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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 5, 2021 8:00pm-8:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm shaun ley. the headlines at eight. three board members including the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club have resigned over the club's handling of racism experienced by former player azeem rafiq. what i've seen is a culture that's locked in the past, a culture that finds it difficult to accept challenge and change. former england capatin michael vaughan was accused of making a racist comment to players — something he denies — the bbc says he won't be presenting his cricket programme next week. greta thunberg leads thousands of young activists through the streets of glasgow to demand action on climate change at c0 p26. we have had 26 cops, they have had decades of blah blah blah and where has that led us?
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a fifth teenager has been found guilty of killing 15—year—old keon lincoln who was shot and stabbed outside his home in birmingham. an experimental pill to treat covid—19 — new trial results show it can cut the risk of hospitalisation or death by nearly 90% in vulnerable adults. prosecutors in the us state of georgia have shown the footage of the fatal shooting of a black jogger at the trial of three white men accused of his murder. coming up on tonights newswatch... has bbc news gone over the top the over cop? join us tonight at 845 here on bbc news. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six.
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the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has resigned over its response to the racism experienced by the former player azeem rafiq. roger hutton issued a stinging attack on executive board members who he said had shown a "constant unwillingness" to accept there was a problem, after an investigation found rafiq was the victim of "racial harassment and bullying". tonight the bbc has announced that former england captain michael vaughan — who has strongly denied making a racist comment to a group of asian players — won't be presenting his cricket programme on radio 5 live next week. here's our sports editor dan roan. the racism that michael vaughan has plunged the country into an unprecedented crisis. chairman stepped down just hours after announcing his departure roger hutton told me the club had let theirformer hutton told me the club had let their former player down. i’m hutton told me the club had let their former player down. i'm sorry that he didn't _ their former player down. i'm sorry that he didn't have _ their former player down. i'm sorry that he didn't have his _ their former player down. i'm sorry that he didn't have his allegations. that he didn't have his allegations investigated in 2018. i'm sorry it's
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taken so long, i'm sorry that ultimately the club hasn't shown the right contrition. i've not personally met anyone that i would consider racist at the york shire country club. 0ne click that what i've seen as a culture that is locked in the past.— i've seen as a culture that is locked in the past. amid more resignations _ locked in the past. amid more resignations hutton _ locked in the past. amid more resignations hutton blame - locked in the past. amid more i resignations hutton blame senior management who he says resisted change after a report found azeem rafiq had suffered harassment. there was a failure — rafiq had suffered harassment. there was a failure by _ rafiq had suffered harassment. there was a failure by many _ rafiq had suffered harassment. there was a failure by many in _ rafiq had suffered harassment. there was a failure by many in the - rafiq had suffered harassment. ii—ii” was a failure by many in the club to accept its findings or understand them or recognise them. since then it's been incredibly frustrating. the ecb has been heavy glee from hosting england masters. but hutton says the governing body should have done more to support the investigation. i done more to support the investigation.— investigation. i heard an investigation _ investigation. i heard an investigation last - investigation. i heard an investigation last night i investigation. i heard an i investigation last night that repeatedly offered to help your chart country club through this investigation. that couldn't be further from the truth. yorkshire batsmen had _ further from the truth. yorkshire batsmen had admitted _ further from the truth. yorkshire | batsmen had admitted repeatedly using a racial slur towards azeem
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rafiq about his pakistani heritage but a panel regarded it as friendly banter. and no action is been taken against any member of staff sparking outrage. do you accept that conclusion that they reached was that it was family banner, is that how you would deem that x phrase towards her colleagues? ha. it is towards her colleagues? iiru it is completely towards her colleagues? i157. it is completely unacceptable. towards her colleagues? no. it is completely unacceptable. so - towards her colleagues? no. it is completely unacceptable. so i i towards her colleagues? no. it is. completely unacceptable. so i was there no action _ completely unacceptable. so i was there no action taken? _ completely unacceptable. so i was there no action taken? because i completely unacceptable. so i was. there no action taken? because you haven't seen that context of the whole of the report. in the club had advised that that was not something he could take disciplinary action to. is he could take disciplinary action to. , ., , . , , to. is he the only current members ? staff upheld — to. is he the only current members ? staff upheld allegation _ to. is he the only current members ? staff upheld allegation against? i to. is he the only current members ? staff upheld allegation against? no. | staff upheld allegation against? no. former captain michael vaughan has been the second player being named in the report. azeem rafiq alleging he made a racist comment towards a group of asian players in 2009. michael vaughan did nice the claim but one of those places he heard the alleged comment. a prominent punted tonight was stood down from his radios show next week in a statement to bbc spokesman said it takes any
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allegations of racism extremely seriously. the allegations michael vaughan predates his time working for the bbc for made the editorial does decision that he won't appear on 55 on monday. the show focuses on topical matters and given his personal involvement we need to make sure we maintain the impartiality of the programme. this all comes at a time when cricket is desperate to try to engage with the south asian community and become more diverse. some feared this damaging episode may send the game backwards. it’s may send the game backwards. it's more about trying to get systemic change _ more about trying to get systemic change in — more about trying to get systemic change in a club like yorkshire which — change in a club like yorkshire which change has been proven to be very difficult and the club i think has failed — very difficult and the club i think has failed to evolve quick enough in a way— has failed to evolve quick enough in a way that_ has failed to evolve quick enough in a way that society is changing and our attitudes towards race and racism — our attitudes towards race and racism. , ., , , ., our attitudes towards race and racism. , . , , ., ., , ., racism. this has been a devastating week for the _ racism. this has been a devastating week for the most _ racism. this has been a devastating week for the most successful i racism. this has been a devastating week for the most successful club l racism. this has been a devastating| week for the most successful club in county cricket. but the
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ramifications of this remarkable saga now extend well beyond headingley. dan roan reporting, who's at the ground, says yorkshire county cricket club is in absolute turmoil. the implosion at york shire is like nothing i can recall. as the space ofjust nothing i can recall. as the space of just a few days' nothing i can recall. as the space ofjust a few days' time this club has lost pretty much all of its sponsors, its right to host international matches, its chairman, half of the board has allegations against two of the biggest names you play here in recent years. tonight there is another revelation around there is another revelation around the head coach, he is being investigated by both yorkshire in the ecb over an alleged anti—semitic tweet in 2010. and be fair i think is that this case perhaps has exposed an ugly side to the game and certainly when you look at professional football, this certainly when you look at professionalfootball, this port seems to suffer from much less diversity and underrepresentation of
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non—white players. a fair perhaps as a result of this has exposed the sport in some way out of kilter with trends in wider society. yorkshire issued a statement pledging they would do whatever it took to regain trust. but the new leaders who come into this club will surely phase one of the greatest challenges the sport has seen in recent years. well, we can speak now to jamie raynor, who's the presenter of the cricket show on bbc radio leeds. thanks so much for staying on to talk to us. at the end of what i'm sure it is been an awful long and exciting day. the obvious question is, we got all night but where did it go wrong?— is, we got all night but where did ituaowron? ,, �*,, it go wrong? goodness me. it's been a fast developing _ it go wrong? goodness me. it's been a fast developing story _ it go wrong? goodness me. it's been a fast developing story and _ it go wrong? goodness me. it's been a fast developing story and wonder. a fast developing story and wonder fears and you heard the report there this is far from fears and you heard the report there this is farfrom over. this is a story that has really gripped the county, the region, the nation if not the globalised world of cricket.
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and to see a club fall to its knees so quickly, so drastically in the way that has done, yes, it's been rather interesting to follow to say the least. in rather interesting to follow to say the least. ,., rather interesting to follow to say the least. , ., , rather interesting to follow to say the least. , , ., the least. in part the story began on our the least. in part the story began on your show _ the least. in part the story began on your show because _ the least. in part the story began on your show because some i the least. in part the story began on your show because some of. the least. in part the story began | on your show because some of the allegations azeem rafiq made were in those interviews and included with the radio leads cricket show. that gives it a particular personal interest for you and your colleagues. in terms of how this has been handled, by the county cricket club, where do you think the key mistakes like? i club, where do you think the key mistakes like?— mistakes like? i think the revelation _ mistakes like? i think the revelation that _ mistakes like? i think the revelation that no - mistakes like? i think the i revelation that no disciplinary action was taken by the cricket club after its own internal investigation into the allegations made by azeem rafiq whereby seven of the 43 were upheld that the county cricket club that felt no disciplinary action needed to be taken by any of its
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executive board members existed in a timeframe. that certainly angered the wider cricket community within york shire, certainly across the nation. i think that is where this is really fallen down. we are then obviously learned that the full report was leaked and therefore reported. and we learned about the racial slur that was used consistently and considered friendly banter. i think that's where it resonates with many communities across this nation and why it is because such an uproar in the last week. ., ~' ,, because such an uproar in the last week. ., ~ ,, , ., ., , week. york shire is not the only county that _ week. york shire is not the only county that will _ week. york shire is not the only county that will have _ week. york shire is not the only. county that will have experienced this problem and not the only experience of problem in cricketing. and yet some seems to have had a uniquely difficult problem in the county. now we seen the sponsors pull—out. what is it about yorkshire county cricket club that you think makes this particularly poisonous bear, that it's been so difficult to
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deal with to them even address? i think it stems from not only a culture of racism within the four walls of headingley but maybe goes to a wider aspect of culture that exists within cricket, domestic cricket for the market, and any further in terms of other clubs but focusing on yorkshire in isolation, this is clearly something they struggle to grapple with over the years. the hearing on november the 16th when the three board members called to give evidence roger hutton, chair, and chief executive will give evidence to that select committee. we shall learn more about how they have grappled with this culture and seemingly not responded in the way that many would've hoped. 0f in the way that many would've hoped. of course azeem rafiq will also give evidence and is been invited to do so on the day. i think will learn a lot more about what has happened
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during that timeframe that azeem rafiq played over two spells for the county over the last decade. and indeed what this internal report found. of course when we saw officially from the yorkshire statement was a redacted version due to the legal ramifications that may have unfolded as a result of breezy but not releasing the full report. but with parliamentary privilege at that select committee on sure will learn a lot more about why the county seemingly struggled to grapple with this culture. lovely to seak grapple with this culture. lovely to s - eak with grapple with this culture. lovely to speak with you- — grapple with this culture. lovely to speak with you. people _ grapple with this culture. lovely to speak with you. people of - grapple with this culture. lovely to speak with you. people of course l grapple with this culture. lovely to l speak with you. people of course can find your programme they can still find your programme they can still find your programme online and listen back to what you and fans have been saying in the county. i'm joined now by dr halima begum, chief executive of the race equality think tank, runnymede trust. thank you very much for being with us. what's your take on this? that must be something about this that feels horribly like we've been here before in different circumstances.
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maybe in different sports, may in different aspects of public life. but there is a kind of depressing familiarity about some of these arguments. familiarity about some of these arguments-— familiarity about some of these aruuments. , , ., �* , arguments. yes, sadly it won't be the last time _ arguments. yes, sadly it won't be the last time that _ arguments. yes, sadly it won't be the last time that were _ arguments. yes, sadly it won't be the last time that were having i arguments. yes, sadly it won't be | the last time that were having this conversation. it's incredibly depressing. i think we need to be very clear about what were talking about here. what were talking about is a story of institutional racism and personal suffering that has been allowed to foster for many, many years. i say that because what i hearin years. i say that because what i hear in the moment is framing around banter. the reason why companies are pulling out, the reason why people are upset wasn't just pulling out, the reason why people are upset wasn'tjust because of the banter, we are talking about personal suffering and institutional racism that has gone on for many years. what's extremely worrying is that our by our we are getting more details about how serious the situation is and how long it's going on for. i'm afraid that we might emerge to hear more stories in
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detail that shows this case to be more disgraceful we know to be today. as you know, the chairman of your chart cricket club has resigned in protest. i'm surprised that the rest of the rest of the executives didn't reside with them. i have some sympathy for roger because he inherited the situation at year end. you can hear it in a statement. this problem is bigger than any individual can manage. he has tried to involve regulated two regulators, other people to help him with this problem. as such is the case of banter, it's far more serious than theirs. ~ ., ~ banter, it's far more serious than theirs. ~ . ~ ., ., ., ., theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we talked at argo _ theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we talked at argo with _ theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we talked at argo with some _ theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we talked at argo with some b - theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we talked at argo with some b who i theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we talked at argo with some b who had| theirs. we talked in an hour ago, we. talked at argo with some b who had a successful career, county cricket or herself. she explained very eloquently the p word for her and anyone in her circle simply can't be used as banter. it is not a banter
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word, it is a word that is loaded and comes with so many other associations that even if the person expressing it and using it things in their own mind it's banter, that's not how it's received. and from her view that's the reason it should be used. i say that you try to put into context for people watching who might still be struggling to understand why this has become so big in issue given to such an extent that major companies are prepared to pull out all of what until now has been for them a brand they wanted to been for them a brand they wanted to be associated with.— be associated with. because i think ou be associated with. because i think you exolain — be associated with. because i think you exolain it _ be associated with. because i think you explain it well, _ be associated with. because i think you explain it well, sean. - be associated with. because i think you explain it well, sean. it's i be associated with. because i think you explain it well, sean. it's not l you explain it well, sean. it's not banter and the more we can repeat the statement that it's banter the more we try and dismiss the issue of racism. what were talking about is insular or banter we are talking about racialized abuse. systemically that went on for years. that is why i think the companies are distancing
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themselves. because if it was only banter and not racialized abuse i think most people can handle banter but many of us cannot handle racialized abuse that went on for years and years and years. let me ask ou, years and years and years. let me ask you. you _ years and years and years. let me ask you, you mentioned _ years and years and years. let me ask you, you mentioned regulator| years and years and years. let me i ask you, you mentioned regulator and roger hutton his attempt to get the english wheels cricket board involved. their response — we don't interfere in the affairs of individual clubs. is that a position you think for a regulatory body to adopt in the 21st century? dirt reason the — adopt in the 21st century? d “it reason the regulatory bodies exists is to good practice or the sports of whole improving. this was seen as quite a high—profile case was that i think for a regulator to step aside from his responsibility is telling. mind you they are actually commenting on the situation at the moment i think what azeem rafiq would've preferred is probably some
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support. rogerwould've would've preferred is probably some support. roger would've preferred some support earlier as a victim experiencing racism it's very well, now and to offer support but where was that support when it was needed? here's the challenge, went regulators and institutions don't step in in a timely way, what starts as an individual act of racism then becomes an institutional challenge. what happens is we haven't rooted out where it was taken place and that if testers and fosters in different parts of an institution become embroiled in silencing what is going on. that's where the challenge lies. if we were to basically put her hands up in the air and say that was disgraceful, we should have done something a lot earlier than actually the situation gets better and we can deal with it. it's when institutions don't do something about it in a timely way and there isn't the right punishment or consequences for racialized abuse, that's when i think we've got abuse, that's when i think we've got a systemic problem. this is why i
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think companies are distancing themselves. as i said, it wasn't just some slur, it was racialized abuse. and then there was a whole incident around the findings being made clear and still there was no disciplinary action. anna regulator did not respond in a chair person and had to resign in protest because it was too much for him alone. well if it was too much for the chairperson, imagine how azeem rafiq felt all those years. bear in mind that azeem rafiq was actually in under 21 england of captain the cricket team. what signal does that give to the rest of the world? we are supposed to be a cricketing nation and a leader for it. thank you very much for giving me this time this evening. the swedish climate activist greta thunberg has accused world leaders of deliberately postponing much needed drastic action against global warming and said they were fighting instead to keep the status quo. addressing thousands of young people
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at a rally in glasgow, she called the cop26 climate summit little more that a celebration of �*business as usual�*. here's our scotland editor sarah smith. a rare opportunity for protesters to loudly deliver a message, almost within earshot of the global decision makers gathered in glasgow. greta thunberg, who inspired me fridays for future movement, says those leaders have so far failed to deliver. young kids, inspired by greta, have drawn their own pictures of her. i know that she put out a sign. and then everybody else started following her, just like this. how do you talk to children this age about climate change without scaring them too much? i don't have to. they themselves are aware. they know about plastic, about pollution, about air pollution. as the government announced measures to put climate
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at the heart of education, kids — mostly with their parents' permission — were skipping school to take part in the youth protest. your sign says now means now, not later. why did you write that? i wrote that because they're saying we need to do this now, we need to get this now, we're going to sort this now, but they are not sorting it. they're just going to make promises they can't keep. do you think that's what the world leaders at cop are doing? making promises that you don't think they're going to keep? yes, it has happened a lot of time before, people say they are going to do things and they don't make enough change to actually have an impact. we are hoping that the folk in cop, i drinking their tea, are listening, i and they're listening to what we say land try and try to make a change. . do you not think they're trying to achieve the same thing as you, to lower carbon emissions and save the planet? yeah... i don't know. i think they are trying, . but we're trying harder. so far at this cop, there have been commitments to reverse deforestation, cut methane emissions and promise more money than ever before to tackle climate change. greta thunberg, who's at the front, doesn't seem very impressed with the progress of cop so far.
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what do you think? i think it's fair enough. you know, it's cop26. i'm 26 years old, it's been 26 years and no progress has been made and our carbon emission keeps increasing. we need action. on stage, thunberg dismissed cop26 as a pr exercise. this is no longer a climate conference, this is now a global greenwash festival. a two—week long celebration of business as usual and blah, blah, blah. they cannot ignore the scientific consensus. and, above all, they cannot ignore us, the people — including their own children. tomorrow, even larger crowds are expected, hoping to keep up the pressure before the final week of climate negotiations. sarah smith, bbc news, glasgow. no more pollution, i we need a revolution! some locations have to grapple with the consequences of our changing climate every day. people living in a village on an island in northern alaska face being forced out of their homes
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because of rising sea levels. alaska is home to rapidly retreating glaciers where the rate of melting is among the fastest on the planet, as our climate editorjustin rowlatt let's go live to justice in anchorage. hello justin. i've got hellojustin. i've got to say of bald eaglejust hellojustin. i've got to say of bald eagle just flew past! i hellojustin. i've got to say of bald eaglejust flew past! i know hellojustin. i've got to say of bald eagle just flew past! i know is a relevant issue of climate change. we here in alaska because this place in a way is a canary in the mind and the climate issue. because temperatures are so close to freezing, if you raise them only a little bit you get really big changes. so ice that used to remain frozen and snow that used to thaw and stay until the spring or summer is now melting earlier. that is driving profound changes here in alaska as i've been discovering. the top of our world is changing — warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet.
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and it is destroying communities. my house used to be about 20 feet out where you see the water breaks. the island of shishmaref is on the front line of climate change. as temperatures rise, less sea ice forms, exposing the coast. it's getting later and later every year for this ocean to freeze up. it's tough but...got to keep going. as the climate changes, the animals and fish the people here used to live on are getting harder to find. right now we are supposed to fishing in the lagoon and up the rivers. we've got a week till, like, december probably to january to start going up again. parts of the main road have washed away and now the airstrip that is the community's lifeline
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to the outside world is threatened. if it gets to the runway, then we can't use it any more. we use the runway for medivacs, we use the runway for getting all ourfood flown in, all our mail. the plan is to move the entire town onto the mainland. it'll cost an estimated $180 million and means access to the sea will be much more difficult. but, says dennis, they've got no choice. the climate changing so fast and the weatherjulie mack waters warming. i would say within the next, five ten years _ would say within the next, five ten years this — would say within the next, five ten years this will all be covered. easy — years this will all be covered. easy. just _ years this will all be covered. easy. just at one or two degrees makes _ easy. just at one or two degrees makes a _ easy. just at one or two degrees makes a big difference. and alaska is inches struggling _ makes a big difference. and alaska is inches struggling to _ makes a big difference. and alaska is inches struggling to cope - makes a big difference. and alaska is inches struggling to cope with i is inches struggling to cope with its new climate reality on the coast. a century ago the glacier came all the way down here, the
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entire valley was frozen. as recently as the 80s they've built this visitor centre because you can still see the glacier in the valley. since then it has completely retreated around the corner and you can't see it at all. these days if you want to see the eyes it is now a tough hike up and over a high pass. this is all that remains of the once mighty glacier. and mountain glaciers arejust mighty glacier. and mountain glaciers are just melting here mighty glacier. and mountain glaciers arejust melting here in alaska, they are melting all over the world. potentially affecting millions of people who depend on ice for their water supply. ii rare millions of people who depend on ice for their water supply.— for their water supply. if we do have glaciers. _ for their water supply. if we do have glaciers, went _ for their water supply. if we do have glaciers, went up - for their water supply. if we do have glaciers, went up the i for their water supply. if we do | have glaciers, went up the note for their water supply. if we do i have glaciers, went up the note have drinking _ have glaciers, went up the note have drinking water for cities, we might not have _ drinking water for cities, we might not have any hydropower potential. especially _ not have any hydropower potential. especially for agricultural needs we will have _ especially for agricultural needs we will have water only maybe they winter _ will have water only maybe they winter months and not during the summer— winter months and not during the summer during the dry periods. alfred _ summer during the dry periods. alfred is — summer during the dry periods. alfred is struggling to come to terms with the idea that his home
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will soon be gone. itruieiiii terms with the idea that his home will soon be gone.— will soon be gone. well it means a lot to me because _ will soon be gone. well it means a lot to me because it's _ will soon be gone. well it means a lot to me because it's got a - will soon be gone. well it means a lot to me because it's got a lot i will soon be gone. well it means a lot to me because it's got a lot of. lot to me because it's got a lot of heritage, a lot of good people. while were here we've just got to keep our tradition going. got to keep our tradition going. got to keep going strong. it keep our tradition going. got to keep going strong.— keep our tradition going. got to keep going strong. it isn't easy to let no of keep going strong. it isn't easy to let go of a — keep going strong. it isn't easy to let go of a place _ keep going strong. it isn't easy to let go of a place you _ keep going strong. it isn't easy to let go of a place you spent - keep going strong. it isn't easy to let go of a place you spent your. let go of a place you spent your entire life. but if greenhouse gas emissions aren't cut rapidly it is something many more millions people are likely going to have to face. really profound changes here in alaska. it points to a much bigger picture. 0ut when i say much bigger i mean really big. what climate experts are saying is that the rising temperatures we are seeing could be kicking the earth out of the cycle of ice ages that we've beenin the cycle of ice ages that we've been in for the last couple of million years, pushing us into a new and uncertain climate reality. hagar and uncertain climate reality. how many more _ and uncertain climate reality. how many more eagles _ and uncertain climate reality. how many more eagles flying past in those circumstances
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goes back thank you so much. the funeral has taken place today for sabina nessa who was attacked as she walked to meet a friend in south east london in september. prayers were said for the 28—year—old teacher at whitechapel�*s east london mosque, who has also been remembered in a series of public vigils. a 36—year—old man has been charged with the murder, and will appear in court next month. the trial is underway in the us state of georgia, of three white men accused of chasing and killing a black man because they thought he looked like a crime suspect. ahmaud arbery had been jogging close to his home. his killers were only arrested after a national outcry. aleem maqbool reports from brunswick. as the child open the video of his final moments were played. all too much for his mother who let out a cry. sitting in front of her at the foreground here the men who pulled the trigger. this was the video they
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were watching, three armed white men had pursued a month say he was a burglary suspect cornered him and shot and killed him. an avid runner had beenjogging through shot and killed him. an avid runner had been jogging through this. just a short distance from his home when the men decided tojump into their trucks and give chase. their own statement showed one of the men who showed involved in the killing used a racial slur as he lay dying. sadly murals of an unarmed black man who would been shot and killed are now darted in towns and cities right across this country. but in arbery case he didn't die in the hands of the police but in the hands of people who thought they could to act as an extension of police and do what they like. that appears to be precisely how the police treated him. but cam footage that is too distressing to show where we see ahmaud arbery on the ground dying
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not being given attention. throughout the encounter police provide comfort to the men who killed him. i can only imagine. they certainly don't a c two appear to be treated as murder suspect. now, no. in fact it was only ten weeks later after protest when the video of the killing had taken by one of the men went viral. travis mcmichael and his father greg and ronnie brian were even arrested. they were eventually charged and now go to trial. you can intentionally — charged and now go to trial. you can intentionally and _ charged and now go to trial. you can intentionally and deliberately - charged and now go to trial. you can intentionally and deliberately kill i intentionally and deliberately kill another person in self—defense and not have committed murder. you another person in self-defense and not have committed murder. you would be not guilty- — not have committed murder. you would be not guilty- is — not have committed murder. you would be not guilty- is it— not have committed murder. you would be not guilty. is it still— be not guilty. is it still self—defense as they chased him? that's because they were attempting to execute a citizens arrest.- to execute a citizens arrest. ahmaud arbe this to execute a citizens arrest. ahmaud arbery this case _ to execute a citizens arrest. ahmaud arbery this case has _ to execute a citizens arrest. ahmaud arbery this case has already - to execute a citizens arrest. ahmaud arbery this case has already led i to execute a citizens arrest. ahmaud arbery this case has already led to l arbery this case has already led to the wrapping of ace citizens arrest law in georgia. before the trial started his mother told me she hope somehow good would come out of this
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tragedy. i somehow good would come out of this traced . ., , somehow good would come out of this traced. .,, ., somehow good would come out of this traced. ., tragedy. i hope that in losing ahmaud arbery _ tragedy. i hope that in losing ahmaud arbery that - tragedy. i hope that in losing ahmaud arbery that people i tragedy. i hope that in losing i ahmaud arbery that people that tragedy. i hope that in losing - ahmaud arbery that people that look like him will be able to jog, they will be able to run, they will be able to do what ever and be free and not be worried about being chased with guns and killed. for not be worried about being chased with guns and killed.— with guns and killed. for the child takin: with guns and killed. for the child taking place _ with guns and killed. for the child taking place in — with guns and killed. for the child taking place in a _ with guns and killed. for the child taking place in a city _ with guns and killed. for the child taking place in a city that - with guns and killed. for the child taking place in a city that is i taking place in a city that is majority black there will be only one african america two american juror here it appears to be easier to turn over laws than attitudes that undoubtedly contributed two of 1's death. president biden, other former us presidents and dignatries gathered at washington's national cathedral for the funeral of colin powell. the 84—year died last month of complications from coronavirus. he was fully vaccinated but had a compromised immune system having been treated for blood cancer. powell was revered as a four—star us army general and statesman
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who appealed to both sides of the aisle on capitol hill. he made history as the us s first black secretary of state. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. after a mainly dry bonfire night some rain on the way into the start of the weekend, in fact, overnight it's turning wetter across northwest scotland. the wind will pick up as well. plenty of cloud elsewhere, few spots of rain here and there couple of showers. temperatures not coming down anywhere near as far as they did last night, particularly in england where there was quite a bit of frost to start the day today. we start tomorrow with temperatures into double figures in some spots. it will be a windier day tomorrow, plenty of cloud around, some patchy rain at times. especially in the west but more substantial rain running across scotland, northern ireland into northern england, especially west of the pennines it into wales. for the midlands, east anglia
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and southern england a few spots of rain, yes, certainly but also some patchy rain heading southwards into the evening. winds picking up across all parts, especially in northern scotland and overnight saturday into sunday severe gales, some because 60 to 70 miles an hour and some big waves into some of the coast as well. it's going to be mild for the weekend. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: three board members including the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club have resigned over the club's handling of racism experienced by former player azeem rafiq. former england capatin michael vaughan was accused of making a racist comment to players — something he denies — the bbc says he won't be presenting his cricket programme next week. greta thunberg leads thousands of young activists through the streets of glasgow to demand action on climate change at cop26. a fifth teenager has been found guilty of killing 15—year—old keon lincoln who was shot and stabbed outside his home in birmingham
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prosecutors in the us state of georgia have shown the footage of the fatal shooting of a black jogger at the trial of three white men accused of his murder. the mother of a 15—year—old schoolboy who was shot and stabbed outside his home in birmingham has said her heart is broken beyond repair after five teenagers were convicted of killing him. keon lincoln died injanuary. 0ur correspondent phil mackie was in court. keon lincoln, a 15—year—old schoolboy seen here messing around with his friends. injanuary, he was killed in broad daylight outside his house, by a group of teenagers who were out looking for someone to attack in this white car. keon was chased, stabbed and shot dead. the gunman was only 14 years old.
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it was an horrific attack on a quiet, suburban street. police say it is not clear if he was targeted — it may have been a random attack. the stolen car was abandoned two miles away. in it they found a knife and a mask with dna. and there was more cctv footage and phone records which led to the arrest, and now conviction of five people. none of them showed any remorse. michael ugochukwu and tahjgeem breaken—ridge are both 18. the 14—year—old and his 16 friend cannot be named because of their ages. a fifth defendant, kieron donaldson, who supplied the knives butt wasn't part of the attack, was guilty of manslaughter. they'll all be sentenced later month. the whole attack lasted less than 40 seconds. and among the first people outside to see what had happened where his milder and twin sister. i heard the gunshots. and my first instinct was, where is my sun? those were the first words i said, where's my son? i found out there was somebody up the road, and...
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yeah, it was my boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surge in the number of under—16s is sentenced for knife crime. 0n return to birmingham, police colleagues carried out a search and live gun cartridges were found. in response, the city's set up a special team to share intelligence about teenagers who at risk of becoming involved. children are killing children, we're seeing it daily. 0ur community's in crisis. it feels like every other day there's a firearm, a gunshot, a knife wound, children being stabbed in parks. places that are supposed to be safe spaces for children are no longer safe anymore. her son's become another teenage casualty in a city that's lost too many young lives in recent years. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham. the number of coronavirus infections could be flattening out — with experts saying we may have reached another peak. the latest figures suggest1 in 55 people in the uk tested positive for covid last week that's more
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than 1.2 million people. it comes as the drug company pfizer said its developed a new covid pill to be taken at the first sign of symptoms — that is eighty— nine per cent effective at preventing hospital treatment or death. here's our health editor hugh pym. are we going to go in the left or the right arm, sir? as people come forward for boosterjabs, here in marlow in buckinghamshire, and here at st helens rugby league ground, the hope is that the spread of the virus can be slowed down. there are very tentative views among expert modellers that there may be a downward trend for infections. it's very possible that cases may continue to go down over the next few weeks, but i'm also very aware that we saw this in september and then we did see a climb in cases again. so i'm probably not confident enough yet to say that this is definitively what we're going to see but if we continue to see this over the next couple of weeks, then i'll be increasingly confident that this wave is turning over.
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it's hard to read the data. the daily reported case numbers which cover people who have come forward for testing have been falling week on week. but an infection survey by the office for national statistics is based on household testing and includes those who don't have symptoms. it paints a broader picture. the latest 0ns survey suggests last week nearly 1.27 million people in the uk had the virus, about the same as the previous week. and the trend does appear to be flattening after increases recently. in england, one in 50 people had the virus. in wales, it was one in 40 and in scotland, one in 80. northern ireland, with one in 65, was the only one to show an increase. but school half term in some parts of the uk last week may have complicated the situation. half term can have had a positive impact in that it may have paused some of those classroom transmissions that we were seeing happening very frequently through september and october. of course, what we don't know yet is if that will be a long lasting effect or that now the kids are back
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at school, we'll start to see those infections pick up again. while vaccinations continue, there's more optimism about covid treatments. a pill developed by pfizer greatly reduced the risk of getting seriously ill among the most vulnerable in trials. hugh pym, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were nearly 34,029 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period. that's 9,400 fewer cases than last friday. it means an average of 37,975 cases were reported per day, in the last week. just over 9 thousand people were in hospital with covid yesterday. there were 193 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which takes the average number of deaths over the past seven days to 171. the total number of people who've died with covid, now stands at at 141,588. 0n vaccinations, 87.2% percent of people aged 12 and over, have now received a first
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dose. and 79.6% percent have been double jabbed. and more than 9.3 million people have received their boosterjab, this includes third doses for those, with certain health conditions. around a million more children in england should be eligible for free school meals and would benefit from a hot meal a day — that's according to a leading food charity. the food foundation says there s an urgent need to expand the criteria of who qualifies by raising the earnings threshold to 20 thousand pounds a year before benefits. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley reports. you feel like you're a failure. you're not a failure. because i run a garden company. my business has lost nearly 150 customers through covid.
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i've lost about £18,000 this year. steve worries about putting food on the table for his three children. he also worries about feeding dozens of families across stalybridge. he set up this foodbank to help others. these are people who've worked and they've been on furlough, gas going up, food going up, everything's going up and the wages aren't going up. there's more working families come here than there is people not working. and that's what i thought i'd never see. i need to get more food... i've not got the food to sustain this. now, we've got two tins of potatoes. i need 80 tins of potatoes this week, so, yeah, i do worry. have you had a good day? i literally live week by week, you know? i might have a pound left in my purse at the end of the week. you need it on, it's cold, sweetheart. colette is a mum of two and works full—time. she doesn't qualify for free school meals because she earns above the eligibility threshold of £7,400 a year.
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going to a food bank, it's not nice, it's scary. food is going up. it's all right when it's just like 20, 30p at that time, but when you work it out over the week or the month, it turns into pounds. i go to the corner shop, my youngest, he has like a little pot with his coins in and he'll say, "wait, mummy, i'mjust getting some money." and he'll bring it down, "i'll get this, mummy, because you haven't got much money and you work hard, i'll get it out of my money." and it's so upsetting. another day and steve has more deliveries. it's going to bolton vale, i've got a foodbank in there with debbie, the head teacher. he's also set up food banks in four primaries, which mainly help the families who don't get free school meals but are running low on food. there's lots of families who don't have much so we really want to help them. this head teacher wants the eligibility threshold expanded to include more children and says schools are struggling to provide a safety net to help working families. on an evening, usually around eight o'clock,
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myself and several other local head teachers go to collect the food for the children. teachers are spending their own money on food, they're topping up the food banks. the challenges are significant. the government says it's expanded access to free school meals more than any other government in recent decades. and there are currently over 1.7 million pupils in england that receive a nutritious free school meal through the benefits—related criteria. but food charities are warning it doesn't go far enough to reach working families struggling to put food on the table. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in stalybridge. the brexit minister, david frost, has said only �*limited progress' has been made in talks between the uk and the eu in brussels, as both sides try and resolve a dispute about northern ireland. britain wants to change the northern ireland protocol, which is designed to regulate trade and prevent the need for a hard border in ireland.
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but significant differences remain between the two sides, leading to speculation london may suspend the deal. �*students at 37 universities across the uk face disruption after a vote for industrial action by academic and administrative staff in a dispute over pensions. members of the university and college union said universities needed to urgently revoke the pension cuts and return to the negotiating table to avoid strike action. universities uk says changes are required to avoid escalating contribution costs. if there is something familiar about the people behind me and think he had seen it before it is because this damp again. abba have released theirfirst album almost 40 years after they split up. it's called voyage. and next year there'll be a concert in london — though they won't appear in person — instead there'll be digital versions
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of the stars on stage. the real singers have been speaking to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson at the studio where they recorded their comeback, in stockholm. benny and bjorn in abba's home town. the good thing about living in stockholm is that people don't bother you. not in the �*70s, not in the �*80s, not now. they come up now and they're all happy and say, "wow, i'm so happy that you made a couple of new songs." # promise me you can...# the idea of making a whole album was not part of the original plan. abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show, which will feature digital recreations of the band in concert, looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good so we said,
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"maybe we should do a couple more." this is a big deal, 40 years between albums. yes. it's emotionally very difficult to grasp, a chilly, that we did what we did. we don't need to prove anything here. i don't think we're taking a risk because if people think that we were better 40 years ago, fine. # you're not the man you should have been...# the album includes a number of songs about relationships ending. both couples in the band divorced shortly before the group split in 1982. people have read a lot of it into various lyrics. and of course, there is some of that in the lyrics,
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but most is fiction. but the emotions are there. yeah, yeah. one reason agnetha and frida were happy to rejoin abba was an agreement that they didn't have to do any of the interviews. but even still, this reunion is set to be very short lived. i've said that's it. i don't want to do another abba album. but, i'm not alone in this — there are four of us. the ladies might be able to do that. yeah. it'll take them to do it, a chilly. yeah, i think so! colin paterson, bbc news, stockholm. the headlines on bbc news... three board members including the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club have resigned over the club's handling of racism experienced by former player azeem rafiq. former england capatin michael vaughan was accused of making a racist comment to players — something he denies — the bbc says he won't be presenting his cricket programme next week. greta thunberg leads thousands of young activists through the streets of glasgow
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to demand action on climate change at cop26

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