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tv   Climate Change Countdown to COP26  BBC News  November 6, 2021 7:30pm-7:46pm GMT

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i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong and unworthy of this or indeed any government. rapper travis scott says he's "absolutely devastated" by the deaths of eight people at the texas festival where he was performing and pledges "total support" to police investigation after a crowd surge. at least 99 people have died in an oil tanker explosion in sierra leone after the lorry collided with another vehicle in the capital, freetown. tens of thousands of people march through glasgow — demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100 climate protests taking place across the uk. we must demand that our leaders stop holding meaningless summits and start taking meaningful action.
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sportsday will be coming up shortly. . . before that, though...it's time for climate change: countdown to cop26. hello and welcome from the cop26 global climate summit in glasgow. i am christian fraser with the latest in a series of programmes from around the world looking at the issues and challenges of climate change. issues and challenges of climate chan . e. ,, ., , ~ issues and challenges of climate chan i e, ,, ., , ~ , issues and challenges of climate chance. , ~ , , ., change. so, this cop26 must be a moment of— change. so, this cop26 must be a moment of solidarity. _ change. so, this cop26 must be a moment of solidarity. well, - change. so, this cop26 must be a moment of solidarity. well, world i moment of solidarity. well, world leaders, scientists, _ moment of solidarity. well, world leaders, scientists, climbing, - leaders, scientists, climbing, climate activists and negotiators have spent the week trying to find solutions to this global emergency. let's take a look back at their key moments of this first week of cop26. humanity has long since run down the clock on climate change. it is one minute to midnight on that doomsday clock and we need to act now. you
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know what — clock and we need to act now. you know what climate _ clock and we need to act now. you know what climate change is doing to us. know what climate change is doing to us you _ know what climate change is doing to us. you don't need my pain on my tears _ us. you don't need my pain on my tears to— us. you don't need my pain on my tears to know— us. you don't need my pain on my tears to know that we are in a crisis — tears to know that we are in a crisis. ~ . , ., ., crisis. methane is one of the classes crisis. methane is one of the glasses we _ crisis. methane is one of the glasses we can _ crisis. methane is one of the glasses we can cut _ crisis. methane is one of the glasses we can cut fastest. i crisis. methane is one of the - glasses we can cut fastest. doing that will— glasses we can cut fastest. doing that will immediately— glasses we can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow - glasses we can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow down i that will immediately slow down climate — that will immediately slow down climate change. _ that will immediately slow down climate change. in _ that will immediately slow down climate change.— that will immediately slow down climate change. in my lifetime, i've witnessed a — climate change. in my lifetime, i've witnessed a terrible _ climate change. in my lifetime, i've witnessed a terrible decline. - climate change. in my lifetime, i've witnessed a terrible decline. in - witnessed a terrible decline. in yours you could and should witness a wonderful recovery. six. yours you could and should witness a wonderful recovery.— wonderful recovery. six years ago, at the 21st — wonderful recovery. six years ago, at the 21st climate _ wonderful recovery. six years ago, at the 21st climate summit - wonderful recovery. six years ago, at the 21st climate summit in - wonderful recovery. six years ago, at the 21st climate summit in parisi at the 21st climate summit in paris the world was on track to one by up to 5.5 degrees. —— to warm by 4.5 degrees. now we're on track to 2.7 degrees. now we're on track to 2.7 degrees but to avoid the worst ravages of climate change we need to mitigate even further to do that will necessitate a massive shift in ambition. one man trying to accelerate that changes the uk's high level climate, campaign for climate change and idle topping and when i spoke to him at cop26 i asked
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him why despite decades of agonisingly slow poke atomic processes are still optimistic. it is not na ve optimism and we are not on track and this is a task of transforming the global economy so let's not equate optimism with na vet and it is a choice. what is the alternativemight be a stubborn pessimist and give up? as i say, we have to fight for every fraction of a degree because of refraction of a degree lower is less human suffering and less economic damage and ultimately i believe that we are an innovative species and we will find the solutions and we are finding them and i look for evidence of things changing. we all know how the cost of renewable power has plummeted and is now cheaper than fossil power in almost every part of the world but we also know from history that industrial transformation have the shape, they take a long time to happen then they go very fast electric vehicles are another example. it is game over for the combustion engine in the next 5-10 the combustion engine in the next 5—10 years. that was unthinkable in paris and now we're starting to see
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that, the beginnings of the exponential change in all sorts of other sectors. green hydrogen, exponential change in all sorts of othersectors. green hydrogen, green steel, green ammonia for shipping. even cement, 30% of the world's cement companies have alljoined the race to save ono. again, i wouldn't have believed that a year ago and i'm a stubborn optimist. that might race to zero. here we will see over $100 million of private capital, pension funds, asset managers, all committed to net zero. that is a game changer, right? they have all got to figure out how to deploy their capital to drive the transition not to defend... it is a name transition not to defend... it is a game changer — transition not to defend... it is a game changer but _ transition not to defend... it is a game changer but some - transition not to defend... it is a game changer but some of- transition not to defend... it is a | game changer but some of those names, bank of the america, city, barclays, they are still investing in fossil fuels and still investing in fossil fuels and still investing in future project for fossil fuels. so all of the entire financial system is invested in the entire economy in the entire economies of track so it is kind of inevitable that at the moment... the game changes that they have now all committed within the next few months
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to submit to public scrutiny, plans to submit to public scrutiny, plans to how they are going to make that transition, with very specific focus on how they start to move away from funding first of all coal and we had seen the first 50 odd already make very clear positions about stopping funding hole but they then going to to say how they are going to move away from financing other fossil fuels in line with the international energy agency's very clever but which just came out which said there is no room for new fossil fuel sources. yes, we will rely on fossil fuels for some time to come but we don't need to keep exploring and finding new sources. what don't need to keep exploring and finding new sources.— finding new sources. what about cass? because _ finding new sources. what about cass? because a _ finding new sources. what about cass? because a lot _ finding new sources. what about cass? because a lot of _ finding new sources. what about cass? because a lot of it - finding new sources. what about cass? because a lot of it comes| finding new sources. what about - cass? because a lot of it comes down to cold, hard cash. what did developing companies either adaptation and mitigation as well. 100 billion are still not there. we said this targeting 2009 and we're still not going to meet until 2023. when you compare that figure to wat joe biden is setting aside the climate change in america, 550 billion, it is a pitiful amount. find billion, it is a pitiful amount. and when ou billion, it is a pitiful amount. and when you compare _ billion, it is a pitiful amount. fific when you compare it to billion, it is a pitiful amount. fific when you compare it to the amount
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billion, it is a pitiful amount. e"ic when you compare it to the amount of money mobilised in covid the it is even more critical to make pitiful so alec sharma, the president of cop26 has said it is a covenant of trust. the target was missed in 2020 and 2021. i think the report there has been published about how it is going to be met is disappointing but is honest and it is showing a pathway to, on average, in this five year period, beating that commitment. i would actually be quite optimistic that that target will be met next year not 2023. i think it is a bit conservative in some of its assumptions about what will be mobilised and i think we will be mobilised and i think we will see a big focus on lots of different ways of mobilising way from public and the private sector so the 100 billion is a covenant of trust but it is $4 trillion a year that needs to be mobilised in emerging and developing companies are most that will come from the private sectors and we need to, yes, that 100 billion need to be met in the future goals that need to be negotiated but we need to talk about what really needs to happen in the real economy to actually finance the radical changes in the next ten
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years. it is the technical teams in the backrooms of this conference to hammer out all the details. but the world leaders who have been setting the scale of the ambition. three who have chosen — the scale of the ambition. three who have chosen not _ the scale of the ambition. three who have chosen not to _ the scale of the ambition. three who have chosen not to attend _ the scale of the ambition. three who have chosen not to attend in - the scale of the ambition. three who have chosen not to attend in person| have chosen not to attend in person a xijinping of china, that dominic vladimir putin of russia and jaya bolsonaro of brazil, countries seen as key to the summit�*s success. brazil is home to the largest area of amazon rainforest, one of the world's latest offences against climate change but is that international correspondent reports from one state there —— greatest defences against linus change. deforestation of the amazon has soared to 12 year high the president bolsonaro. the amazon rain, of forest tape in combating climate change. but the reality can look like this that make the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the
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amazon. just one man and a chainsaw. well, we are making our way, now, deep into the forest. we are being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area thatis the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. but campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jaya bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and feeling climate change. miguel isn't worried about the planet, he isn't worried about the planet, he is worried about his family. his handiwork, seen from above, every tvjohn mcphee that falls here
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releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. the atmosphere, contributing to globalwarming. by the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police and on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business. there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal but sergeant robertson decisions are said he is fighting aleem losing battle.
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every year more trees are lost by slashing and burning. the every year more trees are lost by slashing and burning.— slashing and burning. the heat is burnin: slashing and burning. the heat is burning now _ slashing and burning. the heat is burning now and _ slashing and burning. the heat is burning now and there _ slashing and burning. the heat is burning now and there is - slashing and burning. the heat is burning now and there is ash - slashing and burning. the heat is i burning now and there is ash falling in the air. no attempt has been made to hide this. it is at the side of a busy road and when fires like this happen here it is not the work of nature, it is the work of man. the globe, globalfight against nature, it is the work of man. the globe, global fight against climate change this is one more loss. and here, too, lost ground. more wild west than wild amazon. cattle farming is driven by global demand for brazilian beef and backed by president bolsonaro. this man is a second—generation rancher. he says
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the forest is a living, not a fairy tale. but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she has spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples. or trying to.
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this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than its stores. the message from here is a distress signal. that is it for countdown to cop26. next week i will be hitting glasgow for the second week of the summit. the even more in—depth coverage visit the bbc news website and climate change comic page. i'm
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christian faith goal fraser. thanks for —— i'm christian fraser. thanks for —— i'm christian fraser. thanks for watching. hello and welcome to sportsday — i'm gavin ramjaun. england put on the pyrotechnics — and despite defeat to south africa they progress to the final four of the t20 world cup. farke fired on bonfire night. norwich ditch their manager despite their first win of the season. and feeling the heat — another loss for ole gunnar solskjaer and manchester united — this time to rivals man city. hello and welcome to sportsday. hello there and welcome to the programme. england are into the semi—finals of the t20 cricket world cup... despite losing their first match of the tournament to south africa.
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it was a stunning performance from their opponents with the bat — and they might feel hard done by to depart in the groups but england's run rate in defeat, meaning australia are the other side tojoin the finalfour. joe wilson was watching. as cricket in yorkshire undergoes the most serious scrutiny an england team in sharjah based, the captain says, on diversity and inclusivity. internationally they're the team to beat, which was south africa's plan. hitting 6/2 dozen is in an unstoppable 94 helped south africa to 189. when england batted the chase ended like this forjason roy, that searing pain from his leg tough to watch. whenjoss butler mis—hit the ball — yes, really — south africa had a wicket priced above any in world cricket.
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but there's ali and 100 metres for the spell they hit six consecutive sixes. then in the final over took three consecutive wickets. but is england going through? net run rate ensures that, jason roy helped that. a cruel time to be injured. joe wilson, bbc news. we saw jason roy struggling there following that match. and england captain eoin morgan says he'll be a big miss if he's ruled out of the rest of the tournament. he is unbelievably important. he is a guy who epitomises everything that we are about in the changing room and the way that we play. you see how commanding he is in the top of the order in not only t20 cricket but 50 over cricket as well. obviously, two different partners in the two formats. but, yeah, he is as close as we get to surmising how the changing room should play. former england spin bowler
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phil tufnell was commentating on the games for 5live....

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