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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 7, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: a rallying cry for the cop climate summit in glasgow — the prime minister urges countries to pull together ahead of the final days of intense negotiations police in texas launch a criminal investigation, after eight people are crushed to death at a music festival in houston. this is now a criminal investigation thatis this is now a criminal investigation that is going to involve our homicide division as well as narcotics and we are going to get down to the bottom of it. shocking footage of dangerous driving — police in yorkshire launch a major road safety safety campaign to tackle falling standards post lockdown norwich city win their first
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premier league match of the season, but the smile was wiped from manager daniel farke�*s face just hours later as he's sacked with the side bottom of the table. and whilst it a dry and fairly blustery day for many of you today, it will be particularly when you cross parts of scotland. maybe a few issues this morning. all the details on breakfast. it's sunday 7 november. our top story. the prime minister is urging countries at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow to "pull together and drive for the line," as the conference enters its second and final week. borisjohnson said �*bold compromises�* and �*ambitious commitments�* were needed to tackle climate change. our political correspondent chris mason reports.
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the people most affected by climate change are no longer some imagined future generation. it is change are no longer some imagined future generation.— future generation. it is half time ofthe future generation. it is half time of the climate _ future generation. it is half time of the climate summit. - future generation. it is half time of the climate summit. you - future generation. it is half time i of the climate summit. you may perhaps that will give us the impetus we need to rewrite our story. to turn this tragedy into a triumph. in the 1st week, familiar faces strolling the glasgow stage. big numbers, big promises and faraway dates, but some is from the government. i faraway dates, but some is from the government-— faraway dates, but some is from the government. i think always when you have a multilateral _ government. i think always when you have a multilateral event _ government. i think always when you have a multilateral event like - government. i think always when you have a multilateral event like this, i have a multilateral event like this, to get agreement, there is going to be a lot of work and diplomacy to get an outcome. i�*m talking to people here at this conference have been pretty much to every cop since it began an hour telling me at this i. it began an hour telling me at this 1, they are actually seeing action, they are seeing things take shape in a way they�*ve not seen before. so a way they've not seen before. so what has been achieved so far? ministers appoint new commitments to net 0 carbon emissions by the middle
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of the century meaning 90% of the world economy is covered, ending and reversing deforestation with more than 120 countries signed up, and over 100 countries have agreed to cut their methane emissions by 30% by 2030. but there are plenty, including campaigner greta thunberg, who think this is nowhere near enough. who think this is nowhere near enou:h. , , ., ., ., enough. this is no longer our climate conference, - enough. this is no longer our climate conference, this - enough. this is no longer our climate conference, this is i enough. this is no longer our i climate conference, this is now enough. this is no longer our - climate conference, this is now a global north green wash festival, a 2—week long celebration of business as usual and blah blah blah. they cannot ignore the scientific consensus and, above all, they cannot ignore us, the people, including their own children. the bi came including their own children. the big game of— including their own children. the big game of this conference is to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5 impaired with preindustrial times, to minimise the impact of
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climate change, but this is a huge challenge. it is complicated and it is difficult, involving around 200 countries, each with their own other priorities and concerns. and so the 2nd week begins. the search for compromise, agreement and promises continues. chris mason, bbc news. police in texas have opened a criminal investigation after eight people died at a music festival on friday. dozens more were injured in the crowd surge on the opening night of astroworld, which had been organised by the rapper travis scott. investigators are looking into claims that someone in the crowd was injecting other people with drugs. simonjones reports. a concert venue that has become a crime scene. shortly after this footage was taken, the crowd, made up footage was taken, the crowd, made up of 50,000 people, began to surge
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towards the stage. it�*s not clear why. the dead are aged between 1a and 27. early say they are determined to find answers to the families of those who lost their lives. i families of those who lost their lives. , ., ' ., lives. i will tell you, 1 of the narratives _ lives. i will tell you, 1 of the narratives was _ lives. i will tell you, 1 of the narratives was that - lives. i will tell you, 1 of the narratives was that some i lives. i will tell you, 1 of the - narratives was that some individual was injecting other people with drugs. we do have a report of a security office according to the medical staff was out and treating him last night, that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen and he felt a prick in his neck. when he was examined, he went unconscious. the when he was examined, he went unconscious-_ unconscious. the security arrangements _ unconscious. the security arrangements are - unconscious. the security arrangements are also i unconscious. the security i arrangements are also being unconscious. the security _ arrangements are also being looked into. had been chaotic scenes the gates opened at the start of the event. ila gates opened at the start of the event. ., ' ., , ., event. no 1, no parents, no friend, no sibling — event. no 1, no parents, no friend, no sibling should _ event. no 1, no parents, no friend, no sibling should see _ event. no 1, no parents, no friend, no sibling should see their- event. no 1, no parents, no friend, no sibling should see their loved i event. no 1, no parents, no friend, no sibling should see their loved 1| no sibling should see their loved 1 off to a concert via a world—renowned artist and not be able to expect them to come home
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safely. able to expect them to come home safel . ., , able to expect them to come home safel . ., . . able to expect them to come home safel . ., , ., , ., ., safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives _ safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives lost. _ safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives lost. i _ safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives lost. i just - safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives lost. i just want i safely. flowers have been laid to| mark the lives lost. i just want to mark the lives lost. i 'ust want to send out bears h mark the lives lost. i 'ust want to send out bears to — mark the lives lost. i just want to send out bears to the _ mark the lives lost. i just want to send out bears to the to - mark the lives lost. i just want to send out bears to the to the - mark the lives lost. i just want to | send out bears to the to the ones who was lost last night. we are actually working right now to identify the families so we can help assist them through this tough time. and festivalgoers are left trying to make sense of what happened. man. make sense of what happened. man, there was just _ make sense of what happened. man, there wasjust so _ make sense of what happened. man, there wasjust so many _ make sense of what happened. ij�*isg�*i, there was just so many people there, it felt like a million people at once, peoplejust passing out it felt like a million people at once, people just passing out and you could barely catch a breath. it's you could barely catch a breath. it�*s just sad. it was a concert, it it'sjust sad. it was a concert, it should — it'sjust sad. it was a concert, it should have _ it'sjust sad. it was a concert, it should have been fun, it shouldn't have _ should have been fun, it shouldn't have happened. the should have been fun, it shouldn't have happened-— should have been fun, it shouldn't have happened. the organisers say the are have happened. the organisers say they are committed _ have happened. the organisers say they are committed to _ have happened. the organisers say they are committed to working - have happened. the organisers say| they are committed to working with officials to find out what went wrong. simonjones, bbc news. another 75 migrants were either rescued or intercepted while attempting to cross the channel by the french and uk authorities yesterday. a record 853 people made the crossing on wednesday. the home office is calling on the french authorities to go
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�*further and faster�* in their efforts to stop migrants making the dangerous journey by boat. at least 99 people have died, and more than a hundred others have been injured, after an oil tanker exploded in sierra leone. the truck collided with a lorry at a busyjunction in the capital freetown. umara fofana has the very latest. the blast happened in eastern freetown after a truck rammed into a petrol tanker. people rushed to collect the leaking fuel, causing a heavy trafficjam, according to eyewitness accounts. there was a vast explosion, leaving fireballs spreading through the crowds.
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vehicles in the traffic jam were set alight. hospitals in freetown are overwhelmed with injured people, many in critical condition. most of the dead have been taken to the central mortuary. we started transporting bodies from 11 until four o�*clock. the last set of bodies, i had to convey them with some soldiers to the morgue, for us to get a total headcount. just outside here are anxious relatives who have been asked to come and identify their loved ones. some of them have moved from hospital to hospital, trying to see if their loved ones are actually either admitted or, in fact, dead. on behalf of the president, the government and the entire people of sierra leone, we sympathise... the country�*s vice—president called the incident a national disaster. police, soldiers and firefighters have worked through the night to clear the scene. rescuers expect the death toll to mount. umaru fofana, bbc news, freetown. the dress that the singer amy winehouse wore for her final performance is set to fetch around 14—thousand—pounds at an auction performance is set to fetch around £14,000 at an auction today. the singer wore the dress at a concert in belgrade, a month before she died in 2011.
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some more of the grammy—award winner�*s belongings will also go under the hammer with all proceeds going to the charity set up in her name. the british musician and rapper terence wilson — better known as astro — who was part of the group ub40 for more than thirty years, has died after what his band mates said was a short illness — he was 64. ub40, a reggae and pop band formed in the late 19705, achieved international fame with hits like red red wine and can�*t help falling in love. injuly 1988, they performed at the nelson mandela seventieth birthday tribute in london. astro left the band in 2013 to join anotherformer member, ali campbell, to create a new group. dangerous overtaking
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and reckless speeding shocking dashcam footage released by north yorkshire police shows how some people have been driving carelessly since lockdown rules were lifted. the force says standards on the roads have started to slip as more motorists get back behind the wheel again, as ian white reports. the terrifying moment a campervan pulls out to overtake and drives towards oncoming traffic. just1 example of careless and inconsiderate driving on north yorkshire roads. it�*s these kind of incidents can easily lead to a crash and all too often, these can be fatal. with more of us having — cams, frightening incidents are being sent to police. a driver overtaking a lorry is met by a car heading straight towards them on the wrong side of the road. idols? heading straight towards them on the wrong side of the road.— wrong side of the road. now the way the dash cam — wrong side of the road. now the way the dash cam technology _ wrong side of the road. now the way the dash cam technology works, - wrong side of the road. now the way the dash cam technology works, it i wrong side of the road. now the way the dash cam technology works, it is very high quality so we can see a registration plate, if we can identify vehicle, we can prosecute people have certainly done that. with so many deaths and serious
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injuries and 0 yorkshire roads, release of launched operation boundary, with unmarked patrol cars, bikes and vans. this boundary, with unmarked patrol cars, bikes and vans.— bikes and vans. as of come out of covid and — bikes and vans. as of come out of covid and restrictions _ bikes and vans. as of come out of covid and restrictions of - bikes and vans. as of come out of covid and restrictions of lifted i covid and restrictions of lifted we�*ve seen lots of driving where we think drivers are rusty, out of practice and driving standards have really fallen. we�*ve seen lots of things come out, highlighting dangerous driving and careless driving. more so than we ever have before. ~ �* , ., ., . before. we've 'ust had a vehicle come out. — before. we've 'ust had a vehicle come out. it's— before. we've just had a vehicle come out. it's a _ before. we've just had a vehicle come out. it's a priority - before. we've just had a vehicle come out. it's a priority for - before. we've just had a vehicle come out. it's a priority for us l come out. it�*s a priority for us today. but it stopped. out and about they were quickly finding offences being committed and dealing with them robustly. what we�*re doing today, we are dealing with a number of offences and having a 0 tolerance policy. in a 1st on north yorkshire, the roads policing unit is being beefed up specialjoining regular offices or trying to cut the number offices or trying to cut the number of deaths on the roads. i just
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of deaths on the roads. i 'ust im - lore of deaths on the roads. i 'ust implore people fl of deaths on the roads. i 'ust implore people to i of deaths on the roads. i 'ust implore people to thinkh of deaths on the roads. i just| implore people to think about of deaths on the roads. iiji,sii implore people to think about the driving and drive a little bit more safely and more considerately in future. �* , safely and more considerately in future. �*, . . , safely and more considerately in future. �*, , ., future. it's the police officers who have to deal _ future. it's the police officers who have to deal with _ future. it's the police officers who have to deal with the _ future. it's the police officers who have to deal with the aftermath . future. it's the police officers who | have to deal with the aftermath of road collisions and a careless new seconds of bad driving can have implications that last a lifetime. it was a big transition getting used to the roads again, and the road rage, gosh. let�*s take a look at today�*s papers. the observer. reports on the growing "row over tory sleaze", focusing on government contracts during the pandemic. the paper says mps have demanded details of any lobbying by owen paterson of ministers on behalf of a company that won almost £500 million covid contracts. the photograph on the front page
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of the telegraph refers to the racism row at yorkshire cricket club. it has a picture of iyaan rafiq, the son of cricketer azeem rafiq, outside headingly stadium at a protest yesterday. the sign says "racism is not banter". the independent has a picture of climate activists marching through glasgow on a day of national protests during cop 26 — -- cop26. "another world is possible" is its headline. and finally, novak djokovic�*s claimed a record seventh year—end number one ranking by overcoming poland�*s hubert hurkacz to reach the paris masters final. that victory means he has surpassed pete sampras�*s record for the most year—end rankings and djokovic now has two more than roger federer and rafael nadal. when you think he�*s played at the game time is that a on the dial, a real golden age. just keep going. obviously cop26 is going on, the 2nd, final week in glasgow about to get under way. it�*s a rest david
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them. this is a sustainability story. it�*s talking about the beijing winter olympics in 2022, they won�*t have any real snow, they are bringing in something like 94,000,000 gallons of water. is that right? 49,000,000 gallons of water in order to make fake snow, artificial snow. in order to make fake snow, artificialsnow. in in order to make fake snow, artificial snow. in the quote here from a geographer at strasberg university is that these could be the most unsustainable winter olympics that have ever been held. so basically all the snow is going to have to be produced artificially. maybe in now is the time to start thinking differently. if you�*re starting to have slight palpitations about running out of alcohol at christmas, lots of families will say the last thing they need is it for to be dry. the last thing they need is it for to be d . p, the last thing they need is it for to be d . p. , ., the last thing they need is it for to be dry-— the last thing they need is it for to be d . ., i. ., ., to be dry. can you imagine? from prospector— to be dry. can you imagine? from prospector christmas _ to be dry. can you imagine? from prospector christmas would - to be dry. can you imagine? from prospector christmas would be i prospector christmas would be something to dread without alcohol.
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network rail is trying to ensure the misery of a dry christmas is not on the cards by laying on extra freight trains which would ring and imported wine. we know there is a shortage of around 100,000 hgv drivers. i think i need to do a piece on that. you do. i�*m sitting here on the sofa on boxing day morning so i think my christmas will be dry anyway. i don�*t know if you leave your pet outside the house, i personally don�*t, but some people do. talking about things they might like to watch. i apparently the star wars the mandalorian is the most popular thing for them to watch, followed narrowly by mr bean. thea; thing for them to watch, followed narrowly by mr bean.— narrowly by mr bean. they are launching _ narrowly by mr bean. they are launching a — narrowly by mr bean. they are launching a new— narrowly by mr bean. they are launching a new dog _ narrowly by mr bean. they are launching a new dog tv - narrowly by mr bean. they are l launching a new dog tv station, aren�*t they? i
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launching a new dog tv station, aren't they?— aren't they? i can't believe you 'ust aren't they? i can't believe you just commit — aren't they? i can't believe you just commit the _ aren't they? i can't believe you just commit the sin _ aren't they? i can't believe you just commit the sin of - aren't they? i can't believe you just commit the sin of mixing l aren't they? i can't believe you | just commit the sin of mixing up star wars and star trek. here�*s matt with a look at this morning�*s weather. i�*m with you, roger. maybe i shouldn�*t say that. good morning to you. relatively quite started across southern areas this morning but a bit livelier further north you are. strong wind around. easing through the day. a lot of dry weather to come. during either big pressures chart to show you what is going on. an area of low pressure where there is wind swirling around. clearing away but it is before it clears we see the strongest wind. gusts of a mph. shah was pushing in on the breeze from the north—west. parts of north—west england, north—west scotland, frequent here at the moment and pushing through the skies quite quickly that is because we have severe gale force winds. that could cause a few travel and power
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problems and pretty rough seas to the north—west of scotland, too. waves approaching ten metres high to the coast of sutherland. it is, as i said, a very lively start, especially in the northern half of the country. why did further south, clouds and some sunshine coming through every now and again through today. overall a bit more sunshine than we saw yesterday. more staying dry through the day. showers in western scotland fading. with the wind to the north and north—westerly direction later in the day, it will feel cooler than yesterday but average is still around the seasonal norm. it does mean is going to be cooler than last night, especially at touch of frost. in the west, cloud will increase through the night and into the morning and temperatures should gradually rise here. but as i said, a chilly start to monday, as ashley through eastern areas. looking at details for monday, a region of high pressure has built—in under the lighter wind.
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frost is possible but more weather front pushing in. bringing outbreaks of rain initially across parts of northern ireland and then increasingly into the north and west scotland. a stiffening breeze and a bright, sunny start. a lot of cloud developing and some hazy sunshine across southern areas through the day but overall, a cloudy end to your monday. after the chilly start, still feeling cool in eastern areas and mild in the west. the weather front to the north of us is on the move and a bit further south only slowly with some gusty winds as we go into tuesday. another one will join forces and run along that strip as we go through the middle part of the week. mild air to the south. overall to start the week, temperatures a touch above average, especially southern areas. a bit of rain for a time then turning cooler later in the week. we
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rain for a time then turning cooler later in the week.— later in the week. we were 'ust talkin: later in the week. we were 'ust talking about i later in the week. we were 'ust talking about what i later in the week. we were 'ust talking about what we �* later in the week. we were just talking about what we would i later in the week. we were just i talking about what we would leave later in the week. we were just - talking about what we would leave on the tv for the dog. mine talking about what we would leave on the tv for the dog.— the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio. to be _ the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to be fair. _ the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to be fair. it _ the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to be fair. it is _ the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to be fair. it is not - the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to be fair. it is not on - the tv for the dog. mine likes the radio, to be fair. it is not on all. radio, to be fair. it is not on all day, is not on all day. time now for click. this week, sustainability is the name of the game, which is why i�*m on the eve ecargo bike. it�*s electric, it�*s made from natural and recycled materials, and it�*s usually used for inner city deliveries. but today, it is delivering me to the studio. nice wheels! oh, hello down there! hey! sinclair c5 — blast from the past! i know! an icon of the �*80s created by a computing icon. in memory of sir clive sinclair, i�*m taking this for a spin, but it�*s really been souped up. inside is an escooter with some brand new batteries,
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which means i can go pretty fast! here! wait for me! cheering and applause. spencer chuckles. whoa! ah! 0h! good engines! that�*s how to arrive in a studio! hey! welcome to click! hello, hello, hello! oh, look at us! we�*ve got a shiny studio! we have an audience! hello, audience! cheering and applause. and right next door, through that wall and across the river a bit, we have some very important neighbours. yes, we�*re here at bbc scotland in pacific quay glasgow and just over there, the united nations climate conference, cop26, is hosting leaders from around the world,
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along with 25,000 delegates from 196 nations. the question is will they agree to take the steps needed to tackle our climate emergency? the un says current systems won�*t suffice. we need new ideas and solutions to secure our future. and so in this show, we�*re asking what role do technology and innovation play in helping reduce our emissions? can technology save our world? so, let�*s start, and did you know that one of the biggest causes of greenhouse gas emissions is the agriculture industry? now, we know we need to cut down on our meat consumption and one of the reasons is that cattle are responsible for 10% of those emissions. yes — but it�*s not from what we think it is, is it? the back end? no, no, it�*s not, no. nearly all methane from cows — 95% — comes from the front and not the back. yep, it�*s all about the burps.
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10% of our entire greenhouse gas emissions come from cow burps. and that means you, magenta — everybody, meet magenta, magenta, everybody. applause. she�*s appearing here alongside her her team and her showbiz agent eileen wall, head of research at scotland�*s rural college. eileen, welcome. hi, spencer, and hello, magenta. hello, magenta. can i ask you what is magenta wearing and why? magenta�*s wearing the latest in wearable technology for our bovine friends. she�*s got two bits of kit on her. one, a pedometer — kind of like what we all wear on our wrists — that measures what she is doing, lying down, sitting, walking around and how much energy she�*s using. and around her neck, she�*s got something that measures her head movements so we can know when she�*s eating and when she might be producing something out of her front end. and that helps you to work out how much methane she�*s producing? yeah, so methane is produced after she�*s eaten her meals, so if we know how much she�*s eating, how often she�*s eating, we�*ll be able to extrapolate her methane, as well as being able to measure it to compare it. and you have belch chambers, is that right? we do. we use those for research, that�*s not something we use routinely in the field,
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and we use it very infrequently to really get an idea of how the methane changes over time, how it might differ for this cow over another cow or eating different foods. is there any way we can find out how much methane magenta�*s producing right now? yeah, so the equipment that we have in the chamber is not exactly the same as this — this is a laser methane reader. right. that measures the parts per million of methane that might be coming out of magenta�*s front end at any one time. i�*m going to get out of the way because it is a laser! there�*s a laser, and we all know how dangerous lasers are. so magenta, if you don�*t mind. yeah, don�*t listen, magenta! 0k. oh, she�*s licking it, she knows it�*s coming. she does not chase it like a cat does. oh, she�*s... and the reading is 18 ppm. so it�*s been a while since she�*s had a lot of food. ok, she�*s having a clean day. well, that went a lot more smoothly than it may have done! but what comes out of a cow can also be affected by what you put into a cow. this lot are eating feed created from seaweed found in the waters of hawaii, and its makers, blue ocean barns, claim it cuts
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emissions by 80%. but will it make your beef taste fishy? apparently not, because the thing is... bugs! come and get your lovely bugs! your tasty, crunchy, nutritious bugs! spencer, what are you doing? lara, welcome to my wondrous emporium filled to the brim with fine foods from the future. oh, great, because i�*m absolutely starving. 0k. well, i tell you what, get your lips around these delicacies. um, ok, i�*m actually thinking that because our audience have gone to the trouble of coming here to join us today, oh, right, ok, yes. ..that they may be more deserving of this than me. i�*m sure you�*d love to try some, wouldn�*t you? just here, we�*ve got the first course for you. help yourselves. did we fill in the forms for this? i�*m sure there were forms. listen, trust me, they�*re not bad. i�*ve eaten some roasted mealworm in china and it never did me any harm. see, in the future, we might be eating more insects than meat. they are cheap, they�*re richer in protein, calcium and iron and have less fats than
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beef, pork or chicken. best of all, there are bazillions of them. yes, i heard there are 1.5 billion per person on earth. what do you think? how do they taste? they're very crispy. crispy. you don�*t look too impressed. and you? like roasted chickpeas. ok, that�*s not bad! interesting. do you like roasted chickpeas? love 'em, yeah. 0k! fairenough! how about... ..these? ok, that actually looks borderline appetising. hmm—mm. do you want to try? i think i may be asking you again. yeah, right, ok. just behind here you will find that. all right. just have a taste of that. there we go, anytime you�*re ready, and i will tell you that these are — drum roll — spicy crickets. yes? these dishes are made from insect packed by a british firm called bug — who love bugs, obviously — and they say that bugs use less water, they use less land than animals, they need less feed than animals and, in fact, they can be fed on the things that we throw away. but are they delicious? weakly: they're quite spicy! clears throat. 0k. a bit of a kick.
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right, i don�*t think you�*re impressed by any of this! i think it's like _ sweet—and—sour chicken. ok — again, that�*s not bad! you�*ll eat anything! chickpeas and sweet and sour chicken! i think you�*ve got dinner here sorted, haven�*t you? totally! now, it�*s all very well having tasty stuff to eat but in terms of the climate, how our food is produced is key. and our very ownjen copestake is in a greenhouse for us. jen. yes, i�*m here in the norwich greenhouse and it looks completely different than it did on my last visit. it�*s absolutely filled with plants now. there are 378,000 tomato plants here, and that represents 5% of the uk�*s consumption of tomatoes. last year, we saw this world—first project being built using an environmentally friendly heating system. a typical greenhouse would burn fossil fuels to create the heat that you need to go through these rails. but our greenhouse takes waste heat from sewage treatment works. we use that heat instead
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of burning fossil fuels. the hard hats and hi—vis gear we wore last time have been replaced by coveralls to protect the crops from bringing in external bugs and viruses. workers here have their clothes cleaned on—site. and how many people are working here now? �*cause when i came before, there was nobody. yeah, so we have about 50 people currently working in here on picking. so these tomatoes are going out to the shops? yes, yeah, they�*re being picked, ready to be packed and you�*ll see them in the supermarket soon. and we see different varieties of tomatoes, so can you explain what�*s going on? as we�*ve got here, this is ready to be picked. these ones are just starting to get some colour on, so they�*ll be picked within the next ten days. we introduce predatory insects. at the beginning the year, we introduce macrolophus pygmaeus, which is a true bug. it�*s a predatory insect that feeds on anything like whitefly, aphids, commonly known as greenfly, spider mites. there�*s one of my macrolophus. ah! hello!
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so we do not want to damage him? he�*s fine? he looks like a greenfly. yeah, he�*s just searching away, looking for something to eat. because we�*re coming to the end of the crop, we�*ve taken the top of the plant off. so this would have extended all the way to the top of the greenhouse? up to the top of the wire, the string here. oh, wow. so we keep a buffer over the top of the greenhouse so we can control the atmosphere and the climate within here. and more produce is growing in a greenhouse just next door using the same green technology. how many cucumbers are you growing here in the other greenhouse? the other greenhouse here is 14 million cucumbers. 14 million? 22 million peppers. 22 million peppers?! i don�*t know how many tons of tomatoes, but a lot. it�*s done better than we�*d anticipated in its first year, if i�*m honest. yeah. and, but, you know, great. so this project has proven that you can grow a large scale of produce in a low—carbon way — you just need to be near a waste heat source, and there are plenty of those around the world. thanks, jen. of course, once our crops have been harvested,
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they need to be stored safely so they don�*t spoil. an estimated 630 million tons of grain goes bad each year, which is such a waste. well, dr lorenzo conti thinks he might have a solution. dr lorenzo, what is it? what we have developed, lara, is the world's first subterranean drone and we're using it specifically to help the grain storage operators maintain the quality of their stock. you called it a drone but it doesn�*t look much like drone. that's right. since there wasn't a word in the dictionary to describe what it is we have come up with one. we call it a crover. how does it work and what does it do exactly? it swims through grain in storage, like in silos and sheds, monitoring the conditions of the grain like temperature and moisture and helping maintain quality. how does this vary from conventional methods of looking after your grain?
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well, traditionally you would need a farmer to physically walk on top of the grain bulk with a heavy spear and taking samples at a few points which is dangerous and in some situations not possible to do. ok, that sounds like a biggerjob. so do you think farmers are going to use this? right now, we're focused mostly on centralised grain storage hubs which are usually owned by grain merchants and port operators but we'd like to develop in the future a version that is suitable for farmers as well. ok, and i�*m hoping when it�*s used in the real world, it doesn�*t mix up the grains like that. i can hardly look! thank you so much, dr lorenzo. thank you, lara. and that is it for our click specialfrom cop26 in glasgow. as ever, you can keep up with the team throughout the week. find us on social media, on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we�*ll see you soon. bye— bye.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. like hell on earth. that�*s how one eyewitness described the deadly crush at a music festival in texas on friday. at least eight people died after a crowd surge on the opening night of astroworld in houston. police have opened a criminal investigation into what happened. joe guerra is a reporter for the houston chronicle. he was at the festival. how are you, how i slipped about an hourin how are you, how i slipped about an hour in terms of dealing with coverage and different things like that so it�*s been a lot the last day i guess now, at this point. at the
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moment, how much do we know about the surge, about the crushing, do we know whether there was enough in place to prevent it from happening? i don�*t think we do at this point. i mean, as someone who was there, there was a very robust residence of police and security throughout the day, at least from my perspective. where this happened was near the very front of the stage. the stage was huge, it was shaped like a mountain, and the crowd just went back for blocks and blocks. this was a huge crowd. so if you want right up a huge crowd. so if you want right up in the front where this was happening, i don�*t think you would have any idea there were points when you could see emergency vehicles kind of cutting through the crowd, 1 passed right in front of where we were at 1 passed right in front of where we were at1 point but again, it kind of comes with the territory of a festival. you see emergency
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vehicles, people being treated for things like exhaustion and dehydration, people camped out from the night before to get in, people were waiting at travis�*s stage for several hours and on top of that, people had been waiting literally 3 or 4 hours to get t—shirts and merchandise lines as there was a lot of anticipation and energy and anybody who is familiar with travis scott at all knows he has a very unique intense kind of connection with his crowd so if you�*ve been to 1 of his shows, that energy, that type of gathering at the front of the stage, people being pulled out of different points throughout the show, those things are common in a travis scott show. it�*s just that in this instance, there werejust travis scott show. it�*s just that in this instance, there were just so many other factors that i think came into play. maybe for some people their 1st concert in over a year, astroworld festival was cancelled last year. there was a week of
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events in houston leading up to this events in houston leading up to this event so a lot of the energy and anticipation may be contributed to this. �* ., . anticipation may be contributed to this. �* ., , , ., ., this. alongside investigating how the surae this. alongside investigating how the surge was — this. alongside investigating how the surge was allowed _ this. alongside investigating how the surge was allowed to - this. alongside investigating howl the surge was allowed to happen, houston police have said they would involve the homicide and narcotics divisions after reports of a security officer feeling epic in his neck. he examined it and went unconscious?— neck. he examined it and went unconscious? ,., , unconscious? there were reports he felt something _ unconscious? there were reports he felt something in _ unconscious? there were reports he felt something in his _ unconscious? there were reports he felt something in his neck _ unconscious? there were reports he felt something in his neck while - unconscious? there were reports he felt something in his neck while he l felt something in his neck while he was aiding concertgoers. he was examined and they did find it was some sort of needle. i don�*t know if they police what kind of drug it was anything like that but they are investigating reports that there were drugs involved in this situation because i think if you see the videos, this isn�*tjust a simple, not simple, but this isn�*t just people falling down and being trampled, 11 people were sent to the hospital with cardiac arrest. among
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the others that were already there. there was something else i think going on which is what�*s been suggested by what we see so far. it's suggested by what we see so far. it�*s clearly too soon to speculate to make that distinction over the fatalities. . , to make that distinction over the fatalities. ., , ., ., , fatalities. travis scott has tweeted. _ fatalities. travis scott has tweeted, he _ fatalities. travis scott has tweeted, he is _ fatalities. travis scott hasj tweeted, he is devastated fatalities. travis scott has i tweeted, he is devastated by fatalities. travis scott has - tweeted, he is devastated by what place, his praise the work of emergency services and the immunity. yes, he has. travis is a houston native so a lot of these organisations and people are familiar to organisations and people are familiarto him, he organisations and people are familiar to him, he posted a video on instagram a bit earlier tonight our time, on instagram a bit earlier tonight ourtime, kind of on instagram a bit earlier tonight our time, kind of rehashing those points but also talking about how he felt and if anyone had any information about how this happened, to please contact authority so he�*s being very proactive in terms of really trying to help find out what happened here and i will say on top of that, there were times, multiple times during this performance when he did pause the show and would see
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somebody distress and a security to help that person, make sure they get out, and he would kind of not resume until he was sure the situation was taken care. until he was sure the situation was taken care-— until he was sure the situation was taken care. ., , �* , taken care. that must've been quite traumatic to — taken care. that must've been quite traumatic to him. _ taken care. that must've been quite traumatic to him. assent _ taken care. that must've been quite traumatic to him. assent has - taken care. that must've been quite traumatic to him. assent has been l taken care. that must've been quite l traumatic to him. assent has been up at the hotel to try and reunite families who have not heard from loved ones. what is the atmosphere like in the city? i loved ones. what is the atmosphere like in the city?— like in the city? i think for most --eole, like in the city? i think for most people. it's _ like in the city? i think for most people. it's a — like in the city? i think for most people, it's a sense _ like in the city? i think for most people, it's a sense of- like in the city? i think for most people, it's a sense of shock. i like in the city? i think for most i people, it's a sense of shock. this people, it�*s a sense of shock. this event has been going on in houston since 2018, 2019 and of course last year we didn�*t have as a covid but this event is meant to celebrate the city itself, its name for an amusement park that is now closed in houston so people have warned memories of this place. the environment creates things that people are going to recognise from that amusement park. it�*s supposed to be very positive and upper lip thing. a week of community service type events. he opened a garden at
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an elementary school, open the design centre for high school students, he gifted his old neighbourhood a basket there�*s been a lot of real affirming positive things happening leading up to this and i thinkjust the fact things happening leading up to this and i think just the fact that this happened the way did is really shocking and disturbing to a lot of people obviously and even for concertgoers, people who won�*t in that real heavy part of the crowd in the front, honestly probably had no idea until they got on and checked their phones that this was a reality. their phones that this was a reali . , , , ., their phones that this was a reali . , ,, ., .,, reality. very upsetting for those attendinu. reality. very upsetting for those attending- joey _ reality. very upsetting for those attending. joey guerra - reality. very upsetting for those attending. joey guerra for- reality. very upsetting for those attending. joey guerra for the l attending. joey guerra for the houston chronicle, we hope you can get some rest and a chance to process it. let�*s catch up on all the sport that happened. jane is here. norwich city, the manager went from 1 extreme of emotion to another. the 1st extreme of emotion to another. the ist 1 extreme of emotion to another. the 1st1 of extreme of emotion to another. the 1st 1 of the extreme of emotion to another. the 1st1 of the season. shortly afterwards finds he doesn�*t have a job. we know it�*s fairly little
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being premier league manager. when the team loses, the manager gets the blame. a win for norwich city, butjust a few hours later, manager daniel farke was sacked. it was the club�*s first victory of the season against brentford. mathias normann scored the pick of the goals in their 2—1 win. it put a smile on farke�*s face momentarily, but the three points weren�*t enough to save his job. norwich have twice been promoted under the german, but he leaves with the club bottom of the league. well, despite another loss for manchester united, manager ole gunner solskjaer still has hisjob but the pressure is mounting. he watched his side be outclassed by local rivals manchester city in the derby, which finished 2—0 at old trafford. the defeat leaves united fifth in the league and six points behind their neighbours asjoe lynskey reports.
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the manchester united, he with the connection, the manager who knows the club and the city but now ole gunner solskjaer is under fire and this was a derby day after his darkest day. last time at old trafford they lost 5— 0 to liverpool. our manchester city were here and inside 7 minutes were in front. city had started this match with just 3 points front. city had started this match withjust 3 points more front. city had started this match with just 3 points more than front. city had started this match withjust 3 points more than united but their 1st heart —— 1st half felt in a different lead. it might been fired again. on his own, the keeper kept the minutes soon even he was forced into a mistake. bernardo silver made the most of static defending and clumsy handling. he was the portuguese player making the difference. a 2— 0, this was no rout by the scoreline but for city, just as comfortable and for united, just
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as comfortable and for united, just as bleak. as comfortable and for united, 'ust as bleak. ., ., . . as comfortable and for united, 'ust as bleak. ., ., , ., as comfortable and for united, 'ust as bleak. ., .. ., ., ,, , as bleak. today was a massive test but we weren't _ as bleak. today was a massive test but we weren't at _ as bleak. today was a massive test but we weren't at the _ as bleak. today was a massive test but we weren't at the standard - as bleak. today was a massive test but we weren't at the standard we | but we weren�*t at the standard we know we can be, what we need to be against the top teams in europe. in manchester, the derby means so much. 1 coach, it may decide his future but these were 2 teams from 1 city in very different places. joe lynskey, bbc news. another club in trouble and with a potential new manager is newcastle. they stay just above bottom placed norwich in 19th after a draw against brighton. they got an equaliser through isaac hayden late on after leandro trossard had given brighton the lead. eddie howe — former bournemouth manager — was watching on alongside new co—owner amanda staveley. he�*s widely tipped to get the job after newcastle sacked steve bruce. burnley complete the bottom three — after getting a point at league leaders chelsea. matej vydra with burnley�*s late equaliser after kai havertz had put chelsea ahead. elsewhere, crystal palace
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beat wolves 2—0. there are four more premier league fixtures today. liverpool will go top if they beat west ham by 2 clear goals. before that, antonio conte will take charge of his first league match since becoming tottenham head coach and he�*s expecting a tough afternoon. it was eric dictation to have game, he is really good team. it is it was eric dictation to have game, he is really good team.— he is really good team. it is not a lace to he is really good team. it is not a place to play _ he is really good team. it is not a place to play but _ he is really good team. it is not a place to play but at _ he is really good team. it is not a place to play but at the _ he is really good team. it is not a place to play but at the same - he is really good team. it is not a l place to play but at the same time, we want to try to improve, especially for our table. but it won�*t be easy. we especially for our table. but it won't be easy.— especially for our table. but it won't be easy. especially for our table. but it won't be eas . ~ ., ., won't be easy. we need to get a new microphone — won't be easy. we need to get a new microphone there, _ won't be easy. we need to get a new microphone there, don't _ won't be easy. we need to get a new microphone there, don't we. - rangers can increase their lead at the top of the scottish premiership
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if they can beat ross county at ibrox later and if celtic drop points at dundee.hearts are second for a few more hours at least after they beat dundee united 5—2 at tynecastle. motherwell won away at aberdeen and it was goalless between stjohnstone and st mirren. england have made the semi—finals of the men�*s t20 cricket world cup, despite a narrow defeat to south africa. they lost by 10 runs in sharjah with rassie van der dussen doing the damage as england were set a target of 190 to win. moeen ali did his best to get his side over the line, but they ended up falling just short. and there was concern to see one of their best batsmen, jason roy, on crutches at the end. with the way the play, order, not only with t20 cricket but 50 over cricket as well. obviously 2 different partners in the 2 formats.
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he is as close as we get. in rugby union, england got their autumn internationals off to the perfect start as they ran in 11 tries, in a 69 points to 3 win over tonga at twickenham. without captain owen farrell who�*d tested positive for coronavirus. but england�*s new—look side didn�*t have any issues against the islanders. 22—year—old marcus smith coming on in the second—half to light up twickenham for the first time in an england shirt, and it surely won�*t be the last. we put in the effort when it probably wasn�*t needed which is good. 2nd half is1 probably wasn�*t needed which is good. 2nd half is 1 of those tricky 40 minutes. you know the results. i thought we played harder in the 2nd
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half than we did in the 1st half. it's half than we did in the 1st half. it�*s a good sign for the team. there was a bizarre moment in the wales south africa game in cardiff as a pitch invader got in the way of liam williams when he had a chance to score. it may well have cost wales, because the springboks went on to score the only try of the match late on. 23—18 it finished at the principality stadium. andrew conway starred for ireland as they eased past japan. he got a hat—trick for the home side in dublin as ireland scored nine tries in a 60 points to 5 victory. today scotland�*s men face australia at murrayfield, while england women are aiming to repeat last weekend�*s record—breaking win against new zealand, by beating them again at franklin�*s gardens, but back—rower zoe aldcroft has no doubt the visitors will has a strong response to that loss. we are expecting a big kind of got to keep ourfeet
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we are expecting a big kind of got to keep our feet on the ground, we can�*t be complacent at all and we�*ve just got a kind of maybe think what are they going to do this week, things they will come up with to help them, and hopefully then we will counteract that and hopefully get a 2nd wind. mercedes will want to pick up where they left off today for the mexican grand prix. valterri bottas qualified on pole for the race, with his teammate lewis hamilton in second. championship leader max verstappen — who had dominated the weekend until qualifying — could only manage third. that means mercedes are locked out of the front of the grid. irlat that means mercedes are locked out of the front of the grid.— of the front of the grid. not for the first time. _ here�*s matt with a look at this morning�*s weather. have a look at this. london town. son coming up, beautiful. i think i can see mary poppins there. can you seeit? can see mary poppins there. can you see it? —— sun coming up.
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can see mary poppins there. can you see it? -- sun coming up.— see it? -- sun coming up. sunrise in london this— see it? -- sun coming up. sunrise in london this morning _ see it? -- sun coming up. sunrise in london this morning just _ see it? -- sun coming up. sunrise in london this morning just after- london this morning just after seven. getting later. if you are a little bit further north into scotland, aberdeen is about 7:30am. here are rather lively start to your morning. across scotland you will see wins quite lightly dusting around 70 —— winds. nothing on common but not great day to be on the hills. rough seas towards the north—west. see significant wave heights. the reason it has been so windy in scotland is this area of low pressure which has been clearing away. a ridge of high pressure starts to build in and that will bring more in the way of dry weather. scotland we do have plenty of showers in the north and west.
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one or two showers but they are already starting to fade a little bit. the showers in scotland become more and more confined to the far north as the eases down. still be a blustery afternoon but not quite as strong at the moment. elsewhere across the country, bit more sunshine, varying cloud. cloud towards the south and west areas. one or two isolated showers. bridges around the seasonal norm and 10— 13 degrees. fresher in the breeze compared to yesterday. to this evening and overnight, the wind falls even lighter. a cold night in the west, increasing cloud and increasing breeze again, bringing patchy rain and drizzle to some areas are keeping the temperatures up areas are keeping the temperatures up but eastern england in particular, be prepared, they could be a frost around. actuate colder start for the monday morning commute, and —— undera ridge start for the monday morning commute, and —— under a ridge of high pressure but pushing into the north and west. the court —— across
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parts, especially western areas, some of the rain spreading into the north of england and north and west wales, too. the best of the sunshine in the morning with the frost. turning milder through the day. back to you both. turning milder through the day. back to ou both. . ., turning milder through the day. back to ou both. ., ,, i. turning milder through the day. back to you both-— time now for the film review. hello and a very warm welcome again to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week�*s cinema releases, mark kermode is with us. hi, mark. what have you been watching? loads to talk about. we have a new marvel cinematic universe film, eternals. we have kristen stewart as princess diana in spencer. and the card counter,
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the new movie by paul schrader. and eternals is directed by chloe zhao. chloe zhao, who won an oscarfor nomadland. she�*s a terrific film—maker. so, the story is... this follows a group of godlike eternals who came to earth many, many years ago to fight the deviants, and they�*ve been fighting deviants throughout history. the deviants appear to have been laid to rest. now, they�*ve kind of moved into civilian life. so, they�*re still here on earth, still awaiting the next phase of their mission. they don�*t know when they�*re going to be called upon to regroup and deal with yet another threat, but now the old this threat has resurfaced. got that? i�*m trying to keep up. good, here�*s a clip.
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so, you can see from there, a whole bunch of mcu action—adventure. so, here�*s the thing — directed by chloe zhao — you love nomadland and i�*m a big fan of herfilms. the cast includes angelina jolie, barry keoghan, kumail nanjiani. it is an impressively diverse range of characters, more diverse and i think we�*ve ever seen in a marvel cinematic superhero universe. all these things are plus points. sadly, the film itself doesn�*t work.
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it�*s a mess, and it�*s a mess for a number of reasons. one of them is that it has a kind of plodding narrative thatjumps across continents and through time periods in order to establish its backstory, and by the time we actually get to a new thing happening, we�*ve kind of vaguely lost interest. secondly, it has too many characters, so you never end up investing in anybody in particular. for example, if the film concentrated on kumail nanjiani�*s character or barry keoghan�*s character or something like that, you think, "ok, fine, i can invest in this." as it is, itjust feels like there�*s a lot of moving parts. and the third thing is the special effects just look like that — they look like special effects. they don�*t feel like they�*ve got heft or weight. so, you have this weird thing that, on the one hand, you�*ve got a great film—maker who�*s known for making these intimate portraits of characters that are... they ring with truthfulness. and then, you have this, and you�*re watching the special
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effects and thinking, "well, i�*m not sure how involved chloe zhao is in this." as it turns out, very involved, because she was given a great amount of creative freedom — not only in the script, but also in the whole development of the project. it is really disappointing to report that it is nothing like as good as one would want it to be. there is too much going on for too long, and weirdly, that means that the end result is it�*s like there�*s almost nothing happening. i mean, it�*s bizarre. for a film with this much stuff in it, it�*s oddly empty, and i wanted to like it. wow. sorry. well, you�*re very rarely that passionate on that regard, so, yeah. you try not to say bad things, so that�*s really striking and a shame. now, spencer. i am fascinated to know... i was really sad i couldn�*t get to the screening because i�*m just fascinated by this. ok, so you�*ll remember 2013 and the film diana, which had naomi watts, which was a terrible, tatty soap opera that appeared to have a script that was lifted from the pages of hello magazine. this is directed by pablo larrain, who madejackie,
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which was fantastic. it�*s written by steven knight, a very respected writer, and it stars kristen stewart, who is diana. she is absolutely brilliant in the central role. this is described as a fable from a true tragedy. it plays out over three days, three christmas days at sandringham — so christmas eve, christmas day, boxing day. she just has to get through it. and the film is very much seen internally from her point of view. it�*s about her own troubled state of mind within a situation which robs her of agency, robs her of independence, robs her of identity. there are endless scenes of feasts in which she is being stared at by the royal family. obviously, it addresses things like eating disorders, but does so in a way that absolutely makes you understand the interior psychology of what�*s happening. it has ghost story inflections. there are moments of it that reminded me of the others. we have a vision of anne boleyn, who walks through the corridors, and yet somehow, it isn�*t ridiculous. it has the most brilliant score byjonny greenwood, and thejonny greenwood score is so clever because it sounds
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like a baroque string quartet slowly mutating into free—form mad jazz as a way of describing the interior life of its central character. i thought this was really great, and believe me, i went in sceptical, but i was knocked out. i love kristen stewart anyway, i think she�*s great. i�*ve loved her ever since the days of the twilight movies. i mean, clouds of sils maria — fine, fabulous. personal shopper — fabulous. i liked her way back then, but this is... if there is anyjustice, she should get awards for this because it�*s really, really well done. wow. yes. fascinating. well, you�*ve really, really made me want to see it. and your third choice this week? the card counter, new movie by paul schrader. so, oscar isaac is tell, who is the titular card player. travels from town to town, low stakes game, staying under the radar. that�*s how he likes it. tiffany haddish offers him the chance to join her syndicate, become one of her stable of gamblers, which he doesn�*t want to do until he meets a young man played by tye sheridan, who might give him a reason to want to win big. here�*s a clip. what happened? you get bored? played some slots. you should read some books. i'm going to buy you one. i�*ve read books.
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what is it with her? name one. one what? book. poker for dummies. you may have read it. she laughs. ilike him. oh, you made it to the second dinner break. i must've fired two dozen tournaments before i lasted that long. so, how many are left? four tables, so should be done tomorrow. . how much cards do you play? 40 hands an hour, 8—12 hours a day, 6—7 days a week. - do you do anything else? like what? like anything. go to a park, a concert, a museum. a museum? yeah, i'll buy you a book on it. it's called museums for dummies! ba—dum—bum! she laughs. no, but seriously, you should do something else. just for variety.
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i like playing cards. that is what he does. i love the way that shotjust closes in very, very slowly on its character. now, this is produced by martin scorsese, for whom, obviously, schrader wrote taxi driver. if you�*re a schrader fan, this is the riffs from american gigolo and light sleeper. he essentially makes a version of the same film over and over again — the lonely man — the man who is troubled by his past, the man resting with guilt, and there are flashbacks to horrors in the past. he likes to keep everything completely contact—free. we just saw that thing about him dressing all the stuff in a hotel in the sheets so there isn�*t any tact or contact with the world. at times, it feels a little bit like a greatest hits of paul schrader riffs — you know, the tortured, angsty men. but it�*s very well played —
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oscar isaac is terrific. it�*s very well shot. it looks really, really beautiful. and there�*s a lot to talk about the philosophy of card—playing. which really isn�*t to do with the philosophy of card—playing, it�*s to do with the philosophy of masculine ritual and macho angst. and i have to say, if you�*re not interested in that, there may not be much of a way in, although tiffany haddish�*s character is, i think, really, really welljudged. so, it feels a little bit like, ok, we have seen this before, but if anyone is going to do this, schrader is the man. and also, considering how touch and go his most recent... back catalogue has been. i mean, some really great films like first reform, and then some things like the canyons, which was terrible. this is good. it�*s not innovative, but it is what paul schrader does well. ok, all right. and yourjudgement about best out this week? ok, i know you went to see last night in soho. i loved last night in soho. edgar wright, young woman comes to stay in a bedsit where she is
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transported back to the �*60s, but she�*s seeing a world in which terrible things start to play out. it starts as a kind of 60s glamorous fantasy, that turns into a nightmare. i know you�*re not a horrorfan. visually, it�*s just fantastic. a look, the design, it is so creative. it�*s got such a strong sense. i know some regular viewers don�*t like me reminding them of the fact that i�*m just not good with malice. as the film progresses, the menace against women, against women, and i struggle against that. we should say it is not gratuitously against women. believing it to be something, and then they are than preyed upon. the gender politics are pretty solid. of course that�*s there because edgar wright knows how to direct it, and he does. brilliantly made. super clever. if you don�*t like menace or threat, you are going to
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find it difficult. i�*m glad you found stuff in there you did like. you were there with me spiritually, there�*s no doubt about it. i saw it twice and i want to see it again. and the performances are terrific. really good. quick thought about dvd, streaming? netflix. the harder they fall has come to netflix. it demonstrates the version of the old west we all have is very whitewashed. these are the characters we haven�*t seen on—screen many times. it�*s lots of action, lots of violence, but done in a way i thought was the cinematic and fun. i really enjoyed it. it doesn�*t have a lot of substance, but a lot of surface, and the surface is good. mark, great to see you. thank you very much, and that�*s it. enjoy your cinema going. see you next time, bye—bye.
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good morning — welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. our headlines today. a rallying cry for the cop climate summit in glasgow — the prime minister urges countries to pull together ahead of the final days of intense negotiations police in texas launch a criminal investigation, after eight people are crushed to death at a music festival in houston. this is now a criminal investigation that is going to involve our homicide division as well as narcotics and we are going to get down to the bottom of it. we�*ll be hearing all
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about millie anna�*s dream day out with her acting hero sir ian mckellan, raising awareness about living with down�*s syndrome. and while it�*s a dry and blustery day for many of you, there will be issues over scotland. i will have the details soon in 1st. it�*s sunday 7th november. our top story. the prime minister is urging countries at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow to "pull together and drive for the line," as the conference enters its second and final week. borisjohnson said bold compromises and ambitious commitments were needed to tackle climate change. but labour says the world is far off where it needs to be to keep temperature targets in reach. here�*s our political correspondent chris mason. the people most affected by climate change are no longer some imagined future generation. it is half—time at the climate summit. perhaps that will give us the impetus we need to rewrite our story,
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to turn this tragedy into a triumph. in the first week, familiar faces strolling the glasgow stage. big numbers, big promises and faraway dates, but some from the government. i think always when you have a multilateral event like this, to try to get agreement, there is going to be a lot of work and a lot diplomacy goes to get an outcome. i�*m talking to people here at this conference who have been pretty much to every cop since it began and they�*re telling me at this one, they are actually seeing action, they are seeing things take shape in a way that they�*ve not seen before. so what has been achieved so far? ministers point to new commitments to net—zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century, meaning 90% of the world economy is covered, ending and reversing deforestation with more than 120 countries signed up, and over 100 countries have agreed to cut their methane emissions by 30% by 2030.
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but there are plenty, including campaigner greta thunberg, who think this is nowhere near enough. this is no longer our climate conference, this is now a global north greenwash festival, a 2—week—long celebration of business as usual and blah blah blah. they cannot ignore the scientific consensus and, above all, they cannot ignore us, the people, including their own children. the big aim of this conference is to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees compared with preindustrial times, to minimise the impact of climate change, but this is a huge challenge. it is complicated and it is difficult, involving around 200 countries, each with their own other priorities and concerns.
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and so the second week begins. the search for compromise, agreement and promises continues. chris mason, bbc news. let�*s speak to our political correspondent, ione wells. chris is listed the targets that are aimed to be achieved. it has the prime ministers chris is listed the targets that are aimed to be achieved. it has the prime ministers achieved? chris is listed the targets that are aimed to be achieved. it has the prime ministers achieved? there chris is listed the targets that are aimed to be achieved. it has the prime ministers achieved? there are some signs — prime ministers achieved? there are some signs of _ prime ministers achieved? there are some signs of optimism _ prime ministers achieved? there are some signs of optimism from - prime ministers achieved? there are some signs of optimism from the i some signs of optimism from the prime minister about what�*s already been achieved, 90% of the world committing to net 0, 120 countries pledging to an deforestation and more than 20 countries signing up to and the use of coal power but i think this next week is where we really get stuck into negotiations, and there is still a lot of very tricky stuff to work out. firstly, how do you ensure that all these countries signing up to these pledges actually stick to what they�*ve signed up to. particularly when we see things in the past like for example the us pulling out of
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the paris climate summit under donald trump when he was president of the united states. also how do you make sure that any countries aren�*t disadvantaged by becoming greener and i think there are going to be likely some rows brewing over any kind of financial support, particularly from some of the poorer nations as they make some of these changes and transitions to get towards net 0. the labor party really calling on the government to step up their urgency when it comes to these negotiations with the world still being pretty far away from reaching that 1.5 degree limit on global temperature rises that chris mentioned in his report there. —— labour party. with a global temperature rises of 1.1 c and we seen effects of over the last year or 2 with floods, frost fires and intense heat waves as well across the world. police in texas have opened
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a criminal investigation after eight people died at a music festival on friday. dozens more were injured in the crowd surge on the opening night of astroworld, which had been organised by the rapper travis scott. investigators are looking into claims that someone in the crowd was injecting other people with drugs. simonjones reports. a concert venue that�*s become a crime scene. shortly after this footage was taken, the crowd, made up of 50,000 people, began to surge towards the stage. it�*s not clear why. the dead are aged between 14 and 27. police say they are determined to find answers for the families of those who lost their lives. i will tell you, one of the narratives was that some individual was injecting other people with drugs. we do have a report of a security office according to the medical staff, that was out and treating him last night, that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen
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and he felt a prick in his neck. when he was examined, he went unconscious. the security arrangements are also being looked into. there had been chaotic scenes the gates opened at the start of the event. no—one, no parents, no friend, no sibling should see their loved one off to a concert for a world—renowned artist and not be able to expect them to come home safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives lost. ijust want to send out prayers to the...to the ones that was lost last night. we're actually working right now to identify the families so we can help assist them through this tough time. and festivalgoers are left trying to make sense of what happened. oh, man, there wasjust so many people there, i it felt like a million i
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people there at once, people just passing out _ and you could barely catch a breath. it�*s just sad. everyone should go to a concert, to have fun, this shouldn't have happened. the organisers say they are committed to working with officials to find out what went wrong. simon jones, bbc news. another 75 migrants were either rescued or intercepted while attempting to cross the channel by the french and uk authorities yesterday. a record 853 people made the crossing on wednesday. the home office is calling on the french authorities to go further and faster in their efforts to stop migrants making the dangerous journey by boat. at least 99 people have died, and more than a hundred others have been injured, after an oil tanker exploded in sierra leone.the truck collided with a lorry at a busy junction in the capital freetown.
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the blast happened in eastern freetown after a truck rammed into a petrol tanker. people rushed to collect the leaking fuel, causing a heavy trafficjam, according to eyewitness accounts. there was a vast explosion, leaving fireballs spreading through the crowds. vehicles in the traffic jam were set alight. hospitals in freetown are overwhelmed with injured people, many in critical condition. most of the dead have been taken to the central mortuary. we started transporting bodies from 11 until four o�*clock. the last set of bodies, i had to convey them with some soldiers to the morgue, for us to get a total headcount. just outside here are anxious relatives who have been asked to come and identify their loved ones. obviously, some of the bodies are beyond recognition, so that�*s going to be very tricky for them to do, but also a very emotional scene here. some of them have moved from hospital to hospital, trying to see if their loved ones are actually either admitted or, in fact, dead. on behalf of the president,
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the government and the entire people of sierra leone, we sympathise... the country�*s vice—president called the incident a national disaster. police, soldiers and firefighters have worked through the night to clear the scene. rescuers expect the death toll to mount. umaru fofana, bbc news, freetown. the dress that the singer amy winehouse wore for her final performance is set to fetch around £14,000 at an auction today. the singer wore the dress at a concert in belgrade, a month before she died in 2011. some more of the grammy—award winner�*s belongings will also go under the hammer, with all proceeds going to the charity set up in her name. the british musician and rapper terence wilson — better known as astro — who was part of the group ub40 for more than thirty years, has died after what his band mates said was a short illness — he was 64.
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ub40, a reggae and pop band formed in the late 19705, achieved international fame with hits like red red wine and can�*t help falling in love. injuly1988, they performed at the nelson mandela seventieth birthday tribute in london. astro left the band in 2013 to join anotherformer member, ali campbell, to create a new group. the colder weather can be off—putting for some but if you�*re green—fingered perhaps now is a good time to prepare your garden for its springtime blooms but could the compost you�*re using be damaging the environment? conservation groups around the world are calling for a ban on the use of peat in compost in an effort to tackle climate change. we�*re joined now by the gardener and writer sally nex.
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lots of gardeners know that peter is a fantastic part of gardening. i have been using it for many, many years now and to be quite honest with you, i don�*t think there is any justification anymore for using peat and compost. there have been good reasons, it�*s a good into having compost, it�*s stable, it�*sjust a very good thing to get. but much like these days, we know that although petrol is a good thing to run cars, we need to be moving to electric. i think in terms of gardening, we need to be moving to pete free compost and away from pete, it�*s incredibly environmentally damaging so there is no justification using it. environmentally damaging so there is nojustification using it. find environmentally damaging so there is no justification using it.— nojustification using it. and 'ust ex - lain to nojustification using it. and 'ust explain to people i nojustification using it. and 'ust explain to people who i nojustification using it. and 'ust explain to people who are h no justification using it. and just - explain to people who are watching, maybe people who are gardeners and maybe people who are gardeners and may do some gardening today love using peat in the compost, just explain why it is so environmentally
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damaging to use it? peat explain why it is so environmentally damaging to use it?— explain why it is so environmentally damaging to use it? peat bogs are a really amazing _ damaging to use it? peat bogs are a really amazing environment, - damaging to use it? peat bogs are a really amazing environment, they i damaging to use it? peat bogs are a l really amazing environment, they are unique in terms of the ecosystem thatis unique in terms of the ecosystem that is there, lots of rare creatures, very rare plants that live on peat bog but even worse than that, the fact that you�*re destroying this ecosystem by harvesting the pete, you are also, as you turn the pete in order to extract from the ground, you are oxidising the carbonated contains and as we all know, when carbon becomes oxidised, it becomes carbon dioxide so you are directly contributing to climate change and global warming by harvesting pete. this is really special carbon as well. peat bogs take tens of thousands of years to form so it�*s basically a fossil fuel. these are the remnants of plants and animals, and they looked into the ground, safe, out of the atmosphere rather than in the peat bog. as soon as we
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as gardeners come along and extracted and use it on our own gardens, we are releasing all all that carbon back into the atmosphere and obviously that is not a good thing at all for climate change. so what can people do when they go to the garden centre with a normally get the compost from, what can they do to ensure the compost they are buying doesn�*t contain pete? unfortunately, compost manufacturers aren�*t obliged to put it on the front of the bag if the compost contains pete. so if it doesn�*t say anything at all, it contains pete. if it is organic, it still contains pete, if it�*s as attainable, it still contains pete. pete, if it's as attainable, it still contains pete.- still contains pete. sorry to interrupt- _ still contains pete. sorry to interrupt- i— still contains pete. sorry to interrupt. i wasn't - still contains pete. sorry to interrupt. i wasn't aware i still contains pete. sorry to interrupt. i wasn't aware ofj still contains pete. sorry to - interrupt. i wasn't aware of that interrupt. i wasn�*t aware of that non— requirement for them to say that. do we need some kind of legislation here to compel companies, manufacturers to clearly
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state, as happens in food, what�*s in it? it state, as happens in food, what's in it? ., , ., ., it? it would be wonderful if we had legislation- — it? it would be wonderful if we had legislation. the _ it? it would be wonderful if we had legislation. the industry _ it? it would be wonderful if we had legislation. the industry are - it? it would be wonderful if we had legislation. the industry are about| legislation. the industry are about to start the responsible sourcing scheme. it�*s like vetting, if you like. it�*s a bit like the energy rating you have on your fridge. about the environmental friendliness of the ingredients in compost. that�*s due to come in next year. you will start to see it on bags from next year. that will tell you not only how environmentally friendly or compost is overall but also they will start to list the ingredients on the back of the bag as well so it�*s done my food in terms of that, the thing that is most, the largest proportion of the ingredients will be listed 1st but they are not doing that at the moment and i think the most important thing is when you go into a bargain centre, —— garden centre, you look at the words that
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say peat— free because it is the only way you guarantee a contains no peat at all you will be safe to grow in it. and the government is saying that by 2024 that those products should be sold was clearly there is a direction of travel. is that quick enough? how much of an evolution is the industry requiring? weill. enough? how much of an evolution is the industry requiring?— the industry requiring? well, the government _ the industry requiring? well, the government decided _ the industry requiring? well, the government decided only - the industry requiring? well, the government decided only around j the industry requiring? well, the - government decided only around this year, actually, to bring in this ban by 2024. they have yet to consult on it so it is a slow start but that is the direction of travel, that pete will not exist anymore, by 2024. —— peat. it is a different issue for plants in pots because most of those are grown in peat based compost. a lot of it is imported so that is
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another hurdle we have to get over. but yes, you are quite right, peat itself is going to be eliminated from bound compost by 2024 so we only haven�*t —— a couple of years of this. only haven't -- a couple of years of this. ., ., only haven't -- a couple of years of this. ., «l , ., only haven't -- a couple of years of this. ., ~' , ., , only haven't -- a couple of years of this. ., «l i. , . this. thank you very much were talkinl this. thank you very much were talking to _ this. thank you very much were talking to us — this. thank you very much were talking to us this _ this. thank you very much were talking to us this morning, - this. thank you very much were l talking to us this morning, sally. talking about peat in compost. not many people can say they�*ve met their heroes. they often say don�*t meet your heroes, don�*t they? but 17—year—old millie anna has gone one step further — giving sir ian mckellen a tour of her hometown of windsor, after the actor spotted her instagram post from his show. an aspiring model and actor herself, millie anna has down�*s syndrome, and is passionate about changing perceptions of life with an extra chromosome.
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she spoke to graham satchell, along with her dad jeff. it started a simple photo. next to a picture of her act hero, sir ian mckellen. picture of her act hero, sir ian mckellen-— picture of her act hero, sir ian mckellen. , , ~' . ., picture of her act hero, sir ian mckellen. , , ., ., ., , mckellen. isis think what you do is back calculus. _ mckellen. isis think what you do is back calculus. i _ mckellen. isis think what you do is back calculus. i love _ mckellen. isis think what you do is back calculus. i love that _ mckellen. isis think what you do is back calculus. i love that you - mckellen. isis think what you do is back calculus. i love that you have | back calculus. i love that you have good energy and, yeah.— back calculus. i love that you have good energy and, yeah. yeah, he is a lood good energy and, yeah. yeah, he is a good actor- — good energy and, yeah. yeah, he is a good actor- he _ good energy and, yeah. yeah, he is a good actor. he really _ good energy and, yeah. yeah, he is a good actor. he really is. _ good energy and, yeah. yeah, he is a good actor. he really is. merely - good actor. he really is. merely osted good actor. he really is. merely posted the _ good actor. he really is. merely posted the photo _ good actor. he really is. merely posted the photo on _ good actor. he really is. merely posted the photo on her- good actor. he really is. merely i posted the photo on her instagram page. sir ian mckellen saw it, got in touch and asked millie to show him around windsor, her home town. if he wanted to see me, i think that absolutely, 100%, amazing. ifelt so good, i couldn�*t believe my ears. just a few days later, they spent 4.5 hours together. we
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just a few days later, they spent 4.5 hours together.— just a few days later, they spent 4.5 hours together. we went to my favourite places. _ 4.5 hours together. we went to my favourite places. we _ 4.5 hours together. we went to my favourite places. we had _ 4.5 hours together. we went to my favourite places. we had pastor i 4.5 hours together. we went to my| favourite places. we had pastor and pete. he is amazing and really fun to be with. —— we had pastor and pizza. the way he interacted with me was just full on. i pizza. the way he interacted with me was just full on.— wasjust full on. i 'ust saw an incredibly h wasjust full on. i 'ust saw an incredibly kind _ wasjust full on. i just saw an incredibly kind man - wasjust full on. i just saw an l incredibly kind man interacting wasjust full on. i just saw an - incredibly kind man interacting and getting _ incredibly kind man interacting and getting a _ incredibly kind man interacting and getting a quick sense of how to communicate with millie and then doing _ communicate with millie and then doing it _ communicate with millie and then doing it for 4.5 hours. it communicate with millie and then doing it for 4.5 hours.— doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 hours. doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 hours- it — doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 hours- it was — doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 hours. it was incredible. - doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 hours. it was incredible. millie l doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 l hours. it was incredible. millie has down's syndrome. _ hours. it was incredible. millie has down's syndrome. her _ hours. it was incredible. millie has down's syndrome. her dream - hours. it was incredible. millie has down's syndrome. her dream in i hours. it was incredible. millie has. down's syndrome. her dream in the down�*s syndrome. her dream in the future is to follow in sir ian�*s footsteps. i future is to follow in sir ian's footsteps-— future is to follow in sir ian's footstes. ., ., , ., ,, footsteps. i want to be an actress. aim hilh, footsteps. i want to be an actress. aim high. that— footsteps. i want to be an actress. aim high. that is— footsteps. i want to be an actress. aim high, that is what _ footsteps. i want to be an actress. aim high, that is what they - footsteps. i want to be an actress. aim high, that is what they say. i aim high, that is what they say. yeah, that wasn�*t right. keep your held held high and make sure you have to believe in yourself, love
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yourself. believe you deserve it. millie�*s story has had a remarkable impact and her followers millie�*s story has had a remarkable impact and herfollowers have millie�*s story has had a remarkable impact and her followers have gone up impact and her followers have gone up from 700 to more than 10,000. her remarkable positivity has seen incredible messages of support. for me, it is incredible messages of support. fr?" me, it is very emotional but i'm so me, it is very emotional but i�*m so happy. me, it is very emotional but i�*m so happy- a me, it is very emotional but i�*m so happy. a regular 17—year—old who loves life, loves her family, happy. a regular 17—year—old who loves life, loves herfamily, her time, that being comfortable, i think isjust amazing. time, that being comfortable, i think is just amazing. but also, i just want to say that down syndrome is no big wheel because you can do anything if you set your mind to it. millie and herfamily anything if you set your mind to it. millie and her family are hoping anything if you set your mind to it. millie and herfamily are hoping to give her new followers are positive perspective on what life is life living with down syndrome. ii living with down syndrome. if everybody knew what mickey and i knew right now, no—one, no—one would ever want to not have a childlike
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millie. this has been the best chapter of my life. s and am so proud of my parents. i chapter of my life. s and am so proud of my parents.— chapter of my life. s and am so proud of my parents. i 'ust pour my heart to children h proud of my parents. i 'ust pour my heart to children who _ proud of my parents. ijust pour my heart to children who are _ proud of my parents. ijust pour my heart to children who are very - heart to children who are very important _ heart to children who are very important to me. i'm just so happy that i_ important to me. i'm just so happy that i have — important to me. i'm just so happy that i have two incredible parents who love — that i have two incredible parents who love me and my two best friends, my pals. _ who love me and my two best friends, my pals. my— who love me and my two best friends, my pals, my everything. who love me and my two best friends, my pals. my everything-— my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! _ my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! what _ my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! what started - my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! what started as - my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! what started as a i to love? yeah! what started as a ihoto in to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a _ to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a future _ to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a future ended - to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a future ended in - to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a future ended in it - photo in a future ended in it unforgettable day trip with a hollywood megastar and there is now a campaign to change hearts and minds. graham satchell, bbc news. was great, wasn�*t it? was great, wasn't it? just gorgeous. i've never seen... _
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was great, wasn't it? just gorgeous. i've never seen... well _ was great, wasn't it? just gorgeous. i've never seen... well done - was great, wasn't it? just gorgeous. i've never seen... well done sir - was great, wasn't it? just gorgeous. i've never seen... well done sir ian l i�*ve never seen... well done sir ian mckellen, what a lovely thing to do. here�*s matt with a look at this morning�*s weather. it has been freezing so far! it has been a bit _ it has been freezing so far! it has been a bit varied _ it has been freezing so far! it has been a bit varied but _ it has been freezing so far! it has been a bit varied but it _ it has been freezing so far! it has been a bit varied but it is - it has been freezing so far! it has been a bit varied but it is still- been a bit varied but it is still autumn after all and yes, beautiful start this morning. the seas look fairly calm. different story further north across parts of scotland where the weather is somewhat wilder. showing you what is happening from space. an area of low cloud that is moving itself away but on the back edge we are dragging in north—westerly winds and pretty strong ones at that. some showers and one or two in northern england. the showers keep going in the north of scotland where we have some of the strongest of the winter so far. —— at the moment. 50, 60, maybe 70 mph, stronger on the hills. gail is
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as far south as the irish sea. like in swanage, we have what —— rough seas and could see significant waves in excess of ten metres. they will be battering the shores and they could be travel disruption around as well. the winds will gradually ease. strongest pushing away off to the east of the north sea. still mastery over the country and a cooler breeze than yesterday. variable cloud and hazy sunshine with the best of the sunshine southern scotland, eastern parts of england through the day and there could be the odd shower and cloud in the west but showers mainly confined to the south—east of scotland later. around seasonal average for this time of the year. as wins for lighter and skies clear to the eastern half, colder night with a different story in the west and more in the way of thicker cloud spilling in, keeping temperatures up around seven degrees in belfast. but it is going to be chilly enough for a touch of frost to take you into your monday morning commute. another
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commute to wrap up under a little ridge of high pressure. the dry weather that won�*t last too long for some. weatherfronts pushing into the north and west which will bring rain through the morning. increasingly so into western scotland. damp and drizzly across parts of north and west wales. further south and east you are, continuing some spells of at times hazy sunshine. the best of the sunshine would be the morning but still on the cool side. turning milder with highs around 15 in belfast and then for the rest of the week, we have the weather front on its way southwards, only slowly. another one willjoin it through the middle part of the week but milder air to the south of that weather front and that will continue till mid week chilly in the north and eventually that will push through towards the end of the week and the weekend. that is how it looking. back to you both.— weekend. that is how it looking. back to you both. thank you very much, back to you both. thank you very much. matt- _ a song inspired by captain sir tom moore,
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who raised almost 33—million—pounds for nhs charities by walking laps of his garden, has been released to mark remembrance day. "white doves of peace" is performed by a group of chelsea pensioners and children from the bedford school chapel choir. emma baugh reports. # let�*s live in harmony. # let's live in harmony. making a debut into — # let's live in harmony. making a debut into the _ # let's live in harmony. making a debut into the charts _ # let's live in harmony. making a debut into the charts to _ # let's live in harmony. making a debut into the charts to honour. debut into the charts to honour those who have made sacrifices for us. ii those who have made sacrifices for us. ., y y ., those who have made sacrifices for us. ., , , those who have made sacrifices for us. if only you could still feel son u on us. if only you could still feel son upon your— us. if only you could still feel son upon your face — us. if only you could still feel son upon your face when _ us. if only you could still feel son upon your face when winter- us. if only you could still feel son upon your face when winter is - us. if only you could still feel son i upon your face when winter is done. that once familiar name, that face. i that once familiar name, that face. i found _ that once familiar name, that face. i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously— i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously it _ i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously it means _ i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously it means a - i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously it means a lot- i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously it means a lot to i i found doing this really enjoyable and obviously it means a lot to do the work— and obviously it means a lot to do the work with _ and obviously it means a lot to do the work with the _ and obviously it means a lot to do . the work with the chelsea pensioners
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because _ the work with the chelsea pensioners because obviously— the work with the chelsea pensioners because obviously it _ the work with the chelsea pensioners because obviously it means— the work with the chelsea pensioners because obviously it means a - the work with the chelsea pensioners because obviously it means a lot - the work with the chelsea pensioners because obviously it means a lot to i because obviously it means a lot to them _ because obviously it means a lot to them because _ because obviously it means a lot to them because lots— because obviously it means a lot to them because lots of— because obviously it means a lot to them because lots of them - because obviously it means a lot to them because lots of them lived i them because lots of them lived through— them because lots of them lived through the _ them because lots of them lived through the war— them because lots of them lived through the war and _ them because lots of them lived through the war and it _ them because lots of them lived through the war and it is- them because lots of them lived through the war and it is really. through the war and it is really important _ through the war and it is really important to _ through the war and it is really important to miss _ through the war and it is really important to miss those - through the war and it is reallyl important to miss those people through the war and it is really- important to miss those people who died -- _ important to miss those people who died —— remember— important to miss those people who died —— rememberthose _ important to miss those people who died —— rememberthose people- important to miss those people who| died —— rememberthose people who died —— rememberthose people who died so _ died —— rememberthose people who died so that— died —— rememberthose people who died so that we — died —— rememberthose people who died so that we can, _ died —— rememberthose people who died so that we can, kind _ died —— rememberthose people who died so that we can, kind of, - died —— rememberthose people who died so that we can, kind of, pass i died so that we can, kind of, pass on. died so that we can, kind of, pass on we _ died so that we can, kind of, pass on we live — died so that we can, kind of, pass on we live in— died so that we can, kind of, pass on. we live in their— died so that we can, kind of, pass on. we live in their wake, - died so that we can, kind of, pass on. we live in their wake, really. i on. we live in their wake, really. working — on. we live in their wake, really. working with _ on. we live in their wake, really. working with the _ on. we live in their wake, really. working with the boys _ on. we live in their wake, really. working with the boys was - on. we live in their wake, really. working with the boys was an - working with the boys was an absolute delight. they all sang beautifully stop when we arrived here, it was so well rehearsed, it all happened very quickly. and i hope that they will be pleased. by, hope that they will be pleased. a chance to make a single and remember. it chance to make a single and remember-— chance to make a single and remember. it has been a very excitini remember. it has been a very exciting thing _ remember. it has been a very exciting thing for— remember. it has been a very exciting thing for everybody, l exciting thing for everybody, discovering the new music, listening to the backing tracks, the experience of being recorded, cameras pointing at us, lots of fun. and it is so important because it helps _ and it is so important because it helps us — and it is so important because it helps us remember and pass on the memory— helps us remember and pass on the memory of— helps us remember and pass on the memory of those who gave their lives
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to us so— memory of those who gave their lives to us so that — memory of those who gave their lives to us so that we can be in the world we live _ to us so that we can be in the world we live in_ to us so that we can be in the world we live in today. the to us so that we can be in the world we live in today.— we live in today. the single is ins . ired we live in today. the single is inspired by — we live in today. the single is inspired by scat— we live in today. the single is inspired by scat -- _ we live in today. the single is inspired by scat -- single i we live in today. the single is inspired by scat -- single is| inspired by scat —— single is inspired by scat —— single is inspired by scat —— single is inspired by captain sir tom moore. his grandson said he would be proud. you would have had a bit of a chuckle and a smile given 1.5 years ago, but to know he was doing this, it would have been a really special moment for him. wonderful wasn�*t it? that was emma baugh reporting. lots of events going across the country. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at 9:00. andrew, what�*s in store today? i�*m joined by the leader of the
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opposition of the labour party, so keir starmer. george eustice, environment secretary, doctor susan hopkins of the health security agency and by that great actor and done tony and brian cox. you might know him better as logan roy. all of them here at nine o�*clock. stay with us. headlines are coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. lord patel, the new chair of yorkshire county cricket club, has promised to "rebuild trust" with players and fans, following the racism crisis that has engulfed the club. family and friends of azeem rafiq — who was subjected to harrassment and bullying at the club — took part in a peaceful gathering outside headingley to call for change. phillip norton reports.
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especially in the present climate, we all concerned about that. more and more are starting now. they have been treated in the most appalling fashion. that�*s a scandal. it�*s the report �*s findings of bullying and racial harassment towards player. members of those in�*s family attended the gathering along with some of his friends. he�*s a bit more relaxed. some of the media coverage and everything, to be honest, but sometimes, even media to understand
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what�*s going on, it�*s hard so for him to be able to get that, some exposure, taken on the way they are, it�*s a positive thing, strengthen that. it's a positive thing, strengthen that. , , , ., , it's a positive thing, strengthen that. ,,, ., , , . that. this issue goes beyond cricket into wireless _ that. this issue goes beyond cricket into wireless watson _ that. this issue goes beyond cricket into wireless watson filtering - that. this issue goes beyond cricket into wireless watson filtering down | into wireless watson filtering down to grassroots and scores. just to be acknowledged and what he stands for, and how good he is a football. just to be able to progress in the premier league. with results, outcomes. lord patel of bradford has been appointed as director and chair of the club. he says his aim is to take it forward and drive the change thatis take it forward and drive the change that is needed. let�*s talk to tony
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barry. we�*re joined now by tony bowry, the former cultural diversity officer at yorkshire cricket board. it's it�*s not the same thing. what�*s your experience of racism. mi; it's not the same thing. what's your experience of racism. my experiences wide, experience of racism. my experiences wide. really- — experience of racism. my experiences wide. really- it's— experience of racism. my experiences wide, really. it's always _ experience of racism. my experiences wide, really. it's always been - wide, really. it�*s always been there. from past experiences, when there. from past experiences, when the west indies came to headingley to play for in the 605. in the guys from the community you take the food and the rum and the drums on the shelves, ju5t and the rum and the drums on the shelves, just to create some entertainment. welcoming the west indies team to make them feel comfortable. the authorities didn�*t
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like that. the big headline, the noise was. now got the barmy army doing exactly the same thing, getting lots of credit for supporting the england team. but that didn�*t happen in the past when we did it. that didn't happen in the past when we did it. , , ., ., that didn't happen in the past when wedidit. , .. ., . ., that didn't happen in the past when wedidit. , .. ., m ., ., we did it. double standards? what do ou make we did it. double standards? what do you make of — we did it. double standards? what do you make of the _ we did it. double standards? what do you make of the way _ we did it. double standards? what do you make of the way this _ we did it. double standards? what do you make of the way this came - we did it. double standards? what do you make of the way this came to - we did it. double standards? what do you make of the way this came to the j you make of the way this came to the fore. there is a acknowledgement of the racism and racist actions. of the racism and racist actions. of the information has been prised out stop we always have known there has been problems when it comes to people of colour. brute been problems when it comes to people of colour.— been problems when it comes to people of colour. we really needed to be respected — people of colour. we really needed to be respected and _ people of colour. we really needed to be respected and it's _ people of colour. we really needed to be respected and it's been - people of colour. we really needed to be respected and it's been the l to be respected and it�*s been the weeds growing in the garden for quite a long time. loath?
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weeds growing in the garden for quite a long time.— weeds growing in the garden for quite a long time. why is nothing beini quite a long time. why is nothing being done _ quite a long time. why is nothing being done about _ quite a long time. why is nothing being done about it? _ quite a long time. why is nothing being done about it? why - quite a long time. why is nothing being done about it? why has i quite a long time. why is nothing being done about it? why has it i being done about it? why has it taken something like this for awareness to be raised. labor lots of incidents have been reported in the past. i had issues playing in the past. i had issues playing in the league and we�*ve dealt with it, we approached the cricket world about the incident. and they didn�*t do much about it at the time. so we contacted the commission for racial equality. in the cricket board took some action and made some changes and put some information in every change room in leagues around the country, around the county. so this policy statement should say we are
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fighting against racism and no distinction should be happening. it feels like the ecb are reacting to events rather than leading on this? yes. �* , , ., , , ., events rather than leading on this? yes. �*, , ., , , ., ., yes. it's been happening for quite a number of years. _ yes. it's been happening for quite a number of years. a _ yes. it's been happening for quite a number of years. a cancer - yes. it's been happening for quite a number of years. a cancer in - number of years. a cancer in society, this racism thing, and it needs a big operation to get rid of it. ., ., ., ., needs a big operation to get rid of it. how damaging do you think this last few days _ it. how damaging do you think this last few days has _ it. how damaging do you think this last few days has been _ it. how damaging do you think this last few days has been damaging? | last few days has been damaging? massive, ma55ive damage has been done. yorkshire, i believe they are struggling financially. the fact that all the major sponsors are pulling out of it. it�*s devastating for the future. it�*s because of the
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allegations, usually coached them. i don�*t know whether you are still in touch with them. in don't know whether you are still in touch with them.— don't know whether you are still in touch with them. in that case, he's irobabl touch with them. in that case, he's probably watching. _ touch with them. in that case, he's probably watching. how _ touch with them. in that case, he's probably watching. how other - touch with them. in that case, he's probably watching. how other time touch with them. in that case, he's i probably watching. how other time is it? lots of professionals, people who work with him and knew him personally. who work with him and knew him personally-— who work with him and knew him -ersonall. ,, .. , ., personally. especially some of the lu s personally. especially some of the iu s in personally. especially some of the guys in the — personally. especially some of the guys in the bounds _ personally. especially some of the guys in the bounds of _ personally. especially some of the guys in the bounds of the - personally. especially some of the guys in the bounds of the area. i personally. especially some of the i guys in the bounds of the area. he's guys in the bounds of the area. he�*s been a cricketer. he said his problems with his aggression. he always fights for what he wants. and
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gave everything, put everything into his game. in trying to achieve success. maybe sometimes he would say the wrong thing but personally, he�*s a really nice guy on the other side of it. his cricket has always been taken seriously. bud side of it. his cricket has always been taken seriously.— side of it. his cricket has always been taken seriously. and it's been an enormously _ been taken seriously. and it's been an enormously difficult _ been taken seriously. and it's been an enormously difficult time - been taken seriously. and it's been an enormously difficult time for - been taken seriously. and it's been | an enormously difficult time for him and sort of reflects on the experiences you�*ve had. for young picketers who do experience racism, what impact will it have on them and their sense of whether they belong in the sport. they could be losing brilliant talent. i�*ee in the sport. they could be losing brilliant talent.— brilliant talent. i've had calls from some _ brilliant talent. i've had calls from some parents - brilliant talent. i've had calls from some parents and - brilliant talent. i've had calls - from some parents and youngsters brilliant talent. i've had calls _ from some parents and youngsters and they are asking the questions, do i still pursue an interest in trying to achieve a place in the junior section, do i continue to take my son to the coaching sessions, to the
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cricket camps that we run during the summer. that thinking twice about it. �* , ., summer. that thinking twice about it. because of the abuse? is it still happening _ it. because of the abuse? is it still happening now? - it. because of the abuse? is it still happening now? they - it. because of the abuse? is it i still happening now? they don't it. because of the abuse? is it - still happening now? they don't want to iut still happening now? they don't want to -ut the still happening now? they don't want to put the kids _ still happening now? they don't want to put the kids in _ still happening now? they don't want to put the kids in that _ still happening now? they don't want to put the kids in that sort _ still happening now? they don't want to put the kids in that sort of- to put the kids in that sort of position. to put the kids in that sort of losition. , ., . ., position. the young children or teenagers _ position. the young children or teenagers yes. _ position. the young children or teenagers yes. i _ position. the young children or teenagers yes. i know- position. the young children or teenagers yes. i know you i position. the young children or. teenagers yes. i know you work position. the young children or- teenagers yes. i know you work in yorkshire but do you think this is contained just to yorkshire or is this a board of oblong? it�*s all around the country and somethings have to come out shortly. because i was speaking to colleagues in the south of england and the west of england. south of england and the west of eniland. , ., ., ,, ., england. they are talking about their experiences, _ england. they are talking about their experiences, the - england. they are talking about their experiences, the program | england. they are talking about i their experiences, the program we saw recently with matt which are talking to the former england west indian players, you guys are
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history, tells a massive story. this miiht 'ust history, tells a massive story. this mightjust be _ history, tells a massive story. this mightjust be the _ history, tells a massive story. this mightjust be the beginning of a bigger maelstrom for cricket. tony, thank you for coming in. we�*re here on the bbc news channel until nine o�*clock, and coming up this morning. as more of us get back behind the wheel after lockdowns all that to come on the bbc news channel. but is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. time now for the travel show. coming up this week... the world�*s coldest cowboys.
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that was incredible. sighs. absolutely dashing across the water on horseback. ancient stained glass and very careful hands. i have been working here for 30 years and every time i see this, my heart sings. they are so beautiful. was and how to get your old banger across a frozen lake. oh, it is worse than i thought. it sounds very bad. it�*s fixed russian—style. theme music plays. as the seasons begin to change, icelandic farmers drive their horses down dales and mountains to events known as roundups so they can shelter them on a farm during harsh winters. we have travelled to the north—west of iceland to attend one of the biggest
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roundups in the country, known as laufskalarett. we are here to find out why this spectacular icelandic tradition is more than an annual event, it is a way of life. icelandic horses — this breed perfectly embodies their homeland. they are rugged... ..tough... ..and absolutely stunning. and these guys are not just any old horses, these are viking horses. their ancestors were ridden by viking warriors, when they first came to iceland over 1,000 years ago.
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they can actually carry, they can pull, and they are excellent to sit on. so i think the vikings clever, not only cruel, they were also clever. this is the only breed of horse in iceland and it is an important part of icelandic heritage and culture. these are all purebred icelandic horses and if they ever leave the country, they can�*t come back. haukur is a horse farmer, and every spring, when the lambing season is done, he and many other farmers let their horses spend their summers roaming free in the highlands and valleys of iceland. it is a very good for their upbringing. they live there with big hordes, and they learn the most in the heard, the behaviour and how to survive, to walk in the landscape, all this stuff. haukur is part of a collective of farmers
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who run a tour company called islandshestar, which gives tourist like me the chance to be a cold cowboy and find out what makes these horses so special. on the back of an icelandic horse, looking out at this landscape — it is not terrible, is it? icelandic horses have been bred over the years to be friendly and trusting of humans are which means you can travel across the countryside in a unique fashion. the way we travel, when we are travelling
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with our horses, is that we have this heard of lose horses with us. they are there that we can stop and swap, you know, so we are always having a fresh horse so we can keep up the tempo, we ride a bit faster. we ride, stop, swap, go. we could go on forever, actually. the way to get the wild horses to come with you is, up, up. up, up, like this. most horses can trot, canter and gallop. but not every horse can tolt, special gait that icelandic horses have which does notjust get you across the harsh terrain but it gets you across it quickly and comfortably. the tolt, it feels like you are sitting on a soft sofa. they are very, very smooth. only one foot at the time is on the ground so they are kind of moving like a fast walk, actually. we reach the final leg of our ride and to complete it, we have to cross an ancient trail which goes straight across this lake. but as we swap our horses in preparation for the task ahead, we receive a norse omen in the shape of a sea eagles.
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we have a lot of old beliefs here, superstitious a little. the ravens know a lot, the eagle is very important, he is watching over us a little and bringing us luck. that is what i believe in at least. and with that piece of good news, it is time to hit the water. that was incredible. sighs. absolutely dashing across the water on horseback, surrounded by these beautiful mountains. i think it�*s one of the most
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exhilarating things i have ever done in my life. as autumn moves out, signs of winter begin to move in, and even if the rugged icelandic horses need help to shelter from the coldest season of them all. every year, the atlantic farmers head to the islands and into the valley to round up their horses and bring them home for winter. the horses are driven to lower ground, to places like this. this is laufskalarett, one of the biggest roundups in iceland. every farmer has a small piece of the paddock. you help each other out to put the correct horses
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in the correct part. this takes a while but it works. i think we can definitely fit this one in my hand luggage. due to covid, this amazing spectacle has seen fewer people able to attend this year�*s event. usually it is packed with people, tonnes of people, everybody drinking, laughing, singing. it�*s much more quieter now. so it is a little bit different but it is cosy, it is nice. you have all the nearest family and friends so. in normal times, a huge ball would be held after the event, that thousands of people would attend. but in farm houses across the countryside, icelanders are still celebrating in their own ways that their faithful equine friends have made it home safely for the winter.
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music playing. well, we are not in a great hall and noone is drinking back there but i think it is fair to say that when it comes to celebration, the old viking spirit is alive and well here. next, we are off to canterbury cathedral in south—east england where research has been taking place on its world famous stained glass. it has been thought that the earliest of this glorious glass dates back to 1176 but could this new fact—finding mission reveals some surprising results? choral singing. canterbury cathedral is one of the most important
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places of worship in england and it�*s where archbishop thomas beckett was brutally murdered in 1170 by supporters of king henry ii. for hundreds of years, it�*s attracted visitors from all over the world, and one of his biggest draws has been its stunning stained glass. there�*s a magic about it. it changes all the time, with the light. our wonderful early mediaeval stained glass windows were made by the superstars of their time and they are truly some of the best in the world. behind the creation of these mediaeval masterpieces was the sophisticated and international artistic trade. most of the glass in the early and high middle ages was made in what is now northern france and southern belgium, that sort of region. they would make sheets of glass and then pack them into straw and onto barges and just send
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them across the rivers and across the channel to england. craftsmen, master masons, travelled all over europe. there were no real borders. i�*m preparing to paint the face of christ, no pressure. as well as maintaining and restoring the glass, leone�*s team carry out research. a detective story combined with archaeology. these are historical documents. they obviously tell us about how people in the middle ages experienced their world. this panel here shows us the scene of the execution of eilward of westoning. and it�*s all depicted in great, graphic detail. this is a guy who�*s had had his eyes gouged out and his testicles removed. it�*s really, really evocative of the scene. you can nearly hear him scream.
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but for over 30 years, there�*s been an unsolved mystery over the cathedral�*s most famous windows, the ancestors of christ. we thought that the earliest of those dated to about 1176 but in the 19805, a wonderful art historian, called madeline caviness, suspected these figures were much older. she thought at the time that nobody would ever be able to prove it. she was just going from a stylistic analysis. a team from university college london have been analysing some of the ancestor series. we use a non—invasive technique that sends a beam onto the surface of the glass. this beam of x—rays interacts with the material and re—emit another radiation
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that is detected and processed by the instruments. studying the chemical composition of the glass, we were able to understand the periods in which it was produced and also its origin. so what we found out is that the glass from the ancestor series, it�*s older than we originally thought. so we proved an hypothesis put forward by madeleine caviness in 1987. choral singing. this new research estimates that the windows could be half a century older than previously thought, making them among the oldest in situ stained glass in the world.
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to now find that she has been proved right is just so thrilling, you know? decades later. that�*s so wonderful because that art historian is still alive, and to call her up and after all these decades later, to say to her, "you were right, and we could prove it", that is fantastic. hello, madeline! wonderful to see you, congratulations on getting your thesis verified after all this time! it was absolutely extraordinary. rejuvenating, and octogenarians love to have early memories, so it brought back so much. but the main thing is to realise that this little tiny pebble that i put in the water so long ago, 35 years ago, could so much later be taken up and ingeniously proved that i was right. so it does feel good. no, it's been a tough couple
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of years for all of us, and i grow older. so absolutely extraordinary experience, it means a lot to me. it really does. in proving that these windows are older than originally thought, we now know that they were present to bear witness to thomas becket�*s grisly murder, and the spectacle of king henry ii begging for forgiveness. and this discovery is just the beginning. the research on this ancient glass continues. who knows what other secrets could be uncovered? still to come on the travel show: we follow an amazing road trip across the frozen surface of lake baikal, almost 400 miles long and full of cracks.
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and as if that�*s not hard enough, here�*s the car they�*re doing it in. the ice is really thin, last year it was super thin and now this year is even more thin. so don�*t go away. our next trip is to a literal hot spot, located in a lava field in southern iceland that�*s over 800 years old — the blue lagoon. it�*s a geothermal wellness spa. containing waters with supposedly extraordinarily regenerative qualities, the site attracts visitors from across the globe. iceland runs 100% on renewable energy. the blue lagoon is man—made and its waters are the byproduct of a nearby geothermal power plant. what is fantastic about the blue lagoon, it is not
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actually blue, it is white, but the silica�*s reflection of the sunlight makes it appear blue. the waters flow from 2,000 metres below the surface of the earth. it�*s there, deep underground, but they are imbued with silica, algae and a whole host of minerals that are said to be great for your skin. so you could kind of call it, like, a fountain of youth here. so it�*s really great for small lines and wrinkles in the skin, and it keeps you fresh and young forever. fountain of youth? brilliant! can�*t wait tojump in. of course i can�*t take these claims at face value, i�*d really better try them for myself. 0h! laughs. oh, this is a very odd sensation of being absolutely freezing on top, and very calm and comfortable down below. oh, it�*s lovely, it�*s like a bath. i suppose all i have to do now is lay back and wait to look 10 years younger. it�*s a hard job for some.
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and to wrap up this week, we head to siberia, for the first in a 3—part series following three friends from lithuania on a teeth—chatteringly cold journey thousand kilometrejourney across the surface of lake baikal, the world�*s largest freshwater lake. and if that weren�*t challenging enough they�*re doing it all in a communist—era car. speaker: ladies and gentlemen, welcome to irkutsk _ international airport, _ temperature is 27 degrees below zero... -27. i am karolis, sometimes we call me an explorer. right now i am here with two other guys, and we are going to cross the deepest lake in the world, on ice, called baikal. to cross that lake either way, on foot, by car or motorcycle
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is a huge challenge. we will do this on the a russian car, which we�*ll buy today for 800 euros. keep looking. he�*s older than i am, 1.5 litres, 75 horsepower, good tyres. spiked tires, and what about colour? colour is good. yellow. ok, i think we need to call him. i'm calling regarding your car. you're selling the car? lada? jurgis, we can solve this somehow? yeah, i have an idea. it doesn�*t look good. air conditioning working?
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sorry? air condition, yes, yes. owner, what about heated seats? thank you. what do we have here? oh, it is worse than i thought. we have to change it also. it sounds very bad. it is fixed russian style.
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laughs. you want a challenge? you�*ll get a challenge. laughing continues. inspirational music plays. for me, the safety is on the first place. we need to come back home alive and healthy. we�*re already on the shore of baikal. i feel a bit shaking. i am just hope it all goes well. if the car breaks through
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the ice, guys, lam there. no, forget that, i don't care. is it water? 30 centimetres is not bad. not bad is 1.5 metres. the ice is really thin. last year it was super thin and now this year it�*s even more thin. fingers crossed, we need to pray well now. baikal is baikal, it is serious. you cannotjoke with that. laughs.
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and we�*ll be catching up with karolis and co on part two of their epic drive next week. that is unfortunately all we have time for this week, but coming up next time: wish me luck! we find out how the fast electric cars of extreme e are raising awareness of climate change. don�*t forget you can catch up on all of our adventures on bbc iplayer. we�*re on social media too. just search bbc travel show on all the main platforms and you will find us there. but for now from me and all my new viking friends i�*ve met here in iceland, it�*s goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: a rallying cry for the cop climate summit in glasgow — the prime minister urges countries to pull together ahead of the final days of intense negotiations. police in texas launch a criminal investigation, after eight people are crushed to death at a music festival in houston. this is now a criminal investigation that is going to involve our homicide division as well as narcotics and we are going to get down to the bottom of it. shocking footage of dangerous driving — police in yorkshire launch a major road safety campaign to tackle falling standards post—lockdown. we�*ll be hearing all about millie anna�*s dream day about living with down�*s syndrome. a first league win, but it�*s not good enough for norwich
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who sack their manager. daniel farke was all smiles as his side beat brentford, butjust hours later he was given his marching orders with the club still bottom of the table. and whilst it�*s a dry and fairly blustery day for many of you today, it will be particularly when you cross parts of scotland. maybe a few issues this morning. all the details on breakfast. it�*s sunday 7th november. our top story. the prime minister is urging countries at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow to "pull together and drive for the line," as the conference enters its second and final week. borisjohnson said �*bold compromises�* and �*ambitious commitments�* were needed to tackle climate change. but labour says the world is far off where it needs to be to keep temperature targets within reach. here�*s our political correspondent chris mason. the people most affected by climate change are no longer some imagined
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future generation. it is half time of the climate summit. i hope perhaps that will give us the impetus we need to rewrite our story. to turn this tragedy into a triumph. in the first week, familiar faces strolling the glasgow stage. big numbers, big promises and faraway dates, but some optimism from the government. i think always when you have a multilateral event like this, to get agreement, there is going to be a lot of work and diplomacy to get an outcome. i�*m talking to people here at this conference have been pretty much to every cop since it began an hour telling me at this one, they are actually seeing action, they are seeing things take shape in a way they�*ve not seen before. so what has been achieved so far? ministers point to new commitments to net—zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century,
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meaning 90% of the world economy is covered, ending and reversing deforestation with more than 120 countries signed up, and over 100 countries have agreed to cut their methane emissions by 30% by 2030. but there are plenty, including campaigner greta thunberg, who think this is nowhere near enough. north greenwash festival, a two—week—long celebration of business as usual and blah blah blah. they cannot ignore the scientific consensus and, above all, they cannot ignore us, the people, including their own children. the big aim of this conference is to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees compared with preindustrial times, to minimise the impact of climate change, but this is a huge challenge. it is complicated and it is
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difficult, involving around 200 countries, each with their own other priorities and concerns. and so the second week begins. the search for compromise, agreement and promises continues. chris mason, bbc news. let�*s speak to our political correspondent, ione wells. greta thunberg says it is blah, blah, the pressure is on. the government is keen to stress _ the pressure is on. the government is keen to stress it _ the pressure is on. the government is keen to stress it is _ the pressure is on. the government is keen to stress it is achieved i the pressure is on. the government is keen to stress it is achieved 90%| is keen to stress it is achieved 90% of the world committing to net to zero by the middle of the century and countries pledging to end deforestation and more than 20 countries sending they will end the call power. it is all very well making those pledges. now the question is how will we make all these countries stick to them? i
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think this next week will be really getting stuck into the negotiations around this and still a lot of tricky stuff to work out. firstly, how do you make sure all these countries signing up to these pledges actually stick to them? we have seen in the past things like the united states pulling out of that party climate agreement when the president of the notice states was donald trump. how do you ensure any future leaders of some of these countries don make similar decisions to do that as well? another big sticking point is how to make sure that any is not disadvantaged by sticking to the net zero commitments? ? mike any country. we can expect some row is brewing next week about what financial support might be made available to some of the pool donations to help them stick to climate targets but also some nations are disproportionately affected by some of the impacts of climate change. as you mention, labour are very keen to ramp up the government that borisjohnson still has a lot of work to do to convince
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nations to stick to these pledges is the world are still far off from reaching that 1.5% target limit global temperature rises. what might thank you very much. police in texas have opened a criminal investigation after eight people died at a music festival on friday. dozens more were injured in the crowd surge on the opening night of astroworld, which had been organised by the rapper travis scott. investigators are looking into claims that someone in the crowd was injecting other people with drugs. simonjones reports. a concert venue that�*s become a crime scene. shortly after this footage was taken, the crowd, made up of 50,000 people, began to surge towards the stage. it�*s not clear why. the dead are aged between 14 and 27. police say they are determined to find answers for the families of those who lost their lives.
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i will tell you, one of the narratives was that some individual was injecting other people with drugs. we do have a report of a security officer, according to the medical staff, that was out and treated him last night, that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen and he felt a prick in his neck. when he was examined, he went unconscious. the security arrangements are also being looked into. there had been chaotic scenes the gates opened at the start of the event. no—one, no parent, no friend, no sibling should see their loved one off to a concert by a world—renowned artist and not be able to expect them to come home safely. flowers have been laid to mark the lives lost. i just want to send out prayers to the...to the ones that was lost last night.
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we�*re actually working right now to identify the families so we can help assist them through this tough time. and festival—goers are left trying to make sense of what happened. oh, man, there wasjust so many people there, it felt like a million people there at once, people just passing out and you could barely catch a breath. it'sjust sad. everyone should go to a concert to have fun, this shouldn't happen. the organisers say they are committed to working with officials to find out what went wrong. simon jones, bbc news. at least 99 people have died, and more than 100 others have been injured, after an oil tanker exploded in sierra leone. the truck collided with a lorry at a busy junction in the capital freetown. fuel spilled before igniting and the resulting inferno engulfed bystanders and vehicles
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at a busyjunction. another 75 migrants were either rescued or intercepted while attempting to cross the channel by the french and uk authorities yesterday. a record 853 people made the crossing on wednesday. the home office is calling on the french authorities to go �*further and faster�* in their efforts to stop migrants making the dangerous journey by boat. dangerous overtaking and reckless speeding — shocking dashcam footage released by north yorkshire police shows how some people have been driving carelessly since lockdown rules were lifted. the force says standards on the roads have started to slip as more motorists get back behind the wheel again, as ian white reports. the terrifying moment a camper van pulls out to overtake and drives towards oncoming traffic. just one example of careless and inconsiderate driving on north yorkshire�*s roads. it�*s these kind of incidents which can easily lead to a crash and all too often,
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these can be fatal. with more of us having dash cams, in our vehicles, more frightening incidents are being sent to police. the driver overtaking the lorry is met by a car heading straight towards them on the wrong side of the road. now the way the dash cam technology works, it is very high quality so if we can see a registration plate, if we can identify a vehicle, we can prosecute people and we have certainly done that. with so many deaths and serious injuries and north yorkshire�*s roads, release of launched operation boundary, flooding the roads around harrogate and rippon with marked and unmarked patrol cars, bikes and camera vans. as we�*ve come out of covid and restrictions have lifted what we�*ve seen are lots of driving where we think drivers are a little bit rusty, and out of practice and driving standards have really fallen.
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we�*ve seen lots of things come in through dash cams where highlighting dangerous driving and careless driving, more so than me ever have before. we�*ve just had a vehicle come through, it�*s shown as uninsured so it a priority for us today. we need it stopped. out and about they were quickly finding offences being committed and dealing with them robustly. what we�*re doing today, we are dealing with a number of offences and having a zero—tolerance policy on any traffic offences. in a first on north yorkshire, the roads policing unit is being beefed up with special constablesjoining regular offices, all trying to cut the number of deaths on the roads. ijust implore people to just think about the driving and drive a little bit more safely and more considerately in future. it�*s the police officers who have to deal with the aftermath of road collisions, and a careless few seconds of bad driving can have implications that last a lifetime. we�*re joined now by driving instructor and former police traffic officer dave taylor. have you noticed the driving
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standards deteriorating after lockdown? i standards deteriorating after lockdown?— standards deteriorating after lockdown? :: :: ' ., lockdown? i retired in 2009 and since then _ lockdown? i retired in 2009 and since then i— lockdown? i retired in 2009 and since then i have _ lockdown? i retired in 2009 and since then i have been - lockdown? i retired in 2009 and since then i have been in - lockdown? i retired in 2009 and since then i have been in a i lockdown? i retired in 2009 and i since then i have been in a driving school. since lockdown i have certainly noticed the standard of driving and the risk people seem to be willing to take out on the roads has actually gone up rather than improved since lockdown. so, yes, it�*s very frightening at times. and there seems to be more people willing to take massive risks, mounting pavements to enter roundabouts or cross junctions. is quite frightening, really at times. i wonder why that is. arguably we have been out of practice but for driving behaviour to change so radically like that, there�*s got to be more to it. it seems people are quite happy to get in their vehicle and start to bully people when they are not in a vehicle they would
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probably open doors for people and see ou probably open doors for people aic see you first. probably open doors for people a."ic see you first. it seems when they get in a vehicle the attitude and behaviour seems to change dramatically and they pushed through we are if they were on foot they would probably stand back and let somebody come through. and there are all sorts of different offences being committed. tailgating of learner drivers is very, very prevalent. a learner driver may be travelling at the speed limit quite appropriately and there will be people so close behind them, trying to push them along, and i have regular discussions with my learners with regards to how do they feel and how are they going to cope with people doing that kind of thing after they have passed their driving test? so it is an interesting experience, really, from the point of trying to get people to behave in
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a more appropriate way and a more considerate way than they are driving. what is your- driving. what is your advice, because if— driving. what is your advice, because if somebody - driving. what is your advice, because if somebody is i driving. what is your advice, because if somebody is right driving. what is your advice, - because if somebody is right behind you and trying to push you to shoot a certain speed limit your instinct is to get stressed and the adrenaline starts running and then you are driving becomes less focus? rule 126 in the highway code says we should leave a two second gap between our own vehicle and the vehicle directly ahead of us. if people apply that to second rule appropriately and properly, then most of the driving would actually improve dramatically so with my learners are sent to say to them, don�*t stress yourself, just slow down very, very slightly, increase the gap you have in front of you to three second or for second the gap you have in front of you to three second orfor second gap because if you have got the space in front of you you can control that space. front of you you can control that
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5 race. , ., ., front of you you can control that space, , ., . front of you you can control that space-_ only - front of you you can control that i space._ only control, space. good advice. only control, ou can't space. good advice. only control, you can't control _ space. good advice. only control, you can't control what _ space. good advice. only control, you can't control what other- space. good advice. only control, i you can't control what other people you can�*t control what other people do. you can't control what other people do. ~ , ., . you can't control what other people do. ~ , ., , ,., you can't control what other people do. ~ , ., , . you can't control what other people do. , . do. when you see so much bad driving around, do. when you see so much bad driving around. you — do. when you see so much bad driving around. you can _ do. when you see so much bad driving around, you can only— do. when you see so much bad driving around, you can only think, _ do. when you see so much bad driving around, you can only think, how- do. when you see so much bad driving around, you can only think, how is i around, you can only think, how is it possible for police traffic officers to contain all this behaviour because we are seeing it every day. it behaviour because we are seeing it eve da . , ., behaviour because we are seeing it eve da. , ., , behaviour because we are seeing it eve da. ,., , . every day. it is not possible. when i was on every day. it is not possible. when i was on the _ every day. it is not possible. when i was on the traffic— every day. it is not possible. when i was on the traffic department i i was on the traffic department there were far more traffic patrol officers at that time and even then it was not possible to cover everything. however, it would be fantastic if policing traffic patrol officer numbers increased and they could then take more positive action on a regular basis in all parts of the country. on a regular basis in all parts of the country-— on a regular basis in all parts of the country. on a regular basis in all parts of the count . ., , ., ., , ., the country. finally, what would you sa to the country. finally, what would you say to people _ the country. finally, what would you say to people thinking, _ the country. finally, what would you say to people thinking, as _ the country. finally, what would you say to people thinking, as roger- say to people thinking, as roger ow�*s, about getting a dash cam? do you think it is helpful for people to inform the police with information gathered on it? yes,
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certainl . information gathered on it? yes, certainly- i— information gathered on it? yes, certainly. i use _ information gathered on it? yes, certainly. i use ? _ information gathered on it? yes, certainly. i use ? come - information gathered on it? yes, certainly. i use ? come and i i information gathered on it? yes, certainly. i use ? come and i am| certainly. i use ? come and i am down in sussex and they have an operation crackdown where you can send your videos to and they will pick up those videos and take appropriate action and i have certainly sent dash cam footage in and had positive results from those dash cam footage is so i would also advise anybody to have notjust a front ? come but advise anybody to have notjust a front? come but a real dash cam as well. 50 front ? come but a real dash cam as well. , front ? come but a real dash cam as well, , ., front ? come but a real dash cam as well. , ., ., front ? come but a real dash cam as well. . ., ., well. so it is worth doing. dave ta lor, well. so it is worth doing. dave taylor. a _ well. so it is worth doing. dave taylor, a driving _ well. so it is worth doing. dave taylor, a driving instructor- well. so it is worth doing. dave taylor, a driving instructor and| taylor, a driving instructor and former police traffic officer, thanks forjoining us. probably important to reflect on your own driving, roger, because sometimes you get so angry with other motorist you get so angry with other motorist you think maybe you were to blame. it was interesting watching the report preceding the interview and nowadays so many people have them, don�*t they? if you have an accident it takes all the debate, your fault, my fault, whatever come out of it. it is there and should make it more
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straightforward. probably quite expensive, i don�*t know. here�*s matt with a look at this morning�*s weather. rather rough conditions in the west coast of scotland. this is the isle of harris. our weather watcher said it is to venture out this morning. we have whence wildly gusting between 40 mph and 60 mph in the west of scotland are close to 70 in some spots and even higher over the hills. rough seas. the course of sutherland hit by big waves later and offshore we have seen sees over ten metres. blustery further south and lighter winds across the southern uk with a ridge of high pressure building on. the strongest winds pulling in that pulling away and at the winds will fall a bit lighter. showers across north and western scotland become less
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prevalent. one or two across northern parts of england, especially west of the pennines and one or two through the day. the odd shower further south but more places dry today and some breaks in the cloud letting sunshine through every now and again, the best of which across southern scotland, eastern england and as the winds ease it will be blustery through the afternoon and make it feel a little cooler than yesterday. highs of nine degrees to 13 degrees. these are the temptress where we should be at the stage in november. through this evening and overnight, the winds continue to fall out and a slightly cooler air in place would lighter winds and clearer skies across scotland and parts of england and wales, we could see frost tonight. temperatures in towns and cities a couple of degrees above freezing with us in the west will turn imelda through the morning, into the morning, with outbreaks of rain eventually to northern ireland and western scotland. then these weather front start to push on and they become more dominant through the
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day. the ridge of high pressure starts things dry and gradually declines away. we start sunshine across many central and eastern areas which will turn hazy through the morning and afternoon. a wet morning in northern ireland, outbreaks of rain spreading across scotland on monday and parts of northern england, north and west wales. always more dry the further south and east you are and what it will be chilly in some eastern areas it will turn more mild in the west with highs of 15. the week starting mild in many areas and a bit of rain as the weatherfronts mild in many areas and a bit of rain as the weather fronts put push south but it will turn more chili later in the week. we�*ve had the skater boys, the skater girls, and now there are more women over 30 than ever before taking up skateboarding. numbers have been growing for the last three years — and even more so since the success of the sport at the tokyo olympics. our reporterjohnny o�*shea has been to meet one group of women in st agnes. been to meet one group pump your legs when you start.
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been to meet one group that�*s it. been to meet one group lisa and katie are two members of a growing group of women in their 405 and 505 who have taken up skateboarding. why should the kids have all the fun? they�*re having lessons every two weeks at the mount hawk skatepark. age isjust a number. just get on and do it, life is too short to not try something new. and, yeah, just a fear of failure, just go, i'm just going to give it a go and you can find a local trainer and a local park and just don't be afraid to try. it's good fun. nice! lean back. a lot of them have backgrounds in surfing so they�*re kind of familiar with the board anyway. they know their stances and they�*re quite stable in their balance and stuff like that. and they are fit women, do you know what i mean? they can take on skateboarding, no problem. skateboarding was an olympic event for the first time in the summer with 13—year—old sky brown winning
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a bronze medalfor great britain. we've been told skate parks have seen about 24, 25% increase in people coming to the skate parks over the last 18 months, two years. and certainly there were queues outside skate shops earlier in the summer, and a lot of them girls, skateboarding and wanting to start skateboarding after the olympics. i�*d watched sky brown this summer and i bought my niece and nephew skate kit, not realising i�*d be taking it up shortly afterwards. as coach, zane, shows them what can be done it might be a while before they are pulling off tricks like this, but they are determined to stick with it. it's much harder than it looks. johnny o�*shea, bbc spotlight, mount hawk. we�*re joined in the studio now by professional skaterboarder lucy adams, and we can also speak to sarah brownlow, who�*s a skaterboarder in brighton. there are lots of things at play here. in lockdown people took on new
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skills and in the olympics a massive boom, but this has been building for some time. i boom, but this has been building for some time. , ., , boom, but this has been building for some time-— some time. i started my group over five ears some time. i started my group over five years ago _ some time. i started my group over five years ago which _ some time. i started my group over five years ago which was _ some time. i started my group over five years ago which was a - some time. i started my group over five years ago which was a weekly i five years ago which was a weekly session for women and in amongst that other social networks have started to increase and those groups have started to be and those groups have started to be a frequent thing and lots of skate park calendars have them. originally ou are not park calendars have them. originally you are not a — park calendars have them. originally you are not a skateboarder, - park calendars have them. originally you are not a skateboarder, you i park calendars have them. originally| you are not a skateboarder, you were a photographer and discovered the joy a photographer and discovered the joy of the board. i a photographer and discovered the joy of the board-— joy of the board. i 'ust moved to bali for a year i joy of the board. i 'ust moved to bali for a year in i joy of the board. ijust moved to bali for a year in 2017 _ joy of the board. ijust moved to bali for a year in 2017 and i - joy of the board. ijust moved to bali for a year in 2017 and i was | joy of the board. i just moved to | bali for a year in 2017 and i was a music_ bali for a year in 2017 and i was a music photographer and there was not too much _ music photographer and there was not too much music to photograph and somebody— too much music to photograph and somebody told me to check out pretty poison, _ somebody told me to check out pretty poison, a _ somebody told me to check out pretty poison, a skate bowl venue and i was
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born aubrey— poison, a skate bowl venue and i was born aubrey byatt —— i was blown away _ born aubrey byatt —— i was blown away by _ born aubrey byatt —— i was blown away by it — born aubrey byatt —— i was blown away by it and my son started skateboarding and i was the skate mum _ skateboarding and i was the skate mum that — skateboarding and i was the skate mum that sat around and all the other_ mum that sat around and all the other mums mourned but i loved it and took_ other mums mourned but i loved it and took photos and watched it all -- all_ and took photos and watched it all -- all the — and took photos and watched it all —— all the other mums were moaning about— —— all the other mums were moaning about it _ —— all the other mums were moaning about it i_ —— all the other mums were moaning about it. i came back to the uk and sitting _ about it. i came back to the uk and sitting and — about it. i came back to the uk and sitting and watching was not the same _ sitting and watching was not the same and — sitting and watching was not the same and i started to skate with my son and _ same and i started to skate with my son and then met ricardo who set up the group _ son and then met ricardo who set up the group with lucy he was promoting his mental— the group with lucy he was promoting his mental health skate programme so we got _ his mental health skate programme so we got chatting and one thing led to another— we got chatting and one thing led to another and i ended up learning with him and _ another and i ended up learning with him and going to the indoor place to the she _ him and going to the indoor place to the she shreaders and i became obsessed — the she shreaders and i became obsessed with it and it is taken
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over— obsessed with it and it is taken over my— obsessed with it and it is taken over my life pretty quickly. can i ask why you _ over my life pretty quickly. can i ask why you have _ over my life pretty quickly. can i ask why you have become - over my life pretty quickly. (can i ask why you have become obsessed? what got you good? i ask why you have become obsessed? what got you good?— what got you good? i think i am really drawn _ what got you good? i think i am really drawn to _ what got you good? i think i am really drawn to the _ what got you good? i think i am really drawn to the physical- what got you good? i think i am really drawn to the physical side i really drawn to the physical side but also — really drawn to the physical side but also the mental challenge of skateboarding. i really buzz off that mental side to try to work things— that mental side to try to work things out to keep trying. i think for me _ things out to keep trying. i think for me three years ago the really was hot — for me three years ago the really was not that many females in the skate _ was not that many females in the skate parks, not the outdoor ones. i was reatty— skate parks, not the outdoor ones. i was really conscious i was old because — was really conscious i was old because i_ was really conscious i was old because i started when i was 40 and i because i started when i was 40 and t was _ because i started when i was 40 and t was futty— because i started when i was 40 and i was fully conscious i was female and i_ i was fully conscious i was female and t was — i was fully conscious i was female and i was rubbish because i was new. so i was _ and i was rubbish because i was new. so i was really driven to get good quick— so i was really driven to get good quick to _ so i was really driven to get good quick to try— so i was really driven to get good quick to try to shake off some of that internal self—consciousness which _ that internal self—consciousness which i — that internal self—consciousness which i was feeling that that internal self-consciousness which i was feeling— that internal self-consciousness which i was feeling that must be easier said _ which i was feeling that must be easier said than _ which i was feeling that must be easier said than done, _ which i was feeling that must be easier said than done, lucy, - which i was feeling that must be easier said than done, lucy, to l which i was feeling that must be i easier said than done, lucy, to get good quick. what do you need? i
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can't even stand on a board without toppling off if it is moving, what you need to get good?— toppling off if it is moving, what you need to get good? there are core elements like — you need to get good? there are core elements like balance _ you need to get good? there are core elements like balance but _ you need to get good? there are core elements like balance but like - you need to get good? there are core elements like balance but like sarah i elements like balance but like sarah said, it is that feeling of getting closer in your mind and breaking those little bits down and then being excited enough to go for it again because you want to make it. not only that, to such a social friendly thing that actually when you have that environment and the vibe is good and you have your mates around you and people are progressing, that helps you come up so it is about building that environment and having that place which is what something like she shredders offers. what i tried it recently and what i liked about it is when you are focused on it you are thinking what do my muscles do, we do put my leg, howl are thinking what do my muscles do, we do put my leg, how i stand? it is like a form of deviously trying it, once you see my flip you will be well impressed. you're not thinking about anything else it is
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well impressed. you're not thinking about anything else— about anything else it is like havin: a about anything else it is like having a rest _ about anything else it is like having a rest in _ about anything else it is like having a rest in some - about anything else it is like having a rest in some way . about anything else it is like i having a rest in some way from about anything else it is like - having a rest in some way from the stresses of life.— stresses of life. yeah, you have to focus 10096 _ stresses of life. yeah, you have to focus 10096 and _ stresses of life. yeah, you have to focus 10096 and so _ stresses of life. yeah, you have to focus 10096 and so the _ stresses of life. yeah, you have to focus 10096 and so the time - stresses of life. yeah, you have to focus 10096 and so the time is - stresses of life. yeah, you have to i focus 10096 and so the time is flying focus 100% and so the time is flying by and _ focus 100% and so the time is flying by and you — focus 100% and so the time is flying by and you are thinking i want another— by and you are thinking i want another goal, it is my next goal, my next goal _ another goal, it is my next goal, my next coal. ., ., ., , , next goal. you have great style. thank you- _ next goal. you have great style. thank you- l _ next goal. you have great style. thank you. i find _ next goal. you have great style. thank you. i find it _ next goal. you have great style. thank you. i find it weirdly - thank you. i find it weirdly restful. l thank you. i find it weirdly restful. .., thank you. i find it weirdly restful. ., ., ., thank you. i find it weirdly restful. ., ., restful. i come away from a session and it could — restful. i come away from a session and it could have _ restful. i come away from a session and it could have been _ restful. i come away from a session and it could have been two - restful. i come away from a session and it could have been two hours i restful. i come away from a session l and it could have been two hours and it is light, _ and it could have been two hours and it is light, whereas that time gone? itotally— it is light, whereas that time gone? i totally get that. nothing switches your mind off more than skateboarding, even though your mind is so focused on what you're trying to achieve and that is why i really like it, such a breakfrom everything, and i think that is why this mental—health side of it is so important because it really does help people take them away from some of the stuff that is really busy in their mind and that is it, they are focused, connected by the community and supporting champions, hopefully, by the network. that
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and supporting champions, hopefully, by the network-— by the network. that is why it is wonderful. _ by the network. that is why it is wonderful, women _ by the network. that is why it is wonderful, women who - by the network. that is why it is wonderful, women who are - by the network. that is why it is i wonderful, women who are slightly older, not girls first time as teenagers but our generation. thank you very much indeed. you could have been part of the statistics of 30 ticking up skateboarding but too young. time now for a special report by ros atkins who is looking at why vast tree planting initiatives are concerning some experts. it's no longer controversial to say humans are causing climate change but what we should do about it is less settled. borisjohnson is hosting the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, and this is his mantra. we can get real on coal, cars, cash and trees. now coal, cars and cash remain difficult, pressing issues. but trees, you'd think they are more straightforward. we know trees absorb carbon dioxide,
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which is one of the gases that causes climate change, and there are lots of plans to plant more of them. this was donald trump back in 2020. today, i am pleased to announce the united states willjoin i trillion trees initiative, being launched here at the world economic forum. i trillion trees. and if that's the us, we've seen other big pledges — ethiopia plans to plant 20 billion trees by 2022, china says it will plant 36,000 square kilometres of new forest every year by 2025, and pakistan wants to plant ten billion trees by 2023. but is tree planting really this rare thing, a good idea without a catch? to many, it's not that straightforward. this is dr bonnie waring... we cannot plant our way out of the carbon crisis with business—as—usual emission scenarios. ..or, as dr kate hardwick
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at kew gardens in london notes: . the risk here is that the benefit of new trees is being overstated. there are other risks too — of greenwashing, of damage to ecosystems, of trees distracting from emissions cuts. let's look at all of this, starting with the crucial role that trees play. there are an estimated three trillion trees in the world and they absorb carbon from the air and, crucially, store it. that's one of the reasons why deforestation has been a focus at cop26. bear in mind, in the last 10,000
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years a third of the world's forests have been lost. half of that was in the last century. and if you want to slow global warming, fewer trees doesn't help, and so two policies are being adopted. one is to stop deforestation. the united states will help the world deliver on our shared goal of halting natural forest loss and restoring at least an additional 200 million hectares of forest and other ecosystems by the year 2030. and then the second policy looks to address that forest loss. the commitment yesterday was to sort out deforestation within ten years. in that time, some 70 million hectares of forest will have been disappeared, which is horrendous. what are we going to do to put that back? so it's not only stopping the deforestation, it's reforesting as well. planting trees — as china is doing here — is the second part of the plan. but look beyond the bold
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announcements and it's far from clear what mass tree planting will achieve. let's look at the reasons why. well, first of all, planting lots of trees doesn't necessarily mean you end up with more trees. forrest fleischman is a leading expert on mass tree planting. back in september, he tweeted: . that's right — almost no impact. and if that's india, then look at turkey. in 2019, a un press release told us that turkey had set a new world record by planting 11 million saplings in three hours. a few weeks later, the guardian reported up to 90% of the saplings were thought to be dead. just planting trees isn't enough. there are a number of reasons for this. first of all, saplings are vulnerable. around a quarter will die young.
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second, it takes 20—30 years before a tree will draw significant amounts of carbon dioxide. third, the trees need thinning. without space, a new forest won't thrive. and fourth, if trees die and rot, all of that stored carbon will be released. but even if you do manage a new forest well, there's another issue. this is dr kate hardwick. the point being even if you replace lost forest, the new trees can cause problems. in one article on mass tree planting, three experts write: .
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so there are questions about which trees are planted, where they're planted, how they're managed. and there's an even more fundamental issue — is there enough space? these are grave doubts, as you can hear. but even if we put them to one side, there's another issue too. here's dr bonnie waring again. even if we were to cram trees into every corner of the globe where they could possibly grow, we estimate that they would absorb only about ten years' worth of carbon emissions at current rates and it would take them about a century to grow large enough to do so.
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in other words, neither the volume or the speed is enough. but those who advocate for tree planting don't necessarily say that it is. they argue that trees are one of many ways to help the climate. it's true, trees are crucial for capturing carbon that exists. what's more controversial, though, is that tree planting is also used for something called "carbon offsetting". the idea is that if you cause emissions, you balance this with an action to reduce carbon elsewhere. one example comes from the band coldplay. it wants its next tour to be as green as possible. here's its lead singer chris martin on one of their ideas. in terms of offsetting people being there, we're able to plant a tree for every ticket sold. coldplay are doing other things, too. and more broadly, offsetting is now
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widely used by companies and countries as part of their efforts to become carbon neutral. and some, though not all, offsetting schemes involve trees. and there are concerns about how and if this works. take the situation in wales. there are plans there by big business to encourage more tree planting, and those plans are under fire. these companies in england who have a completely different agenda, and that is the carbon—neutral agenda. they will work on behalf of multinational companies, buy up farms in wales and satisfy their carbon—neutral status at the expense of communities in wales. now, the firm in this case here says sustainability is central to its business and that it always consults with local communities, but the concerns go beyond any one example. some scientists just don't buy the whole idea.
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mike berners—lee also says this concept is "bogus". greenpeace's language is equally blunt. it describe offsetting schemes as "greenwashing" and "a way for polluters to avoid real emissions cuts". and this perhaps explains why tree planting is so controversial. it's not about if tree planting can make some difference, it's about if it takes a focus away from emissions. and as we consider that, this clip is perhaps useful, of the author fred pearce. and concern about how trees fit into climate action doesn't mean they're not part of the equation.
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but as i've made this report, i've kept thinking of this graphic. these are global emissions over the past 100 years. you can see them escalating throughout the 20th century and the year with the most emissions was 2019. 2020 emissions were reduced by covid but this week, scientists reported that global carbon dioxide emissions will rebound towards the level before the pandemic. and while our emissions remain this high, the difference that mass tree planting can make is limited. it also risks creating a reassuring sense of action being taken, when the reality is that carbon levels in our atmosphere need to come down — and quickly. for that to happen will take emissions cuts, no matter how many trees we plant.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. a bit ofa a bit of a rollercoaster yesterday? until yesterday, norwich hadn't had a win all season in the league. they were bottom of the table. understandably pleased they would get a win. understandably pleased they would aet a win. , understandably pleased they would aetawin. , ., ., ., get a win. plus the international matches were _ get a win. plus the international matches were coming _ get a win. plus the international matches were coming up - get a win. plus the international matches were coming up and i get a win. plus the international| matches were coming up and the writing was on the world that daniel farke would get his marching orders. so despite that win for norwich city, just a few hours later, manager daniel farke was sacked. it was the club's first victory of the season against brentford. mathias normann scored the pick of the goals in their 2—1 win. it put a smile on farke's face momentarily, but the three points weren't enough to save his job. norwich have twice been promoted under the german, but he leaves with the club bottom of the league. manchester united lost, but manager ole gunnar solskjaer still has hisjob. it was a 2—0 defeat in the derby
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to neighbours city and it's prompted more speculation about solskjaer�*s future. it was a lack—lustre performance at old trafford with eric bailly scoring an own goal. then bernardo silva got a second for cityjust before half—time. an impressive performance from them, but it's united's fourth defeat in six premier league matches and a second consecutive loss at home to one of their biggest rivals, prompting more questions to be asked of the united boss. another club in trouble and with a potential new manager is newcastle. they stay just above bottom placed norwich in 19th after a draw against brighton. leandro trossard gave the home side the lead, but newcastle then got an equaliser through isaac hayden. and watching him was eddie howe, former bournemouth manager, alongside new co—owner amanda staveley. howe is the man widely tipped to get the job after newcastle sacked steve bruce. there are four more premier league fixtures today. liverpool travel to west ham
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for the late game, but before that, arsenal take on watford, leeds play leicester and antonio conte will take charge of his first league match since becoming tottenham head coach and he's expecting a tough afternoon against everton. our expectation is a tough game, because everton is a really good team. goodison park is not an easy place to play, but at the same time i will want to show that, want to try to improve the results, especially for our table. but it won't be easy. in scotland, rangers can increase their lead at the top of the premiership if they beat ross county at ibrox later, and if celtic drop points at dundee. hearts are second — for a few more hours at least — after they beat dundee united 5—2 at tynecastle. motherwell won away at aberdeen and it was goalless between stjohnstone and st mirren.
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england are through to the semi—finals of the men's t20 cricket world cup, despite a narrow defeat to south africa. they lost by 10 runs in sharjah with rassie van der dussen doing the damage as england were set a target of 190 to win. moeen ali did his best to get them over the line, but they fell short. and concern for one of their best batsmen, jason roy, on crutches with a calf injury and could be out of the tournament. in rugby union, england got their autumn internationals off to the perfect start with a 69—3 win over tonga at twickenham. they did it without captain owen farrell who'd tested positive for coronavirus. but england's new—look side didn't have any issues, running in ii tries against the islanders. 22—year—old marcus smith came on in the second—half to impress the sold out stadium. his first time in an england shirt, but probably not his last. there was a bizarre moment in the wales south africa game
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in cardiff as a pitch invader got in the way of liam williams when he had a chance to score. it may well have cost wales, because the springboks went on to score the only try of the match late on. 23—18 it finished at the principality stadium. andrew conway starred for ireland as they eased past japan. he got a hat—trick for the home side in dublin as ireland scored nine tries in a 60—5 victory. scotla nd scotland play australia later today, but wasn't that a nightmare for wales? how upset it would you be? he has been handed over to south wales police. he will be the least popular person in the stadium. it doesn't change the score. thank you, good to see you. time to say goodbye to roger now — you're off to read the news for andrew marr. lam, and i i am, and i will. lam, and i will. enjoy i am, and i will. enjoy your sunday.
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here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. some of the weather conditions are a bit lively across the country. across scotland we have the strongest of the wind this morning, 40 to 60 miles an hour quite widely. stronger over the hills and rough seas to the north—west coast, set to be battered by big waves. strong winds will be easing down through the day but they are bringing showers to north—west scotland. showers further south but many other parts, a dry start to sunday. staying dry throughout the day. she was becoming less frequent across northern scotland and towards the south we will see the wind is full lighter. the winds will still have the north—westerly feed, so not especially warm. 9013 celsius and these are average for this stage in november. sunny spells in central, southern and eastern england. winds falling light once again and there
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could be a chance of frost around. turning milder in the west towards the end of the night as cloud spills into northern ireland, western scotland are west and wales. your monday morning commute across parts of scotland, england, eastern wales could be chilly and a touch of frost around for some. best of sunshine will be in these areas through the morning, notice how cloud amount increase from the west in the day. northern ireland getting ready for rain during the morning commute. rain spreading to parts of scotland in the afternoon and turning down through north and west england and also to the west and north of wales. a little bit on the cool side after the chilly start but much wilder in the chilly start but much wilder in the west. highs of 15. that is how it is looking. not many people can say they've met their heroes. and 17—year—old millie anna has gone one step further. she's given sir ian mckellen a tour of her hometown of windsor, after the actor spotted her instagram post from his show.
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an aspiring model and actor herself, millie anna has down's syndrome, and is passionate about changing perceptions of life with an extra chromosome. she spoke to graham satchell, along with her dad jeff. it started a simple photo. 17—year—old millie anna at the theatre royal windsor, next to a picture of her acting hero, sir ian mckellen. i just think what he did was spectacular. i love that he has good energy and, yeah. yeah, he's a good actor. yeah, he really is, he's iconic. millie posted the photo on her instagram page. ian mckellen saw it, got in touch and asked millie to show him around windsor, her home town. i actually thought, wow, ian wanted to see me, i think that is absolutely, 100%, amazing. i felt so good, i couldn't believe my ears. just a few days later, millie anna and sir ian spent 4.5 hours together.
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we went windsor castle, we went to the cobbles, we went to my favourite restaurant, enzo's. we had pasta and pizza. he is amazing, he was really fun to be with. the way he communicates with me how he interact with me is just spot on. ijust saw an incredibly kind man interacting and getting a quick sense of how to communicate with millie and then doing it for 4.5 hours. it was 4.5 hours. it was incredible. millie has down's syndrome. her dream in the future is to follow in sir ian's footsteps. i want to be an actress, so i want to bejust like ian. aim high, that's what you say, isn't it, you have to aim high. yeah, that's right. keep your held held high and make sure you've got to believe in yourself, love yourself and forgive yourself too.
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millie's story has had a remarkable impact. her followers have gone up from 700 to more than 10,000. her remarkable positivity has seen incredible messages of support. for me, it's very emotional but i'm so happy. for a regular 17—year—old who loves life, loves herfamily, her time, being comfortable, i think it is just amazing. but honestly, i just want to say that down's syndrome is no big deal because you can do anything if you set your mind to it. millie and her family are hoping to give her new followers a positive perspective on what life is life living with down's syndrome. if everybody knew what nicki and i knew right now, no—one, no—one would ever want to not have a child like millie.
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this has been the best chapter of my life. and i'm so proud of my parents. i wouldn't do this without them. ijust pour my heart to children who are very important to me. i'm just so happy that i have two incredible parents who love me. i wouldn't have done this without them, my two best friends, my pals, my everything. what's not to love? yeah! what started as a photo in a theatre turned into unforgettable day trip with a hollywood megastar and is now a campaign to change hearts and minds. graham satchell, bbc news. i have got a feeling that is not the last we will see of millie. it was another week of charlestons, rumbas and quicksteps as the remaining strictly couples
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pulled out all the stops on the dancefloor last night. but as the glitterball trophy gets closer in sight, the standards are getting higher. let's take a look at some of the performances. music.
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cheering and applause we're joined now by former strictly professional dancer,
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flavia cacace—mistry. lovely to see you. can we start with the charleston and aj. ll lovely to see you. can we start with the charleston and aj.— the charleston and aj. it was a very aood the charleston and aj. it was a very good week- — the charleston and aj. it was a very good week- the _ the charleston and aj. it was a very good week. the standard _ the charleston and aj. it was a very good week. the standard went - the charleston and aj. it was a very good week. the standard went up. | good week. the standard went up. that charleston was great. she totally deserved to be top of the leaderboard. so much content, so many changes of rhythm and she was completely in sync with kai. l many changes of rhythm and she was completely in sync with kai.— completely in sync with kai. i don't know how your— completely in sync with kai. i don't know how your mind _ completely in sync with kai. i don't know how your mind keeps - completely in sync with kai. i don't know how your mind keeps ticking | know how your mind keeps ticking over, because this dance is jampacked. over, because this dance is jampacked— over, because this dance is jampacked. over, because this dance is 'amacked. ,, ., ., ., ~ ., jampacked. she had a tough week, and if eve hinu jampacked. she had a tough week, and if everything comes _ jampacked. she had a tough week, and if everything comes together _ jampacked. she had a tough week, and if everything comes together in - jampacked. she had a tough week, and if everything comes together in that. if everything comes together in that minute and a half, that is the result. ., . , minute and a half, that is the result. ., ., , ., ., result. tom was another highlight. he was for me. — result. tom was another highlight. he was for me, because _ result. tom was another highlight. he was for me, because last - result. tom was another highlight. he was for me, because last week| result. tom was another highlight. i he was for me, because last week he had a bad week with the tango. the
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tango and pass a they are different styles, but they are strong, powerful dancers. i was a bit concerned he went from one to the other. but it was a great routine and i love the fact it was old school, costumes for old school and the music was traditional. he played it elegantly and i think he changed his mindset from the week before when he went aggressive, thatjust didn't suit him, then he went to do something powerful but elegant. i was very happy for him to come back so strong. he looked fully in control. completely in control and effortless. ~ . , control. completely in control and effortless. . , ., , control. completely in control and effortless. ~ . , ., , ., effortless. which is what it is all about. which _ effortless. which is what it is all about. which brings _ effortless. which is what it is all about. which brings me - effortless. which is what it is all about. which brings me to - effortless. which is what it is all about. which brings me to dan. | effortless. which is what it is all. about. which brings me to dan. he will hold his hands up and say i am not the best answer. but he is having a ball.— having a ball. because of his heiuht, having a ball. because of his height. some _ having a ball. because of his height, some things - having a ball. because of his height, some things could i having a ball. because of his i height, some things could look
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having a ball. because of his - height, some things could look a bit awkward, but it doesn't, and he has definitely got rhythm, he can hear the music. i thought last night's performance was perfect for him. i said from the beginning he would be good at the ballroom, but when he does the latin stuff and solo dancing, he shines. he struggles more when he is in hold with his partner. he needs to have that same confidence and ease when he is with his partner, as when he is solar. last night was good, he was free and able to just perform and enjoyed. == able to 'ust perform and en'oyed. -- solo. able tojust perform and enjoyed. —— solo. we see him on a monday morning, he is bursting with the energy. some of the others, we have seen him improve we can week, adam, in particular when you saw him dance, for a slimmer, he was very elegant. the development has not been... ., . , ., , been... you are right, expectations were hiuh
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been... you are right, expectations were high for— been... you are right, expectations were high for him _ been... you are right, expectations were high for him being _ been... you are right, expectations were high for him being a _ been... you are right, expectations were high for him being a sports i were high for him being a sports person. he did deliver in the first few weeks and sometimes it tails off a bit and the pressure get to see. in the beginning, you have a long time to rehearse the first routine and then it gets less and less because all your other commitments take over. now they have less days to get their routines together. it was a good effort, don't get me wrong, but the overall level was really high. he is in a danger zone, because it wasn't one of his best and the others were also good. it and the others were also good. it was a strong week, like you said at the beginning. who else is in the danger zone? the beginning. who else is in the dangerzone? ll the beginning. who else is in the dangerzone? it is the beginning. who else is in the danger zone?— the beginning. who else is in the dancerzone? , ., ., , , ., danger zone? it is going to be up to the ublic. danger zone? it is going to be up to the public- l — danger zone? it is going to be up to the public. ithink— danger zone? it is going to be up to the public. i think adam, _ danger zone? it is going to be up to the public. i think adam, obviously| the public. i think adam, obviously he is at the bottom, i think dan will be saved by the public. if adam isn't and stays, who knows who could go down there with him? from a dance point of view, there is a group that are moving away from sarah and dan,
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in their own bubble and improving in their own way, having their own progression. but the others are all there or thereabouts. adam is probably the weakest of that group. okay. but probably the weakest of that group. oka . �* , ., , ,., okay. but we will see who is saved and who isn't- _ okay. but we will see who is saved and who isn't. what _ okay. but we will see who is saved and who isn't. what do _ okay. but we will see who is saved and who isn't. what do you - okay. but we will see who is saved and who isn't. what do you make | okay. but we will see who is saved | and who isn't. what do you make of tilly ramsay? _ and who isn't. what do you make of tilly ramsay? l _ and who isn't. what do you make of tilly ramsay? i love _ and who isn't. what do you make of tilly ramsay? i love her, _ and who isn't. what do you make of tilly ramsay? i love her, she - and who isn't. what do you make of tilly ramsay? i love her, she has. tilly ramsay? i love her, she has been a favourite _ tilly ramsay? i love her, she has been a favourite or— tilly ramsay? i love her, she has been a favourite or second - tilly ramsay? i love her, she has. been a favourite or second favourite a lot of the weeks. she is versatile and rose is, and sometimes people can be very good at the ballroom and tilly has been versatile, she comes out and does a ballroom dance and looks elegant and has a really good top line, which is improving each week. then she will come out and do a latin dance which is different and she will look very confident, she is
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very natural. she understands the technique, so herfeet are getting better. she is moving across the dance floor beautifully and she just keeps improving. i enjoy watching her, she makes it look quite effortless. her, she makes it look quite effortless-— her, she makes it look quite effortless. ~ , ., effortless. when 'udges point out thetechnicar— effortless. when judges point out the technical things _ effortless. when judges point out the technical things we _ effortless. when judges point out the technical things we wouldn't i the technical things we wouldn't recognise, she follows it so beautifully. lovely to see it, you are always right with your predictions, sol are always right with your predictions, so i hope everyone at home is listening. you can watch the strictly results show on bbc one tonight at 7.15pm. that's all for today. dan and sally will be back tomorrow morning from 6:00. enjoy the rest of your weekend, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. our top stories. police in houston open a criminal investigation into the texas music festival crowd surge that left eight people dead. there are rumours that some people were injecting other people with drugs. iraq's prime minister mustafa al—kadhimi survives an attempt on his life as rockets hit his home in baghdad's high—security sector. borisjohnson has called for ambitious commitments and bold compromises, as the un climate negotiations
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in glasgow enter their final week. england's health secretary sajid javid urgers over people over

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