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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 6, 2021 3:00pm-3:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. former uk prime minister sirjohn major accuses borisjohnson�*s government of acting in a "shameful" manner over the owen paterson row. i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong and unworthy of this or indeed any government. tens of thousands of people take part in a march through glasgow, demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100 taking place across the uk. at least eight people have died and dozens are hurt after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival in houston, texas. the organisation which enforces human rights laws warns it could take legal action against yorkshire county cricket club, as another cricketer comes forward to say he was the subject of racist abuse while
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playing for the county. i'm ben boulos, live at the willington wetlands nature reserve , where we are finding out how natural habitats like this are helping to tackle the climate crisis. and it's just one win in six premier league games for manchester united, after being beaten by neighbours manchester city 2—0 at old trafford this afternoon. and, in half an hour here on bbc news, sustainability is the name of the game. that's coming up in click. the former conservative prime
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minister sirjohn major has launched an attack on borisjohnson�*s goverment, calling its handling of owen paterson's recommended suspension, "shameful and wrong". on wednesday, the commons voted in favour of changing the system that governs the behaviour of mps, despite a recommendation by the independent standards commissioner to suspend mr paterson for 30 days. ministers backtracked following uproar from their own mps and opposition parties. here's our political correspondent ione wells. if there's one person who knows the damage allegations of sleaze can cause, it is sirjohn major. the former conservative prime minister's own government in the 1990s was brought down in part due to the cash for questions scandal. mps were offered money in exchange for asking parliamentary questions. but sirjohn claimed that, while he set up a committee to look at standards in public life to tackle this, the current government has tried to defend this sort of behaviour over the last few days.
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i think the way the government handled that was shameful and wrong, and unworthy of this or indeed any government. it also had the effect of trashing the reputation of parliament. he is referring here to the government's handling of owen paterson, the former tory mp who was handed a 30—day suspension for breaching lobbying rules. the government tried to overturn his suspension and change the system that judges mps�* conduct. they asked mps to back the plans in the vote. shouting. but u—turned less than 2a hours later, after a furious backlash by the opposition and some conservatives. owen paterson has now resigned and the government has said the way this played out was a mistake. it says the prime minister has stated that paid lobbying and paid advocacy by ministers and mps is absolutely wrong. but sirjohn has claimed this is not a mistake made on its own. it seems to me, as a lifelong conservative, that much
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of what they are doing is very un—conservative in its behaviour. there are many strands to this that go well beyond the standards committee imbroglio of the last few days. there is a general whiff of "we are the masters now" about their behaviour. it has to stop and it has to stop soon. sirjohn�*s comments follow a difficult week internally for the conservative party. some of their mps are frustrated they put their necks on the line to vote with the government for it to then u—turn. voters will be the ultimate judge of how much this damages the government. but the message to borisjohnson from his predecessor today was not to take any votes for granted. ione wells, bbc news. christopher hope is chief political correspondent and assistant editor at the daily telegraph. he told us that these comments byjohn major do matter. john major's comments really matter, he is a _ john major's comments really matter, he is a former—
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john major's comments really matter, he is a former tory— john major's comments really matter, he is a former tory prime _ john major's comments really matter, he is a former tory prime minister, i he is a former tory prime minister, there _ he is a former tory prime minister, there aren't — he is a former tory prime minister, there aren't many— he is a former tory prime minister, there aren't many of _ he is a former tory prime minister, there aren't many of those, - he is a former tory prime minister, there aren't many of those, when i he is a former tory prime minister, i there aren't many of those, when he say things. _ there aren't many of those, when he say things. they— there aren't many of those, when he say things, they can. _ there aren't many of those, when he say things, they can. a _ there aren't many of those, when he say things, they can. a number- there aren't many of those, when hej say things, they can. a number ten, say things, they can. a numberten, they say things, they can. a number ten, they will— say things, they can. a number ten, they will know— say things, they can. a number ten, they will know he _ say things, they can. a number ten, they will know he supported - say things, they can. a number ten, they will know he supported jeremyl they will know he supported jeremy hunt in _ they will know he supported jeremy hunt in the — they will know he supported jeremy hunt in the leadership _ they will know he supported jeremy hunt in the leadership campaign- they will know he supported jeremy hunt in the leadership campaign inl hunt in the leadership campaign in 2019 _ hunt in the leadership campaign in 2019 he _ hunt in the leadership campaign in 2019 he hated _ hunt in the leadership campaign in 2019. he hated brexit, _ hunt in the leadership campaign in 2019. he hated brexit, he- hunt in the leadership campaign in- 2019. he hated brexit, he campaigned against _ 2019. he hated brexit, he campaigned against brexit. — 2019. he hated brexit, he campaigned against brexit, all— 2019. he hated brexit, he campaigned against brexit, all the _ 2019. he hated brexit, he campaigned against brexit, all the way— 2019. he hated brexit, he campaigned against brexit, all the way it _ against brexit, all the way it turned — against brexit, all the way it turned out, _ against brexit, all the way it turned out, and _ against brexit, all the way it turned out, and it— against brexit, all the way it turned out, and it matters. against brexit, all the way it. turned out, and it matters what against brexit, all the way it - turned out, and it matters what he says and _ turned out, and it matters what he says and he — turned out, and it matters what he says and he knows _ turned out, and it matters what he says and he knows how— turned out, and it matters what he says and he knows how damagingl says and he knows how damaging smears _ says and he knows how damaging smears can — says and he knows how damaging smears can be _ says and he knows how damaging smears can be to— says and he knows how damaging smears can be to a _ says and he knows how damaging smears can be to a government. i says and he knows how damaging. smears can be to a government. his government— smears can be to a government. his government was _ smears can be to a government. his government was brought _ smears can be to a government. his government was brought very- smears can be to a government. his government was brought very low. smears can be to a government. his government was brought very low in the i990s _ government was brought very low in the i990s by— government was brought very low in the 1990s by sleaze _ government was brought very low in the 1990s by sleaze and _ government was brought very low in the 1990s by sleaze and that - government was brought very low in the 1990s by sleaze and that is - government was brought very low in the 1990s by sleaze and that is a - the 1990s by sleaze and that is a concern — the 1990s by sleaze and that is a concern and _ the 1990s by sleaze and that is a concern and mps _ the 1990s by sleaze and that is a concern and mps right _ the 1990s by sleaze and that is a concern and mps right now- the 1990s by sleaze and that is a concern and mps right now are l concern and mps right now are meeting — concern and mps right now are meeting their _ concern and mps right now are meeting their constituents, i concern and mps right now are - meeting their constituents, speaking to them, _ meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding _ meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding out _ meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding out how— meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding out how it _ meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding out how it went- meeting their constituents, speaking to them, finding out how it went and| to them, finding out how it went and ifjohh_ to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major — to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major is — to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major is right— to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major is right here, _ to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major is right here, it- to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major is right here, it is- to them, finding out how it went and ifjohn major is right here, it is a - ifjohn major is right here, it is a worry— ifjohn major is right here, it is a worry for— ifjohn major is right here, it is a worry for boris _ ifjohn major is right here, it is a worry for boris johnson. - ifjohn major is right here, it is a worry for boris johnson. there . ifjohn major is right here, it is aj worry for borisjohnson. there is ifjohn major is right here, it is a l worry for boris johnson. there is a real lesson — worry for boris johnson. there is a real lesson learned _ worry for boris johnson. there is a real lesson learned here, - worry for boris johnson. there is a real lesson learned here, i- worry for boris johnson. there is a real lesson learned here, i think. i real lesson learned here, i think. there _ real lesson learned here, i think. there is— real lesson learned here, i think. there is concern _ real lesson learned here, i think. there is concern about _ real lesson learned here, i think. | there is concern about arrogance, and overbearing _ there is concern about arrogance, and overbearing nature, _ there is concern about arrogance, and overbearing nature, trying - there is concern about arrogance, and overbearing nature, trying to| and overbearing nature, trying to boss _ and overbearing nature, trying to boss parliament _ and overbearing nature, trying to boss parliament about, - and overbearing nature, trying to boss parliament about, it - and overbearing nature, trying to boss parliament about, it really. and overbearing nature, trying to i boss parliament about, it really was a clash _ boss parliament about, it really was a clash between _ boss parliament about, it really was a clash between the _ boss parliament about, it really was a clash between the executive - boss parliament about, it really was a clash between the executive and i boss parliament about, it really wasj a clash between the executive and a legislator— a clash between the executive and a legislator and — a clash between the executive and a legislator and a _ a clash between the executive and a legislator and a boris _ a clash between the executive and a legislator and a boris johnson's - legislator and a boris johnson's government— legislator and a borisjohnson's government came _ legislator and a borisjohnson's government came off— legislator and a borisjohnson's government came off worse. i legislator and a boris johnson's i government came off worse. but legislator and a boris johnson's - government came off worse. but he is very loyal— government came off worse. but he is very loyal and — government came off worse. but he is very loyal and what— government came off worse. but he is very loyal and what drove _ government came off worse. but he is very loyal and what drove this - government came off worse. but he is very loyal and what drove this was - very loyal and what drove this was an idea _ very loyal and what drove this was an idea to— very loyal and what drove this was an idea to bring _ very loyal and what drove this was an idea to bring in— very loyal and what drove this was an idea to bring in an _ very loyal and what drove this was an idea to bring in an appeals - an idea to bring in an appeals process— an idea to bring in an appeals process to _ an idea to bring in an appeals process to the _ an idea to bring in an appeals process to the way _ an idea to bring in an appeals process to the way mps - an idea to bring in an appeals process to the way mps are l an idea to bring in an appeals - process to the way mps are dealt with, _ process to the way mps are dealt with. but— process to the way mps are dealt with, but equally— process to the way mps are dealt with, but equally to _ process to the way mps are dealt with, but equally to try— process to the way mps are dealt with, but equally to try that - process to the way mps are dealt with, but equally to try that to i process to the way mps are dealtl with, but equally to try that to the owen _ with, but equally to try that to the owen paterson _ with, but equally to try that to the owen paterson case _ with, but equally to try that to the owen paterson case because -
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with, but equally to try that to the . owen paterson case because there's with, but equally to try that to the - owen paterson case because there's a lot of sympathy — owen paterson case because there's a lot of sympathy between _ owen paterson case because there's a lot of sympathy between his _ owen paterson case because there's a lot of sympathy between his friends i lot of sympathy between his friends on the _ lot of sympathy between his friends on the backbenches, _ lot of sympathy between his friends on the backbenches, given - lot of sympathy between his friends on the backbenches, given his- lot of sympathy between his friends on the backbenches, given his wifel on the backbenches, given his wife kitted _ on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself— on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself last— on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself last year, _ on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself last year, so - on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself last year, so it - on the backbenches, given his wife killed herself last year, so it was . killed herself last year, so it was an attempt— killed herself last year, so it was an attempt to _ killed herself last year, so it was an attempt to do _ killed herself last year, so it was an attempt to do some - killed herself last year, so it was an attempt to do some good - killed herself last year, so it was an attempt to do some good forl killed herself last year, so it was . an attempt to do some good for all mps, _ an attempt to do some good for all mps. it— an attempt to do some good for all mps. it was— an attempt to do some good for all mps. it was the— an attempt to do some good for all mps, it was the wrong _ an attempt to do some good for all mps, it was the wrong way- an attempt to do some good for all mps, it was the wrong way to - an attempt to do some good for all mps, it was the wrong way to sell. mps, it was the wrong way to sell it. former conservative minister, david gauke, says sirjohn major's comments arejustified. the attempt for the government to sort of step in the way of the house of commons disciplinary processes, to enforce a whip, you know, in other words order conservative mps to vote a particular way on matters which are normally left to the individual position of members of parliament, and to try to sort of stand in the way of that process i think it cannot be defended. i thinkjohn major is right to criticise that and he is right to say that this behaviour is not entirely novel or original for this government. there have been a number of occasions where the government has behaved badly in seeking to remove checks and balances and that does not do anything
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for the uk's system of government, it doesn't do anything for our international reputation and i think it is dangerous for us if this goes, if you like, unpunished. if the public aren't prepared to just shrug their shoulders and i think it's important that conservative mps in particular make it very clear to the prime minister and to the government whips that they won't tolerate anything similar in future. so if you were in that position, you just said it shouldn't go unpunished, what would you expect to happen? what would you be asking for? i think if i was still a conservative mp, i would certainly be making it very clear that any attempt to interfere in businesses of this sort would not have my support. i think the prime minister, you know, should be aware that there is significant disquiet, i know, amongst my former colleagues as to what happened this week.
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there is a lot of debate about the position of the chief whip and the leader of the house of commons, but these are decisions that are made by the leader of the party, by the prime minister, by borisjohnson and, you know, i think conservative mps need to be very, very clear that this type of behaviour, undermining checks and balances, failing to abide by the highest standards of integrity, is not something that the country should be willing to tolerate. that was a david gauke speaking earlier. cop26 continues in glasgow with the focus on nature and the natural world. 45 governments from around the world are expected to pledge urgent action and investment to shift to more sustainable ways of farming. meanwhile, climate protests have got under way across the uk and ireland to demand action to tackle climate change. tens of thousands of demonstrators have braved pouring rain in glasgow
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and the event is expected to be the biggest protest during the un climate conference taking place in the city. about 200 similar marches are being held across the world. there is a march going on at the moment and it is going to be heading where alexandra mckenzie is, our correspondent on the green and a number of activists are going to be speaking once the protest march comes to an end, i believe? yes. comes to an end, i believe? yes, that is absolutely _ comes to an end, i believe? yes, that is absolutely right. _ comes to an end, i believe? yes, that is absolutely right. i - comes to an end, i believe? yes, that is absolutely right. i am - comes to an end, i believe? us: that is absolutely right. i am here on glasgow green in the east end of the city of glasgow and you can probably see behind me what we are seeing at the moment, just some of those activists arriving. they have been walking for the last couple of hours, we understand tens of thousands of them. they left
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kelvingrove park in the west end of the city and they have been walking for about three miles. so this is just the very beginning of them starting to arrive. we are expecting glasgow green to fill up with thousands upon thousands of activists and the reason they are coming here, there is also a stage beside me, they have had quite a lot of trouble with the stage because of the weather here, you mentioned the weather. we have had rain, we have had wind and thankfully the sun is shining a little bit at the moment but they have had to swap stages. the stage they had planned to do the rally on, it was too dangerous so they have a more covered stage that they have a more covered stage that they are planning to use. now the march, it has been, we understand quite peaceful, some people did chained themselves to railings on a bridge quite close to here, but they have been removed by police and taken away by police and we are
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expecting to hear greta thunberg. we are not quite sure what time, there is still a lot of people to arrive here on the green. she also spoke at george square yesterday and she was very critical of the conference, of cop26. she said it had been a talking shop, she said it had just been business as usual, she said it had been a failure and she said it wasjust more blah blah blah, so we will be hearing from her and also some other activists a bit later on. we are seeing all of these protests and ijust wonder if we are seeing all of these protests and i just wonder if what they are saying and the action that is being taken is being acknowledged by those carrying out those really heavy negotiations?— negotiations? they are. the activists themselves - negotiations? they are. the l activists themselves obviously negotiations? they are. the - activists themselves obviously hope thatis activists themselves obviously hope that is the case, but they are saying that the decisions and the actions need to come from grass roots level and are not from people
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within the conference. and they have sent out another message today from cop26 coalition, the organisers of today's event, which is the biggest gathering of cop26 and they have said we won't tolerate warm words and long—term targets anymore, we want action now, so they are hoping those words will be heard and acknowledged by people within the conference and all those world leaders that were here in the week. 0k, leaders that were here in the week. ok, we are probably going to come back to you once the crowds villa behind you, and the climate activists take to the stage, which includes greta thunberg as well. we are going to stay with cop26. it is focusing on nature this week. our presenter ben boulos is at willington wetlands in derbyshire for us today. hello. isn't this the most tranquil,
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beautiful, peaceful place, it feels so far removed from glasgow, 300 miles north of where we are, but it is habitats like this that could help us solve some of those climate change challenges that they are desperately trying to solve up at the cop26 summit. one of the things they have been doing here is reintroducing beavers into the area, into the habitat, in a limited and a controlled way. to find out more about that, with me is steve birkenshaw, one of the volunteers at the wetlands here. you were involved in releasing the beavers into the wetlands, tell us about the project. very much so, it is the culmination of a tot— very much so, it is the culmination of a tot of— very much so, it is the culmination of a lot of hard work by a lot of people — of a lot of hard work by a lot of people i— of a lot of hard work by a lot of people. i have been involved here for some — people. i have been involved here for some years now but on that particular— for some years now but on that particular day, the first pair went in behind — particular day, the first pair went in behind me into the pooland it was a _ in behind me into the pooland it was a great _ in behind me into the pooland it was a great privilege to transport them _ was a great privilege to transport them to— was a great privilege to transport them to their final destination. thert— them to their final destination. then it — them to their final destination. then it really hit home to me, this is the _ then it really hit home to me, this is the first— then it really hit home to me, this is the first time in 800 years that these _ is the first time in 800 years that these creatures have been back in derbyshire — these creatures have been back in
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derbyshire and it is a tremendous moment— derbyshire and it is a tremendous moment for all of us, so very pleased _ moment for all of us, so very pleased-— moment for all of us, so very leased. . . . . ., , pleased. what a great thing to be involved in _ pleased. what a great thing to be involved in and _ pleased. what a great thing to be involved in and when _ pleased. what a great thing to be involved in and when you - pleased. what a great thing to be involved in and when you got - involved in and when you got involved in and when you got involved in and when you got involved in it, you started getting involved in it, you started getting involved in it, you started getting involved in the wetlands here when you retired, how did you get involved? it you retired, how did you get involved?— you retired, how did you get involved? . , . involved? it was always my aim when i came out involved? it was always my aim when i came out of— involved? it was always my aim when i came out of full-time _ involved? it was always my aim when i came out of full-time work - involved? it was always my aim when i came out of full-time work to - involved? it was always my aim when i came out of full-time work to stay l i came out of full—time work to stay active _ i came out of full—time work to stay active and _ i came out of full—time work to stay active and do something outdoors in the countryside, preferably with other— the countryside, preferably with other people as well. i have been a member— other people as well. i have been a member of— other people as well. i have been a member of the wildlife trust for some _ member of the wildlife trust for some years and i thought, well, let's_ some years and i thought, well, let's see — some years and i thought, well, let's see what volunteering opportunities they have to offer. six years— opportunities they have to offer. six years ago, i did my first day with— six years ago, i did my first day with them — six years ago, i did my first day with them and have never looked back and since _ with them and have never looked back and since then, it has been ongoing. just hoping _ and since then, it has been ongoing. just hoping to release the beavers isn't where it ended, you have been involved in actively monitoring, what have you seen? we involved in actively monitoring, what have you seen?— involved in actively monitoring, what have you seen? we have seen where they — what have you seen? we have seen where they headed _ what have you seen? we have seen where they headed around - what have you seen? we have seen where they headed around the - where they headed around the reserve. — where they headed around the reserve, we have 44 hectares, it is a trig _ reserve, we have 44 hectares, it is a trig area — reserve, we have 44 hectares, it is a big area and we have four that are e>
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settting _ indications as to where they will be settling down, where they are keeping — settling down, where they are keeping food and that sort of thing and in _ keeping food and that sort of thing and in due — keeping food and that sort of thing and in due course, we are looking to see a _ and in due course, we are looking to see a lodge — and in due course, we are looking to see a lodge or a burrow.— see a lodge or a burrow. steve, thank yom _ see a lodge or a burrow. steve, thank you. graham _ see a lodge or a burrow. steve, thank you. graham osborne - see a lodge or a burrow. steve, thank you. graham osborne is l see a lodge or a burrow. steve, - thank you. graham osborne is from severn trent water. your company got involved in supporting this project. why are you so fussed about beavers being in the why are you so fussed about beavers bein- in the wetlands? why are you so fussed about beavers being in the why are you so fussed about beavers bein- in the wetlands? peavey why are you so fussed about beavers being in the why are you so fussed about beavers bein- in the wetlands? peavey is being in the wetlands? peavey is basicall a being in the wetlands? peavey is basically a furry _ being in the wetlands? peavey is basically a furry water _ being in the wetlands? peavey is basically a furry water company. | basically a furry water company. what _ basically a furry water company. what is — basically a furry water company. what is good _ basically a furry water company. what is good for _ basically a furry water company. what is good for nature - basically a furry water company. what is good for nature is - basically a furry water company. what is good for nature is goodl basically a furry water company. i what is good for nature is good for water— what is good for nature is good for water and — what is good for nature is good for waterand our— what is good for nature is good for water and our great _ what is good for nature is good for water and our great big _ what is good for nature is good for water and our great big major- what is good for nature is good forl water and our great big major boost is about— water and our great big major boost is about improving _ water and our great big major boost is about improving 5,000 _ water and our great big major boost is about improving 5,000 hectaresl water and our great big major boost. is about improving 5,000 hectares of lriodiversity— is about improving 5,000 hectares of biodiversity improvement _ is about improving 5,000 hectares of biodiversity improvement across - is about improving 5,000 hectares of biodiversity improvement across the i biodiversity improvement across the seven— biodiversity improvement across the seven train— biodiversity improvement across the seven train catchment _ biodiversity improvement across the seven train catchment and _ biodiversity improvement across the seven train catchment and this - biodiversity improvement across the seven train catchment and this is - seven train catchment and this is one of— seven train catchment and this is one of the — seven train catchment and this is one of the amazing _ seven train catchment and this is one of the amazing projects - seven train catchment and this is one of the amazing projects that| one of the amazing projects that will help— one of the amazing projects that will help us— one of the amazing projects that will help us treat _ one of the amazing projects that will help us treat the _ one of the amazing projects that will help us treat the water - one of the amazing projects that will help us treat the water and i will help us treat the water and help manage _ will help us treat the water and help manage climate _ will help us treat the water and help manage climate change i will help us treat the water and help manage climate change inj will help us treat the water and - help manage climate change in the lon- help manage climate change in the long term — help manage climate change in the long term lry— help manage climate change in the long term by reducing _ help manage climate change in the long term by reducing energy- long term by reducing energy consumption _ long term by reducing energy consumption.— long term by reducing energy consumtion. , . , ., consumption. help me as someone cominu consumption. help me as someone comin: to consumption. help me as someone coming to this _ consumption. help me as someone coming to this as _ consumption. help me as someone coming to this as a _ consumption. help me as someone coming to this as a lay _ consumption. help me as someone coming to this as a lay person, - consumption. help me as someonej coming to this as a lay person, how do beavers and a habitat like this contribute to the work of a water company? contribute to the work of a water com an ? ~ . , contribute to the work of a water company?— contribute to the work of a water coman ? ~ . , , ., , company? what they will be doing is manauuin company? what they will be doing is managing and _ company? what they will be doing is managing and slowing _ company? what they will be doing is managing and slowing the _ company? what they will be doing is managing and slowing the flow - company? what they will be doing is managing and slowing the flow of. managing and slowing the flow of water. _ managing and slowing the flow of water. which _ managing and slowing the flow of water, which will _ managing and slowing the flow of water, which will reduce - managing and slowing the flow of water, which will reduce floodingl water, which will reduce flooding downstream _ water, which will reduce flooding downstream and, _ water, which will reduce flooding downstream and, through - water, which will reduce flooding downstream and, through doing i water, which will reduce flooding - downstream and, through doing their teaking _ downstream and, through doing their teaking dams. — downstream and, through doing their leaking dams, they— downstream and, through doing their leaking dams, they will— downstream and, through doing their leaking dams, they will manage - downstream and, through doing their leaking dams, they will manage the i leaking dams, they will manage the water— leaking dams, they will manage the water quality — leaking dams, they will manage the water quality by _ leaking dams, they will manage the water quality by dropping _ leaking dams, they will manage the water quality by dropping out - leaking dams, they will manage the
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water quality by dropping out the i water quality by dropping out the sediment — water quality by dropping out the sediment and _ water quality by dropping out the sediment and the _ water quality by dropping out the sediment and the contaminants i water quality by dropping out the - sediment and the contaminants such as phosphates— sediment and the contaminants such as phosphates and _ sediment and the contaminants such as phosphates and nitrates - sediment and the contaminants such as phosphates and nitrates and - sediment and the contaminants such as phosphates and nitrates and they| as phosphates and nitrates and they will be _ as phosphates and nitrates and they will be able — as phosphates and nitrates and they will be able to — as phosphates and nitrates and they will be able to be _ as phosphates and nitrates and they will be able to be reused _ as phosphates and nitrates and they will be able to be reused in - as phosphates and nitrates and they will be able to be reused in the - will be able to be reused in the environment _ will be able to be reused in the environment where _ will be able to be reused in the environment where they- will be able to be reused in the environment where they are i will be able to be reused in the - environment where they are meant to be, environment where they are meant to be. instead _ environment where they are meant to be. instead of— environment where they are meant to be, instead of treated _ environment where they are meant to be, instead of treated by— environment where they are meant to be, instead of treated by us _ environment where they are meant to be, instead of treated by us later- be, instead of treated by us later down _ be, instead of treated by us later down the — be, instead of treated by us later down the line _ be, instead of treated by us later down the line in _ be, instead of treated by us later down the line in the _ be, instead of treated by us later down the line in the treatment. down the line in the treatment process — down the line in the treatment process so _ down the line in the treatment rocess. y down the line in the treatment rocess. , . . ~ process. so they are almost like nature's very — process. so they are almost like nature's very own _ process. so they are almost like nature's very own mini - process. so they are almost like i nature's very own mini engineers. they are furry water companies and they will— they are furry water companies and they will be — they are furry water companies and they will be looking _ they are furry water companies and they will be looking up _ they are furry water companies and they will be looking up to _ they are furry water companies and they will be looking up to the - they will be looking up to the environment _ they will be looking up to the environment for— they will be looking up to the environment for us, - they will be looking up to the environment for us, which i they will be looking up to the environment for us, which is| environment for us, which is fantastic _ environment for us, which is fantastic. lit— environment for us, which is fantastic-— environment for us, which is fantastic. , ,, fantastic. it sounds like you need to net fantastic. it sounds like you need to get some _ fantastic. it sounds like you need to get some lan _ fantastic. it sounds like you need to get some lan yards _ fantastic. it sounds like you need to get some lan yards made - fantastic. it sounds like you need to get some lan yards made up| fantastic. it sounds like you need i to get some lan yards made up for them, seven train to beaver. and the pension scheme. thank you very much to you, graham. the wildlife trust are really emphasising this point today on the day that cop26 is focusing on nature, that you cannot solve the climate crisis without supporting natural habitats like this one, giving us all plenty of food for thought. by, this one, giving us all plenty of food for thought.— this one, giving us all plenty of food for thought. a lot of education auoin on food for thought. a lot of education going on at — food for thought. a lot of education going on at the _ food for thought. a lot of education going on at the moment, _ food for thought. a lot of education going on at the moment, thank - food for thought. a lot of education | going on at the moment, thank you. the headlines on bbc news... the former uk prime minister sirjohn major has accused borisjohnson's government of acting in a "shameful" manner — over the owen paterson row.
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tens of thousands of people have been taking part in a march through glasgow demanding new steps to tackle global warming — one of more than 100 taking place across the uk. at least eight people have died and dozens are hurt after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival in houston, texas. a lot going on in the sporting world. for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin ra mjuan. the pressure on manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer is sure to intensify after they lost 2—0 to neighbours manchester city at old trafford. city took the lead after just seven minutes when eric bailly turned joao cancelo's cross into his own net. they then made it two just before half—time when cancelo crossed again and bernardo silva somehow managed to squeeze in the finish. the result sees pep guardiola's side move up to second in the table
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whilst it's united's fourth defeat in six premier league matches and a second consecutive loss at home to one of their biggest rivals, which means more questions will be asked of the united boss. it is about starting on the front foot. we try to do that today, we played against a good team, that made it hard for us. they pressed us and we couldn't find a way out of the press and unfortunately when you concede a goal early on, that makes it very difficult. it is unfortunate, that it happens in that way. massive compliment to the players, the real— massive compliment to the players, the real artists, for the way we played — the real artists, for the way we played and, you know, the result of course _ played and, you know, the result of course is _ played and, you know, the result of course is so — played and, you know, the result of course is so important, it is the reason — course is so important, it is the reason why— course is so important, it is the reason why but to come here to old trafford. _ reason why but to come here to old trafford. our— reason why but to come here to old trafford, our rivals of the city, our neighbours and play the way we played. _ our neighbours and play the way we played. it— our neighbours and play the way we played, it was really good. worrying times for ole gunnar
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solskjaer and another manager under pressure at aston villa at the moment, dean smith, who slipped to their 5th defeat in a row... they were beaten 1—0 at southampton. it was a sweet moment for adam armstrong — an absolute belter here from him, to win it. his goal proving to be decisive for saints, as they move up to 12th in the table. in rugby union — the autumn internationals continue. england begin their campaign against tonga in a few minutes without captain owen farrell. the england captain tested positive for covid and isolated yesterday before undergoing another pcr test — but won't feature. he has been replaced by george furbank. courtney lawes will skipper the side in farrell's absence. jonny sexton marked his 100th cap for ireland, four conversions and a penalty— for ireland, four conversions and a penalty as— for ireland, four conversions and a penalty as they thrashed japan by 60-5— penalty as they thrashed japan by 60-5 in _ penalty as they thrashed japan by 60—5 in dublin. and after being thrashed by the all blacks last week, it doesn't get much easier for wales. south africa — the number—one ranked side in the world — come to the principality this evening. wales have won their last four meetings in cardiff though. at the t20 world cup, england are facing south africa in theirfinal group game,
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all but guaranteed. only a huge defeat can stop england going through. south africa are batting first and they are on course for a decent total. rassie van der dussen has launched several big sixes on his way to a half century and quinton de kock made 34. after 15 overs, south africa are 118—2, a wicket each for mooen ali and adil rashid. meanwhile, australia thrashed reigning champions the west indies to take a step closer to the semi—finals. josh hazlewood taking four wickets in the west indies�* innings of 157—7. and the aussies comfortably knocked it off in reply. aaron finch with an unbeaten 89, as they chased it down with 22 balls to spare. francesco bagnaia has claimed pole position for the fifth motogp race in a row. the italian set a new all time lap record at the portimao circuit in qualifying for sunday's algarve grand prix. he'll be joined on the front row byjack miller and joan mir. new world champion fabio quartararo could only manage seventh on the grid.
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that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. a fourth person has died after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a river in pembrokeshire last week. andrea powell had been in a critical condition in hospital since the incident last saturday. a "paddle out" was held at aberavon beach in tribute to one of the other paddleboarders who died. police say a woman has been arrested on suspicion of gross negligence manslaughter and has been released pending inquiries. from monday, people in england will be able to book their covid boosterjab a month in advance. currently you have to wait six months after your second dose, before making an appointment — but that's being relaxed by one month in efforts to increase uptake ahead of winter.
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boosters are being offered to those over 50 or at higher risk of covid. at least 93 people have been killed in an oil tanker explosion in the capital of sierra leone. the blast happened after the tanker collided with another vehicle in freetown. at least 100 others have been injured. at least eight people have died in a crush at the opening night of a music festival in texas. police in houston say panic broke out after the crowd began to surge towards the front of the stage at rapper travis scott's astroworld event. the show was called off shortly afterwards. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. a headline performance by rapper travis scott at the astroworld music festival in houston. thousands of concertgoers welcomed the event back after the pandemic, but, among the watchers, a nightmare was unfolding. everybody go to the middle...
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a crowd surge that has left at least eight people dead. the music played on as some of the injured were stretchered away, many not realising what was happening in front of them. the performance was halted several times for emergency services to reach people — and finally stopped when it was apparent many had been hurt. 17 people were taken to hospital, 11 in cardiac arrest. the crowd began to compress towards the front of the stage, ok, and that caused some panic, and it started causing some injuries. people began to fall out, become unconscious, and it created additional panic. the astroworld event began in 2018. a crowd of around 50,000 was expected at houston's nrg park. earlier in the day, there had been reports of people storming the event's perimeter to get into the concert. police in the city say they are now
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investigating what caused the crush, and are asking people not to speculate, but focus on the victims. tonight's focus though needs to be on the families, - and on the lives that we lost, i many of them extremely young, tragically young. organisers said on social media, "our hearts are with the astroworld festival family, "especially those we lost and their loved ones." they say they are now supporting local officials to find out what went wrong. kathryn stanczyszyns, bbc news. here in england, yorkshire county cricket club has launched an investigation after a second former player alleged he was subjected to repeated racial abuse. it comes in the wake of an independent report, which found azeem rafiq had been the victim of harrassment and bullying. the equality and human rights commission has now asked to see a copy of the full report and is considering whether to take action. simon jones has more.
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a racism row that has rocked notjust yorkshire, but the cricketing world. azeem rafiq was the victim of racial harassment but the club took no disciplinary action. now, claims by a second unnamed former player are being looked into. they tend to say yorkshire is one place, it's either my way or the hard way, to be honest. and they really need to sort of... i think theyjust haven't really understood what inclusivity those past errors will now be looked at by the equality and human rights commission. it has asked for a full independent report into what happened to azeem rafiq to consider whether there has been a breach of the law.
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the mayor of west yorkshire has described recent events as "shameful". i am really hoping that this is an opportunity to change at the very top, and i do notice that lord patel has come in to steer some of that transition. it's time for change, root and branch change, and let's hope we see that leadership that has been sadly missing. a gathering calling forjustice for azeem will take place outside headingley this afternoon. today we'll prove that all yorkshire people are resilient. we are all prepared to undertake the hard work which is necessary to put yorkshire back at the pinnacle of english cricket. we all need to work together now and work hard to create this new wonderful dawn that is going to hopefully shine every morning at headingley, the most iconic cricket ground in world cricket. but with an exodus of the club's sponsors and headingley banned
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from hosting international cricket, rebuilding yorkshire's international reputation won't be easy. simon jones, bbc news. the coronavirus pandemic was particularly difficult for children. lockdown meant many of them couldn't play outside or meet with friends. that was certainly true for makenzy beard — a teenagerfrom wales. when she couldn't play hockey — she decided to take up painting. tomos morgan has been to meet her. there is good, isn't it. six out of ten. granddad _ there is good, isn't it. six out of ten. granddad bernard - there is good, isn't it. six out of. ten. granddad bernard witnessing there is good, isn't it. six out of- ten. granddad bernard witnessing his portrait for the very first time. that there is cavolo nero. he has the greenest _ that there is cavolo nero. he has the greenest fingers, _ that there is cavolo nero. he has the greenest fingers, he - that there is cavolo nero. he has the greenest fingers, he can - that there is cavolo nero. he has| the greenest fingers, he can grow anything — the greenest fingers, he can grow anything he wants. it is the greenest fingers, he can grow anything he wants.— anything he wants. it is his granddaughter's _ anything he wants. it is his granddaughter's latest - anything he wants. it is his granddaughter's latest and anything he wants. it is his - granddaughter's latest and favourite work. 1
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granddaughter's latest and favourite work. ~ . granddaughter's latest and favourite work. ~' . , . work. i like it that he is laughing, it is a real — work. i like it that he is laughing, it is a real swell, _ work. i like it that he is laughing, it is a real swell, not _ work. i like it that he is laughing, it is a real swell, not a _ work. i like it that he is laughing, it is a real swell, not a fake - work. i like it that he is laughing, it is a real swell, not a fake one | it is a real swell, not a fake one which _ it is a real swell, not a fake one which is — it is a real swell, not a fake one which is hard to capture.- it is a real swell, not a fake one which is hard to capture. easy prone to a fake smile? _ which is hard to capture. easy prone to a fake smile? it _ which is hard to capture. easy prone to a fake smile? it takes _ which is hard to capture. easy prone to a fake smile? it takes a - which is hard to capture. easy prone to a fake smile? it takes a lot - which is hard to capture. easy prone to a fake smile? it takes a lot to - to a fake smile? it takes a lot to net a to a fake smile? it takes a lot to get a smile _ to a fake smile? it takes a lot to get a smile out _ to a fake smile? it takes a lot to get a smile out of— to a fake smile? it takes a lot to get a smile out of him. - to a fake smile? it takes a lot to get a smile out of him. it - to a fake smile? it takes a lot to | get a smile out of him. it doesn't seem that _ get a smile out of him. it doesn't seem that hard! _ get a smile out of him. it doesn't seem that hard! but _ get a smile out of him. it doesn't seem that hard! but when - get a smile out of him. it doesn't seem that hard! but when he - get a smile out of him. it doesn't i seem that hard! but when he goes, get a smile out of him. it doesn't - seem that hard! but when he goes, he can't sto -. seem that hard! but when he goes, he can't stop- like — seem that hard! but when he goes, he can't stop. like many _ seem that hard! but when he goes, he can't stop. like many teenagers, - can't stop. like many teenagers, makenzy is _ can't stop. like many teenagers, makenzy is a _ can't stop. like many teenagers, makenzy is a busy _ can't stop. like many teenagers, makenzy is a busy 14-year-old. i j can't stop. like many teenagers, i makenzy is a busy 14-year-old. i do county level— makenzy is a busy 14—year—old. i do county level football and netball and i_ county level football and netball and i also play hockey for wales, as well as— and i also play hockey for wales, as well as i_ and i also play hockey for wales, as well as i do— and i also play hockey for wales, as well as i do lifeguarding in my free time and _ well as i do lifeguarding in my free time and just try to stay active. but. _ time and just try to stay active. but. when _ time and just try to stay active. but, when lockdown hit and school and sport on hold, the teenager needed another freedom of expression and it came in the form of art. this is the first — and it came in the form of art. this is the first painting _ and it came in the form of art. this is the first painting i _ and it came in the form of art. this is the first painting i did. this - is the first painting i did. this was created _ is the first painting i did. this was created with _ is the first painting i did. this was created with just - is the first painting i did. try 3 was created with just three months under her palate, having never turned her hand up to the brush before, even though mum was an artist herself. has she been giving you tips? artist herself. has she been aaivin ou tis? ., has she been giving you tips? no, none at all- _ has she been giving you tips? no, none at all. why _ has she been giving you tips? no, none at all. why haven't _ has she been giving you tips? no, none at all. why haven't you - has she been giving you tips? no, none at all. why haven't you been | none at all. why haven't you been teachin: ? none at all. why haven't you been teaching? nothing _ none at all. why haven't you been teaching? nothing to _ none at all. why haven't you been
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teaching? nothing to teach! - none at all. why haven't you been teaching? nothing to teach! what| teaching? nothing to teach! what ha--ened teaching? nothing to teach! what happened was _ teaching? nothing to teach! what happened was the _ teaching? nothing to teach! what happened was the power - teaching? nothing to teach! what happened was the power of - teaching? nothing to teach! what happened was the power of social media. after a tweet saying she had entered this on to the royal academy young are to show, her work went viral. it sold out each piece to thousands of pounds to buyers across the globe. thousands of pounds to buyers across the lobe. ~ , thousands of pounds to buyers across the lobe. ~ ., thousands of pounds to buyers across the lobe. ~ , ., ., the globe. within the space of two da s, six the globe. within the space of two days. six or _ the globe. within the space of two days, six or seven _ the globe. within the space of two days, six or seven of— the globe. within the space of two days, six or seven of the - the globe. within the space of two days, six or seven of the paintings were _ days, six or seven of the paintings were already sold and more people wanted _ were already sold and more people wanted to — were already sold and more people wanted to buy them and work that was --oin wanted to buy them and work that was going to _ wanted to buy them and work that was going to be _ wanted to buy them and work that was going to be produced, without even seeing _ going to be produced, without even seeing it. _ going to be produced, without even seeing it, so people were going, can i seeing it, so people were going, can i have _ seeing it, so people were going, can i have your— seeing it, so people were going, can i have your next piece of work and i was like. _ i have your next piece of work and i was like. i— i have your next piece of work and i was like, i haven't even done it, head _ was like, i haven't even done it, head you — was like, i haven't even done it, head you know you like it? this is one of her— head you know you like it? this is one of her earliest _ head you know you like it? this is one of her earliest works, - head you know you like it? this isj one of her earliest works, painted at the start of lockdown. it is called sad eyes. this, or skipper, you can see the progression from this to that one. the you can see the progression from this to that one.— you can see the progression from this to that one. the unsold work is still on display _ this to that one. the unsold work is still on display at _ this to that one. the unsold work is still on display at the _ this to that one. the unsold work is still on display at the blackwater i still on display at the blackwater gallery in cardiff, which snapped them up after spotting her talent. i them up after spotting her talent. i went to visit her piece in the them up after spotting her talent. i went to visit her piece in the royal academy when it was on show there and, to be honest, in a sea of
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hundreds of pieces, has just nz. the fact that she is and she can see the energy in a person wouldn't usually see, she captures emotion and that is for me what makes these pieces stand out. �* ,. ., ., . is for me what makes these pieces stand out. �* ,. . , stand out. between school and sport, it has been difficult _ stand out. between school and sport, it has been difficult to _ stand out. between school and sport, it has been difficult to find _ stand out. between school and sport, it has been difficult to find time - it has been difficult to find time for a new masterpiece recently and, even with all of the success she has had, art may not be makenzy�*s future profession. i had, art may not be makenzy's future rofession. ., �* . ., profession. i don't want to painting as a career. _ profession. i don't want to painting as a career. i _ profession. i don't want to painting as a career, i don't _ profession. i don't want to painting as a career, i don't think. - profession. i don't want to painting as a career, i don't think. you - as a career, i don't think. you don't want — as a career, i don't think. you don't want painting _ as a career, i don't think. you don't want painting as - as a career, i don't think. you don't want painting as a - as a career, i don't think. gm, don't want painting as a career even though you have sold them for thousands? why?— though you have sold them for thousands? why? though you have sold them for thousands? wh ? , . . thousands? why? there is a 'oy that i aet from thousands? why? there is a 'oy that i get from squeezing * thousands? why? there is a 'oy that i get from squeezing in h thousands? why? there is a 'oy that i get from squeezing in the h i get from squeezing in the painting. i get from squeezing in the aintinu. ~._ i get from squeezing in the aintinu. a, . ., painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a hobby- _ painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a hobby. that's _ painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a hobby. that's it. _ painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a hobby. that's it. and - painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a hobby. that's it. and if - painting. maybe the fund will go. it's a hobby. that's it. and if you | it's a hobby. that's it. and if you want to do _ it's a hobby. that's it. and if you want to do everything, _ it's a hobby. that's it. and if you want to do everything, you - it's a hobby. that's it. and if you want to do everything, you have| it's a hobby. that's it. and if you i want to do everything, you have to be willing — want to do everything, you have to be willing to do that. and i have a flexible _ be willing to do that. and i have a flexible mother and family. do you sleep much? _ flexible mother and family. do you sleep much? i _ flexible mother and family. do you sleep much? i am _ flexible mother and family. do you sleep much? i am pretty— flexible mother and family. do you sleep much? i am pretty bad - flexible mother and family. do you sleep much? i am pretty bad at. sleep much? i am pretty bad at sleeina. sleep much? i am pretty bad at sleeping- a _ sleep much? i am pretty bad at sleeping. a flexible _ sleep much? i am pretty bad at sleeping. a flexible family -
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sleep much? i am pretty bad at i sleeping. a flexible family indeed for their vastly _ sleeping. a flexible family indeed for their vastly talented _ sleeping. a flexible family indeed | for their vastly talented daughter.

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