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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 6, 2021 4:00pm-4:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 4pm... former uk prime minister, sirjohn major, accuses borisjohnson�*s government of acting in a "shameful" manner over the owen paterson row. i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong and unworthy of this or indeed any government. tens of thousands of people take part in a march through glasgow, demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100 climate protests taking place across the uk. i'm ben boulos, live at the willington wetlands in derbyshire, finding out how natural sites like this are connected to tackling
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the climate crisis. at least eight people have died and dozens are hurt after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival in houston, texas. it's more doom and gloom for manchester united — beaten at home by their neighbours city to leave them with just one win in six league games. and coming up in half an hour here on bbc news... the media show takes a looks at how radio audiences have changed during the pandemic, and who the winners and losers are. the former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, has launched an attack on borisjohnson�*s goverment —
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calling its handling of owen paterson's recommended suspension as shameful and wrong. on wednesday, the commons voted in favour of changing the system that governs the behaviour of mps, despite a recommendation by the independent standards commissioner to suspend mr paterson for 30 days. ministers backtracked, following uproar from their own mps and opposition parties. here's our political correspondent, ione wells. if there's one person who knows the damage allegations of sleaze can cause, it is sirjohn major. the former conservative prime minister's own government in the 1990s was brought down in part due to the cash for questions scandal. mps were offered money in exchange for asking parliamentary questions. but sirjohn claimed that, while he set up a committee to look at standards in public life to tackle this, the current government has tried to defend this sort of behaviour over the last few days. i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong,
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and unworthy of this or indeed any government. it also had the effect of trashing the reputation of parliament. he is referring here to the government's handling of owen paterson, the former tory mp who was handed a 30—day suspension for breaching lobbying rules. the government tried to overturn his suspension and change the system that judges mps�* conduct. they asked mps to back the plans in the vote. shouting. but u—turned less than 2a hours later, after a furious backlash by the opposition and some conservatives. owen paterson has now resigned and the government has said the way this played out was a mistake. it says the prime minister has stated that paid lobbying and paid advocacy by ministers and mps is absolutely wrong. but sirjohn has claimed this is not a mistake made on its own. it seems to me, as a lifelong conservative, that much of what they are doing is very un—conservative in its behaviour. there are many strands to this that go well beyond
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the standards committee imbroglio of the last few days. there is a general whiff of "we are the masters now" about their behaviour. it has to stop and it has to stop soon. sirjohn�*s comments follow a difficult week internally for the conservative party. some of their mps are frustrated they put their necks on the line to vote with the government for it to then u—turn. voters will be the ultimate judge of how much damages judge of how much damage this causes the government. but the message to borisjohnson from his predecessor today was not to take any votes for granted. ione wells, bbc news. christopher hope is chief political correspondent and assistant editor at the daily telegraph — he told us that these comments byjohn major do matter. john major's comments really matter, he is a former tory prime minister, there aren't many of those, - so, when he say things, they count. in number ten, they will know he supported jeremy hunt - in the leadership campaign in 2019.
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he hated brexit, he campaigned i against brexit, or the way it turned l out, and it matters what he says. and he knows how damaging smears can be to a government. his government was brought very low in the '90s by sleaze _ |and that is a concern and mps right| now are meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding out how it went and, - ifjohn major is right here, - it is a worry for boris johnson. there is a real lessonj learned here, ithink. this concern about arrogance, an overbearing nature, - trying to boss parliament about, it really was a clash _ between the executive and the legislature - and borisjohnson's - government came off worse. but he is very loyal and what drove this was an idea to bring _ in an appeals process to the way mps are dealt with, but equally to tie - that to the owen paterson case . because there's a lot of sympathy of sympathy amongst his friends . on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself last year, i so it was an attempt to do some good for all mps. it was the wrong way to sell it.
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well, former conservative minister, david gauke, says sirjohn major's criticism isjustified. the attempt for the government to sort of step in the way of the house of commons disciplinary processes, to enforce a whip, you know, in other words order conservative mps to vote a particular way on matters which are normally left to the individual position of members of parliament, and to try to sort of stand in the way of that process i think it cannot be defended. i thinkjohn major is right to criticise that and he is right to say that this behaviour is not entirely novel or original for this government. there have been a number of occasions where the government has behaved badly in seeking to remove checks and balances and that does not do anything for the uk's system of government, it doesn't do anything for our international reputation
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and i think it is dangerous for us if this goes, if you like, unpunished, if the public aren't prepared tojust shrug their shoulders and i think it's important that conservative mps in particular make it very clear to the prime minister and to the government whips that they won't tolerate anything similar in future. so if you were in that position, you just said it shouldn't go unpunished, what would you expect to happen? what would you be asking for? i think if i was still a conservative mp, i would certainly be making it very clear that any attempt to interfere in businesses of this sort would not have my support. i think the prime minister, you know, should be aware that there is significant disquiet, i know, amongst my former colleagues as to what happened this week. there is a lot of debate about the position of the chief whip and the leader of the house of commons, but these are decisions that are made
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by the leader of the party, by the prime minister, by borisjohnson and, you know, i think conservative mps need to be very, very clear that this type of behaviour, undermining checks and balances, failing to abide by the highest standards of integrity, is not something that the country should be willing to tolerate. former conservative minister david gauke there. we have the latest covid figures from the government. of those who have tested positive, 30,693 have been reported. 155 deaths have also been recorded and thatis deaths have also been recorded and that is deaths within 28 days of a positive test. we willjust that is deaths within 28 days of a positive test. we will just scroll the page up for you so you can follow it with us. certainly, those
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main figures at the top are showing the numbers of people who have been vaccinated and, at the moment, we are looking at the population aged 12 and above. so of those who have received their first dose, 87.3 and fully inoculated is at 79.7% of the total population from the age of 12 upwards. so 30,693 people have tested positive and 155 people have died following a positive covid test. cop26 continues in glasgow with the focus on nature and the natural world. 45 governments from around the world are expected to pledge urgent action and investment to shift to more sustainable ways of farming. meanwhile, climate protests have got under way across the uk and ireland to demand action to tackle climate change. tens of thousands of demonstrators have braved pouring rain in glasgow and the event is expected to be
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the biggest protest during the un climate conference taking place in the city. about 200 similar marches are being held across the world. so it is a global movement today. our correspondent, alexandra mackenzie, is at glasgow green, where the march will finish later. has it finished now? i think, as you can possibly _ has it finished now? i think, as you can possibly see. — has it finished now? i think, as you can possibly see, there _ has it finished now? i think, as you can possibly see, there are - can possibly see, there are thousands of people here already but i think they are still coming, the march is still ongoing but the rally has started, that is under way and we do have a few guests here, some from glasgow and others from a bit further afield so hopefully we will have time to hear from all of them. what is your name and where you from? i what is your name and where you from? ., ., ., ., ., from? i am scott and i am from glasgow _ from? i am scott and i am from glasgow and — from? i am scott and i am from glasgow. and why _ from? i am scott and i am from glasgow. and why did _ from? i am scott and i am from glasgow. and why did you - from? i am scott and i am from glasgow. and why did you thinkj from? i am scott and i am from l glasgow. and why did you think it was so important _ glasgow. and why did you think it was so important to _ glasgow. and why did you think it was so important to be _ glasgow. and why did you think it was so important to be here - glasgow. and why did you think it was so important to be here on i glasgow. and why did you think it l was so important to be here on the march today? this was so important to be here on the march today?— march today? this is a seminal moment. _ march today? this is a seminal
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moment. the _ march today? this is a seminal moment, the climate - march today? this is a seminal moment, the climate crisis - march today? this is a seminal moment, the climate crisis is l moment, the climate crisis is escalating and what we know we need are real _ escalating and what we know we need are real solutions to tackle the climate — are real solutions to tackle the climate crisis. not cheap talk like ned zero— climate crisis. not cheap talk like ned zero x— climate crisis. not cheap talk like ned zero x 2015 that we know kicks the can— ned zero x 2015 that we know kicks the can of— ned zero x 2015 that we know kicks the can of climate action further down _ the can of climate action further down the — the can of climate action further down the road, so i am here with thousands— down the road, so i am here with thousands of people at this march to demand _ thousands of people at this march to demand real climate action now. you talk about demand real climate action now. 7m. talk about solutions and climate action. if there was one that was a priority, what would you say that would be? ., , ,, ., would be? real significant emission cuts that are _ would be? real significant emission cuts that are binding, _ would be? real significant emission cuts that are binding, not _ cuts that are binding, not voluntary, binding regulation. and if i turn to voluntary, binding regulation. and if i turn to you. — voluntary, binding regulation. fific if i turn to you, what is voluntary, binding regulation. fific if i turn to you, what is your name and where you from? i if i turn to you, what is your name and where you from?— if i turn to you, what is your name and where you from? i am anya, a student from _ and where you from? i am anya, a student from manchester - and where you from? i am anya, a l student from manchester university. i am student from manchester university. lam with— student from manchester university. lam with youth _ student from manchester university. i am with youth flame, _ student from manchester university. i am with youth flame, a _ student from manchester university. i am with youth flame, a youth- student from manchester university. i i am with youth flame, a youth group that suworts — i am with youth flame, a youth group that supports education _ i am with youth flame, a youth group that supports education around - i am with youth flame, a youth group that supports education around food i that supports education around food systems— that supports education around food systems and — that supports education around food systems and how— that supports education around food systems and how they— that supports education around food systems and how they affect - that supports education around food| systems and how they affect climate change _ systems and how they affect climate chan . e. �* ., , ., systems and how they affect climate chance. ~ ., , ., change. and what is the main message ou are change. and what is the main message you are bringing _ change. and what is the main message you are bringing here _ change. and what is the main message you are bringing here today? _ change. and what is the main message you are bringing here today? i- change. and what is the main message you are bringing here today? i think. you are bringing here today? i think it has been 27 _ you are bringing here today? i think it has been 27 years _ you are bringing here today? i think it has been 27 years of— you are bringing here today? i think it has been 27 years of copd - it has been 27 years of copd negotiations— it has been 27 years of copd negotiations and _ it has been 27 years of copd negotiations and yesterday. it has been 27 years of copd i negotiations and yesterday was it has been 27 years of copd -
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negotiations and yesterday was the first time _ negotiations and yesterday was the first time they _ negotiations and yesterday was the first time they had _ negotiations and yesterday was the first time they had a _ negotiations and yesterday was the first time they had a youth - negotiations and yesterday was the first time they had a youth centred | first time they had a youth centred day in _ first time they had a youth centred day in cop— first time they had a youth centred day in cop so— first time they had a youth centred day in cop so when— first time they had a youth centred day in cop so when they— first time they had a youth centred day in cop so when they say - first time they had a youth centred day in cop so when they say they. first time they had a youth centred . day in cop so when they say they are listening _ day in cop so when they say they are listening to _ day in cop so when they say they are listening to youth _ day in cop so when they say they are listening to youth voices, _ day in cop so when they say they are listening to youth voices, make - day in cop so when they say they are listening to youth voices, make surel listening to youth voices, make sure they are _ listening to youth voices, make sure they are actually _ listening to youth voices, make sure they are actually addressing - listening to youth voices, make sure they are actually addressing our - they are actually addressing our concerns— they are actually addressing our concerns and _ they are actually addressing our concerns and what _ they are actually addressing our concerns and what we _ they are actually addressing our concerns and what we are - they are actually addressing our concerns and what we are doingj they are actually addressing our - concerns and what we are doing here at the _ concerns and what we are doing here at the protest — concerns and what we are doing here at the protest is _ concerns and what we are doing here at the protest is making _ concerns and what we are doing here at the protest is making sure - concerns and what we are doing here at the protest is making sure we - concerns and what we are doing here at the protest is making sure we arei at the protest is making sure we are putting _ at the protest is making sure we are putting pressure _ at the protest is making sure we are putting pressure on— at the protest is making sure we are putting pressure on them, - at the protest is making sure we are putting pressure on them, making l putting pressure on them, making sure they— putting pressure on them, making sure they know— putting pressure on them, making sure they know that _ putting pressure on them, making sure they know that we _ putting pressure on them, making sure they know that we are - putting pressure on them, making sure they know that we are going i putting pressure on them, making. sure they know that we are going to keep pressure — sure they know that we are going to keep pressure until— sure they know that we are going to keep pressure until they— sure they know that we are going to keep pressure until they listen- sure they know that we are going to keep pressure until they listen to i keep pressure until they listen to what _ keep pressure until they listen to what we — keep pressure until they listen to what we want _ keep pressure until they listen to what we want to _ keep pressure until they listen to what we want to say. _ keep pressure until they listen to what we want to say.— keep pressure until they listen to what we want to say. what kind of ressures what we want to say. what kind of pressures you _ what we want to say. what kind of pressures you want _ what we want to say. what kind of pressures you want to _ what we want to say. what kind of pressures you want to put - what we want to say. what kind of pressures you want to put on - what we want to say. what kind of| pressures you want to put on them and how important is it to have that youth voice and put pressure on them? i youth voice and put pressure on them? ~ �* , . , , them? i think it's incredibly important _ them? i think it's incredibly important to _ them? i think it's incredibly important to have - them? i think it's incredibly important to have the - them? i think it's incredibly| important to have the youth them? i think it's incredibly - important to have the youth voice, the youth — important to have the youth voice, the youth voices _ important to have the youth voice, the youth voices very _ important to have the youth voice, the youth voices very punchy, - important to have the youth voice, the youth voices very punchy, it i important to have the youth voice, the youth voices very punchy, it is| the youth voices very punchy, it is our futures— the youth voices very punchy, it is our futures and _ the youth voices very punchy, it is our futures and so _ the youth voices very punchy, it is our futures and so much - the youth voices very punchy, it is our futures and so much climate l our futures and so much climate anxiety— our futures and so much climate anxiety these _ our futures and so much climate anxiety these days, _ our futures and so much climate anxiety these days, we - our futures and so much climate anxiety these days, we need - our futures and so much climate anxiety these days, we need a l anxiety these days, we need a solution, _ anxiety these days, we need a solution, otherwise _ anxiety these days, we need a solution, otherwise there - anxiety these days, we need a solution, otherwise there is i anxiety these days, we need a solution, otherwise there is a i solution, otherwise there is a breakdown _ solution, otherwise there is a breakdown-— solution, otherwise there is a breakdown. ., ,, , ., ., solution, otherwise there is a breakdown. ., ., , breakdown. thank you, we have people from all around _ breakdown. thank you, we have people from all around the _ breakdown. thank you, we have people from all around the world, _ breakdown. thank you, we have people from all around the world, from - breakdown. thank you, we have people from all around the world, from the - from all around the world, from the uk and further afield. what is your name and where have you come from to be here in glasgow? i name and where have you come from to be here in glasgow?— be here in glasgow? i have come from panama. be here in glasgow? i have come from panama- what — be here in glasgow? i have come from panama. what is _ be here in glasgow? i have come from panama. what is your _ be here in glasgow? i have come from panama. what is your experience - be here in glasgow? i have come from panama. what is your experience of i panama. what is your experience of climate change _ panama. what is your experience of climate change in _ panama. what is your experience of climate change in panama? - panama. what is your experience of climate change in panama? why - panama. what is your experience of - climate change in panama? why people live on islands —
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climate change in panama? why people live on islands and _ climate change in panama? why people live on islands and coastal _ climate change in panama? why people live on islands and coastal land - live on islands and coastal land already. — live on islands and coastal land already, one of the island says moving — already, one of the island says moving to _ already, one of the island says moving to the mainland so we are living _ moving to the mainland so we are living already with what is going on and here _ living already with what is going on and here we are deciding the future in glasgow— and here we are deciding the future in glasgow while, back home, we are already— in glasgow while, back home, we are already living and struggling and our island is going under water. do our island is going under water. dy: you our island is going under water. you think our island is going under water. drr you think what is being discussed here in glasgow is going to help the people in panama?— here in glasgow is going to help the people in panama? well, my hope is that they can — people in panama? well, my hope is that they can help — people in panama? well, my hope is that they can help the _ people in panama? well, my hope is that they can help the world, - people in panama? well, my hope is that they can help the world, not - that they can help the world, not 'ust that they can help the world, not just panama, but we should look at how indigenous people live, in nature — how indigenous people live, in nature, that would be one of the solutions — nature, that would be one of the solutions. . ~ nature, that would be one of the solutions. ., ,, , ., ., nature, that would be one of the solutions-— nature, that would be one of the solutions. ., ,, , ., ., ., solutions. thank you and where have ou come solutions. thank you and where have you come from? _ solutions. thank you and where have you come from? i _ solutions. thank you and where have you come from? i am _ solutions. thank you and where have you come from? i am from _ solutions. thank you and where have you come from? i am from brazil. i solutions. thank you and where have l you come from? i am from brazil. and what message — you come from? i am from brazil. and what message are _ you come from? i am from brazil. and what message are you _ you come from? i am from brazil. and what message are you coming - you come from? i am from brazil. and what message are you coming to - you come from? i am from brazil. and what message are you coming to the l what message are you coming to the rally with? we what message are you coming to the rall with? ~ ., _, what message are you coming to the rall with? ~ ., .., ., rally with? we are coming here from indiaenous rally with? we are coming here from indigenous peoples, _ rally with? we are coming here from indigenous peoples, gathering - rally with? we are coming here from indigenous peoples, gathering a - indigenous peoples, gathering a collective — indigenous peoples, gathering a collective group— indigenous peoples, gathering a collective group of— indigenous peoples, gathering a collective group of indigenous . collective group of indigenous people — collective group of indigenous people from _ collective group of indigenous people from all— collective group of indigenous people from all around - collective group of indigenous
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people from all around the i collective group of indigenous - people from all around the americas, so we _ people from all around the americas, so we are _ people from all around the americas, so we are here — people from all around the americas, so we are here to— people from all around the americas, so we are here to remember- people from all around the americas, so we are here to remember the - so we are here to remember the people _ so we are here to remember the people not— so we are here to remember the people not only— so we are here to remember the people not only from _ so we are here to remember the people not only from civil- so we are here to remember thel people not only from civil society but also — people not only from civil society but also from _ people not only from civil society but also from the _ people not only from civil society but also from the parties, - people not only from civil society but also from the parties, that i people not only from civil society. but also from the parties, that are negotiating — but also from the parties, that are negotiating our— but also from the parties, that are negotiating our future, _ but also from the parties, that are negotiating our future, to- but also from the parties, that are . negotiating our future, to remember their roots _ negotiating our future, to remember their roots and — negotiating our future, to remember their roots and where _ negotiating our future, to remember their roots and where they— negotiating our future, to remember their roots and where they are - their roots and where they are coming — their roots and where they are coming from _ their roots and where they are coming from. our— their roots and where they are coming from. our energy- their roots and where they are coming from. our energy as l their roots and where they are - coming from. our energy as human beings _ coming from. our energy as human beings because _ coming from. our energy as human beings. because if— coming from. our energy as human beings. because if you _ coming from. our energy as human beings. because if you remember,| coming from. our energy as human . beings. because if you remember, we as indigenous— beings. because if you remember, we as indigenous people _ beings. because if you remember, we as indigenous people still— beings. because if you remember, we as indigenous people still have - beings. because if you remember, we as indigenous people still have this i as indigenous people still have this connection — as indigenous people still have this connection i— as indigenous people still have this connection. i think— as indigenous people still have this connection. i think we _ as indigenous people still have this connection. i think we have - as indigenous people still have this connection. i think we have more l connection. ithink we have more solutions— connection. ithink we have more solutions that _ connection. ithink we have more solutions that are _ connection. ithink we have more solutions that are reasonable, i connection. i think we have more. solutions that are reasonable, just and fair— solutions that are reasonable, just and fair for— solutions that are reasonable, just and fairforthe _ solutions that are reasonable, just and fair for the people. _ solutions that are reasonable, just and fair for the people. find- solutions that are reasonable, 'ust and fair for the peoplei and fair for the people. and you want to get _ and fair for the people. and you want to get this _ and fair for the people. and you want to get this message - and fair for the people. and you want to get this message today | want to get this message today across to the world leaders and the people at cop26, how confident are you that you are getting their message across? i you that you are getting their message across?— you that you are getting their messaue across? ., , . ., message across? i am very confident, actually because _ message across? i am very confident, actually because i _ message across? i am very confident, actually because i think _ message across? i am very confident, actually because i think these - message across? i am very confident, actually because i think these types i actually because i think these types of messages — actually because i think these types of messages you _ actually because i think these types of messages you send _ actually because i think these types of messages you send one - actually because i think these types of messages you send one by- actually because i think these types of messages you send one by one, i actually because i think these types i of messages you send one by one, so ithink— of messages you send one by one, so i think each— of messages you send one by one, so i think each conversation _ of messages you send one by one, so i think each conversation you - of messages you send one by one, so i think each conversation you have - i think each conversation you have with each— i think each conversation you have with each person _ i think each conversation you have with each person that _ i think each conversation you have with each person that is _ i think each conversation you have with each person that is here - i think each conversation you havej with each person that is here from different— with each person that is here from different locations _ with each person that is here from different locations having - with each person that is here from different locations having the - with each person that is here from i different locations having the same purpose. _ different locations having the same purpose. we — different locations having the same purpose. we can _ different locations having the same purpose, we can have _ different locations having the same purpose, we can have this- different locations having the same purpose, we can have this coalition together— purpose, we can have this coalition together and — purpose, we can have this coalition together and we _ purpose, we can have this coalition together and we see _ purpose, we can have this coalition together and we see this— purpose, we can have this coalition together and we see this on- purpose, we can have this coalition together and we see this on the - together and we see this on the march— together and we see this on the march here _ together and we see this on the march here, people _ together and we see this on the march here, people from - together and we see this on the . march here, people from different groups _ march here, people from different groups of— march here, people from different groups of civil _ march here, people from different
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groups of civil society— march here, people from different groups of civil society marching. march here, people from differentj groups of civil society marching for the same — groups of civil society marching for the same purpose _ groups of civil society marching for the same purpose so _ groups of civil society marching for the same purpose so i _ groups of civil society marching for the same purpose so i think- groups of civil society marching for the same purpose so i think we - groups of civil society marching for| the same purpose so i think we are getting _ the same purpose so i think we are getting in— the same purpose so i think we are getting in a — the same purpose so i think we are getting in a good _ the same purpose so i think we are getting in a good place. _ the same purpose so i think we are getting in a good place.— getting in a good place. thank you all very much- _ getting in a good place. thank you all very much. that _ getting in a good place. thank you all very much. that is _ getting in a good place. thank you all very much. that is the - getting in a good place. thank you| all very much. that is the message from the uk, panama, from brazil and we are hoping to hear also from greta thunberg in a short while. before we do that, i believe that is vanessa, from uganda, who is speaking on the stage and she has become very good friends with greta thunberg. become very good friends with greta thunbera. . , become very good friends with greta thunbera. ., , ., become very good friends with greta thunber.. ., , ., ., ._ thunberg. that is right, we are away from the stage _ thunberg. that is right, we are away from the stage but _ thunberg. that is right, we are away from the stage but we _ thunberg. that is right, we are away from the stage but we did _ thunberg. that is right, we are away from the stage but we did mingle . from the stage but we did mingle with the people there and there are people from all over the world who have arrived from glasgow green and the message from the cop26 coalition who have organised the event today have said they won't tolerate warm words and long—term targets anymore, they want action now and that is the message we are getting from the stage behind us. qm.
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message we are getting from the stage behind us.— stage behind us. 0k, thank very much. stage behind us. 0k, thank very much- and _ stage behind us. 0k, thank very much. and greta _ stage behind us. 0k, thank very much. and greta thunberg - stage behind us. 0k, thank very much. and greta thunberg will. stage behind us. 0k, thank very i much. and greta thunberg will be speaking shortly, we believe very soon after vanessa nakate. let's remind you of the headlines. the former uk prime minister sir john major has accused borisjohnson's government of acting in a "shameful" manner over the owen paterson row. tens of thousands of people have been taking part in a march through glasgow demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100 taking place across the uk. at least eight people have died and dozens are hurt after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival in houston, texas. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin ra mjuan. hello, yes indeed, so much going on today and we start with the football. the pressure on manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer is sure
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to intensify after they lost 2—0 to neighbours manchester city at old trafford. city took the lead afterjust seven minutes when eric bailly turned joao cancelo's cross into his own net. they then made it two just before half—time when cancelo crossed again and bernardo silva somehow managed to squeeze in the finish. the result sees pep guardiola's side move up to second in the table, whilst it's united's fourth defeat in six premier league matches, and a second consecutive loss at home to one of their biggest rivals. which means more questions will be asked of the united boss. it is about starting on the front foot. we have had a couple of difficult weeks, a couple of good results last weeks, a couple of good results last week but today of a couple of steps back again after a few steps forward last week, but we need to have everyone back fresh in their minds, ready to go and we need to look more like what we started to look like before the liverpool game. i have to say towards the end of last season, start of this season, we looked a
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little bit more like what we wanted to. massive compliment to the players, the real artists, for the way we played and, you know, the result of course is so important, it is the reason why but to come here to old trafford, our rivals of the city, our neighbours and play the way we played, it was really good. in the rest of the premier league games, we are into the second half at brentford, who are losing to bottom side norwich who are on the hunt for theirfirst bottom side norwich who are on the hunt for their first league win of the season. hunt for their first league win of the season-— hunt for their first league win of the season. ' �* ., ., , the season. 2-1, brentford have 'ust scored from — the season. 2-1, brentford have 'ust scored from what i the season. 2-1, brentford have 'ust scored from what i i the season. 2-1, brentford have 'ust scored from what i am i the season. 2-1, brentford have 'ust scored from what i am seeing. h the season. 2-1, brentford havejust scored from what i am seeing. and | scored from what i am seeing. and chelsea look set to continue their fine form, beating burnley in that match. later on, brighten up against newcastle, who could end the day bottom depending on the norwich result. and three matches in the scottish premiership to update you on.
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hearts can go second for the time being at least, if they can hold on for victory against dundee united — who are also in the top four. it is currently goalless and sam johnstone became simmering. england are leading tonga 23—0 at half—time in the rugby union, despite missing owen farrell. johnny sexton marked his 100th cap for ireland with a try, four conversions and a penalty as they comfortably beat japan by 60 points to 5 in dublin. and after being dismantled by the all blacks last week, it doesn't get much easier for wales. south africa — number one ranked side in the world — come to the principality this evening. wales have won their last four meetings in cardiff though. at the t20 world cup, england are facing south africa in theirfinal group game with a semi—final spot all but guaranteed. only a huge defeat can stop england going through. their opponents put on a fantastic showing with the bat — setting england 190 to win. aiden markram and rassie van der dussen with and inspired 52 and 94 not out respectively.
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van de dussen with several big sixes. england currently on 37 without loss after four overs. they need just 87 to secure semi—final spot. meanwhile, australia had no trouble against the reigning champions west indies, taking a step closer to the semi—finals. josh hazlewood got four wickets in the west indies�* innings of 157—7. and the aussies comfortably knocked it off in reply. david warner with an unbeaten 89, as they chased it down with 22 balls to spare. we know, even if you take early wickets against the west indies, they are going to keep coming hard and at the last five overs is where i think they get a lot of runs, especially with pollard under bravo towards the end so they did an exceptionaljob to get to a total today. 160 i think was a par score, it was a very nice wicket and, with the bat, we can say that we are on a nice wicked tonight so it was great to get some momentum. novak djokovic will finish as the atp year end number one for a record seventh time. he made sure by beating poland's hubert hurkacz in three sets to reach the final of the paris
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masters. the win ensures djokovic has overhauled pete sampras�* record. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. at least eight people have died in a crush at the opening night of a music festival in texas. police in houston say panic broke out after the crowd began to surge towards the front of the stage at rapper travis scott's astroworld event. the show was called off shortly afterwards. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. a headline performance by rapper travis scott at the astroworld music festival in houston. thousands of concertgoers welcomed the event back after the pandemic, but, among the watchers, a nightmare was unfolding. everybody go to the middle... a crowd surge that has left at least eight people dead. the music played on as some
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of the injured were stretchered away, many not realising what was happening in front of them. the performance was halted several times for emergency services to reach people — and finally stopped when it was apparent many had been hurt. 17 people were taken to hospital, 11 in cardiac arrest. the crowd began to compress towards the front of the stage, ok, and that caused some panic, and it started causing some injuries. people began to fall out, become unconscious, and it created additional panic. the astroworld event began in 2018. a crowd of around 50,000 was expected at houston's nrg park. earlier in the day, there had been reports of people storming the event's perimeter to get into the concert. police in the city say they are now investigating what caused the crush, and are asking people not to speculate, but focus on the victims.
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tonight's focus though needs to be on the families, - and on the lives that we lost, i many of them extremely young, tragically young. organisers said on social media, "our hearts are with the astroworld festival family, "especially those we lost and their loved ones." they say they are now supporting local officials to find out what went wrong. kathryn stanczyszyns, bbc news. back to one of our main stories now, and talks at cop will turn to the role nature can play in achieving those targets. our presenter ben boulos is at willington wetlands in derbyshire for us today. hello. hello. how peaceful, how tranquil, how calm this places as dusk falls, and it feels so far
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removed from glasgow and the cop26 summit, but what happens in habitats like this is directly connected with the goals they are achieving or trying to achieve their of tackling climate change. one of the big projects here has been reintroducing beavers into the site and there is evidence of that. look at this track, it looks as if it has the hallmarks of a beaver trail. there are other elements to the project as well. i want to speak to the derbyshire wildlife trust. tell us about the project and why it was so important to get this done here. so important to get this done here. ’sr down important to get this done here. 5r down stream willington floods on a regular basis so that, so we are bringing in the beavers to stop that rush of water down. bud bringing in the beavers to stop that rush of water down.— rush of water down. and you don't need to encourage _ rush of water down. and you don't need to encourage that, _ rush of water down. and you don't need to encourage that, they - rush of water down. and you don't need to encourage that, they do i rush of water down. and you don't i need to encourage that, they do that themselves. need to encourage that, they do that themselves-— themselves. they do it themselves, and they need _
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themselves. they do it themselves, and they need to _ themselves. they do it themselves, and they need to water _ themselves. they do it themselves, and they need to water to _ themselves. they do it themselves, and they need to water to hide - themselves. they do it themselves, and they need to water to hide and l and they need to water to hide and if needs be and that is why they build the dams, so they have a deep refuge. we don't know whether they will hear, it is up to the individual beaver. there is plenty of deep water for them to hide in. and i have been here all day, quiet as a field mouse trying to spot them and haven't spotted a single one but there is evidence they are here and that they are thriving. yes. there is evidence they are here and that they are thriving.— there is evidence they are here and that they are thriving. yes, we have evidence here, _ that they are thriving. yes, we have evidence here, like _ that they are thriving. yes, we have evidence here, like the _ that they are thriving. yes, we have evidence here, like the sticks - that they are thriving. yes, we have evidence here, like the sticks we i evidence here, like the sticks we found yesterday. you can see the gnaw marks where they are trying to reach the layout under the bark and you can see here they have taken all of the cambrian layer off it. this looks like they _ of the cambrian layer off it. this looks like they are _ of the cambrian layer off it. this looks like they are destroying their habitat. iflat looks like they are destroying their habitat. ., ., ., ., , ., habitat. not at all, what they are doinu is habitat. not at all, what they are doing is essentially _ habitat. not at all, what they are doing is essentially a _ habitat. not at all, what they are doing is essentially a copper - habitat. not at all, what they are | doing is essentially a copper sink, a traditional woodland management tool that we have done for years to replicate how nature would do it —— coppicing. it allows more limbs to shoot out on a tree which could prolong the life of the tree for
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hundreds of years if not more. you can see this stick is willow, where it has fallen into the water, the birds have started to grow and shoot and so when beaver drop the limbs into the water, they will start to grow and we have seen this where they have dropped the trees in and the dam has started to vegetate and the dam has started to vegetate and it has the added benefit of holding back more silt in the and filtering out pollutants. but when ou filtering out pollutants. but when you introduce _ filtering out pollutants. but when you introduce a _ filtering out pollutants. but when you introduce a species _ filtering out pollutants. but when you introduce a species to - filtering out pollutants. but when you introduce a species to the - you introduce a species to the habitat, it has a knock—on effect. what about the fish? are they not upset the beavers are here? the university of _ upset the beavers are here? iie: university of southampton upset the beavers are here? tie: university of southampton have recently done a study and have found that fish, particularly looking at brown trout, the fish have grown more numerous and larger in size in deeper pools. i more numerous and larger in size in deeper pools-— deeper pools. i always thought they ate fish, but — deeper pools. i always thought they ate fish, but they _ deeper pools. i always thought they ate fish, but they don't. _ deeper pools. i always thought they ate fish, but they don't. no, - deeper pools. i always thought they ate fish, but they don't. no, they i ate fish, but they don't. no, they are very much — ate fish, but they don't. no, they are very much herbivores, - ate fish, but they don't. no, they are very much herbivores, they i ate fish, but they don't. no, they l are very much herbivores, they do not eat fish. are very much herbivores, they do rrot eat fish-— not eat fish. you learn something new every — not eat fish. you learn something new every day- — not eat fish. you learn something new every day. thank _ not eat fish. you learn something new every day. thank you - not eat fish. you learn something new every day. thank you very i not eat fish. you learn something i new every day. thank you very much
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indeed. and the whole day, we have been looking out, there are two pairs of beavers that were released some time ago, looking out for them all day. i'm told they are crepuscular, that means they appear at dawn and dusk and as we appear to be hitting the crepe school hour, we mayjust be hitting the crepe school hour, we may just get a be hitting the crepe school hour, we mayjust get a sight of those elusive creatures ? like the crepuscular hour. you are losing the light but it still looks absolutely beautiful. thank you very much. i am hoping to bring you some latest news concerning that a tragedy that took place at the festival, travis scott's festival in houston, texas. a treat here saying he is committed to working with the houston community to heal and support the families in need —— back a tweet. i will have a quick look to see if there is a little bit more coming
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from him, if you bear with me. there is a little bit more coming from him, if you bearwith me. i will keep looking but to let you know there is some reaction that has come from the rapper travis scott, where eight people died following a crowd surge. he says he is committed to working with the houston community to heal and to support the families that are in need. more as and when we get it. it's thought to affect at least one in ten of us over our lifetime — but doctors still don't know what causes irritable bowel syndrome. a new study from addenbrooke's hospital, and the university of cambridge, has uncovered a potential clue that could make a big difference to how ibs is treated. richard westcott reports. if we were to do a colonoscopy on you, laura, it would look exactly like this, effectively normal... there's no simple test to diagnose it, and no simple treatment that works, but at least one in ten of us has irritable bowel syndrome and, as laura told me, the effects can be miserable.
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the pain, the bloating, i could not go to the supermarket, i could not go to the gym, i could not see friends. when we were allowed go out for social activities, i was not able to go out for dinner. i was not able to go to the office for work. but now, a huge global genetics study has thrown up an interesting clue as to the origins of ibs. scientists from a0 institutions, including a team from here in cambridge, looked at the dna of more than 50,000 people with the condition. then they compared it to the dna of nearly half a million people without it. they spotted differences in their genes, but interestingly, the differences are similar to those that you might see in someone with anxiety, depression, or insomnia. what that tells us is that these conditions are likely to have a shared genetic origin.
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they are coming from the same place, effectively, and some of that is hard—wired. does that mean basically you could be born with a gene that could either give you ibs or anxiety or both, there's nothing you can do about it? yes, that's absolutely true and that's part of what we've demonstrated. some people who inherit these genetic variants, they may get ibs, other people may get anxiety, and some people will get both of those conditions. they are sort of hard—wired, if you like. ultimately, these findings could lead to new treatments. it gives us a new window on how we think about the management of ibs. a lot of treatments so far have very much focused on the gut and the abdomen and dietary therapies, and those work for some people, but not for everybody. so what our study suggests is that we need to think about more about treatments that affect the interaction between the brain and the gut. and target some of those nervous processes, the neural processes, and that we may well see some benefit there. in your experience, did you feel you were taken seriously when you went to people with ibs? no, i saw a couple of gps, and i was told that it was just ibs and i was a bit... ..fobbed off.
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millions have ibs and it's thought many more remain undiagnosed.

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