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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 6, 2021 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. at least eight people have died and dozens are hurt — after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival in houston, texas. former uk prime minister sirjohn major accuses borisjohnson�*s government of acting in a "shameful" manner — over the owen paterson row. the organisation which enforces human rights laws warns it could take legal action against yorkshire county cricket club — as a second cricketer comes forward to say he was the subject of racist abuse while playing for the county. the emotion is adopted.
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a breakthrough for biden — the us house of representatives approves the president's 1 trillion dollar infrastructure programme. i'm ben boulos live at the willington wetlands nature reserve in derbyshire where we are finding out how natural sites help to tackle the climate crisis. people living in england will be able to book their covid boosterjabs a month in advance — under new plans to speed up their rollout. one of brazil's most popular singers — marilia mendonca — has died in a plane crash — aged 26.
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hello, and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. we start with breaking news from houston, texas, where at least eight people have died and scores of people have been hurt after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival. eleven people were taken to hospitals in cardiac arrest while some 300 people were treated for injuries such as cuts and bruises at the event. with more, here's david campanale. the incident happened very quickly, according to local police, as concertgoers at the event press forwards. the award—winning rap singer travis scott was on the stage as the crash happened and repeatedly stop performing as emergency officials attended to the injured. the crowd began to compress towards the front of the stage and that caused some panic and it started
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causing some injuries, people began to fall out, become unconscious, and has created additional panic. it’s has created additional panic. it's not et has created additional panic. it's not yet clear what caused the crash to start. police at the scene feared that casualty numbers may rise. travis scott's astroworld festival began in 2018 and has become a huge draw. early on friday, hundreds of people had rushed the event's perimeter, knocking down metal detectors and a security screening area to get into the concert. but following the incident, the second and final day of the festival has been cancelled. a local countyjudge described what had happened as an extremely tragic night.— extremely tragic night. tonight's focus needs _ extremely tragic night. tonight's focus needs to _ extremely tragic night. tonight's focus needs to be _ extremely tragic night. tonight's focus needs to be on _ extremely tragic night. tonight's focus needs to be on the - extremely tragic night. tonight's| focus needs to be on the families and on the lives that we lost, many of them extremely young, tragically young. of them extremely young, tragically ounu . of them extremely young, tragically ounu. . ., . of them extremely young, tragically
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ounu. ., ., , , of them extremely young, tragically ounu. ., ., , young. the concert organisers are now working _ young. the concert organisers are now working with _ young. the concert organisers are now working with huston's - young. the concert organisers are now working with huston's police | young. the concert organisers are l now working with huston's police to establish the fact of what happened. here in the uk, the former prime minister sirjohn major, has accused the government of "trashing the reputation" of parliament. it's after borisjohnson attempted to alter the rules governing mps' behaviour. on wednesday, the commons voted narrowly in favour of changing the system, which would have saved the former conservative minister, 0wen paterson, from a 30—day suspension for lobbying. the government later backtracked following uproar from its own mps and opposition parties. 0ur political correspondent ione wellsjoins me. what is so significant about this? it's a former conservative prime minister speaking and who is currently not happy with the current government. he currently not happy with the current government-— government. he “oins a stream of critics this _ government. he joins a stream of critics this week. _ government. he joins a stream of critics this week. firstly _ government. he joins a stream of critics this week. firstly the - critics this week. firstly the uproar from the opposition parties, very unhappy with the government's plans to try to rip up the rule
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system that polices mp conduct and they try to overturn the suspension of 0wen paterson, formally now a conservative mp and we had the backlash from conservative mps themselves, some of them rebelling against the government themselves. they not vote on plans of the government and the mps privately really express their dismay at the fact that they were putting their heads on the line really for their bosses to save 0wen paterson. now we've had john major come out, very critical of the handling, and this is significant because he is a prime minister whose own government was really tainted by allegations of so—called sleaze in the 1990s. his government had to resign for the so—called cash for questions scandal where mps were paid to... in the house of commons so he's really come
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at this from the own perspective and experience and earlier today told the bbc that what boris johnson and his the bbc that what borisjohnson and his government had done a trashy reputation of parliament. i've been a conservative all my life and it seems to me as a lifelong conservative that much of what they are doing is very un— conservative in its behaviour. there are many strands to this that go well beyond the standards committee of the last few days and there is a general whiff of we are the masters now about their behaviour. it has to stop and it has to stop soon. that phrase, we are the masters now, really interesting because boris johnson talks continually about levelling up and not about getting a separation between the people in government and people everywhere else. john is well spoke about how brexit is playing out and he expressed great concern about that as well, didn't he?— as well, didn't he? yes, what was interesting _ as well, didn't he? yes, what was interesting was _ as well, didn't he? yes, what was interesting was he _ as well, didn't he? yes, what was interesting was he said _ as well, didn't he? yes, what was interesting was he said this - as well, didn't he? yes, what was interesting was he said this was i as well, didn't he? yes, what was i interesting was he said this was not an isolated mistake that the
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government made, he pointed to a pattern of behaviour he felt the government was doing that he called very open conservative ? may very un—conservative and the current example he referred to ? mackie called it un—conservative. 0ne example he referred to ? mackie called it un—conservative. one was article 16 to suspend parts of the northern ireland protocol, the bit of a brexit deal put in place to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland which also creates a trade border between great britain and northern ireland. there have been numerous reports that the government may be looking to suspend this part of the agreement, now sirjohn major said it would be colossally stupid, absurd to do that and he said it would damage relations notjust with europe and ireland but with washington and the us, and he was keen to stress this behaviour of changing rules if and when they do
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not quite align with what the government wants to do, it's a very damaging pattern in his view and also something he said was notjust an conservative —— notjust un—conservative but would damage our reputation overseas as well. thank ou. there's been a massive fuel tanker explosion in the capital of sierra leone — more than ninety people are feared to have been killed. dozens have been injured, many of them critically, and local reports say hospitals in freetown have been overwhelmed. the blast happened late on friday, after a tanker collided with another vehicle. huge fireballs rose from the site as the burning fuel spread, igniting cars and setting off more explosions. here in england, yorkshire county cricket club has launched an investigation after a second former player alleged he was subjected to repeated racial abuse. it comes in the wake of an independent report, which found azeem rafiq had been the victim of harrassment and bullying. the equality and human rights commission has now asked to see a copy of the full report and is considering whether to take action.
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simon jones has more. a racism row that has rocked notjust yorkshire, but the cricketing world. azeem rafiq was the victim of racial harassment but the club took no disciplinary action. now, claims by a second unnamed former player are being looked into. they tend to say yorkshire is one place, it's either my way or the highway, to be honest. and they really need to sort of... i think theyjust haven't really understood what inclusivity and diversity really means. yorkshire now has a new chair, lord kamlesh patel. in a statement, he said: those past errors will now be looked at by the equality and human rights commission. it has asked for a full independent report into what happened to azeem rafiq to consider whether there has been a breach of the law. the mayor of west yorkshire has described recent events as "shameful".
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i am really hoping that this is an opportunity to change at the very top, and i do notice that lord patel has come into steer some of that transition. it's time for change, root and branch change, and let's hope we see that leadership that has been sadly missing. a gathering calling forjustice for azeem will take place outside headingley this afternoon. today will prove that all yorkshire people are resilient. we are all prepared to undertake the hard work which is necessary to put yorkshire back at the pinnacle of english cricket. we all need to work together now and work hard to create this new wonderful dawn that is going to hopefully shine every morning at headingley, the most iconic cricket ground in world cricket. but with an exodus of the club's sponsors and headingley banned from hosting international cricket, rebuilding yorkshire's international reputation won't be easy. simon jones, bbc news.
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the us house of representatives has approved president biden's one trillion dollar infrastructure bill, a key part of his programme to rebuild the united states following the coronavirus pandemic. it's the final stage in its legislative progress before it's signed into law. a vote on a second bill, on social policy and climate change, has been delayed. 0ur north america correspondent david willis has more. this is a major victory for presidentjoe biden who postponed a visit to his home state of delaware this weekend in the hope of using his influence to get his legislation across the line. it's a centrepiece, has been, of his legislative agenda
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but he has been bogged down for weeks because of wrangling between members of his own party, progressives and moderates. the progressives and moderates. the progressive wing wanted to tie this legislation to the passage of a larger social spending climate control bill but in the end, the house speaker decided to press ahead with a vote on the infrastructure package alone which has already been passed in the upper house, the senate, and she succeeded in pulling that off with the help of some republican support as well. what this does is provides billions of dollars to repair roads, bridges and expanders country's broadband internet service and there is also money therefore a network of electric charging stations and funds for the people of the road and public transport networks. it is the
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most unfortunate spend on infrastructure in decades and president biden has also said that it will lead to the creation of thousands ofjobs. cop26 continues in glasgow with the focus on nature and the natural world. meanwhile a day of global protests demanding stronger action on climate change has begun. the first events took place in australia with others planned in nearly 200 cities around the world. joining me now is steve godden — he's in glasgow where a march is due to take place later today. hello to you. another week to go on cop26 but greta thunberg was already saying it's a failure. is that rhetoric designed to inspire protesters like the ones behind you to really make their call to action even stronger?—
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to really make their call to action even stronger? yeah, i think what has been happening _ even stronger? yeah, i think what has been happening is _ even stronger? yeah, i think what has been happening is it _ even stronger? yeah, i think what has been happening is it has - even stronger? yeah, i think what| has been happening is it has really been building up to this moment, the biggest day of protest right in the middle of the cop26 conference. this global day of action with the focus very much here in glasgow where the conference is taking place. you can see it here, we are a couple of hours away from getting going but people already starting to gather for a march that, just to give you an idea of it, will move here from kelvingrove park through the city centre, down, the left as a journey of a few hours to glasgow green where there will be a rally. at the moment, there is lots of space around me but we are expecting around me but we are expecting around 50,000 people on this march and that estimate has been revised down a little bit with that said to be around 100,000 but we are expecting 50,000 people on the march today. i think the weather might play a little bit of a part in proceedings, not a very nice day in glasgow here but it is, i suppose, november in glasgow and that's what
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you should expect. there will be a big police presence is a throughout this. that follows on from, as you the youth march yesterday led by greta thunberg you had very strong words about cop26 and what cop26 has achieved, calling it a failure and that passionate response to something we can etch expect to see more of. $5 something we can etch expect to see more of. �* , something we can etch expect to see more of. . , ., something we can etch expect to see more of. �* , ., ., more of. as we mentioned, the talks at cop26 today _ more of. as we mentioned, the talks at cop26 today are _ more of. as we mentioned, the talks at cop26 today are turning _ more of. as we mentioned, the talks at cop26 today are turning to - more of. as we mentioned, the talks at cop26 today are turning to the - at cop26 today are turning to the role nature can play and achieving target to tackle climate change. ben boulos is at willington wetlands in derbyshire for us today. that is another broadcast tying in with our climate change conference. 7 with our climate change conference. ? mike with our climate change conference. 7 mike v with our climate change conference. ? mike v climate change conference. take in that view, isn't that the most peaceful, tranquil, calming site on a saturday? the nature
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reserve in derbyshire, heart of the english countryside, and this place feels so far removed from glasgow, the cop26 happening some 300 miles north of here. but sites like this one are directly related to climate change. the wildlife trust said you cannot tackle the climate crisis without also tackling the crisis in nature. if we destroy nature, it will have a negative effect on the climate and the flip of that they say is if you support the natural habitat, naturalsigns say is if you support the natural habitat, natural signs like this, that will help you achieve the goals you're trying to achieve at the summit and tackle climate change. we will be finding out a little bit about one of the major projects, one of the most important they are doing here injust a moment but of the most important they are doing here in just a moment but first let's bring in our regional manager for the derbyshire wildlife trust. tells about this site and why it is so important. we bought it in 2005
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so important. we bought it in 2005 so it has spent the past 16 years being turned into the most fantastic nature reserve. what we have tried to do here is create a wide range of wetland habitats, a real mosaic. what difference does this kind of site make to climate change? it acts as fantastic carbon _ site make to climate change? it acts as fantastic carbon sinks. _ site make to climate change? it acts as fantastic carbon sinks. these - site make to climate change? it acts as fantastic carbon sinks. these are | as fantastic carbon sinks. these are the areas we can also allow water to move into. we can hold water here, help control flooding events and the wider environment. clean the air and the water as well. indie wider environment. clean the air and the water as well.— the water as well. we can see the size of the — the water as well. we can see the size of the site, _ the water as well. we can see the size of the site, 46 _ the water as well. we can see the size of the site, 46 hectares, - the water as well. we can see the size of the site, 46 hectares, a i size of the site, 46 hectares, a nice aerial shot of it now, and the amount of wildlife it supports, it must be incredible but there have been some species that you have reintroduced and there was one in particular that i want you to tell is about, the beavers, why has that been such a big deal here? indie is about, the beavers, why has that been such a big deal here?- is about, the beavers, why has that been such a big deal here? we see it as a management _ been such a big deal here? we see it as a management tool _ been such a big deal here? we see it as a management tool so _ been such a big deal here? we see it as a management tool so you - been such a big deal here? we see it as a management tool so you can - been such a big deal here? we see it| as a management tool so you can see the cattle in front of us now, we
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think a one of the best methods of keeping the grassland the best condition for the wildlife that use it to beaver are no different, they are known as wetland engineers simply by their everyday behaviours they exhibit, just being beavers, they exhibit, just being beavers, they have a huge effect on the wider landscape around them. and what difference do they make to climate change? difference do they make to climate chanie? , . , ., difference do they make to climate chanie? , ., , ,, ., difference do they make to climate chanie? , . , ,, ., ., change? they are very keen on having still dee- change? they are very keen on having still deep water _ change? they are very keen on having still deep water so _ change? they are very keen on having still deep water so to _ change? they are very keen on having still deep water so to achieve - change? they are very keen on having still deep water so to achieve this, - still deep water so to achieve this, they build dams and they will damn fast flowing streams and create pools. those pools can then hold water, they can iron out the high flood events and slow the water through the landscape and they create them in periods of drought as well. we also know beaver dams can act as fantastic... so actually capturing silt and agricultural run—off, clearing the water before it comes back to the main water bodies but by holding it and allowing it to come out to the flood
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plains, they prevent the main rivers from flooding up as well. thank you. the rental and are home to such a diverse range of wildlife. let me show you some of them on this post here, that is just the range of water fell that inhabits the area. we've been hearing about the beavers and we will go in search for them a little later. they are notoriously difficult to find but we will try our best so join difficult to find but we will try our best sojoin me difficult to find but we will try our best so join me a little later for that. our best so join me a little later forthat. i our best so join me a little later for that. i will tell you what else thatis for that. i will tell you what else that is very far removed from, the hubbub of a newsroom on a saturday morning, enjoy it, beautifulthere. a fourth person has died after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a river in pembrokeshire last week. andrea powell had been in a critical condition in hospital since the incident last saturday. a man and two other women also died. police say a woman has been arrested on suspicion of gross negligence manslaughter.
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from monday, people in england will be able to book their covid boosterjab a month in advance.(pres)the current rules mean you have to wait six months after your second dose before making the appointment — but that's being relaxed, in efforts to increase uptake ahead of winter. dominic hughes reports. the rollout of the booster programme for the over—50s and the clinically the —50s and the clinically vulnerable has proved more sluggish than the initial vaccinations that began last december. this are administered six months after the second dose, and up until now it has not been possible to book an appointment until you reach that milestone. but from monday, the rules in england are being relaxed
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so you can schedule a jab a month before you need it. the government says the booster programme is moving ahead at pace. more than 9 million boosterjabs have so far been administered — that's nearly 16% of the uk population over the age of 12 — and initial data shows confidence in the vaccine among the over—50s remains high, with 94% likely to get their booster. in scotland, people will be able to book boosters online from later this month, and in wales and northern ireland, people will be invited to book an appointment. care homes are an obvious priority for the booster programme and here, there's some good news, with residents in nine out of ten homes in england having been offered a booster. the rest are booked in to be seen in the next few weeks. but the race is on between the vaccine, the virus and the coming winter. dominic hughes, bbc news. brazil is mourning the loss of one of its most popular singers — marilia mendonca — who was killed in a plane crash on her way to a concert. the 26—year old country music singer was a feminist icon in the country and won a latin american grammy in 2019. courtney bembridge has this report.
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marilia mendonca was one of brazil's most popular singers. for the past two years her songs had the highest number of listeners on any brazilian artist on the streaming service, spotify. she started her career as a teenager and quickly found nationalfame, becoming known as the �*queen of suffering' because she sang about heartbreak, but her songs also focused on female empowerment and it won her legions of fans. she was on her way to perform at a concert in the south—east of brazil and posted this video on social media, showing her on board the private plane, but less than 15 kilometres from the destination, the plane crashed in the mountains. her uncle, her producer and two crew members were also killed. an investigation is under way but it is believed the plane may have hit a nearby electricity tower on its descent.
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translation: we cannot yet speak to the cause of the crash but it is a fact that there is wreckage of an antenna which suggests that the aircraft hit this antenna before it came down. brazil's president, jair bolsonaro, has paid tribute to the singer in a tweet, describing her as one of the greatest artists of her generation who with her unique voice, charisma and music won the affection and admiration of the whole country. among the other high—profile tributes, her friend and famous brazilian footballer, neymar, who treated, "i refuse to believe, i refuse". a funeral is being held in her home state on saturday, with up to 100,000 mourners expected. marilia mendonca was just 26 years old.
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scientists in chile have unveiled dozens of fossils that they've found in the country's atacama desert. the bones come from various animals that lived millions of years ago. perhaps the biggest find was the jaw of a giant shark that's become something of a celebrity in recent years. the bbc�*s tim allman has more. some call this the desert graveyard. an arid, desolate place. but dig down deep beneath the sand and the topsoil and it is somewhere rich with hidden knowledge. fossils and bones, an insight into life on this planet from another age. translation: we found different types of vertebrates. _ without a doubt one of the most striking is a wonderfully large fish, a shark. it's the megalodon. it's famous because of the hollywood movie the meg and here is one of the places in the world where the largest number of their teeth have been found. and this is what that wonderfully
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large fish might have looked like. it's believed the megalodon lived somewhere between 23 million and 3.6 million years ago. they could grow up to around 20 metres in length. a fierce and terrifying predator. quite the discovery, but no surprise to anyone around here. after being neglected for decades, around 2,500 hectares of this land are now preserved as a protected site. a place for discovery, and the uncovering of secrets. tim allman, bbc news. after being neglected for decades, around 2,500 hectares of this land are now preserved as a protected site. a place for discovery, and the uncovering of secrets. tim allman, bbc news.
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you're watching bbc news. rememberjackie weaver and that infamous hanforth parish council meeting that shone a new light on local democracy? well it's happened again — this time though — as they can meet in person it really got heated. police officers had to be called into a council meeting in essex, after it descended into chaos. maldon district council was discussing sanctions against its member chrisy morris, who responded by using a megaphone and refusing to leave. alex dunlop reports. point of order! councillor morris, your behaviour is unacceptable. point of order! local council meetings can be dry and dull. not this one. sorry, what — "shut up" was that? are you telling me to shut up? yes, iam. you are very rude. we have two recordings — the official one, and this phone recording made by the independent councillor chrisy morris. as the meeting gets under way, councillor morris presents his own
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version of megaphone democracy. —— of megaphone diplomacy. point of order! members, are you prepared to continue? point of order! now, officially, a point of order could be a request to rule on an alleged irregularity in procedure. mr morris feels he has a point to make. no, i won't cease this behaviour! you have no authority on me. the meeting chairman feels proceedings are being disrupted. you're the coward! you won't even answer a phone call! you're the coward! all officers to leave the meeting. point of order. well, this stand—off between mr morris and the other councillors goes on for a good 12 minutes before police arrive to try to calm things down. sorry, guys, could youjust identify yourselves, please? that didn't seem to work, so they gave councillor morris a warning. in my view, you're in breach of the peace by not - letting this continue. i'm happy for you to remain in it, as long as... -
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i am letting this continue. i've not broken any law. i'm not breaching the peace because i am democratically elected to represent the people that voted me in. when everyone returns, it's clear that the meeting is only going one way, and it's abandoned. after a unanimous vote by fellow councillors, chrissy morris will now be banned from all council committees until may 2023. they've all gone. i'm the last one here. which makes me captain of this here ship. alex dunlop, bbc news. let's hope we don't need any megaphones to get the weather forecast. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. some might want to hide away from it actually, it is rainy across scotland, northern ireland but in improving to your southward south so things are brightening up. the rain becomes more... with its washing further east, many staying largely
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dry. the best of the sunshine further north. turning much colder. the rain and drizzle clears. it begins to feed on. tonight, temperatures a bit down on last night, fresher tomorrow morning but clear over frost. into tomorrow morning we see some of the strongest of the winds, 60, 70, 80 while our gusts. some possible disruption. using three end of the day and the odd shower but for many, sunday a drier, brighterand odd shower but for many, sunday a drier, brighter and slightly fresh day. good eye for now. —— goodbye for now.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... at least eight people have died and dozens are hurt, after a crowd surge on the opening night of a music festival
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in houston, texas.

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