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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 5, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns — in the wake of the club's inaction around racism. thousands of young activists are marching through the streets of glasgow this lunchtime, demanding politicians at the cop26 meeting take serious action on climate change. we have a special report from alaska where climate change is threatening the very existence of one island community. azeem rafiq was found to have enjoyed bullying and racism when he was a player at yorkshire. now roger hudson has apologised unreservedly.
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i would say that what i have seen is a culture that is locked in the past, a culture that finds it difficult to accept the challenge and change. ——hutton. in my view it would be great if we could move forward. he would be great if we could move forward. . , ., would be great if we could move forward. ., . , forward. he has also criticised the sort was forward. he has also criticised the sport was my _ forward. he has also criticised the sport was my governing _ forward. he has also criticised the sport was my governing body, - forward. he has also criticised the sport was my governing body, the ecb. we will be asking what needs to happen now. also today. the birmingham teenager, keon lincoln, who was shot and stabbed outside his home in birmingham — a fifth teenager has been convicted of his killing. an experimental pill to treat covid — new trial results show it can cut the risk of hospitalisation or death by nearly 90% in vulnerable adults. and gimme, gimme, gimme — new music that's been a long time coming. we speak to abba, on the day they release their first studio album in a0 years.
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and coming up on the bbc news channel — england captain owen farrell has tested positive for covid—i9 on the eve of his side's test against tonga. he'll take more tests later today. hello, good afternoon. let's start our bulletin this lunchtime with the latest at the cop26 climate summit. thousands of people, including many schoolchildren, are protesting on the streets of glasgow, calling on world leaders at the summit to take action to tackle global warming. the campaigner greta thunberg is among them, on the day that debate at cop is focused
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on younger people. the education secretary will later set out a new strategy for schools in england, including a duke of edinburgh style award scheme recognising efforts to protect the environment. here's our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. you know week that began with the world leaders gathering in glasgow, today brings the biggest protest yet. today brings the biggest protest et. ~ ., ., today brings the biggest protest et. ~ . ., . today brings the biggest protest yet— climatel yet. what do we want? climate “ustice, yet. what do we want? climate justice. peace. _ yet. what do we want? climate justice, peace, love, _ yet. what do we want? climate i justice, peace, love, everywhere! thousands— justice, peace, love, everywhere! thousands gathered, determined their voices would be heard. greta thunberg, who inspired the climate strike movement, surrounded by supporters and the media here taking part. this march is taking place just minutes from where earlier world leaders and now their national delegations have been meeting to discuss the climate. some here, though, so there has been a clear divide, that they feel they have
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been excluded from the talks, their concerns not listened to, and by taking to the streets they hope that will change. we taking to the streets they hope that will chance. ~ ., , taking to the streets they hope that will chance. ~ . , ., . ., will change. we really need a change because it's — will change. we really need a change because it's just _ will change. we really need a change because it's just not _ will change. we really need a change because it'sjust not on, _ will change. we really need a change because it'sjust not on, they - will change. we really need a change because it'sjust not on, they are - because it's just not on, they are not listening. why are you laughing? they are not listening. who not listening. why are you laughing? they are not listening.— they are not listening. who is not listenin: ? they are not listening. who is not listening? the _ they are not listening. who is not listening? the world _ they are not listening. who is not listening? the world leaders, - they are not listening. who is not| listening? the world leaders, they come here for— listening? the world leaders, they come here for all— listening? the world leaders, they come here for all the _ listening? the world leaders, they come here for all the stuff- listening? the world leaders, they come here for all the stuff and - come here for all the stuff and leave in their planes and it's not happening. leave in their planes and it's not happening-— happening. glasgow and many neighbouring _ happening. glasgow and many neighbouring councils - happening. glasgow and many neighbouring councils have - happening. glasgow and many l neighbouring councils have said youngsters will not be punished for being here. why are you here today? i want to stop climate change. shouldn't you be at school? isn't it a school day today?— shouldn't you be at school? isn't it a school day today? yes, but you are allowed to be — a school day today? yes, but you are allowed to be off _ a school day today? yes, but you are allowed to be off to _ a school day today? yes, but you are allowed to be off to do _ a school day today? yes, but you are allowed to be off to do the _ a school day today? yes, but you are allowed to be off to do the march. i allowed to be off to do the march. this was— allowed to be off to do the march. this was a — allowed to be off to do the march. this was a chance for young people to have their say, notjust from scotland but from around the world too. we scotland but from around the world too. ~ ., scotland but from around the world too. . . . , scotland but from around the world too. . . ., , ., , ., too. we are really angry, we are an: too. we are really angry, we are angry because — too. we are really angry, we are angry because they _ too. we are really angry, we are angry because they are - too. we are really angry, we are angry because they are not - too. we are really angry, we are | angry because they are not doing nothing _ angry because they are not doing nothing and _ angry because they are not doing nothing and they— angry because they are not doing nothing and they are _ angry because they are not doing nothing and they are still - angry because they are not doing nothing and they are still killing i nothing and they are still killing defenders — nothing and they are still killing defenders on _ nothing and they are still killing defenders on our— nothing and they are still killing defenders on our lands. - nothing and they are still killing defenders on our lands. we - nothing and they are still killing defenders on our lands. we are| defenders on our lands. we are talking — defenders on our lands. we are talking and _ defenders on our lands. we are talking and talking _ defenders on our lands. we are talking and talking and - defenders on our lands. we are talking and talking and the - defenders on our lands. we are talking and talking and the only spaces — talking and talking and the only
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spaces that— talking and talking and the only spaces that we _ talking and talking and the only spaces that we have _ talking and talking and the only spaces that we have our - talking and talking and the only spaces that we have our spaces talking and talking and the only- spaces that we have our spaces here outside _ spaces that we have our spaces here outside because _ spaces that we have our spaces here outside because inside _ spaces that we have our spaces here outside because inside they- spaces that we have our spaces here outside because inside they don't i outside because inside they don't want _ outside because inside they don't want to— outside because inside they don't want to listen _ outside because inside they don't want to listen to _ outside because inside they don't want to listen to us. _ outside because inside they don't want to listen to us.— outside because inside they don't want to listen to us. change is not assive, want to listen to us. change is not passive. it — want to listen to us. change is not passive, it needs _ want to listen to us. change is not passive, it needs collective - want to listen to us. change is not| passive, it needs collective action, so if we are together we hope we can achieve something better. hope from those here that _ achieve something better. hope from those here that those _ achieve something better. hope from those here that those meeting - achieve something better. hope from those here that those meeting at - achieve something better. hope from| those here that those meeting at cop will implement meaningful change. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. let's get more now from alexandra mackenzie who's in glasgow. today, it is very much a date to hear the voices of the next generation.— hear the voices of the next reneration. , �*, , . generation. yes, it's very much about young — generation. yes, it's very much about young people _ generation. yes, it's very much about young people today. - generation. yes, it's very much about young people today. i'm| generation. yes, it's very much i about young people today. i'm in george square, which is in the centre of the city of glasgow, and that's where the march that we were talking about has been taking place. we have a few people behind us in the square and there is a real carnival atmosphere and a sense of youth and young people, there are
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some very young people, primary children who have been marching with their banners and their message todayis their banners and their message today is we are not going to school, we are going to keep our climate call. they are waiting for the march to come, it will possibly be here in the next half an hour so the stage is also set behind me and there will be speakers. greta thunberg, the swedish teenage activist will be there, and she will give her speech later on this afternoon.— later on this afternoon. alexandra mackenzie. _ later on this afternoon. alexandra mackenzie, thank _ later on this afternoon. alexandra mackenzie, thank you. _ later in the programme we'll be looking at the impact climate change is having on one community in alaska, which is at risk from rising sea levels. and a reminder you can keep up to date with everything that's going on at cop26 on our website, that's bbc.co.uk/news. the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has resigned, in the wake of its response to the racism experienced by azeem rafiq when he was a player there.
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roger hutton has apologised unreservedly to mr rafiq, and has criticised the governing body — the england and wales cricket board — for what he says was its failure to help. it comes after an investigation found azeem rafiq had been subject to racial harassment and bullying during his time with yorkshire — but the club said it would take no disciplinary action. azeem rafiq represented yorkshire in two stints between 2008 and 2018, and said institutional racism had left him close to taking his own life. here's our sports correspondent laura scott. chanting in yorkshire's 158 year history it in yorkshire's158 year history it has never faced a crisis like this. at the end of a disastrous week for one of the country's most prestigious cricket clubs, the man in charge bowed to the mounting
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pressure on him, telling the bbc why he had to go. pressure on him, telling the bbc why he had to go-— he had to go. more broadly than that, i would — he had to go. more broadly than that, i would say _ he had to go. more broadly than that, i would say that _ he had to go. more broadly than that, i would say that what - he had to go. more broadly than that, i would say that what i've l that, i would say that what i've seen is a culture that is locked in the past, a culture that finds it difficult to accept the challenge and change, and that, in my view, it would be great if we could move forward. ihis would be great if we could move forward. , _, , ., forward. his departure comes more than a year — forward. his departure comes more than a year of _ forward. his departure comes more than a year of the _ forward. his departure comes more than a year of the former— forward. his departure comes more than a year of the former yorkshire | than a year of the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq came forward alleging institutional racism at the club. an investigation found he had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying, but yorkshire said no disciplinary action would be taken and the full report, which included and the full report, which included a racial slur against azeem rafiq, being dismissed as friendly banter, has still not been published. last night the england and wales cricket board hit the club with unprecedented punishment for what it called the wholly unacceptable handling of the situation. they included launching a full governance review, the threat of financial sanctions and suspension on the club hosting international or major
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matches. yorkshire's gary ballance was also suspended from england selection after he admitted to using a racial slur against azeem rafiq. it's been clear that throughout this investigation we have had concerns about the manner in which decisions are made, and it's very clear that given the conclusion of the investigation and the subsequent action that's been taken in respect of disciplinary action to those implicated, it's very clear that there has been a lack of realisation of the seriousness of the issue and the implications for the wider game. again, the board have felt compelled to take this action. the again, the board have felt compelled to take this action.— to take this action. the racism scandal here _ to take this action. the racism scandal here has _ to take this action. the racism scandal here has led - to take this action. the racism scandal here has led to - to take this action. the racism scandal here has led to a - to take this action. the racism - scandal here has led to a commercial catastrophe with a long list of sponsors cutting ties with the club, among them the stadium sponsor emerald, the kit supplier nike and household brands like yorkshire tea. the concerns over the culture at the club extend beyond those with their names on the wall, and to those who might be coming through these gates.
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this is going to have devastating consequences, and quite rightly so, in the british asian community which is really passionate about cricket, which has supported headingley, which has supported headingley, which has supported yorkshire county cricket club for so long, and i think this is a betrayal. i don't think this is a betrayal. i don't think it's a safe organisation for my children to visit. i don't think it's a safe organisation for people of colour at the moment and i think that there needs to beat root and branch change at the organisation before i would even consider going back. i guess that my ultimate fears they too will become victims of racism and i'm not going to accept that. this is how they treat one of the most senior cricketers, x cricketers know of course, in the organisation. how do they treat more junior players from asian backgrounds? it’s junior players from asian backgrounds?— junior players from asian backarounds? �* , ., ., , backgrounds? it's more about trying to net backgrounds? it's more about trying to get systemic _ backgrounds? it's more about trying to get systemic change _ backgrounds? it's more about trying to get systemic change in _ backgrounds? it's more about trying to get systemic change in a - backgrounds? it's more about trying to get systemic change in a club - to get systemic change in a club like yorkshire which change has proven— like yorkshire which change has proven to — like yorkshire which change has proven to be very difficult and the club, _ proven to be very difficult and the club, i_ proven to be very difficult and the club, i think, proven to be very difficult and the club, ithink, has proven to be very difficult and the club, i think, has failed to evolve quick— club, i think, has failed to evolve quick enough in the way that society is changing — quick enough in the way that society is changing and our attitudes towards _ is changing and our attitudes towards race and racism. last night,
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the former england _ towards race and racism. last night, the former england captain - towards race and racism. last night, the former england captain michaell the former england captain michael vaughan revealed he was named in the report for allegedly telling a group of asian players, including azeem rafiq, in 2009 that there were too many of you lot. in his daily telegraph column, michael vaughan wrote this hit me very hard, it was like being struck over the head with a brick. i have been involved it with cricket for over 30 years and have never once been accused of any remotely similar incident. he added, i completely and categorically deny that i have said those words. this deeply damaging and continually developing race row has engulfed yorkshire. but the ramifications are being felt far beyond the boundaries of headingley. laura scott, bbc news. let's rejoin laura. it has emerged this lunchtime that azeem rafiq might not be alone in all of this. yes, jane, today brought more damning allegations as another, as yet unnamed, yorkshire player told
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the daily mail that he had also experienced racial abuse here, something he said ruined his career, and another player said he heard michael vaughan making racist comments, acclaim vaughan strongly denies. we are yet to hear the outcome of an emergency yorkshire board meeting that was due to take place but what is clear there are still major issues still to be resolved. roger hutton and others say the board must go to enable a new start for yorkshire at this critical time. azeem rafiq's employment tribunal against his club continues and the ecb faces scrutiny for its role in all of this. many people will be wondering if yorkshire can recover from the financial mire that has resulted from the scandal and just how it can rebuild the trust of the community, players and authorities which has been so badly eroded. remember at the heart of all of this is a man who said the institutional racism he experienced here left him close to taking his own life. fans of
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yorkshire rememberfondly the yorkshire remember fondly the miracle yorkshire rememberfondly the miracle of headingley when england won the ashes in one of the greatest test matches ever, but what has played out here in recent times could soon be described as the misery of headingley.- could soon be described as the misery of headingley. thank you, laura. misery of headingley. thank you, laura- laura _ misery of headingley. thank you, laura. laura scott. _ the education secretary nadhim zahawi has apologised for what he called the mistake that led to the government u—turn on reforming the commons standards system. the conservative mp at the centre of the row, owen paterson, resigned, after the government changed its mind about blocking his suspension from parliament for breaking lobbying rules. let's speak to our political correspondent ione wells. ione, the government says the u—turn is the right thing to do and it begs the question why they tried to do what they did in the first place. that's exactly right. some mps and ministers never thought it was a goodideain ministers never thought it was a good idea in the first place to try and overhaul the system, tojudge mps' conduct and overturn the suspension of owen paterson. now that this u—turn has happened, there
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has been a big backlash with some mps feeling like they were hung out to dry yesterday by their own bosses. this morning the education secretary nadhim zahawi said it was a mistake for the government to have pushed ahead with those plans but did stop short of saying exactly who is mistake this was. ithink the mistake, and i'm absolutely able to say to you, we did make a mistake and it's right to move very quickly within 24 hours and say, actually, you know what, we shouldn't have conflated these two things. that is a mistake and that is something that, rightly, your viewers were saying, actually, why did you make that mistake? all i can say is, i'm sorry we made that mistake, but it was right to move quickly. and actually, it's much more human — and i would prefer a leader that's able to reflect and actually come back and say that we've made a mistake, than one thatjust simply ploughs on ahead. interestingly, his colleague, business secretary kwasi kwarteng, also facing pressure to apologise today after he went on the airwaves before that u—turn to say that it was difficult to see a future for
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kathryn stone, the independent standards commissioner for parliament, given the government was trying to overhaul the standard system that she is a very key part of. interesting that nadeem is a hobby talked about collective responsibility because there are a number of figures certainly in the firing line today over the mess that some mps see all of this as, firstly, the prime minister himself, with some mps pointing to other examples of u—turns that the government has made under his leadership, then there is also the chief whip mark spencer, after mps were whipped to vote with the government yesterday, some of whom against their own well, i was told some mps who are thinking of abstaining yesterday were told they might lose certain positions they held if they did that, so here's another one in the firing line too, doors of the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg who was defending the government's plans in the house of commons. downing street have said this afternoon that they have said this afternoon that they have full confidence, the prime minister has full confidence in both the chief whip mark spencer but also injacob rees—mogg. but the question
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for the government now is, do conservative mps, and will they be willing in future, to back the government over things they don't agree with if they fear they could be stung like this in future? lane be stung like this in future? ione wells, thanks — be stung like this in future? ione wells, thanks very _ be stung like this in future? ione wells, thanks very much. - a teenager has been convicted for his part in the killing of 15—year—old keon lincoln, who was stabbed and shot outside his home in birmingham earlier this year. yesterday four other teenagers, including a 14—year—old gunman, were found guilty of murder. this morning, kieron donaldson who supplied the weapons but wasn't there when keon died, was convicted of manslaughter. our midlands correspondent phil mackie reports from birmingham crown court. music. this is keon lincoln, a typical teenager messing around with his family and friends. injanuary, after a day spent in remote lessons because of lockdown, a group of teenagers murdered him outside his house. it appeared carefully planned, they drove to his house
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in this stolen white ford. he was standing on the street. this was the moment it stopped and the attack began. it's taken from cctv footage which showed keon being chased, stabbed and then being shot dead. well this shrine is here to mark a spot near to where keon was stabbed and fatally shot. the whole attack lasted less than a0 seconds and among the first people who were outside to see what had happened where his mother and his twin sister. i heard the gunshots. my first instinct was, where's my son? those were the first words i said, where's my son? i found out there was somebody up the road and... yeah, it was my boy. a week after he died, the community gathered to remember him and appealled for calm. the situation that we are in with
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the postcode war needs to stop. and we have now learn to respect each other and love each other in the way that we ought to love each other. and we can only do that by putting away the knife and the gun. the stolen car was abandoned a couple of miles away. in it they found a knife and a mask with dna. there was more cctv footage and phone records which led to the arrest and now conviction of four teenagers for murder. michael ugochukwu and tahjgeem breaken—ridge are both 18. the other two killers can't be named because of their ages — they are 1a and 16. another 18—year—old, kieron donaldson, was convicted of manslaughter. the weapons that are being used, they are terrifying weapons - to think that, you know, the knives, they are - more like swords. you know, the weapons that young people are getting hold of, - they should never be getting hold of weapons such as those. - it's diabolical, it's unnecessary, it never needed to happen. -
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so we are trying to come to terms with that. - we just want closure. we still don't know why keon lincoln was killed but he has become another teenage casualty in a city that's lost too many young lives in recent years. there were two other people involved in the attack that got out of the stolen white ford who haven't been identified, although two people have been arrested and released under investigation. police are still appealing for information in connexion with keon lincoln's death. when the verdict was read out today, there were sobs from the public gallery. we were sent a statement from his mum, saying that everyday is a living nightmare. she said she would that wish this suffering on anyone and i can only hope a day
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will come when the senseless murdering of children all come to an end. referring to all the other debts we have seen in birmingham, the west midlands and all over the country. the people who have been convicted in connexion with the killing will be sentenced at the end the month. thank you. the pharmaceutical manufacturer pfizer, has said that a clinical trial of a pill to treat covid—19, shows that the drug is highly effective. the product is called paxlovid, and it is reported to have achieved an 89 % reduction in the risk of hospitalization or death — that's among adult patients with coronavirus who are at high risk of progressing to severe illness. with me now is our health correspondentjim reed: how significant is this? when you think about _ how significant is this? when you think about last _ how significant is this? when you think about last year _ how significant is this? when you think about last year there - how significant is this? when you think about last year there were l think about last year there were lots of companies talking about the effectiveness of vaccines. this year we're talking about treatment instead. these are treatments given to people at high risk of catching and then going on to develop serious
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disease, so pills taken at home after you have tested positive. pfizer, the second big drug company to report clinical trial results today, said they were very encouraging. 89% reduction in the risk of needing hospital treatment or of dying if he took this pill, compared with the group who were a placebo. it is still early days, this treatment is going to need approval by the regulators. at the uk authorities have already ordered 250,000 causes of this treatment and another half a million causes of a different treatment made by the company that was approved earlier this week by regulators. the downside i should mention, these treatments do need to be given very quickly after testing positive for covid. it will be up to the nhs this winter to roll these out to people who need them as quickly as possible for them to have much of an effect. interesting, thank you very much. our top story this lunchtime.
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the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns — in the wake of the club's inaction around racism suffered by azeem rafiq when he played for yorkshire. also on the programme — how a shortage of taxi drivers is raising fears about safety at night. coming up on the bbc news channel... all the latest from the t20 world cup where new zealand have set namibia a target of 164 — both teams can still qualify for the semi finals. scotland face india later. people living in a village on an island in northern alaska face being forced out of their homes because of climate change. sea levels have risen, threatening the island's infrastructure — and a reduction in sea ice, and rapid coastal erosion, is severely affecting their way of life. alaska is home to rapidly retreating glaciers where the rate of melting is among the fastest on the planet
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as our climate editorjustin rowlatt found when he visited the region. the top of our world is changing — warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. and it is destroying communities. my house used to be about 20 feet out where you see the water breaks. the island of shishmaref is on the front line of climate change. as temperatures rise, less sea ice forms, exposing the coast. it's getting later and later every year for this ocean to freeze up. it's tough but got to keep going. as the climate changes, the animals and fish of the people
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here used to live on are getting harder to find. right now we are supposed to fishing in the lagoon and up the rivers. we've got a week till, like, december probably to january to start going up again. parts of the main road have washed away and now the airstrip that is the community's lifeline to the outside world is threatened. if it gets to the runway, - then we can't use it any more. we use the runway for medivacs, we use the runway for getting - all our food flown in, all our mail. the plan is to move the entire town onto the mainland. it'll cost an estimated $180 million and means access to the sea will be much more difficult. but, says dennis, they've got no choice. what's happening here - in shishmaref is ultimately going to happen in california, j going to happen in new york.
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every community or city. that's on the coast needs to know what the heck's _ going on here because if not they're going to start washing away. dennis wants what's happening to his community to stand as a warning to the world. justin rowlatt, bbc news, alaska. a shortage of taxi drivers across the country is leading to concerns about public safety, according to the industry trade body. the licensed private hire car association says more than half of licenced drivers haven't returned to work after the pandemic, leaving a shortfall of 160,000 drivers. that's prompted concerns about the safety of shift workers and people struggling to get home. coletta smith reports. welcome to the sugarmill. this 600 capacity venue has been packed to the rafters since it reopened. i've worked in venues for 20 years. i've honestly never
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known it this bad. but for clubbers and for staff, it's a nightmare to get a taxi once the party is over. i'm leaving at about four o'clock in the morning, maybe even five, and then having to wait until six o'clock in the morning to get a taxi. it's a long time to be stood by yourself in town, and for me, it's the safety issue. so if we go back in time, pre—pandemic, i'd probably only be waiting about five, ten minutes. taz isn't just worried for her staff. so if we've got a vulnerable individual, a young woman that's left on her own, it's making sure that she can get home, so getting her into a cab. the majority of people are just giving up and walking home and we don't want lone individuals wandering around the streets just by themselves. now that the nights are getting colder and darker, getting home
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safely from a night out is crucial. but taxis provide a really vital service at any time of the day, whether it's getting staff into work, whether it's a hospital appointment, or even just doing the weekly shop. the shortfall of drivers is leading to long waits and high prices. a lot of them retired. a lot of them couldn't actually keep the payments up on their vehicles. their national trade body says taxi drivers found otherjobs when their trade dried up during lockdowns and it's too costly and time—consuming to restart. the drivers are being faced with a massive great big outlay. the time he or she has probably been earning 15 or 20% of what they normally do, some people literally haven't been able to carry on. a taxi licence from a local council can set you back as much as £600, and waiting for the medical and criminal records checks can take months. a handful of councils have been proactive, though. in the summer, torbay council in devon saw this problem coming and cut the cost of their licence tojust 50 quid.
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they've got 25 new drivers but still need at least 25 more. as the christmas season puts extra demand on taxi firms, customers can only hope that more councils take action to make sure everyone can get home safely. colette smith, bbc news. after a break of a0 years, abba have released a new studio album — which benny andersson and bjorn ulvaeus say was never really planned. as a reminder — benny played the piano, bjorn the guitar, and together they wrote the scandinavian supergroup's numerous hits of the 1970s and early 80s. they've been telling our entertainment correspondent colin paterson they enjoyed writing a couple of new songs but hadn't set out to complete an album. colin went to visit them at their studio in stockholm. benny and bjorn in abba's home town. the good thing about living in stockholm is that people don't
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bother you, not in the �*70s, not in the �*80s, not now. they come up now and they're all happy and say, "wow, i'm so happy that you made a couple of new songs." the idea of making a whole album was not part of the original plan. abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show which will feature digital recreations of the band in concert looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good so we said, maybe we should do a couple more. and we did. and then we said, maybe we should do a few more. so we have an album. bjorn, he's sounding very laid—back. have you got any more nerves? i mean, this is a big deal, a0 years between albums. yes, it's emotionally very
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difficult to grasp, actually, that we did what we did. we don't need to prove anything here. i don't think we are taking a risk because of people think that we were better a0 years ago, fine. # you're not the belle, i you should have been. # the album includes a number of songs about relationships ending. both couples in the band divorced shortly before the group split in 1982. people have read a lot of it into various lyrics. and of course, there is some of that in the lyrics, but most is fiction. but the emotions are there. yeah, yeah. but not the exact situations. no exactly. but after waiting a0 years for abba to get back together, the reunion could be very short. i've said that's it. i don't want to do another ab album.
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but i'm not alone in this, there are four of us.

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