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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 7, 2021 1:00am-1:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm rich preston. our top stories: hospitals overwhelmed after a hundred people are killed in a fuel tanker explosion in sierra leone with many more injured. us police are investigating reports that someone at a houston music festival was injecting people with drugs before the crowd stampeded. thousands of demonstrations take place around the world to demand urgent action to combat climate change as the cop26 summit continues. and the death of a pregnant woman sparks protests in poland against a near—total ban on abortion. she's said to be the first woman to die as a result of the law.
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sierra leone's vice president says the state will provide economic assistance to the families of a hundred people killed on friday when a fuel tanker exploded in the capital, freetown. the city's hospitals have been overwhelmed by the number of people injured. umaru fofana reports from freetown. the blast happened in eastern freetown after a truck rammed into a petrol tanker. people rushed to collect the leaking fuel, causing a heavy trafficjam, according to eyewitness accounts. there was a vast explosion, leaving fireballs spreading through the crowds. vehicles in the traffic jam were set alight. hospitals in freetown are overwhelmed with injured people, many in critical condition. most of the dead
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have been taken to the central mortuary. we started transporting bodies from 11 until four o'clock. the last set of bodies, i had to convey them with some soldiers to the morgue, for us to get a total headcount. just outside here are anxious relatives who have been asked to come and identify their loved ones. obviously, some of the bodies are beyond recognition, so that's going to be very tricky for them to do, but also a very emotional scene here. some of them have moved from hospital to hospital, trying to see if their loved ones are actually either admitted or, in fact, dead. on behalf of the president, the government and the entire people of sierra leone, we sympathise... the country's vice—president called the incident a national disaster. police, soldiers and firefighters have worked through the night to clear the scene. rescuers expect the death toll to mount. umara fofana, bbc news, freetown.
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police investigating a deadly crush at a music festival in the us state of texas say they're looking into reports that someone in the crowd was injecting others with drugs. eight people died in the stampede at the music festival, when fans pushed towards the stage, causing panic. the rapper travis scott says he's devastated by what took place while he was performing at the event. the bbc�*s nomia iqbal has this report, and a warning that it does contain some flashing images. after the pandemic kept people away last year, fans turned up for the festival in texas in their thousands. but on the first night of the two day event, something went wrong. a crowd surge towards the stage as rapper travis scott performed. it's not clear what set the crowd in motion. the injured were given medical help,
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while the music continued, many not realising what happened. the performance was eventually stopped, as a mass casualty incident was declared. the crowd began to compress towards the front of the stage, 0k, and that caused some panic, and it started causing some injuries, people began to fall out, become unconscious. seven of those who died were aged between 1a and 27. others were taken to hospital with cardiac arrest. this has not happened to us ever in houston, since i've been a police officer. we take pride of it and we are going to get down to the bottom. a lot of narratives out there right now. a lot of them. on social media, and even last night. i think that all of us need to be respectful of the families. police have also confirmed they are looking into reports of some individuals being injected with a drug, and say this is now a criminal investigation. people who were at the festival have been speaking about the chaos. there were people pushing back—and—forth.
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it was like a ripple effect, one person pushed and the whole crowd went forward, and then they went back, so it was going every other way. astroworld was founded by travis scott, who is from houston. he is the partner of kyliejenner, one of the world's highest paid social media influencers. in a statement, travis scott said he's absolutely devastated about what's happened. he thanked the emergency services for their response in helping everyone affected and said he is committed to working with officials to find out what went wrong. nomia iqbal, bbc news, north america. we can now speakjoey guerra who's a music critic for the houston chronicle. joey was in the crowd during travis scott's perfomance and witnessed events spiral out of control. hejoins us live he joins us live now. where were you when this started to happen? i were you when this started to ha en? . , were you when this started to ha en? ., ., were you when this started to
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hauen? ., happen? i was near the back. i wasn't in _ happen? i was near the back. i wasn't in the _ happen? i was near the back. i wasn't in the thick _ happen? i was near the back. i wasn't in the thick of _ happen? i was near the back. i wasn't in the thick of where . wasn't in the thick of where all this was happening. this was from my perspective in a very contained place at the front of the stage. i was kinda behind the bulk of that, watching the concert and everything unfold.- everything unfold. music festivals _ everything unfold. music festivals often _ everything unfold. music festivals often are - everything unfold. music festivals often are very l everything unfold. music. festivals often are very high energy generally, especially performances e”erg)’ generally, especially performances from someone like travis scott. was it immediately apparent what was happening and how serious it was? it happening and how serious it was? ,, , happening and how serious it was? ., , ., ., ., , happening and how serious it was? ., ., ., was? it was not, no. i was not aware that — was? it was not, no. i was not aware that this _ was? it was not, no. i was not aware that this was _ was? it was not, no. i was not aware that this was happening to the extent it was. i really don't think anyone around me in the vicinity knew what was happening because timeframes that we know now, with this was happening, people were singing along, dancing, taking videos with the phone. there had been small indications right before that that there was something happening but because it's a festival, you kind of expect to see some of things that we saw before this really kind of took off. ,, ~ before this really kind of took off. . ~ ., ., ., , ,
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off. talk through what happened in the appointment _ off. talk through what happened in the appointment was - off. talk through what happened in the appointment was clear - in the appointment was clear that this was quite a serious incident. ~' ,, incident. right, think more eo - le incident. right, think more peeple that _ incident. right, think more people that were _ incident. right, think more people that were very - incident. right, think more people that were very near| incident. right, think more - people that were very near the front, where this was happening, it was very clear that there was a lot of friction, a lot of moving back and forth. anybody who's been to a concert where it is standing room, and you get anywhere near the front or the middle, when one row or one group of people move, i mean the whole thing kind of moves. you have to move with the crowd. if one person stumbles in the midst of that, that can create some sort of domino effect and our reporting, one of the concert —goers described it as a tower ofjenga blocks falling which gives you an image of what this was. on the back, use or emergency vehicles cutting through the crowd, they had sirens and alarms on but again, if you go to a festival, people are taken out throughout the day because of dehydration and exhaustion �*s of the people
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who won't write in the mix of that, thisjust who won't write in the mix of that, this just seemed who won't write in the mix of that, thisjust seemed like who won't write in the mix of that, this just seemed like a festival setting with some of these things unfortunately do happen but i think once people started filing out, when he finished, and people of course take to social media immediately after a show, that's when a lot of this really became clear, that this was much given i think anybody new. , , was much given i think anybody new. , . ., , was much given i think anybody new. ,. ., , new. the music had been stopped a coule new. the music had been stopped a couale of _ new. the music had been stopped a couple of times _ new. the music had been stopped a couple of times deviously - new. the music had been stopped a couple of times deviously to - a couple of times deviously to allow people the chance to cool down and calm down. should someone have intervened earlier and put the brakes on and allowed things to properly stop and settle down? i allowed things to properly stop and settle down?— and settle down? i think let's 'ust a and settle down? i think let's just a really _ and settle down? i think let's just a really tough _ and settle down? i think let's just a really tough question l just a really tough question because you are right, he did stop the concert multiple times. travis himself pointed out people who were distressed or needed help, waiting for security to come and get that person and take them to safety. but again, in previous events, i've been to everyone, the same thing has happened, like in
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normal concerts. people get tamped up and energetic, there is a unique culture between fans and this kind of thing for better or worse does happen a lot during his concerts but is always as vigilant as he can be in terms of people safe. irate in terms of people safe. we will leave — in terms of people safe. we will leave it _ in terms of people safe. we will leave it there for now. thank you for making the time for us. let's get some of the day's other news. police in southern germany say three people have been seriously wounded in a knife attack on a high speed train. a man has been detained, and police believe there's no further danger to the public. the train was travelling between the bavarian cities of regensburg and nuremburg. russia has registered its worst daily figure for coronavirus infections, surpassing 41,000 for the first time. moscow remains the epicenter of the pandemic in the country and most public places are now disinfected every day. the rise in cases comes at the end of an eight day nationwide paid holiday, introduced to curb the spread of infections.
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china has boosted its daily coal output to a record level in response to a shortage that led to power plant shut—downs last month. the raised output has been blamed for thick smog in the capital beijing. economic planners say the increase, to more than twelve million tonnes of coal a day, will ensure a warm winter for the chinese people. marches have been taking place in more than 200 cities around the world as part of what's been described as the "global day of action for climate justice". tens of thousands of people took to the streets of glasgow — where the un's cop—26 climate talks are taking place. lorna gordon has this report from glasgow: even the driving rain couldn't keep them away. this, the biggest protest march through glasgow during cop. some had travelled just a short distance to get here, others were from the sharp end of the changing climate. i come from the philippines, and i am an indigenous person from the mountains.
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this is personally important to me because climate change is killing my people. if the climate summit has so far focused on the decisions made by world leaders and their teams gathered here in glasgow, today is about the people, the thousands gathered, calling for change. discussions inside cop today focusing on nature. tough topics loom large for the days ahead. i don't have many expectations for the official cop conference but hopefully all this, people getting together, will put some pressure on the decision—makers. whatever we can do, we want to contribute. i want to be on the right sidel of history and i think that one day we will look back at this and hopefully feel proud - of ourselves that we are here.
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i don't know where we will be in ten years, in 20 years, so i'm out here, so is my mum, my gran, my grandad, everybody�*s out here. i don't believe it until i see any results. there is no law binding commitments so we willjust have to see it. the afternoon was mostly peaceful, but there were a small number of arrests, including this group of scientists blocking a bridge. organisers of today's events say there were over 300 climate demonstrations worldwide, from the streets of london... ..to here in amsterdam... ..to sydney in australia. we just want to ask you, from our heart, for your support. and people from around the world calling for action from those in charge... i know it's a big deal, to get together the 196 countries, to say, yes, that is what we are going to do.
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i wish that we can do that, that it happens here. those marching here today will be hoping for positive news during the final week of talks, that it's not too late to deliver the substantial change they want. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. reports from iraq say the prime minister mustafa al—kadhimi is unhurt following what the military say was an assassination attempt. it's reported that rockets from a drone hit his home in the high security green zone in the capital baghdad in the early hours of sunday. since the attack, al kadhimi has tweeted to say he is fine and called for calm and restraint. you are watching bbc news. the headlines: hospitals overwhelmed, after 100 people are killed in a fuel tanker explosion in sierra leone — many more are injured. an investigation is underway into reports that someone at a houston music festival in the us was injecting people with drugs before the crowd stampeded.
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an appeals court in the us has temporarily stopped president biden's vaccine mandate for businesses. the law would require workers at companies with more than 100 employees, to be fully vaccinated or get weekly tests. but many republican states have filed legal challenges, accusing the president of overstepping his authority. mr biden says it is about setting a national standard of safety at work. we can now speak to seth weathers, who's a republican strategist. thank you for making time for us. ~ . , thank you for making time for us. . . , , ., thank you for making time for us. . ., thank you for making time for us. what is your reaction to this? i us. what is your reaction to this? i am _ us. what is your reaction to this? i am glad _ us. what is your reaction to this? i am glad to - us. what is your reaction to this? i am glad to see - us. what is your reaction to this? i am glad to see the l this? i am glad to see the ruling that came down here, you could say has been putting on hold the mandate. it is clearly unconstitutional and the joe biden administration has no business trying to mandate what people put into their bodies. this is a basic right. this is
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a huge move for any government. president biden said this would cover to third of the workforce and it is about protecting the most vulnerable and keeping on protection. we putting people at risk? ., ., ., ., , at risk? no, not at all. this pandemic— at risk? no, not at all. this pandemic has _ at risk? no, not at all. this pandemic has gone - at risk? no, not at all. this pandemic has gone on - at risk? no, not at all. this pandemic has gone on way| at risk? no, not at all. this i pandemic has gone on way too long, at least the lot sounds across states, and the reality is, forcing people getting the vaccine does nothing to stop the spread. this is a fact. if you choose or not to get a vaccine, it is up to individuals but you're not stopping the spread. the fact that the biden administration continues to push that is an unbelievable abuse of power. the ruling has already come through forfederal the ruling has already come through for federal employees and contractors and sub
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contractors, those contractors and sub contractors are ostensibly employed by private firms, what about those individuals employed by private firms but have to answer to the government? mr; firms but have to answer to the government?— government? my hope is that those individuals _ government? my hope is that those individuals that - government? my hope is that those individuals that do - government? my hope is that those individuals that do not l those individuals that do not want the vaccine i hope they are able to sue the hell out of companies involved as well as the government for pushing the mandate. again, this is all based on a lie from the government and it is being spread around the bill, spreading in your country as well and the reality is we are not stopping the spread, slowing down, speeding up the end of the pandemic. none of those things are happening. it is all elisa getting the vaccine does nothing to stop the spread so when dealing with something that is nothing like and so i am happy to see this and so i am happy to see this andi and so i am happy to see this and i do not know where it goes from here when it gets to the next cold. from here when it gets to the next cold-— from here when it gets to the next cold. , , ., ., , , next cold. many epidemiologists would disagree _ next cold. many epidemiologists would disagree that _ next cold. many epidemiologists
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would disagree that vaccination l would disagree that vaccination do not help stop the spread. the us vaccine take—up has levelled out at about 58% and the president is keen to get people fully inoculated... i do people fully inoculated... i do not live people fully inoculated... i do not give a _ people fully inoculated... i do not give a damn _ people fully inoculated... i do not give a damn what - people fully inoculated... i if not give a damn what the president is keen on doing will not, he can go screw himself. the reality is it is not his decision but i put my body or what my children put in their body. there are a lot on the other side and the stats actually prove this does not stop the vaccine itself does not stop the spread. you can still get the virus whether you are vaccinated or not. it is continuing to happen over and over again so there is no argument from that basis. it is not even a debatable fact at this point. not even a debatable fact at this point-— this point. thank you for sharing _ this point. thank you for sharing your _ this point. thank you for sharing your views - this point. thank you for sharing your views with l this point. thank you for i sharing your views with us. appreciated.— meanwhile president biden is preparing to sign his one trillion dollar infrastructure
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bill into law — a key part of his programme to rebuild the united states following the pandemic. the bill covers investment in bridges, roads and broadband, but congress still has to hold a more controversial vote on a second major spending package on health, education and measures to tackle climate change. the polish government has denied that the country's strict abortion laws are responsible for the recent death of a 30—year—old woman who had complications with her pregnancy but wasn't able to get a termination. huge protests have been held in warsaw and other polish cities, calling for the near—total ban on abortions to be scrapped. poland is one of the most devoutly catholic countries in europe. courtney bembridge has this report. shunting, not one more. tens of thousands of protesters much to the ministry in warsaw after the ministry in warsaw after the death of a pregnant woman reignited the debate. it has been a year since the
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constitutional court ruled in favour of a near total ban on abortion. rotors highlighting the recent case of a 30—year—old woman who died halfway through her pregnancy. herfamily halfway through her pregnancy. her family says doctor had halfway through her pregnancy. herfamily says doctor had been aware of severe faecal defects but refuse to perform an abortion while the foetus still had a heartbeat fearing repercussion.— had a heartbeat fearing repercussion. had a heartbeat fearing reercussion. , , ., repercussion. this is what we call the present _ repercussion. this is what we call the present effect. - repercussion. this is what we call the present effect. the i call the present effect. the doctors will be afraid to perform abortions though in theory, abortion is legal in poland. when the woman's life and child is in danger but —— when the life of the woman is in danger but doctors are afraid because they know they will be facing legal charges. i will be facing legal charges. i want to live, i have someone to default — want to live, i have someone to default. izabela did not receive help because she was pregnant— receive help because she was pregnant because the heart of the foetus was still beating.
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the polish government denies the low is to blame and says an investigation is under way into the two doctors involved but these protesters claim there are similar cases happening right across the country and they say they will be many more unless the ban is scrapped. —— there will be many more. courtney bembridge, bbc news youth sports in asia have been hit hard by two years of lockdown. training has been curbed or scrapped, as it was in many other parts of the world, and keeping a team or league together has been difficult. in asia, that process has gone on longer than expected and in singapore, where gatherings are restricted to two in most cases, even a 7s rugby match is out of the question. well, let's find out more now about the effect these restrictions have had on sports teams and their young athletes. chris archibald, who has coached a youth rugby club for a decade, joins us from singapore. can you explain what restrictions have been imposed
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on you and how you have worked around them? {lila on you and how you have worked around them?— around them? 0k, can i 'ust start by saying fl around them? 0k, can i 'ust start by saying that i around them? 0k, can i 'ust start by saying that the h start by saying that the singapore community very much tried to work within the restrictions to keep things going. when you look at the various restrictions, we go from total lockdown to groups of eight, groups of five. and the current mandate is groups of two so that makes it very challenging to keep the drills and exercises interesting to the players. at the moment we are running picking camps because that is pretty much all we can do in groups of two. when you look across the community, what has been a great is to watch everybody come together, give each other ideas, help each other out and sort of make the whole system work to try and keep kids active and running around an equally keep kids seeing their friends. a lot of which are made through the rugby
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community.— made through the rugby community. made through the rugby communi . ., ., ., . community. you mention france, sort community. you mention france, sport obviously — community. you mention france, sport obviously important - community. you mention france, sport obviously important not - sport obviously important not just for exercising but socialising. —— friends. have you coped with the lack of physical interaction? it is physical interaction? it is massively _ physical interaction? it is massively challenging. . physical interaction? it 3 massively challenging. you look at it, it has to have a long—term effect on the kids and one of what we look at is, if you look at youth spot, between the ages of five — 11, mainly it is apparent bringing the kids along, encouraging them to get into spot. from 11-15, that is them to get into spot. from 11—15, that is where kids really build a bond with the sport they play and rugby is one of those. once you get to 16 and upwards, a lot of kids dropped out of spot, partly because of exams, partly because of exams, partly because of exams, partly because of other distractions. —— out of sport. so that
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bracket, 11—15 is vital to keep kids playing. we want to have active dissipation and that future to keep them healthy and to keep them playing team games, so taking two years makes it extremely boring. we're we will get a higher than normal dropout rate. again, we fully understand the pandemic and the need to be careful but we are very much hopeful we can get ourselves back on the road to playing, to competition and plays with friends. —— players. thank you very much. the british musician and rapper terence wilson, better known as astro, who was part of the group ub40 for more than 30 years, has died after what his band mates said was a short illness. he was 64. # red, red wine, you are so
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fine, you keep me rocking all the time. ifeel $1 million. the reggae and pop band formed in the late 1970s, achieved internationalfame with hits such as red red wine and can't help falling in love. injuly 1988, it performed at the nelson mandela 70th birthday tribute in london. astro left the band in 2013 to create a new group. archaeologists excavating the roman site of pompeii in italy say they've discovered a room used by slaves, which they say gives an extraordinary insight into their daily lives. nina nanji reports. a window into how slaves lived in ancient pompeii. it is a cramped space with three wooden beds. one smaller bed is possibly a child's, indicating that the room could have housed a family. the room was found during an excavation of a large
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villa on the outskirts of pompeii. the city was engulfed in a volcanic eruption nearly 2000 years ago, burying it and its residents in ash. translation: it is an exceptional cross—section of the life and daily work of a part of the ancient population that is little known through official sources, always seen from the point of view of the elite and here instead, we see the lives of slaves, servants, people of a very low social status. the room is exceptionally well preserved. there are earthen red jars, ceramicjugs and a wooden chest containing metal and fabric objects thought to be part of a horse's harness. casts were created of the perishable items using impressions they had left in the hardened ash. the ruins of pompeii remain a rich source for archaeologists. it is a city frozen in time and one of italy's most visited tourist attractions. nina nanji, bbc news.
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that's it from us for the time being. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ rich preston bye— bye. hello. saturday's cloud and rain moving south was only one part of the weather picture. the other was the strengthening wind, and close to this low pressure, northern scotland will get off to a stormy start on sunday morning. there could be some travel disruption, as severe gales move through, and still some outbreaks of rain, whereas much of the rest of the uk, although it is still breezy, will get off to a dry start. cloudy skies in the west, and it's mild, temperatures around 6—11 celsius. just focus on the winds, though, on sunday morning, particularly across orkney and northeast scotland, here some gusts 60—70mph here, maybe a little bit more exposed coasts and hills with some large waves on some of the coasts as well. so some disruptive strong
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winds to begin the day, slowly easing as the day goes on. still a few showers moving through here. maybe one or two showers with the cloud across the western side of the uk, but most places, as high pressure begins to move in, will have a dry sunday. the best of any sunny spells in the east. these temperatures are a little down on saturday's readings, but still on the mild side of average. now, as we go on through sunday evening and night, we will find some clear spells through eastern parts of scotland and down the eastern side of england. and this will allow for a touch of frost in the coldest spots, as temperatures drop close to freezing. we will keep the cloud in the west, the temperatures hold up here, and it is a mainly dry night to come. we have another weather system coming our way. this area of low pressure, the weather fronts around it, and it will gradually take this weather front southwards across the uk. it will take a lot of the week to do so. it will slowly bring in some outbreaks of rain across northern ireland on monday into scotland, especially the north and west, could see some reaching into parts of northwest england and wales as well,
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whereas the rest of wales and england will stay mainly dry, some sunny spells in eastern england, around 11 celsius here, feeling rather chilly, whereas in belfast, up to 11; celsius. the breeze freshening again across northwestern areas. here comes the weather front slowly moving southwards as the week goes on. but we will maintain a west or south—westerly flow into the uk. so for the week ahead, things are looking mild. you will notice that on the temperatures here. a lot of cloud around, a few sunny spells, and again, some outbreaks of rain very gradually spreading southwards as the week goes on.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: around a hundred people have died after a massive explosion when a fuel tanker collided with a lorry in sierra leone's capital, freetown. fuel spilled before igniting and the resulting fire engulfed crowds of people and vehicles at a busyjunction. the vice—president has called it a national disaster. police investigating a deadly crush at a music festival in the us state of texas say they're looking into reports that someone in the crowd was injecting others with drugs. eight people died in the stampede at the music festival in houston, when fans pushed towards the stage, causing panic. marches have been taking place in more than 200 cities around the world as part of what's been described as the global day of action for climate justice. tens of thousands of people took to the streets of glasgow where the un's cop—26 climate talks are taking place.

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