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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 5, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm GMT

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at 6:00 — the chairman of yorkshire county cricket resigns as the club is engulfed by a racism row. he's left over the club's response to the racism experienced by former player azeem rafiq. despite a year long enquiry, no disciplinary action was taken. what i've seen is a culture that is locked in the past. a culture that finds it difficult to accept challenge and change. former england capatin michael vaughan was accused of making a racist comment to players — something he denies. the bbc says he won't be presenting his cricket programme next week. also on the programme tonight... greta thunberg leads thousands of young activists through the streets of glasgow to demand action on climate change at cop26.
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we have had 26 cops. we have had decades of blah, blah, blah. and where has that led us? we report from a village in northern alaska where rising sea levels are already driving people from their homes new coronavirus cases begin to flatten out with some experts saying the uk may have reached a peak. # keep an eye on dan # promise me you can...# and abba is back — with their first album in a0 years. and coming up on the bbc news channel, a blow for england as captain 0wen farrell tests positive for coronavirus on the eve of their autumn international opener.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has resigned over its response to the racism experienced by the former player azeem rafiq. roger hutton issued a stinging attack on executive board members who he said had shown a "constant unwillingness" to accept there was a problem, after an investigation found rafiq was the victim of racial harassment and bullying. tonight the bbc has announced that former england captain michael vaughan — who has strongly denied making a racist comment to a group of asian players — won't be presenting his cricket programme on radio 5 live next week. here's our sports editor dan roan. the racism that cricketer azeem rafiq suffered at yorkshire has plunged the county into an unprecedented crisis. today, as the fallout continued, the chairman bowed to intense pressure to step down, and, just hours after announcing his departure, roger hutton told me the club had left
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their former player down. i hutton told me the club had left theirformer player down. i am hutton told me the club had left their former player down. i am sorry that he didn't _ their former player down. i am sorry that he didn't have _ their former player down. i am sorry that he didn't have his _ their former player down. i am sorry that he didn't have his allegations i that he didn't have his allegations investigated in 2018. i am sorry it has taken so long. i am sorry that, ultimately, the club hasn't shown the right contrition. i have not personally met anyone i would consider racist at yorkshire county cricket club. what i have seen is a culture that is locked in the past. are made more resignations at headingley today, hutton blamed senior management, who he said resisted change after a report found rafiq had suffered racial harassment.— rafiq had suffered racial harassment. . , ., ., _ harassment. there was a failure by man in harassment. there was a failure by many in the _ harassment. there was a failure by many in the club _ harassment. there was a failure by many in the club to _ harassment. there was a failure by many in the club to accept - harassment. there was a failure by many in the club to accept its - many in the club to accept its findings, understand them or recognise them. and since then, that has been incredibly frustrating. the ecb has banned headingley from hosting england matches, but hutton said the governing body should have done more to support the investigation. i done more to support the investigation.— done more to support the investiuation. . . , . investigation. i heard a statement last niuht investigation. i heard a statement last night from — investigation. i heard a statement last night from the _ investigation. i heard a statement last night from the ecb, _ investigation. i heard a statement last night from the ecb, that - investigation. i heard a statement last night from the ecb, that they| last night from the ecb, that they repeatedly offered to help me and yorkshire county cricket club
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through this investigation. that could not be further from the truth. yorkshire batsmen gary ballance had admitted repeatedly using a racial slur towards rafiq about his pakistani heritage, but a panel regarded it as friendly banter, and no action has been taken against any member of staff, sparking outrage. do you accept that conclusion that they reached, that it was friendly banter? is that how you would deem that expression, that phrase, towards a colleague? h0. that expression, that phrase, towards a colleague?- that expression, that phrase, towards a colleague? no, if you use that language. _ towards a colleague? no, if you use that language. it — towards a colleague? no, if you use that language, it was _ towards a colleague? no, if you use that language, it was completely i that language, it was completely unacceptable. 50 that language, it was completely unacceptable.— unacceptable. so why no action? because you _ unacceptable. so why no action? because you haven't _ unacceptable. so why no action? because you haven't seen - unacceptable. so why no action? because you haven't seen the i unacceptable. so why no action? - because you haven't seen the context of the club under legal advice, that it was not something you could take disciplinary action in relation to. is gary ballance the only member of staff that there has been an allegation upheld against? ha. allegation upheld against? no. former england _ allegation upheld against? firm former england captain allegation upheld against? i157. former england captain michael bourne has become the second player to reveal he is named in the report. rafiq alleging he made a racist comment towards a group of asian players in 2009, michael vaughan denies the claim, but today one of
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those player said he had heard the alleged comment. a prominent pundit, tonight he was stood down from his radio show next week. in a statement, a bbc spokesman said it takes any allegations of racism extremely seriously. the allegation against michael vaughan predates his time working for the bbc. we have made the editorial decision that michael will not appear on the show on monday. the show focuses on topical discussion around current cricketing matters and given his involvement we need to maintain impartiality on the programme. it comes at a time when cricket is desperate to try to engage with the south asian community and become more diverse. some fear this damaging episode may send the game backwards. it is damaging episode may send the game backwards. , ., ., , backwards. it is more about trying to net backwards. it is more about trying to get systemic — backwards. it is more about trying to get systemic change _ backwards. it is more about trying to get systemic change in - backwards. it is more about trying to get systemic change in a - backwards. it is more about trying to get systemic change in a club i to get systemic change in a club like yorkshire, where change has proven to be very difficult, and the club, i think, proven to be very difficult, and the club, ithink, has proven to be very difficult, and the club, i think, has failed to evolve quick enough in the way that society is changing, and our attitudes
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towards race and racism. this has been a devastating _ towards race and racism. this has been a devastating week - towards race and racism. this has been a devastating week for - towards race and racism. this has been a devastating week for the l towards race and racism. this has - been a devastating week for the most successful club in county cricket. the ramifications of this remarkable saga now extend well beyond headingley. dan roanjoins us now. a dramatic week? absolutely. the way that things have unravelled here, sophie, the nature of the implosion at yorkshire is like nothing i can recall in sport. in the space ofjust a few days' time, this club has lost pretty much all of its sponsors, its right to host international matches, its chairman, half of the board, there is allegations against two of the biggest names to play here in recent years. tonight, there is another revelation around the head coach, andrew gale, being investigated by both yorkshire and the ecb over an alleged anti—semitic tweet in 2010. and the fear, i think, is that this case has perhaps exposed an ugly side to the game. certainly, when
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you look at professional football, this sport seems to suffer from much less diversity, and underrepresentation of non—white players, a fear, perhaps, as a result of this, that it has exposed that this sport is in some way out of kilter with trends in wider society. today, yorkshire issued a statement pledging that they would do whatever it took to regain trust. but the new leaders who come into this club will shortly face one of the greatest challenges the sport has seen in recent years. dan roan, thank you- — the mother of a 15—year—old schoolboy who was shot and stabbed outside his home in birmingham has said her heart is broken beyond repair after five teenagers were convicted of killing him. keon lincoln died injanuary. 0ur correspondent phil mackie was in court. music keon lincoln, a 15—year—old schoolboy seen here messing around
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with his friends. injanuary, he was killed in broad daylight outside his house, by a group of teenagers looking for someone to attack in this car. he was chased, stabbed and shot dead. the government was only 14 shot dead. the government was only 1a years old. it was a horrific attack on a quiet, suburban street. police say it is not clear if he was targeted, and it may have been a random attack. the stolen car was abandoned two miles away. in it they found a knife and a mask with dna stop and there was more cctv footage and phone records which led to the arrest, and now conviction of five people. none of them showed any remorse. two are 18. the 14—year—old and his 16 friend cannot be named because of their ages. a fifth defendant, ciaran donaldson, who supplied the knives but was not part of the attack, was guilty of manslaughter. they will all be sentenced later month. the whole attack lasted _ sentenced later month. the whole attack lasted less _ sentenced later month. the whole attack lasted less than _ sentenced later month. the whole attack lasted less than 40 - sentenced later month. the whole l attack lasted less than 40 seconds. attack lasted less than a0 seconds. among the first people outside to see what had happened where his mother and twin sister. i
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see what had happened where his mother and twin sister.— see what had happened where his mother and twin sister. i heard the aunshots. mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots- and _ mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots. and my _ mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots. and my first _ mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots. and my first instinct - mother and twin sister. i heard the l gunshots. and my first instinct was, where _ gunshots. and my first instinct was, where is _ gunshots. and my first instinct was, where is my— gunshots. and my first instinct was, where is my son? those were the first words— where is my son? those were the first words i— where is my son? those were the first words i said, where is my son? i first words i said, where is my son? i found _ first words i said, where is my son? i found out— first words i said, where is my son? i found out there was somebody up the road. _ i found out there was somebody up the road, and... yeah, it was my box _ the road, and... yeah, it was my bo . ,, . the road, and... yeah, it was my bo _ ,, . ii' the road, and... yeah, it was my bo . ,, . ::' �* ., the road, and... yeah, it was my bo.. if �* ., the road, and... yeah, it was my boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surue boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surae and boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surge and the _ boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surge and the role _ boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surge and the role under _ boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surge and the role under 16 - boy. since 2014, birmingham has seen a surge and the role under 16 is - a surge and the role under 16 is sentenced for knife crime. police colleagues _ sentenced for knife crime. police colleagues carried _ sentenced for knife crime. police colleagues carried out _ sentenced for knife crime. police colleagues carried out a - sentenced for knife crime. police colleagues carried out a search l sentenced for knife crime. police i colleagues carried out a search and live gun cartridges were found. in live gun cartridges were found. in response, the city has set up a special team to share intelligence about teenagers at risk of becoming involved. ., ~ involved. children are killing children. _ involved. children are killing children, we _ involved. children are killing children, we are _ involved. children are killing children, we are seeing - involved. children are killing children, we are seeing it. involved. children are killing i children, we are seeing it daily. 0ur children, we are seeing it daily. our community is in crisis. it feels like every other day there is a firearm, gunshot, a knife wound, children being stabbed in parks, places that are supposed to be safe spaces for children, they are no longer safe anymore. iher spaces for children, they are no longer safe anymore.— longer safe anymore. her son has become another _ longer safe anymore. her son has become another teenage - longer safe anymore. her son has become another teenage casualtyj longer safe anymore. her son has i become another teenage casualty in longer safe anymore. her son has - become another teenage casualty in a city that has lost too many young
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lives in recent years. the swedish climate activist greta thunberg has accused world leaders of deliberately postponing much needed drastic action against global warming and said they were fighting instead to keep the status quo. addressing thousands of young people at a rally in glasgow she called the cop26 climate summit little more that a celebration of business as usual. here's our scotland editor sarah smith. a rare opportunity for protesters to loudly deliver a message, almost within earshot of the global decision makers gathered in glasgow. greta thunberg, who inspired me fridays for future movement, says those leaders have so far failed to deliver. young kids, inspired by greta have drawn their own pictures of her. t greta have drawn their own pictures of her. ~ ., ., , , ., ., of her. i know that she put out a si . n. of her. i know that she put out a sign- and _ of her. i know that she put out a sign. and then _ of her. i know that she put out a sign. and then everybody - of her. i know that she put out a sign. and then everybody else i sign. and then everybody else started following her. just like
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this. ., ., ., ,, started following her. just like this. ., ., . ~' ., started following her. just like this. ., ., ., ,, this. how do you talk to children this. how do you talk to children this ace this. how do you talk to children this age about _ this. how do you talk to children this age about climate _ this. how do you talk to children this age about climate change i this age about climate change without scaring them too much? thea;r without scaring them too much? they themselves are _ without scaring them too much? they themselves are aware. _ without scaring them too much? they themselves are aware. they know about _ themselves are aware. they know about plastic, about pollution, about — about plastic, about pollution, about air— about plastic, about pollution, about air pollution. is about plastic, about pollution, about air pollution.— about air pollution. is the government _ about air pollution. is the government announced i about air pollution. is the - government announced measures about air pollution. is the _ government announced measures to put climate at the heart of education, kids, mostly with their parents�* permission, where skipping school to take part in the youth protest. your sign says now means now, not later. why? sign says now means now, not later. wh ? �* .. , ., sign says now means now, not later. wh? , ., why? because we are saying we need to do this now. _ why? because we are saying we need to do this now, we're _ why? because we are saying we need to do this now, we're starting - why? because we are saying we need to do this now, we're starting this - to do this now, we're starting this now, but they are not sorting it. they are making promises they can't keen _ they are making promises they can't kee -. ., they are making promises they can't kee, ., ., �* “ , they are making promises they can't kee. ., .,�* ,, ,~ they are making promises they can't kee. ., j ,, ,~ ., keep. you don't think they are going to keep their— keep. you don't think they are going to keep their promises? _ keep. you don't think they are going to keep their promises? yes, - keep. you don't think they are going to keep their promises? yes, it - keep. you don't think they are going to keep their promises? yes, it has| to keep their promises? yes, it has ha--ened to keep their promises? yes, it has happened before, _ to keep their promises? yes, it has happened before, people _ to keep their promises? yes, it has happened before, people say - to keep their promises? yes, it has happened before, people say they. to keep their promises? yes, it has i happened before, people say they are --oin happened before, people say they are going to _ happened before, people say they are going to do things and they don't make _ going to do things and they don't make enough change to have an impact — make enough change to have an impact. we make enough change to have an im act. ~ ., make enough change to have an imact. ~ . .,, ., make enough change to have an imact. . . . ., ~ impact. we are hoping that the folk in cop drinking _ impact. we are hoping that the folk in cop drinking the _ impact. we are hoping that the folk in cop drinking the tea, _ impact. we are hoping that the folk in cop drinking the tea, they - impact. we are hoping that the folk in cop drinking the tea, they are . in cop drinking the tea, they are listening — in cop drinking the tea, they are listening and _ in cop drinking the tea, they are listening and try _ in cop drinking the tea, they are listening and try to _ in cop drinking the tea, they are listening and try to make - in cop drinking the tea, they are listening and try to make a - in cop drinking the tea, they are i listening and try to make a change. do not _ listening and try to make a change. do not think— listening and try to make a change. do not think they _ listening and try to make a change. do not think they are _ listening and try to make a change. do not think they are trying - listening and try to make a change. do not think they are trying to - do not think they are trying to achieve the same thing is you, lower
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carbon emissions and save the planet? carbon emissions and save the lanet? ., carbon emissions and save the lanet? . ., �* ,, ., planet? yeah... i don't know. i think they _ planet? yeah... i don't know. i think they are _ planet? yeah... i don't know. i think they are trying, _ planet? yeah... i don't know. i think they are trying, but - planet? yeah... i don't know. i think they are trying, but we i planet? yeah... i don't know. i. think they are trying, but we are trying _ think they are trying, but we are trying harder _ think they are trying, but we are trying harder. why— think they are trying, but we are trying harder. why do _ think they are trying, but we are trying harder. why do not- think they are trying, but we are trying harder. why do not go- think they are trying, but we are trying harder. why do not go sol trying harder. why do not go so far at this— trying harder. why do not go so far at this top. — trying harder. why do not go so far at this cop, there _ trying harder. why do not go so far at this cop, there have _ trying harder. why do not go so far at this cop, there have been- at this cop, there have been commitments— at this cop, there have been commitments to _ at this cop, there have been commitments to reverse - commitments to reverse deforestation, _ commitments to reverse deforestation, cut - commitments to reverse i deforestation, cut methane commitments to reverse - deforestation, cut methane and promise — deforestation, cut methane and promise more _ deforestation, cut methane and promise more money— deforestation, cut methane and promise more money than - deforestation, cut methane and promise more money than ever| deforestation, cut methane and - promise more money than ever before to tackle _ promise more money than ever before to tackle climate _ promise more money than ever before to tackle climate change. _ promise more money than ever before to tackle climate change. greta - to tackle climate change. greta thunberg. _ to tackle climate change. greta thunberg. at _ to tackle climate change. greta thunberg, at the _ to tackle climate change. greta thunberg, at the front, - to tackle climate change. greta thunberg, at the front, does i to tackle climate change. greta. thunberg, at the front, does not seem _ thunberg, at the front, does not seem very— thunberg, at the front, does not seem very impressed _ thunberg, at the front, does not seem very impressed with - thunberg, at the front, does not seem very impressed with the l seem very impressed with the progress — seem very impressed with the progress so _ seem very impressed with the progress so far. _ seem very impressed with the progress so far. what - seem very impressed with the progress so far. what do - seem very impressed with the progress so far. what do you. seem very impressed with the - progress so far. what do you think? ithink— progress so far. what do you think? i think it _ progress so far. what do you think? i think it is — progress so far. what do you think? i think it is fair— progress so far. what do you think? i think it is fair enough. _ progress so far. what do you think? i think it is fair enough. i— progress so far. what do you think? i think it is fair enough. i am - progress so far. what do you think? i think it is fair enough. i am 26- i think it is fair enough. i am 26 years old, it has been 26 years and no progress has been made in carbon emissions, they keep increasing. we need action. {in emissions, they keep increasing. we need action-— need action. on stage, as better than bera need action. on stage, as better than berg dismissed _ need action. on stage, as better than berg dismissed cop26 - need action. on stage, as better than berg dismissed cop26 as i need action. on stage, as better than berg dismissed cop26 as a| need action. on stage, as better. than berg dismissed cop26 as a pr exercise. , , ., ., ., exercise. this is no longer a climate conference, - exercise. this is no longer a climate conference, it - exercise. this is no longer a climate conference, it is - exercise. this is no longer a climate conference, it is a i exercise. this is no longer a - climate conference, it is a global greenwash festival. a two week long celebration of business as usual and blah, blah, blah. they cannot ignore the scientific consensus. above all, they cannot ignore us, the people. including their own children. tomorrow, even larger crowds are expected, hoping to keep up the
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pressure before the final week of climate negotiations. sarah smith, bbc news, glasgow. the impact of climate change is already very real for villagers on an island in northern alaska. they're being forced out of their homes because of rising sea levels. alaska is home to rapidly retreating glaciers where the rate of melting is among the fastest on the planet. from there here's our climate editorjustin rowlatt. the top of our world is changing — warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet — and it is destroying communities. yeah, my house used to be about 20 feet out where you see the water breaks. the island of shishmaref is on the front line of climate change. as temperatures rise, less sea ice forms, exposing the coast. it's getting later and later every year for this ocean to freeze up.
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it's tough, but... got to keep going. as the climate changes, the animals and fish the people here used to live on are getting harder to find. right now we are supposed to fishing in the lagoon and up the rivers. we've got a week till, like, december probably to january to start going up again. parts of the main road have washed away and now the airstrip that is the community's lifeline to the outside world is threatened. if it gets to the runway, - then we can't use it any more. we use the runway for medivacs, we use the runway for getting - all our food flown in. the plan is to move the entire town onto the mainland. it'll cost an estimated $180 million. but, says dennis, they've got no choice.
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ithe climate is changing so fastl and the storms are getting more violent and that ice isn't forming in the water is warming. - i mean, i would say within the next five or ten years, this _ will all be covered. easy. just that one or two degrees makes a big difference. - and alaska isn'tjust struggling to cope with its new climate reality on the coast. a century ago, the glacier came all the way down here, the entire valley was frozen. and as recently as the 80s they built this visitor center, because you could still see the glacier in the valley. since then it has completely retreated round the corner and you can't see it at all. these days, if you want to see the ice it is now a tough hike up and over a high pass. this is all that remains of the once mighty portage glacier. and mountain glaciers aren'tjust
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melting here in alaska, they are melting all over the world, potentially affecting millions of people who depend on ice for their water supply. if we didn't have glaziers we are no longer going to have drinking water for cities, we might not have any hydropower potential. especially for agricultural needs, we would have water may be only during the winter months and not during the summer months, during the dry periods there would be no water. back in shishmaref, alfred is struggling to come to terms with the idea that his home will soon be gone. while shishmaref means a lot to me because it's got a lot of heritage, a lot of good people, while we are here we have just got to keep our tradition going. just try to keep going strong. it isn't easy to let go of the place where you've spent your entire life. but if greenhouse gases aren't cut rapidly, it is something many millions more people are likely
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to have to face. alaska is like the canary in the mind when it comes to climate change. temperatures are so close to freezing, raise them a little bit and you get big changes. the lake that's date frozen until spring or late summer is melting and it is also squeezing the range for arctic foxes and birds. but the fears that rising temperatures could be kicking the earth at the cycle of ice ages we have been in for the last couple of million years and pushing us into a new and uncertain climate reality. justin rowlatt in alaska, thank you. our top story this evening: the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the club's response to the racism experienced by former player azeem rafiq. and coming up: # you're not the man
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you should have been...# abba are back in the studio with their first album in a0 years. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel... a tough day for scotland as india eased to an eight wicket win at the t20 world cup. the number of coronavirus infections could be flattening out — with experts saying we may have reached another peak. the latest figures suggest one in 55 people in the uk tested positive for covid last week — that's more than 1.2 million people. it comes as the drug company pfizer said its developed a new covid pill to be taken at the first sign of symptoms — that is eighty— 9% effective at preventing hospital treatment or death. here's our health editor hugh pym are we going to go in the left
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all the right arm, sir? as people come forward for boosterjabs here in marlow in buckinghamshire, and here at st helens rugby league ground, the hope is that the spread of the virus can be slowed down. there are very tentative views among expert model is that there may be a downward trend for infections. it's very possible that cases may continue to go down over the next few weeks, but i'm also very aware that we saw this in september and then we did see a climb in cases again. i'm probably not confident enough yet to say that this is definitively what we are going to see but if we continue to see this over the next couple of weeks, then i'll be increasingly confident this wave is turning over. it's hard to read the data. the daily reported case numbers which cover people who have come forward for testing have been falling week on week. but an infection survey by the office for national statistics is based on household testing and includes those who don't have symptoms. it paints a broader picture.
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the latest 0ns survey suggests last week nearly 1.27 million people in the uk had the virus, about the same as the previous week. and the trend does appear to be flattening after increases recently. in england, one in 50 people had the virus. in wales, it was one in a0 and in scotland, one in 80. northern ireland with one in 65 was the only one to show an increase. but school half term in some parts of the uk last week may have complicated the situation. half term had a positive impact in that it may have caused some of those classroom transmissions that we were seeing happening very frequently through september and october. of course, what we don't know yet if that will be a long lasting effect or that now the kids are back at school, we'll start to see those infections pick up again. while vaccinations continue there's more optimism about covid treatments. a pill developed by pfizer greatly reduced the risk of getting seriously ill among the most vulnerable in trials.
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hugh pym, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were nearly 3a,029 new infections recorded, in the latest 2a—hour period. that's 9,a00 fewer cases than last friday. it means an average of 37,975 cases were reported per day, in the last week. just over 9,000 people were in hospital with covid yesterday. there were 193 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which takes the average number of deaths over the past seven days to 171. the total number of people who've died with covid, now stands at at 1a1,588. 0n vaccinations, 87.2% percent of people aged 12 and over, have now received a first dose. and 79.6% have been double jabbed. and more than 9.3 million people have received their boosterjab,
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this includes third doses for those, with certain health conditions. the trial of three men accused of murdering a black man while he was outjogging has begun today in the us state of georgia. the death in february last year of 25—year—old ahmaud arbery sparked protests across the us. further controversy has followed after a nearly—all white jury was selected for the trial — in which the defendants have pleaded not guilty. 0ur north america correspondent aleem maqbool is in brunswick, georgia. it was called a modern day lynching and hit the headlines, notjust because this was three white men decided this young black man looked like, they claimed a burglary suspect and they felt that gave them the right to arm themselves, chase him, corner him, shoot him and kill him. it wasn'tjust him, corner him, shoot him and kill him. it wasn't just that it later emerged that one of them used a
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racial slur as ahmaud arbery lay dying. it was also the fact the police didn't make an arrest in this case for nearly ten weeks, and only then once a video of the killing went viral and there were protests. i met the mother of ahmaud arbery before the trial started and she said she had never seen the video. 0ne said she had never seen the video. one of the most upsetting and emotional scenes at the trial today was hearing her anguished cry as she watched the video for the first time in the courtroom. as you said in the this trial starts in controversial circumstances because although we are in a city that is majority black, only one member of the jury is african—american. some of those supporters of the family feel these racist attitudes went towards killing ahmaud arbery and may influence thejury and killing ahmaud arbery and may influence the jury and the verdict. thank you.
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around a million more children in england should be eligible for free school meals and would benefit from a hot meal a day — that's according to a leading food charity. the food foundation says there s an urgent need to expand the criteria of who qualifies by raising the earnings threshold to £20,000 a year before benefits. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley reports. you feel like you're a failure. you're not a failure. because my business has lost nearly 150 customers through covid. i've lost about £18,000 this year. steve worries about putting food on the table for his three children. he also worries about feeding dozens of families across stalybridge. he set up this foodbank to help others. these are people who've worked and they've been on furlough, gas going up, food going up, everything is going up and the wages aren't going up. more working families come here than there is people not working.
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and that's what i thought i'd never see. i need to get more food... i've not got the food to sustain this. now, we've got two tins of potatoes. i need 80 tins of potatoes this week, so, yeah, i do worry. have you had a good day? i literally live week by week. i might have a pound left in my purse at the end of the week. it's cold, sweetheart. colette is a mum of two and works full—time. she doesn't qualify for free school meals because she earns above the eligibility threshold of £7,a00 a year. going to a food bank, it's not nice, it's scary. food is going up. it's all right when it's just like 20, 30p, but when you work it out over the week or the month, it turns into pounds. i go to the corner shop, my youngest, he has like a little pot with his coins in and he'll say, "wait, mummy, i'mjust getting some money." and he'll bring it down, "i'll get this, mummy, because you haven't got much money and you work hard, i'll get it out of my money." and it's so upsetting. another day and steve has more deliveries.
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it's going to bolton, i've got a foodbank in there with debbie, the head teacher. he's also set up food banks in four primaries, which mainly help the families who don't get free school meals but are running low on food. there's lots of families who don't have much i so we really want to help them. this head teacher wants the eligibility threshold expanded to include more children and says schools are struggling to provide a safety net to help working families. on an evening, usually around eight o'clock, myself and several other local head teachers go to collect the food for the children. teachers are spending their own money on food, they are topping up the food banks. the challenges are significant. the government says its expanded access to free school meals more than any other government in recent decades. and there are currently over 1.7 million pupils in england that receive a nutritious free school meal through the benefits—related criteria. but few charities are warning it
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doesn't go far enough to reach working families struggling to put food on the table. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in stalybridge. abba have released theirfirst album almost a0 years after they split up. it's called voyage. and next year there'll be a concert in london — though they won't appear in person — instead there'll be digital versions of the stars on stage. the real singers have been speaking to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson at the studio where they recorded their comeback, in stockholm. benny and bjorn in abba's home town. the good thing about living in stockholm is that people don't bother you. not in the �*70s, not in the �*80s, not now. they come up now and they're all happy and say, "wow, i'm so happy that you made a couple of new songs." # promise me you can...# the idea of making a whole album was not part of the original plan.
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abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show, which will feature digital recreations of the band in concert, looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good so we said, "maybe we should do a couple more." this is a big deal, a0 years between albums. yes. it's emotionally very difficult to grasp, actually, that we did what we did. we don't need to prove anything here. i don't think we're taking a risk because if people think that we were better a0 years ago, fine. # you're not the man- you should have been...# the album includes a number of songs about relationships ending. both couples in the band divorced shortly before the group split in 1982. people have read a lot of it
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into various lyrics. and of course, there is some of that in the lyrics, but most is fiction. but the emotions are there. yeah, yeah. one reason agnetha and frida were happy to rejoin abba was an agreement that they didn't have to do any of the interviews. but even still, this reunion is set to be very short lived. i've said that's it. i don't want to do another abba album. but, i'm not alone in this — there are four of us. i think you can twist his arm. the ladies might be able to do that. yeah. it'll take them to do it, actually. yeah, i think so! colin paterson, bbc news, stockholm. let's have a look at the weather. forget bonfire night nature has been cutting on its own show for us. some
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beautiful sunsets, especially in cornwall. the light is reflecting from the layers of cloud working in from the layers of cloud working in from the layers of cloud working in from the west. it continues to feed in from the west overnight so most places will be cloudy. there will be some spots of rain and heavy rain across northern parts of scotland, where it will turn windy. but it will be mailed through the night where there is the cloud and anybody starting saturday morning in double digits, ten or 11 degrees. a lot of cloud start the day and rain moving southwards across scotland into northern ireland, parts of north—west england and north wales. a lot of dry weather ahead of that but a lot of cloud and behind the rain band, things will brighten up and we will see further showery rain into north of scotland, where it will continue to turn increasingly windy. but miles, 11 to 1a degrees. during saturday night our band of patchy rain will push across the south. showery rain into the
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north—west of the uk

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