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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 6, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire, here are the headlines at seven. former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, accuses borisjohnson�*s government of acting in a "shameful" manner — over the owen paterson row. i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong and unworthy of this or indeed any government. rapper travis scott says he's "absolutely devastated" by the deaths of eight people at the texas festival where he was performing and pledges "total support" to police investigation after a crowd surge. at least 99 people have died in an oil tanker explosion in sierra leone after the lorry collided with another vehicle in the capital, freetown. tens of thousands of people march through glasgow — demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100
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climate protests taking place across the uk. we must demand that our leaders stop holding meaningless summits and start taking meaningful action. more pressure on manchester united as they lose at home manchester city — all the afternoon's action in sportsday at quarter to eight. the former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, has strongly criticised the government, saying its attempt this week to overturn the suspension of a tory mp — who'd beenjudged to have broken lobbying rules — was both "shameful and wrong."
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he said the government's actions were "unworthy of this or any government," and fitted a pattern of behaviour that he believed, was "un—conservative." here's our political correspondent, chris mason. very few are granted the privilege of living here. and so the verdict of those that have on the man who now does matter. particularly when they are in the same party. and even more so when a former tory prime minister brands the current tory prime minister's government as perhaps politically corrupt. it seems to me as a lifelong conservative, that much of what they are doing is very un—conservative in its behaviour. there are many strands to this that go well beyond the standards committee imbroglio of the last few days, there is a general whiff of we are the masters now about their behaviour. it has to stop, and it has to stop soon. he's referring to the former
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cabinet minister owen paterson, he was facing a 30 days�* commons suspension and the possibility of a by—election for breaking rules round the work he did for private companies alongside being an mp. but the government tried to block or delay that. until at least it changed its mind. i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong and unworthy of this or indeed any government. it also had the effect of trashing the reputation of parliament. if there is one man who knows a thing or two about how damaging sleaze can be to a government, it is sirjohn major, it came at least in part to define his time in office. and we should remember he is no fan of borisjohnson, and hasn't been for some time. nonetheless, it is quite something to hear a critique as wide and deep from a former tory prime minister. parliament cannot be the plaything of any prime minister or indeed any government, this government has done a number of things that concern me deeply. they have broken the law,
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i have in mind the illegal prorogation of parliament which i went to the supreme court about. they have broken treaties, i have in mind the northern ireland protocol. they have broken their word on many occasions, the one i find most odious was the cut in overseas aid. so if you are in the government now, what on earth do you say in response to all of this? obviously i disagree withjohn major, disagree with him on quite a few issues but in particular this one, i accept with hindsight the government has made this clear, that with hind sight it was a mistakes to try to bring that through on the timing we did, but it doesn't mean it wasn't the right thing to try to do. a statement added that ministers hoped to find a resolution to the northern ireland protocol, consensualy. this has without question been a bumpy few days for the government, entirely of its own making. as critics within the conservative
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party and beyond ask sharp questions about the prime minister's judgment. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — reviewing them tonight — political commentator jo phillips and nigel nelson — the political editor of the sunday mirror and sunday people. travis scott says he's devastated, after eight people died, in a crush at the opening night of his music festival in texas. police there say panic broke out, after the crowd began to surge towards the front of the stage, at scott's �*astroworld' event. the festival has now been called off. nomia iqbal�*s report has flashing images in it. after the pandemic kept people away last year, fans turned up for the festival in texas in their thousands. it has been hard just like being stuck in the house. unforgettable. that is the best way i can put it.
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but on the first night of the two—day event, something went wrong. a crowd surged towards the stage as rapper travis scott performed. it is not clear what set the crowd in motion. the injured were given medical help, while the music continued, many not realising what happened. the performance was eventually stopped as a mass casualty incident was declared. the crowd began to compress towards the front of the stage, ok, and that caused some panic, and it started causing some injuries, people began to fall out, become unconscious. 17 people were taken to hospital, 11 in cardiac arrest. officials have urged people not to jump to conclusions about what caused the surge.
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tonight's focus, though, needs to be on the families, and on the lives that we lost, many of them extremely young, tragically young. astroworld is a festival founded by travis scott, who is from houston. he is the partner of kyliejenner, one of the world's highest paid social media influencers, for posting videos of ambulances at the festival on instagram which she has now removed. in a statement, travis scott said he is absolutely devastated about what has happened, and said he is committed to working with officials to find out what went wrong. at least 99 people have died in an oil tanker explosion in sierra leone. the blast happened after a lorry collided with another vehicle in the capital, freetown. at least 100 people have been injured. umaru fofana reports. the blast happened in eastern freetown after a truck is thought to have rammed into a petrol tanker.
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people rushed to collect the leaking fuel, causing a heavy trafficjam, according to eyewitness accounts. there was a vast explosion, leaving fireballs spreading through the crowds. vehicles in the trafficjam were set alight, hospitals in freetown are overwhelmed with injured people, many in critical condition. most of the dead have been taken to the central mortuary. we started transporting bodies from 11 until four o'clock. the last of the bodies, i had to convey them with some soldiers to the morgue so we could get a total headcount. just outside here are anxious relatives who have been asked to come and identify their loved ones. obviously, some of the bodies are beyond recognition so that is going to be very tricky
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for them to do but also a very emotional scene here. some of them have moved from hospital to hospital, trying to see if their loved ones are actually either admitted or in fact dead. the country's vice president called the incident a national disaster. on behalf of the president, the government and the entire people of sierra leone, who sympathise with you about this accident. police, soldiers and firefighters have worked through the night to clear the scene. rescuers expect the death toll to mount. the mayor of freetown, yvonne aki—sawyerr, is currently in the uk for the cop26 climate summit, and about to fly back to sierra leone. she's been telling the bbc more about the explosion. this is a result of the crowd coming towards the tanker and trying to get petrol and unfortunately somewhere, perhaps a cigarette butt, and the explosion happened. devastating, with 98 dead, and 92 injured, very, very severe injuries.
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i've been speaking to doctors and this is a level two disaster, which means the national disaster management agency is the lead. i've joined them on conference calls today, working also with our freetown council team, trying to see how best we can support the injured and also play a role in matching families to the dead people. a fourth paddleboarder has died and a woman has been arrested after after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a river in pembrokeshire last week. megan paterson reports. gathered with their boards to remember paul o'dwyer, his life and his passion. a paddle out�*s reserved really for very special people, it's a surfing tradition, and we thought it was very fitting, at a tough time for the surf club, to come together and really celebrate someone who was a great guy. paul o'dwyer was one of four paddleboarders who died
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after getting into difficulty on the river cleddau in haverfordwest, a week ago. morgan rogers and nicola wheatley also lost their lives. andrea powell spent a week in hospital in a critical condition, but died yesterday from her injuries. five other people were part of the paddleboarding excursion — they were rescued uninjured. a weather warning for heavy rain was in place when the group, part of south wales paddleboarders, went out. the river was high and fast flowing. police confirmed today a woman from the south wales area has been arrested on suspicion of gross negligence manslaughter. she has been released under investigation. megan patterson, bbc news. marches have been taking place in more than 200 cities around the world as part of what's being described as the "global day of action for climate justice". tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets of glasgow — where the cop26 climate talks are ongoing. with more, here's our scotland
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correspondent, lorna gordon. even the driving rain did and wind couldn't keep them away. this the biggest protest march through glasgow during cop. the city's streets full, some had travelled just a short distance to get here, others from the sharp end of the changing climate. i come from the philippines and i am an indigenous person from the mountains and this is personally important to me, because climate change is killing my people. it is killing indigenous peoples round the world. we are at the front line of the impacts of climate change, but we have the least carbon footprint. if the climate summit has so far focused on the decisions made by world leaders and teams gathered here in glasgow, today is about the people, the thousands gathered calling for change. discussions inside cop
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today focusing on nature. tough topics including the timetable for reviewing emissions cuts, raising finance for the poorest countries and the rules for checking that countries and companies keep their promises still lie ahead. this afternoon was mostly peaceful. but there were a small number of arrests including this group of scientists being led away by police, after blocking a bridge. organisers of today's events say there were over 300 climate demonstrations worldwide, from the streets of london... to here in amsterdam... to sydney in australia. and people from round the world taking to the stage in glasgow, calling for action from those in charge. i don't have many expectations for the official cop conference
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but hopefully all this people getting together will put pressure on the decision makers. i don't know where we will be in ten, 20 years so i am out here with my mum, gran, grandad. i don't believe it until i see any results and there is no law—abiding commitments so we will have to see, i think it is all for show. those marching here today on a wet and dark november afternoon will be hoping for positive news during the final week of talks but it is not too late to deliver the substantial change they want. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. the headlines on bbc news: former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, accuses borisjohnson�*s government of acting in a "shameful" manner — over the owen paterson row. travis scott says he's "absolutely devastated" by the eight deaths and dozens of injuries at the texas festival
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where he was performing and pledges "total support" to police investigation after a crowd surge. andt least 99 people have died in an oil tanker explosion, in sierra leone after the lorry collided with another vehicle in the capital, freetown. yorkshire county cricket club has launched an investigation after a second ex—player alleged he too was subjected to repeated racial abuse. it comes after an independent report, which found cricketer azeem rafiq had been the victim of harrassment and bullying. the equality and human rights commission has now asked to see a copy of the full report and is considering whether to take action. simon jones has more. a racism row that has rocked notjust yorkshire, but the cricketing world. azeem rafiq was the victim of racial harassment but the club took no disciplinary action. now, claims by a second unnamed former player are being looked into. they tend to say yorkshire is one place, it's either my way
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or the hard way, to be honest. and they really need to sort of... i think theyjust haven't really understood what inclusivity and diversity really means. yorkshire now has a new chair, lord kamlesh patel. in a statement, he said: those past errors will now be looked at by the equality and human rights commission. it has asked for the full independent report into what happened to azeem rafiq to consider whether there has been a breach of the law. the mayor of west yorkshire has described recent events as "shameful". i am really hoping that this is an opportunity to change at the very top, and i do notice that lord patel has come into steer some of that transition. it's time for change, root and branch change, and let's hope we see that leadership that has
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been sadly missing. a gathering calling forjustice for azeem will take place outside headingley this afternoon. today will prove that all yorkshire people are resilient. we are all prepared to undertake the hard work which is necessary to put yorkshire back at the pinnacle of english cricket. we all need to work together now and work hard to create this new wonderful dawn that is going to hopefully shine every morning at headingley, the most iconic cricket ground in world cricket. but with an exodus of the club's sponsors and headingley banned from hosting international cricket, rebuilding yorkshire's international reputation won't be easy. simon jones, bbc news. from monday, if you live in england will be able to book their covid boosterjab a month in advance. at the moment you have to wait six months after your second dose before making an appointment. boosters are being offered to those
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over 50 or at higher risk of covid. the government's latest covid figures for the uk show there were 30,693 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means on average, 36,163 new cases were reported every day, in the last week. just over 9,000 people were in hospital with covid as of thursday. there were 155 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which takes the average number of deaths over the past seven days to 169. more than 9.6 million people have received their boosterjab, this includes third doses for those with certain health conditions. it's thought to affect at least one in ten of us over our lifetime — but doctors still don't know what causes irritable bowel syndrome. now a new study has uncovered a potential clue that could make a big difference to how ibs is treated. richard westcott reports.
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if we were to do a colonoscopy on you, laura, it would look exactly like this, effectively normal... there's no simple test to diagnose it, and no simple treatment that works, but at least one in ten of us has irritable bowel syndrome, and as laura told me, the effects can be miserable. the pain, the bloating, i could not go to the supermarket, i could not go to the gym, i could not see friends. when we were allowed go out for social activities, i was not able to go out for dinner. i was not able to go to the office for work. but now, a huge global genetics study has thrown up an interesting clue to the origins of ibs. scientists from a0 institutions, including a team from here in cambridge, looked at the dna of more than 50,000 people with the condition. then they compared it to the dna of nearly half a million people without it. they spotted differences in their genes, but interestingly,
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the differences are similar to those that you might see in someone with anxiety, depression, or insomnia. what that tells us is that these conditions are likely to have a shared genetic origin. they are coming from the same place, effectively, and some of that is hard—wired. does that mean basically you could be born with a gene that could either give you ibs or anxiety or both, there's nothing you can do about it? yes, that's absolutely true and that's part of what we've demonstrated. some people who inherit these genetic variants, they may get ibs, other people may get anxiety, and some people will get both of those conditions. they are sort of hard—wired, if you like. ultimately, these findings could lead to new treatments. it gives us a new window on how we think about the management of ibs. a lot of treatments so far have very much focused on the gut and the abdomen and dietary therapies, and those do work for some people, but not for everybody. so what our study suggests is that we need to think about more about treatments that affect the interaction between the brain and the gut. and target some of those nervous processes, the neural processes, and that we may well see
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some benefit there. in your experience, did you feel you were taken seriously when you went to people with ibs? no, i saw a couple of gps, and i was told that it was just ibs and i was a bit... ..fobbed off. millions have ibs and it's thought many more remain undiagnosed. laura hopes this research can begin to change that. i think a lot of people are really ashamed to speak about it. and it's really difficult for them. it's something that impacts them on a daily basis and quite often for years, and theyjust, they would rather not bring attention to it, i think. let's return now to the marches in glasgow where around 100,000 people took part in a protest to demand more action to tackle climate change. anna brown was among them. she's part of fridays for future and has been working with the group organising today's events,
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tell us what you are marching today. today was all about showing the real leaders of the people on the streets and we need to listen to peoples stories who are most affected today was about standing and showing solidarity. d0 today was about standing and showing solidari . , ., ~ solidarity. do you think the delegates _ solidarity. do you think the delegates who _ solidarity. do you think the delegates who were - solidarity. do you think the delegates who were still i solidarity. do you think the i delegates who were still there solidarity. do you think the - delegates who were still there and listening? i delegates who were still there and listenin: ? ~ , listening? i think there listening, i think they _ listening? i think there listening, i think they sometimes _ listening? i think there listening, i think they sometimes don't - i think they sometimes don't understand the urgency of the message so we look at the case of reparations, 100 billion was promised for the most affected countries by 2020 in the last few days that date has been pushed back to 2023. people listen but then promises are not lived up to so that our words are not action is really happening. our words are not action is really happening-—
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happening. when you hear that methane is _ happening. when you hear that methane is going _ happening. when you hear that methane is going to _ happening. when you hear that methane is going to be - happening. when you hear that methane is going to be slashed happening. when you hear that - methane is going to be slashed and dozens of countries will phase out call and i promise again to stop deforestation they say city is different this time because that is serious money behind it, do you believe them? i serious money behind it, do you believe them?— believe them? i do believe the romises believe them? i do believe the promises and _ believe them? i do believe the promises and to _ believe them? i do believe the promises and to some - believe them? i do believe the promises and to some extent i believe them? i do believe the - promises and to some extent they think their promises will work such as phasing out coal and fossil fuels. we hear these promises, and phasing out deforestation by 2030. you never hear country's saying we're going to do this and this and this to get to that target so we are the targets but never know the steps that are going to happen. they are making these targets without a plan so until we see are set out plan it is very hard are that they will live up is very hard are that they will live up to the promises. do is very hard are that they will live up to the promises.— is very hard are that they will live up to the promises. do you mind me askin: up to the promises. do you mind me asking how — up to the promises. do you mind me asking how old _ up to the promises. do you mind me asking how old you _ up to the promises. do you mind me asking how old you are? _ up to the promises. do you mind me asking how old you are? i _ up to the promises. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am - up to the promises. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am 19 - asking how old you are? i am 19 ears asking how old you are? i am 19 years old- _ asking how old you are? i am 19 years old- how _ asking how old you are? i am 19 years old. how much _ asking how old you are? i am 19 years old. how much do - asking how old you are? i am 19 years old. how much do you - asking how old you are? i am 19 i years old. how much do you worry asking how old you are? i am 19 - years old. how much do you worry for our years old. how much do you worry for your future. — years old. how much do you worry for your future. the _ years old. how much do you worry for your future, the future _ years old. how much do you worry for your future, the future of _ years old. how much do you worry for your future, the future of your - your future, the future of your children, even grandchildren? i
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think it is worrying and can cause a lot of anxiety. see so many people being affected by it, we have extreme weather and food shortages, especially for people in the most affected countries like uganda and the philippines and then you start to see it here with the progress of floods we are having each year so it is really concerning and when you look at what is happening in the sea level rising and what is going to happen by 2050 i don't really understand how people are not worried because if you look at what is happening it is very hard to say we will all be fine if you look at what has happened in the level of inaction. , . , inaction. greta thunberg said yesterday _ inaction. greta thunberg said yesterday that _ inaction. greta thunberg said yesterday that cop26 - inaction. greta thunberg said yesterday that cop26 has - inaction. greta thunberg said i yesterday that cop26 has been inaction. greta thunberg said - yesterday that cop26 has been a failure so far, was she right? it is cop26, failure so far, was she right? it is come, we — failure so far, was she right? it is cop26, we have _ failure so far, was she right? it 3
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cop26, we have had 26 of these and back of the first when they knew the issue are new when it could end up so you can see there has been continuous failure on these promises, on the system. that's why we talk about the way to change the climate crisis is changing the system because the system has failed us. ., ~' system because the system has failed us. ., ~ , ., system because the system has failed us. . ~' i., ., system because the system has failed us. thank you for talking to us, anna. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller we have had a lot of cloud around today, and have seen a lot of rain, particularly in scotland in the rain has been heavy. it cleared before the end of the afternoon in many areas and brightened up and the blustery showers and rainbows to be had. the other part of today is close to this area of low pressure at severe gales affecting northern and eastern parts of scotland. the wind really still picking up a bit further as we go through most of this evening and overnight gusts of
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16 to 17 mph and maybe on more exposed hills and big waves hitting the coast. —— 60 to 70 mph. overnight temperatures stay from six degrees to 11 celsius. tomorrow those winds in northern and eastern parts of scotland, again they will be disruptive with some big waves on the coast and very slowly as we go through the day the strongest winds will ease. they will be accompanied ijy will ease. they will be accompanied by further outbreaks of rain before they will also ease. in the western side of the uk passing showers and as high pressure starts to build into the uk, it will be a dry day and sunny spells on the east, sunniest in the afternoon in north—east england and yorkshire and the temperatures are nudge down and where they have been today so it will feel a bit cooler out there about the wind is easing. with high pressure over us, it will be a cooler night going into monday
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morning. you will notice where most of the clear skies are, across eastern scotland and the eastern side of england this is where we will have the lowest temperatures as monday begins. low enough for a touch of frost and getting close to freezing in a few spots. into monday and the next atlantic frontal system heads away. many will stay dry on monday that from these fronts we will see admits of rain blew through northern ireland into scotland, particularly in the north and west. some of that when reaching reach into cumbria. on the whole, wales at the western side of england will be cloudy, mainly dry. stilla the western side of england will be cloudy, mainly dry. still a few bright sunny spells and eastern england. getting mild and the blue starting to pick up with that rain heading into the north—west. this weather system on the weekend was slowly edged southwards. probably not a huge amount of rain but mid with the possibility of seeing heavier bursts so keep an eye on those and those temperatures are staying in the mild side of average throughout next week. there is a weather warning at the moment from
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the met office for those strong ones the met office for those strong ones the northern east of scotland. you can look at that if you like online.
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hello this is bbc news with xxxx. the headlines... former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, accuses borisjohnson's government of acting
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in a "shameful" manner — over the owen paterson row. i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong and unworthy of this or indeed any government. rapper travis scott says he's "absolutely devastated" by the deaths of eight people at the texas festival where he was performing and pledges "total support" to police investigation after a crowd surge. at least 99 people have died in an oil tanker explosion in sierra leone after the lorry collided with another vehicle in the capital, freetown. tens of thousands of people march through glasgow — demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100 climate protests taking place across the uk. we must demand that our leaders stop holding meaningless summits and start taking meaningful action.
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sportsday will be coming up shortly. . . before that,

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