—up jabs.
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60% of the population that are being offered the boosters are taking it up. i think it's lower than we saw in the first round, that may be due to people thinking they are already protected which is why we're giving a lot of public health messages about why it's so important to them to come forward for the third dose. it's also been made easier to get that third dose as close to six months as possible by releasing the vaccinations just after five months. we are seeing immune waning effects from the vaccine and we know the virus is circulating at very high levels in our community so unless people get vaccinated we will have a long and difficult winter. in terms of the cases and infection
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numbers, 30,305 new covid i9 in terms of the cases and infection numbers, 30,305 new covid 19 cases today and that compares to roughly the same number yesterday actually. 30,693 yesterday. deaths, 62 new covid i9 30,693 yesterday. deaths, 62 new covid 19 deaths compared to 155 yesterday but deaths are usually lower in terms of these recorded statistics on a sunday because of the way figures are recorded. 62 deaths and 30,305 new covid 19 cases. 62 deaths and 30,305 new covid 19 cases. good afternoon. sir keir starmer has accused the prime minister of �*corrupt and contemptible' behaviour in trying to �*protect�* the conservative mp 0wen paterson — after he was found to have broken lobbying rules. the labour leader said the government's attempt this week to overhaul the system thatjudges mps was "trashing" the uk's reputation for upholding democratic standards. cabinet minister george eustice has
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dismissed the situation as a "storm in a teacup". 0ur political correspondent ione wells reports. the symbol of british democracy in the uk and overseas. but after a week where the government u—turned on its plans to overhaul the system that holds mps to account here, just as one of their own mps was facing a 30 day suspension, some fear that image has been turned upside down. it's a pattern of behaviour, and what makes me most angry is the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country, and so this is far from a one—off and a u—turn, you know, a bad week for the government. it's a pattern of behaviour by a prime minister who doesn't know how to uphold standards in public life. the labour leader's anger is tangible after conservative mps
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blocked a recommendation to suspend their mp 0wen paterson after he breached lobbying rules, calling instead for an overhaul of the mps standards watchdog. the government u—turned on their plans less than 2a hours later, and owen paterson has since resigned. while the government has apologised and called the move a mistake, today the environment secretary claimed the vote was not about trying to let 0wen paterson off the hook. the vote wasn't to reject the report that had been put together, the vote was to establish an appeals process so that mps in this sort of position that, yes, 0wen paterson was in but others as well in future would have a right of appeal, and i think that's right. it is still an important objective to have due process here, to have a right of appeal, but obviously we can only take that forward with the agreement and cooperation of other parties. but the opposition don't buy
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the argument this was not about 0wen paterson, and chair of the parliament standards committee, the labour mp chris bryant, says parliament should still pass the motion to suspend him to show beyond doubt that his behaviour was unacceptable. he says his committee will consider proposed reforms to the system to judge mps, and they will produce a report on possible changes before christmas. on monday, mps will debate the issues that 0wen paterson's case has thrown up in parliament, but the goodwill among opposition mps to cooperate with the government's ideas for reform now appear thin on the ground. ione wells, bbc news. in texas — police have opened a criminal investigation after eight people died at the "astroworld" music festival in houston. they died after a crowd surge on the opening night of the event headlined by rapper travis scott. police say they're looking into reports that somebody in the audience had been injecting people with drugs. the musician has encouraged anyone with information to come forward as sean dilley reports. i just want to send out prayers to... to the ones that was lost last night. his shock and trauma is clear. on his social media, travis scott reflected on a night of entertainment that
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went tragically wrong. i'm honestlyjust devastated. i could never imagine anything like this to have happened. i'm going to do everything i can to keep you guys updated. signs of trouble were first seen shortly after 9pm local time. as the crowd advanced towards the stage, entertainment was replaced by panic. casualties swiftly overwhelmed the venue's first aiders. at first confusion, but then mayhem, with people pushing and shoving to make their escape. by the end of friday night, eight people had died. hundreds received medical treatment at the scene and 25 were taken to hospital. police in houston have launched a criminal investigation after suggestions of foul play.
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one of the narratives was injecting other people with drugs. we do have a report of a security officer, according to the medical staff, that was out and treating them last night, that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen and he felt a prick in his neck. most who attended the concert did not see what led to the deaths and injuries, but many have shared their accounts of what they saw. this isn'tjust, ithink, people falling down and being trampled. i mean 11 people were sent to the hospital with cardiac arrest, you know, among the others that were already there. there were something else i think going on which is what has been suggested by what we see so far. investigators will now be speaking to those at the event who may have information that could help them understand what exactly happened and who, if anyone, may be to blame. sean dilley, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news... the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid before meeting her newborn daughter, appeal to all mums—to—be to get the vaccine borisjohnson is accused of "corrupt and contemptible behaviour" over his government's moves to change the system of upholding parliamentary standards and stop one of his mps being suspended: police investigating a crush at a music festival in the us city of houston have opened a criminal inquiry following unconfirmed reports that people were being injected with drugs. liverpool in action shortly. they are about to kick off against west ham but arsenal continuing their recent good run with a third successive win in the premier league. they beat watford and arsenal had an early goal. they did eventually make a breakthrough. had
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another goal disallowed and the win puts arsenal fifth and watford are 17th. totte n ha m tottenham had a draw against everton. after only a few days of this new team you said there will be work to do. the game between leeds and leicesterfinished1—1. the second premier the sacking of the weekend. no action with their manager yesterday. their last five games including defeat on friday leaving them 15th in the table. in a statement the chief executive said this year we have not seen the continuous improvement in results performances and the position which we have all been looking for. smith had been in charge for three years. the new middlesbrough manager has been named. he returned seven months
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after been sacked by sheffield for he was in charge for almost five years taking them from the one to the premier league. scottish premiership leaders rangers are playing the bottom side will stop their 3—1 up after going one goal down and celtic up to second after beating dundee 4—2. two players scored two goals each. dundee pulled one back but it was not enough. celtic 14—2. one back but it was not enough. celtic14-2. i one back but it was not enough. celtic 14—2. i still can go to clear. manchester united missed the chance to move up to third place. they looked on course to maintain their 100%
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record spurs scored their first ever point against united. there were wins for manchester city and england boss that women are set to seal back to back victories and at northampton. these are the live pictures now. 49—10 is the score. new zealand did not score a try under the 50th minute. another famous win and new zealand will not take their spot at the top of the world rankings. nine minutes left in that match. catch the closing stages over on bbc two. new zealand are the final team to make the semifinals of the men's t20 world cup and they will play england. they started quickly against afghanistan, taking three wickets in the opening six overs. there score of 124—8 did not
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feel like enough and proved not to be. the side reach their target with two overs to spare. we will update you on the liverpool game and you can keep up to date and i should mention that scotland had beaten australia at murrayfield. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. the prime minister is urging countries at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow to "pull together and drive for the line," as the conference enters its second and final week. borisjohnson said �*bold compromises' and �*ambitious commitments' were needed to tackle climate change. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. it is half—time at the climate summit. the people most affected by climate
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change are no longer some imagined future generation but young people alive today. perhaps that will give us the impetus we need to rewrite our story. to turn this tragedy into a triumph. in the first week, familiar faces strolling the glasgow stage. big numbers, big promises and faraway dates, but some optimism from the government. i think always when you have a multilateral event like this, to try to get agreement, there is going to be a lot of work and a lot of diplomacy goes to get an outcome. i'm talking to people here at this conference have been pretty much to every cop since it began and they are telling me at this one, they are actually seeing action, they are seeing things take shape in a way they've not seen before. so what has been achieved so far? ministers point to new commitments to net—zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century, meaning 90% of the world economy is covered, ending and reversing deforestation with more than 120 countries signed up, and over 100 countries have agreed to cut their methane emissions by 30% by 2030. but there are plenty, including campaigner greta thunberg, who think this is
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nowhere near enough. this is no longer a climate conference, this is now a global north greenwash festival, a two—week—long celebration of business as usual and blah blah blah. they cannot ignore the scientific consensus and, above all, they cannot ignore us, the people, including their own children. the big aim of this conference is to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees compared with pre—industrial times, to minimise the impact of climate change, but this is a huge challenge.
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it is complicated and it is difficult, involving around 200 countries, each with their own other priorities and concerns. and so the second week begins. the search for compromise, agreement and promises continues. chris mason, bbc news. the iraqi prime minister has appealed for calm, after surviving a drone attack on his home in the fortified green zone of baghdad. the interior ministry said two drones were shot down, but a third hit his house. at least six of mr kadhimi's security guards were wounded. the united states and iran have condemned the incident. it's not yet known who carried out the attack, which came after violent clashes in baghdad between the security forces and supporters of pro—iranian political groups. he announced he was unhurt on national television, describing the strikes as cowardly.
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translation: my house was the target of a cowardly attack. _ thanks to god, i and those who work with me are in good shape. your heroic security and army forces are working on protecting iraq and its stability. cowardly rockets and cowardly drones do not build countries or futures. we are working on building our homeland by respecting the state and its institutions and by building a better future for all iraqis. one of the world's biggest travel companies has stopped selling holidays that include trips to see performing dolphins and whales in captivity.expedia said it had made the change after consultation with animal welfare charities. thousands of dolphins perform for tourists in sealife centres globally. holiday activities that include swimming with dolphins in artificial pools have long—been criticsed as cruel by animal rights activists.
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a us appeals court has temporarily blocked presidentjoe biden's plans for a vaccine mandate for businesses. the law would require workers at private companies with more than 100 employees to get fully vaccinated against covid—19 or be tested weekly. david campa nale reports. president biden has avoided imposing vaccine mandates up until now and has focused instead on incentives from private businesses and individuals. but with the delta vary advising and just 58% of the country vaccinated, he has changed his strategy. all federal workers and contractors were ordered to have the jab by december eight together with workers from private employers with 100 or more on their payroll. that or be tested for coronavirus weekly but it has not, that protest.
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the president's instruction covers 100 million people on two thirds of the workforce. circulated by the occupational safety and health administration the order has now been stalled by the courts. the response that is coming from the petitioners, this is a group of stage private organisations, religious organisations, have argued that that they are exceeding their federal limits. that they are stepping into things that belong to the states to decide. elsewhere, germany has so far not gone down the route of compulsory vaccinations. instead, focusing on a voluntary response. but health professionals say they are now seeing a new influx of mostly unvaccinated patients. translation: the average age in our intensive care unit is 40. | the youngest is 35. there is also a 70—year—old patient. the most tragic thing - is that it is often parents, almost all of them unvaccinated, who have become infected. -
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it is this that has prompted britain to consider making it compulsory for all nhs workers in england to be jabbed from next april. care home workers in england must already be double vaccinated to hold onto theirjobs but it does mean that tens of thousands of care home staff face dismissalfrom thursday, a deadline that is now looming. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. it is likely to remain so until the speech of high pressure really does tumble its way across all parts of the british isles. away from that north—east and quarter there a north—westerly breeze to speak of but quite late already. as those guys begin to clear after dark
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especially so because the eastern side of england and scotland this is where we will see temperatures really for running away. frost in two places. at worst a different story and increasing amounts of cloud will eventually bring cloud and wind and rain into western scotland to northern ireland and may be up to the irish as well and there will be bits and pieces of rain until the main will be bits and pieces of rain untilthe main rain will be bits and pieces of rain until the main rain area gets in and eventually to the north of england and wales. further south and east are dry monday for you and the sunshine you could see 13. hello. this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines... the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid before meeting her newborn daughter, appeal to all mums—to—be to get the vaccine saiqa parveen was eight months pregnant when she caught the virus — the mother of five died five weeks later for the sake of your loved ones, please get vaccinated.
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if she had the vaccine, she might have lived and had a chance of surviving. borisjohnson is accused of "corrupt and contemptible behaviour" over his government's moves to change the system of upholding parliamentary standards and stop one of his mps being suspended. the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country and so this is far from a one off. police investigating a crush at a music festival in the us city of houston have opened a criminal inquiry following unconfirmed reports that people were being injected with drugs. terrifying footage of dangerous driving — police in yorkshire launch a major road safety campaign to tackle falling standards post lockdown another premier league manager gets the sack — aston villa's dean smith becomes the second to be fired this weekend.
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north yorkshire police have released shocking dashcam footage which they say shows how some people have been driving carelessly since lockdown rules were lifted, including dangerous overtaking and reckless speeding. the force says standards on the roads have started to slip as more motorists get back behind the wheel again, as ian white reports. the terrifying moment a camper van pulls out to overtake and drives towards oncoming traffic. just one example of careless and inconsiderate driving on north yorkshire's roads. it's these kind of incidents which can easily lead to a crash and all too often, these can be fatal. with more of us having dash cams in our vehicles, more frightening incidents are being sent to the police. the driver overtaking the lorry is met by a car heading straight towards them on the wrong side of the road.
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now the way the dash cam technology works, it is very high quality so if we can see a registration plate, if we can identify a vehicle, we can prosecute people and we have certainly done that. with so many deaths and serious injuries on north yorkshire's roads, release of launched operation boundary, flooding the roads around harrogate and rippon with marked and unmarked patrol cars, bikes and camera vans. as we've come out of covid and restrictions have lifted what we've seen lots of driving where we think drivers are a little bit rusty, and out of practice and driving standards are really falling. we've seen lots of things come in through dash cams where highlighting dangerous driving and careless driving, moreso than we ever have before. we've just had a vehicle come through, it's shown as uninsured so it's a priority for us today. we are going to try to get it stopped. out and about they were quickly finding offences being committed and dealing
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with them robustly. it's illegal, your numberplate. what we're doing today, we are dealing with a number of offences and having a zero—tolerance policy on any traffic offences. in a first for north yorkshire, the roads policing unit is being beefed up with special constablesjoining regular officers, all trying to cut the number of deaths on the roads. ijust implore people to just think about their driving and drive a little bit more safely and more considerately in future. it's the police officers who have to deal with the aftermath of road collisions, and a careless few seconds of bad driving can have implications that last a lifetime. ian white, bbc news. not many people can say they've met their heroes. 17—year—old millie anna has gone one step further. she's given sir ian mckellen a tour of her hometown of windsor. the oscar—winning actor spotted an instagram post of a picture millie anna had taken of herself in front of a poster for a play in which he was starring, and which she had just seen. an aspiring model and actor herself, millie anna has down's syndrome,
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and is passionate about changing perceptions of life with an extra chromosome. she spoke to graham satchell, along with her dad jeff. it started with a simple photo. 17—year—old millie anna at the theatre royal windsor, next to a picture of her acting hero, sir ian mckellen. i just think what he did was spectacular. i love that he had good energy and, yeah. yeah, he's a good actor. yeah, he really is, he's iconic. millie posted the photo on her instagram page. ian mckellen saw it, got in touch and asked millie to show him around windsor, her hometown. i actually thought, wow, ian wanted to see me, i think that is absolutely, 100%, amazing. i felt so good, i couldn't believe my ears. just a few days later, millie anna and sir ian spent 11.5 hours together.
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we went windsor castle, we went to the cobbles, we went to my favourite restaurant, enzo's. we had pasta and pizza. he is amazing, he was really fun to be with. the way he communicates with me and how he interacts with me is just spot on. ijust saw an incredibly kind man interacting and getting a quick sense of how to communicate with millie and then doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 11.5 hours. it was incredible. millie has down's syndrome. her dream in the future is to follow in sir ian's footsteps. i want to be an actress, so i want to bejust like ian. aim high, that's what you say, isn't it, you have to aim high. yeah, that's right. keep your head held high
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and make sure you've got to believe in yourself, love yourself and forgive yourself too. millie's story has had a remarkable impact. her followers have gone up from 700 to more than 10,000. her remarkable positivity has seen incredible messages of support. the response, for me, it's very emotional but i'm so happy. for a regular 17—year—old who loves life, loves herfamily, her time, being comfortable, i think it is just amazing. but also, i just want to say that down's syndrome is no big deal because you can do anything if you set your mind to it. millie and her family are hoping to give her new followers a positive perspective on what life is like living with down's syndrome. if everybody knew what nicki and i know right now, no—one, no—one would ever want to not
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have a child like millie. this has been the best chapter of my life. and i'm so proud of my parents. i wouldn't do this without them. ijust pour my heart to children who are very important to me. i'm just so happy that i have two incredible parents who love me. i wouldn't have done this without them, my two best friends, my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a theatre turned into an unforgettable day trip with a hollywood megastar and is now a campaign to change hearts and minds. graham satchell, bbc news.
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labour accuses the government of corrupt behaviour as the lobbying row goes on. borisjohnson had sought to change the rules governing mps' conduct — just as one of his own mps had been found to have breached them. the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country. for the government, one minister today dismissed the row as a storm in a teacup. also on the programme... the push on boosterjabs — people are being urged to take up the offer when it comes amid warnings of a difficult winter ahead. ijust i just was —— ijust was —— want i just was —— want to send ijust was —— want to send out players... travis scott's emotional appeal as us authorities investigate eight deaths at his astroworld music festival. and arsenal edge up in the premier league
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with a victory over watford. good afternoon. sir keir starmer has accused the prime minister of "corrupt and contemptible" behaviour, saying he tried to protect a conservative mp after he was found to have broken the rules on lobbying. the labour leader said the government's attempt to overhaul the system thatjudges mps was "trashing" the uk's reputation for democratic standards. today, one cabinet minister rejected that and called the row a "storm in a teacup". here's our political correspondent chris mason. mps are forever aware how many people don't much like politicians. it's why for so many,
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who spend their weeks here, this row over the government's behaviour gets right up their nose. because it leaves a whiff of this being a self—serving place. for the opposition parties, it is also a chance to take aim at the prime minister. instead of upholding standards, he orders his mps to protect his mate and rip up the whole system. now, that is corrupt, it is contemptible and it's not a one—off. and what makes me most angry is the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country. at the heart of this is this man, the former cabinet minister owen paterson. he was found to have broken the rules by making the case to ministers and others on behalf of companies that were paying him. he was due to be thrown out of the commons for 30 days and potentially face a by—election until the government ordered its mps to back a review of the system. then, under intense pressure, it changed its mind.
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today, this cabinet minister claimed it wasn't about getting mr paterson off the hook. the vote wasn't to reject the report that had been put together. the vote was to establish an appeals process so that mps in the sort of position that owen paterson was in, but others as well, in future would have the right of appeal. i think that's right. it's still an important objective to have due process here, to have a right of appeal. but obviously we can only take that forward with the agreement and cooperation of other parties. mps will return here tomorrow and spend around three hours debating parliamentary standards. there is still deep anger on all sides about what has happened here. the labour mp chris bryant, who chairs the commons standards standards committee, still wants parliament to vote to condemn owen paterson's behaviour, even though mr paterson has now resigned. plenty feel there is something of a rebuilding job to be done
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here for the government and parliament to restore trust in how this place works. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. a senior uk medical adviser has said we could face a "difficult winter" unless more people get their covid boosterjabs. dr susan hopkins told the bbc that a growing number of elderly and vulnerable people who'd been double—vaccinated were being hospitalised and dying with the virus because their immunity was decreasing. alison freeman reports. it is being called a national mission. government says it is down to all obviously stop when the restrictions being put in place by getting our boosterjabs. with health officials clear on the importance of the vaccine. i think that we are _ importance of the vaccine. i think that we are seeing _ importance of the vaccine. i think that we are seeing immune - importance of the vaccine. i think. that we are seeing immune waning effects from the vaccine. we know the virus is circulating at very high levels in our community so unless people get vaccinated we will
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have a long and difficult winter. and phil is doing exactly that. getting his third vaccination, six months and one week after his second jab. it months and one week after his second 'ab. , . . . , ., months and one week after his second 'ab. , . ., ., , ., ., jab. it is available to have, there is no reason _ jab. it is available to have, there is no reason not _ jab. it is available to have, there is no reason not to _ jab. it is available to have, there is no reason not to have - jab. it is available to have, there is no reason not to have it. - jab. it is available to have, there i is no reason not to have it. people should get — is no reason not to have it. people should get it _ is no reason not to have it. people should get it as _ is no reason not to have it. people should get it as soon _ is no reason not to have it. people should get it as soon as _ is no reason not to have it. people should get it as soon as they - is no reason not to have it. people should get it as soon as they can. | should get it as soon as they can. and other people here felt the same. in march 2020| went through treatment for breast cancer. so i am really grateful to receive all three of my vaccines. it really grateful to receive all three of my vaccines.— of my vaccines. it was really excitin: of my vaccines. it was really exciting waiting _ of my vaccines. it was really exciting waiting for - of my vaccines. it was really exciting waiting for it - of my vaccines. it was really exciting waiting for it to - of my vaccines. it was really . exciting waiting for it to happen of my vaccines. it was really - exciting waiting for it to happen so i'm pleased to have had it done. we know i'm pleased to have had it done. know that so i'm pleased to have had it done. - know that so far, around 10 million people have taken the boosterjab but in the over 80s age group, around 30% have not, and with over 50 is the figure rises to around 40%. that 50 is the figure rises to around a0%. that is because some in that age group are not eligible yet. we did age group are not eligible yet. - did not really get going with vaccinating in earnest until the end of january and vaccinating in earnest until the end ofjanuary and beginning of february. if you put the 12 weeks
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between the first and second dose in the six months, the important timescale for the booster, we are just getting to the point where people are starting to come through and be invited.— and be invited. young people are also bein: and be invited. young people are also being encouraged _ and be invited. young people are also being encouraged to - and be invited. young people are also being encouraged to get - and be invited. young people are. also being encouraged to get their vaccinations. herein in e work, eleanor, who is 12, was in the queue to have her first eleanor, who is 12, was in the queue to have herfirstjab. i eleanor, who is 12, was in the queue to have her first jab.— to have her first 'ab. i was a bit nervous to have her first 'ab. i was a bit eeusnrv but — to have her first 'ab. i was a bit nervous but i'm — to have her first jab. i was a bit nervous but i'm glad _ to have her first jab. i was a bit nervous but i'm glad i'm - to have her first jab. i was a bit nervous but i'm glad i'm doing| to have her first jab. i was a bit. nervous but i'm glad i'm doing it to have her first jab. i was a bit - nervous but i'm glad i'm doing it so we can get back to normal. iconic! we can get back to normal. covid cases are — we can get back to normal. covid cases are dropping _ we can get back to normal. covid cases are dropping amongst - we can get back to normal. covid cases are dropping amongst the young but numbers are still high. and with infection rates rising in older people who suffer more severely with symptoms, the push to get people vaccinated continues. alison freeman, bbc news, york. and in the latest figures on coronavirus, just over 30,000 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means on average, there were 35,362 new cases were reported every day in the last week. there were another 62 deaths of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. that means an average of 168 deaths
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per day in the last week. figures on boosterjabs show more than ten million people have now received one — that includes third doses for those with certain health conditions. in texas, tributes have been paid to some of the eight people who died at the astroworld music festival in houston — including the youngest victim, a 14—year—old boy. police have launched a criminal investigation — including into reports that someone was injecting people in the audience with drugs. the rapper travis scott — who founded the festival — has encouraged anyone with information to come forward. nomia iqbal reports. ijust want i just want to send out prayers to... to the ones that were lost last night. to... to the ones that were lost last night-— to... to the ones that were lost last nirht. ., , , . last night. for the first time since the tragedy. _ last night. for the first time since the tragedy, travis _ last night. for the first time since the tragedy, travis scott - last night. for the first time since i the tragedy, travis scott addressed his fans. appearing summer and distressed, he reflected on what went wrong at the festival he founded. i went wrong at the festival he founded. ., went wrong at the festival he founded. . ., , , went wrong at the festival he founded. . ., _ , founded. i am honestly 'ust
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devastated. i founded. i am honestly 'ust devastated. ii founded. i am honestly 'ust devastated. i could i founded. i am honestlyjust devastated. i could never i founded. i am honestlyjust- devastated. i could never imagine anything like this could happen. i'm going to do everything i can to keep you guys updated. going to do everything i can to keep you guys updated-— going to do everything i can to keep you guys updated. there were signs of trouble shortly _ you guys updated. there were signs of trouble shortly after _ you guys updated. there were signs of trouble shortly after 9pm - you guys updated. there were signs of trouble shortly after 9pm local i of trouble shortly after 9pm local time. as the crowd surged towards the stage, the party soon turned into panic. the venue's first aiders were quickly overwhelmed. people were quickly overwhelmed. people were pushing and shoving to make their escape. by the end of the evening, eight people had died. more is being heard about those who lost their lives in the crush. the youngest was 1a. other victims include breanna rodriguez, just 16. she was a keen dancer, friends are fundraising to pay for her funeral. franco patino, 21. and this 27—year—old was the oldest victim. police in houston say this is now a
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criminal investigation, after suggestions of file play. fine criminal investigation, after suggestions of file play. one of the narratives was _ suggestions of file play. one of the narratives was that _ suggestions of file play. one of the narratives was that some _ suggestions of file play. one of the narratives was that some individual was injecting other people with drugs. we do have a report of a security officer, according to the medical staff, that was out and treated him last night, that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen and he felt a prick in his neck. ,, ., , ., , ., neck. several people were treated with an anti-drug _ neck. several people were treated with an anti-drug medication. - with an anti—drug medication. investigators will now be speaking to anyone who was at the event to find out exactly what happened and who, if anyone, find out exactly what happened and who, ifanyone, is find out exactly what happened and who, if anyone, is to blame. find out exactly what happened and who, ifanyone, is to blame. nomia iqbal, bbc news, north america. more protests have been taking place in sudan, two weeks after its military seized power in a coup. two days of civil disobedience are now planned by people angry at the army's action, two years after a military dictator — in powerfor decades — was toppled. now sudan's civilian prime minister
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is under house arrest and protests calling for democracy are being met with force — as our africa correspondent andrew harding found in khartoum. blocking the roads today in khartoum. barricades going up across the city. civilians here taking big risks to protest, to show their fury at sudan's military coup. we want to change. we want something to do with the civilisation. you want democracy? we want democracy, of course. we don't like military at all. do you know what i'm saying? are you scared of the military? yeah. you're scared they will shoot? they are killing us. the protests began two weeks ago, when the generals seized power, halting this giant country's admittedly bumpy transition from dictatorship to democracy. so which side will prove stronger? the army or the street?
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in a khartoum hospital, we find an elderly tailor recovering from a savage beating by the military... can i see your leg? ..and this young student, shot in the leg. a lot of people were shot. his message to the soldiers... they're like animals. the animals are better. it's hard to find anyone here who supports the military takeover. it's heartbreaking, honestly. to see those young people, the ones that are being killed, just for asking what's rightfully theirs. for frequenting with the civilian government. so for me, it's very devastating. it makes me angry. the man leading sudan's coup is general burhan. his spokesman, an admiral, told me that the military had done nothing wrong. you've detained the prime minister
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and other politicians. your troops have killed protesters on the streets. why on earth would the sudanese people trust you for a second? translation: time will show this was not a coup. _ we will hold elections and the military will step aside. this was simply a course correction. but many people here are not convinced. even at night, the protests continue. the determination — the defiance — here is impressive. and it's possible that sudan's generals will back down under growing international pressure. but for now, this country's democratic revolution remains on hold. on a continent where it seems military coups are firmly back in fashion. andrew harding, bbc news, khartoum. with all the sport now, here's karthi gnanasegaram at the bbc sport centre. good evening.
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two premier league managers have been sacked this weekend. aston villa have parted ways with dean smith after their fifth league defeat in a row, less than 2a hours after norwich sacked their manager daniel farke. arsenal have kept their faith in mikel arteta and he has now taken his side up to fifth place in the premeier league after a 1—0 win over watford. our correspondent natalie pirks reports. a busy afternoon in the premier league began with a moment of reflection. mikel arteta was reflecting on a change in fortunes. once considered an early shout for the sack, arsenal have been flying, and it looked like that winning streak would continue. the celebrations _ streak would continue. the celebrations were - streak would continue. the celebrations were a - streak would continue. iia: celebrations were a tad streak would continue. "iia: celebrations were a tad premature, though. it is going to be offside here. s ., ., though. it is going to be offside here. . . ., ., though. it is going to be offside here. s ., ., ., , ., here. watford needed to settle and this did not — here. watford needed to settle and this did not help. _ here. watford needed to settle and this did not help. danny _ here. watford needed to settle and this did not help. danny rose's - this did not help. danny rose's wrestling move on lacazette earning arsenal a penalty, wrestling move on lacazette earning arsenala penalty, but wrestling move on lacazette earning arsenal a penalty, but it was aubameyang instead who took it. the agility still very much there on the
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38—year—old foster's 500th appearance. claudio ranieri had promised pizza if watford could keep a clean sheet. promised pizza if watford could keep a clean sheet-— a clean sheet. dinner was soon ruined. sweet _ a clean sheet. dinner was soon ruined. sweet as _ a clean sheet. dinner was soon ruined. sweet as you _ a clean sheet. dinner was soon ruined. sweet as you like! - a clean sheet. dinner was soon ruined. sweet as you like! a i ruined. sweet as you like! a frenetic finish so arsenal have another goal ruled offside. and watford are nearly capitalised on some slack defending. but i watford sending off ensured mikel arteta's 100th match in charge of the gunners was a winning one. natalie pirks, bbc news. in the day's other games, antonio conte's first premier league game in charge of tottenham ended in a goalless draw with everton. leeds and leicester city drew 1—1. west ham lead liverpool 1—0 after 23 minutes. in the scottish premiership, celtic are in second place after a 11—2 win over dundee. jota scored twice, including this excellent effort, with kyogo furuhashi scoring the other two for celtic. league leaders rangers are 2—1 ahead against ross county —— 4—1 ahead.
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arsenal have the chance to go three points clear at the top of the women's super league when they face west ham later. they face west ham later. place after alessio russo's first half goal was cancelled out by a fifth minute injury time equaliser from tottenham. that game finished 1—1. there were also wins for manchester city and reading. scotland have made an unbeaten start to rugby union's autumn nations series, beating australia in a tight contest by 15 points to 13 to follow up on last week's success against tonga. it's scotland's third consecutive victory over australia. and england's women made a fast start against new zealand at franklin's gardens, taking a 28 points to nil lead by half time. they continued to pile the pressure on their opponents, winning by 56 points to 15, a record victory over the world champions. there's more on the bbc sport website, including news of scotland's final game at the men's t20 cricket world cup against pakistan.
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that's it for now. the late news is at ten tonight. now on bbc one, the news where you are. the wind has been a realfeature over at the northern parts of scotland. the gusts in excess of 100mph. the rest of today, the wind gradually easing, the low pressure that brought the strengthening wind, gradually easing. not quite losing all of this influence, it takes some time before the isobars open up, the tail end of a weather front keeps the showers going across the very far north—east. keeps the breeze quite noticeable here. elsewhere, the first signs of wind dropping out is the little ridge of high pressure comes through. is the skies care after dark the temperatures tumble, we see that process continuing
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across the eastern side of scotland and england and eventually, if you are prone, you will end up with some frost at the heart of east anglia, and maybe one or two sheltered spots in the east of scotland. in the west, different story, cloud keeping the temperatures up through far west of scotland and northern ireland. that increasing cloud isjust of scotland and northern ireland. that increasing cloud is just the first signs of a new set of atlantic fronts gradually making themselves known across central and western parts of scotland, throughout northern ireland and the first part of monday, do not be fooled by the trite start across england and wales, eventually the cloud thickens across the north west of england, through the north of wales, eventually into the afternoon, you see some quite heavy bursts across the cumbrian fells. generally speaking, further south and east you stay dry, not overly warm in east anglia after a chilly start but a little bit of sunshine, you could be looking at 12 or 13 . taking you
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towards the middle part of the week, notice how this weather front clears towards the near continent, a portion of it wants to come back towards the british isles. at the same time, that will introduce some really quite mild air again, especially so across the greater part of england and wales, that little bit fresher away from the frontal zone, across scotland and northern ireland. not perry shipley cold just a little bit fresher than how you started the week, in the middle part of the week in the south you could see 1a or 15 and a fair amount of dry weather. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at five... the family of an unvaccinated mother, who died from covid before she could meet her newborn daughter, urge all mums—to—be to get the vaccine. saiqa parveen was eight months pregnant when she caught the virus — the mother of five died five weeks later. for the sake of god and your loved ones, please get vaccinated. if she had the vaccine, she might live and she might have had a chance of surviving. she might have had a chance of surviving. borisjohnson is accused of "corrupt and contemptible behaviour" over his government's efforts to change the parliamentary standards system and stop one of his mps being suspended. the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country, and so this is far from

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