Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 5, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

10:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the racism row at the club, as the board prepare to hold an emergency meeting. roger hutton apologises to azeem rafiq and criticises the culture at the club, saying it refused to change — and he's accused the ecb of declining to help. former england captain michael vaughan says he was named in yorkshire's report on rafiq — but "totally denies any "allegation of racism". we'll have the latest from headingley. a senior cabinet minister admits the government made a mistake over its handling of the owen paterson case — amid criticism of the prime minister. we made a mistake.
10:01 am
we reflected within 2a hours. we made a mistake, collectively, and we've come to the commons and said, "look, let's separate these things out "and let's do this properly", because fairness is important. the role young people can play in tackling global warming will be the focus of the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow today. campaigner greta thunberg will host a protest as thousands of young people are expected to join. the world health organization warns that europe is once again at the centre of the global coronavirus pandemic. and here we go again, abba have told the bbc they would be willing to help end the uk's two decade defeat at eurovision.
10:02 am
the chairman of yorkshire cricket club, roger hutton, has resigned over the club's response to the racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. it comes after an investigation found mr rafiq was a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" — after which the club said they would take no disciplinary action. mr hutton — who had been under mounting pressure to step down — "apologised unreservedly" to 30—year—old rafiq. he said the club "should have recognised at the time the serious "allegations of racism". he also accused the club of "a culture that " refuses to accept change or challenge". he was also highly critical of the england and wales cricket board, claiming the governing body "declined to help". the ecb have issued a statement responding to that. it said that yorkshire ccc did reach out to us at the beginning of the investigation with a request that we partner with them
10:03 am
on exploring azeem's allegations of racism and bullying against the club. his resignation came before an emergency board meeting today, amid calls for "heads to roll" at the club. azeem rafiq, who represented yorkshire in two stints between 2008 and 2018, said "institutional racism" at the club had left him close to taking his own life. simonjones reports. a club with a culture that refuses to accept change or challenge, the words of roger hutton as he apologise unreservedly to azeem rafiq. an independent panel found that the former player had been the victim of harassment and bullying but that the club had taken no
10:04 am
action. this week, gary ballance said he regretted using a racial slur during conversations with his ex team—mate. he's been suspended from england selection indefinitely. now, the former england captain michael vaughan says he, too, was named in the report for allegedly telling a group of asian players, including rafiq, in 2009, that there "were too many of you lot". but in his daily telegraph column, vaughan writes, "this hit me very hard. the club has been suspended from hosting international matches by the england and wales cricket board for what it calls the "wholly unacceptable handling" of azeem rafiq's racism claims. it's really important that the ecb sends a message to cricket fans across this country that we will not stand for this. that racism, and anything to do
10:05 am
with racism and discrimination of any kind, has absolutely no place in the game. the departing chairman is calling for more people to go, and says he looks forward to the day when yorkshire cricket club is a great club again. former cricketer mark ramprakash told bbc breakfast that the latest developments have forced yorkshire county cricket club to take a long hard look at themselves: there needed to be some more statements, i think, coming out, and recognising that the environment was not right, and with seven counts of the 43, the allegations that azeem made, seven of them were upheld. and there was an apology to azeem rafiq, but no consequences, and i think that's the thing that really grates. we have heard sajid javid get involved in this situation, saying that the ecb must take action swiftly and decisively,
10:06 am
otherwise it's not fit for purpose. and they have done that, and the ramifications for yorkshire as a club are huge, because they have now been suspended from hosting international matches, which is a really serious punishment financially. and it really has to make the club look long and hard at itself. he worked at headingley for the yorkshire cricket foundation — the charitable arm of yorkshire county cricket club — for four years up until 2017. part of his job was to promote the sport among south asian communities. he's now the secretary of the great horton church cricket club in bradford. what has your reaction been to the resignation of the chairman? will
10:07 am
that help the club develop and move on? , ., . �* that help the club develop and move on? , ., ., ~ ., on? first of all, azeem rafiq came out and spoke _ on? first of all, azeem rafiq came out and spoke against _ on? first of all, azeem rafiq came out and spoke against what - on? first of all, azeem rafiq came out and spoke against what he - on? first of all, azeem rafiq came out and spoke against what he had i out and spoke against what he had experienced. what azeem rafiq experience was an extreme example. in terms of the organisation, the latest thing to come out, with the chairman resigning, is what people would see as having done the decent thing. but it has been 15 months since azeem rafiq first made his allegations. it has taken so long, and he has suffered for so long before any
10:08 am
action was taken. throughout all this, yorkshire have been hoping that this issue would go away, clearly, but thankfully other people have been involved... what clearly, but thankfully other people have been involved... what examples have been involved... what examples have ou have been involved... what examples have you seen — have been involved. .. what examples have you seen or— have been involved... what examples have you seen or heard _ have been involved... what examples have you seen or heard of _ have been involved... what examples have you seen or heard of racism? . have you seen or heard of racism? while i was there, in terms of direct racism, there was clearly a culture that went on to bring that kind of behaviour. there was a stereotypical language used. attitudes towards certain communities. give us examples without naming names.- communities. give us examples without naming names. what did you see and hear? _ without naming names. what did you see and hear? we _ without naming names. what did you see and hear? we will— without naming names. what did you see and hear? we will have - without naming names. what did you see and hear? we will have been - see and hear? we will have been around, playing cricket in the yorkshire area, over 50 years now. we have never been recognised as
10:09 am
being part of the cricket team, stereotyping, it was all about taxi drivers. that was referenced a lot within the organisation. and also restaurant workers, as if that was the only thing we do. that is the stereotypical thinking that existed. name—calling, azeem rafiq was called some of the worst possible names that you could call anybody. the other type of name—calling was also part of the culture as well. we other type of name-calling was also part of the culture as well.— part of the culture as well. we are talkin: part of the culture as well. we are talking about _ part of the culture as well. we are talking about a _ part of the culture as well. we are talking about a locker _ part of the culture as well. we are talking about a locker room, - talking about a locker room, changing room culture, but with genuine ingrained racism, orjust a thoughtless, and educated racism? fix, thoughtless, and educated racism? lot of it was and educated. people were just having a good
10:10 am
lot of it was and educated. people werejust having a good laugh, good fun, even though it was at the expense of other people. the real problem was there was no challenge from people in the organisation. people know that this type of behaviour is against the law and you cannot behave like that, but nobody challenged that behaviour. even at the highest level it is coming out now, within yorkshire, and the ecb, to allow this to go on for so long is not acceptable. did to allow this to go on for so long is not acceptable.— to allow this to go on for so long is not acceptable. did you complain about it? at — is not acceptable. did you complain about it? at the — is not acceptable. did you complain about it? at the time, _ is not acceptable. did you complain about it? at the time, |_ is not acceptable. did you complain about it? at the time, i was - is not acceptable. did you complain. about it? at the time, i was shocked in terms of what i heard. i have been around a long time. every organisation has a different culture. that type of behaviour did shock me. i did offer to resign within six weeks at the time, i pointed out examples of what was happening, and i was not prepared to
10:11 am
carry on working in that environment. i was given assurances —— assurances. in terms of they wanted me to change some things within the organisation. in me to change some things within the organisation-— organisation. in your “ob, trying to find and scout h organisation. in your “ob, trying to find and scout new _ organisation. in yourjob, trying to find and scout new talent, - organisation. in yourjob, trying to find and scout new talent, did - organisation. in yourjob, trying to find and scout new talent, did thisj find and scout new talent, did this put off people from south asian communities to pursue a crickets care through yorkshire?- communities to pursue a crickets care through yorkshire? sadly that has existed for _ care through yorkshire? sadly that has existed for a _ care through yorkshire? sadly that has existed for a long _ care through yorkshire? sadly that has existed for a long time. - care through yorkshire? sadly that| has existed for a long time. people have had experience of taking the young people to play for other counties. there are horror stories of the weight their children have been treated, how unfairly they have felt they are treated by existing coaches and management within the organisation. i5
10:12 am
coaches and management within the organisation-— organisation. is this something to do with the _ organisation. is this something to do with the age, _ organisation. is this something to do with the age, the _ organisation. is this something to j do with the age, the demographic organisation. is this something to i do with the age, the demographic of people running cricket? they are just not modern, in tune with how society has changed from 50 years ago? society has changed from 50 years a . o? ., society has changed from 50 years a i o? ., , society has changed from 50 years ato? ., , , ., society has changed from 50 years ato? ., , ., society has changed from 50 years ato? . , ., , ago? that is part of the problem. look at yorkshire. _ ago? that is part of the problem. look at yorkshire. parts - ago? that is part of the problem. look at yorkshire. parts of - ago? that is part of the problem. look at yorkshire. parts of westl look at yorkshire. parts of west yorkshire, talk about crickets, we actually form a majority of cricket players now, the authorities have not come to terms with that. something that comes across notjust at the highest level in terms of professional players but at grassroots level as well, in terms of how we are being forced back into our communities and are being asked to play, to stay within our own areas, play cricket there, as opposed to becoming part of mainstream cricket, which we feel that we are. we mainstream cricket, which we feel that we are-— that we are. we will put all these comments _ that we are. we will put all these comments to _ that we are. we will put all these comments to yorkshire _ that we are. we will put all these comments to yorkshire cricket i that we are. we will put all these l comments to yorkshire cricket club to give them a right to reply to
10:13 am
this, but do you think this pertains just to yorkshire, or is this spread across cricket as a whole? that there are these systemic problems in cricket. in sport we see it as well, in football we see it as well, but what about cricket as a whole? the roblem what about cricket as a whole? tue: problem within what about cricket as a whole? tta: problem within yorkshire what about cricket as a whole? tt2 problem within yorkshire cricket have finally, thankfully, been highlighted. sadly, azeem rafiq has had to suffer. our governing body, ecb, the need to take a good long look at themselves in terms of how they have dealt with the issue. why has it been allowed to go on for so long? yes, international cricket has been taken away from yorkshire, but they have invested huge amounts of taxpayers money into yorkshire in the name of south asian communities
10:14 am
in the last six, seven years, if not more. millions of pounds of taxpayers money has gone into yorkshire in the name of south asian communities, where has this gone, what difference has it made, why has it resulted in something like this? thank you very much indeed. as world leaders discuss climate action at the cop26 summit in glasgow, young people across the city arejoining protests calling for more to be done. the swedish activist greta thunberg will be there, and has called for more supporters tojoin in. here's our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon. the faces of some of those taking part in today's march in glasgow. they say they're frustrated. we are sick and tired of climate inaction. they want change. for me, the biggest issue when it comes to climate change is the continued extraction of fossil fuels. they have demands. what i have to say for world leaders
10:15 am
is that they must pay climate - reparations to the communities most affected by the climate crisis. - and want those at the summit to listen to what they say. and my message to the world leaders is that no—one is safe from this climate crisis. greta, do you think glasgow will deliver? greta thunberg, who inspired the school climate strike movement, is in the city during cop. no more blah blah blah. crowd: no more blah blah blah. at a protest earlier this week, she said world leaders were only pretending to take climate change seriously. that movement would only come because of pressure from the public. change is not going to l come from inside there. that is not leadership. this is leadership. this is what leadership looks like. cheering. these young people will be among those leading the march through glasgow. strike with us, the workers, the youth from glasgow, the local people. dylan has been striking for the climate for the past three years since he was ilt. it is very hard to switch off, i would say, especially
10:16 am
the past two years, really, since the cop got announced. it's been full steam ahead the whole time. so it is very all—consuming. just because there's so much to do, there's always more we can do. it feels like you have a constant battle with yourself to do as much as you can. so, um, yeah, i mean, there's definitely been sleepless nights. what do we want? climate justice. when do we want it? now. covid means they're not sure how this will compare to previous marches, but organisers are hoping for thousands, and that it will be impossible to ignore. glasgow is on a global scale. it's a small city. i think it has a lot of heart. and to be honest, i think it's a city that cares a lot about this stuff. and really, it has a long history of protest. it cares aboutjustice. and i think the people here are angry. so i think that, you know, in terms of spirit, in terms of reaction to the cop, it will match any previous cop. it might even outmatch it. but in terms of bodies on the street, it's difficult to assess because of the pandemic. making their voices heard matters so much to these pupils, they say it's worth missing a day of school.
10:17 am
the strength of their feelings is clear. anger at the politicians for not taking action sooner. also grateful that we have this opportunity to even protest because there's tonnes of countries that don't have that opportunity. i feel very strongly about it. you know, it's our world and it's our future. - will you get into trouble for missing school? i think that it's like we're missing lessons to teach the world one. and hoping their calls for change will be heard. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. the adventurer and tv presenter, bear grylls, is at cop26 in his capacity as chief ambassador of world scouting. you have been lucky enough to travel around the world to the most remote places, over the last 15 years, is this something you have been
10:18 am
passionate about since those days? yes, it is. when i started out doing all of this i was more of a climate sceptic in some ways. i used to think the world was pretty resilient, we would be ok. i have totally changed. over the last ten years after seeing the devastating effect of climate change close up many times, notjust in terms of wildlife and environment and to rein and extremity of weathers and flash floods and wildfires, but also in terms of the effect it has on vulnerable coastal communities. i think this is the thing about climate change, ultimately it affects humanity. that is why this day at cop26 is a powerful one, representing 57 million people around the world, young scouts, they want to change, to do the right thing for the environment. but we do need the world leaders to lead and to do these things and reduce these
10:19 am
fossil fuels and invest in renewables, go above and beyond to protect our wild places, the forests and the oceans. because it is dd now, we are beyond the date now, we have to have action. this now, we are beyond the date now, we have to have action.— have to have action. as chief scout, do ou have to have action. as chief scout, do you encourage — have to have action. as chief scout, do you encourage millions - have to have action. as chief scout, do you encourage millions of - do you encourage millions of scouts to become activists, to demonstrate, to become activists, to demonstrate, to skip school on fridays, to get the world to change? t the world to change? i encourage them to stand _ the world to change? i encourage them to stand up _ the world to change? i encourage them to stand up for _ the world to change? i encourage them to stand up for what - the world to change? i encourage them to stand up for what they i them to stand up for what they really believe in. as young people it is their futures, they are environments, there is definitely a place for activism as long as it is done respectfully and peacefully. this is not about as encouraging young people, this is about listening to all of our millions of scouts who want to do something good for the planets, they want to see their leaders in their countries lead and be pioneers protect the world. forall of lead and be pioneers protect the world. for all of as it is about
10:20 am
trying to be on the right side of the history, to say, did we stand up and say enough is enough, you have got to protect our world? share and say enough is enough, you have got to protect our world?— got to protect our world? are they ri . hts, got to protect our world? are they rights. perhaps. — got to protect our world? are they rights, perhaps, young _ got to protect our world? are they rights, perhaps, young people, i got to protect our world? are they rights, perhaps, young people, to| got to protect our world? are they i rights, perhaps, young people, to be sceptical and cynical about what political leaders will do? they can say whatever they want but what they do is different. i am just thinking, i seem to remember you were taking the prime minister of india to look at the effects of climate change, he was shocked. but then of course india is not signing up to a lot of the pledges that other countries are at cop26? ., ., , , ., at cop26? india has 'ust done net zero at cop26? india has 'ust done net 2070. h at cop26? india hasjust done net zero 2070. ideally we _ at cop26? india hasjust done net zero 2070. ideally we would i at cop26? india hasjust done net zero 2070. ideally we would be i zero 2070. ideally we would be saying, sooner and sooner. you have got to engage with leaders. i took president obama to alaska. he wanted
10:21 am
to see climate change effects close up. he wanted to see it. i think young people have a right to be sceptical because there has been a lot of talk before but ijust hope that this feels different, is different, we are actually seeing some change. i am proud of the uk. i think we are leaders in terms of this around the world. ultimately, we can do our part, and we should be doing our part, but we need, you are right, we need the leaders, to not just talk but actually to do it. forgive me, is that not quite a pan— glossy interview of things? and i think a lot of people younger than us will be seeing that is not the case at all. greta thunberg put out a statement yesterday saying this is just more green washing. in terms of fundamental changes and pledges that have been agreed so far.
10:22 am
who would not feel sceptical? it is so easy for politicians to be like that. we are on our own, we are powerless. but there is a collective power, when you see young people getting together saying, please listen to us. on my own i have no power here. bats collectively, if we make our voices heard, to say, please do the right thing, protect the rainforest, protect the oceans, do notjust let it be commercially fished out, and checked. you have to look around you. it is this thing of being on the right side of history. wouldn't we all love to be able to say, do it, to the politicians? thank you for talking to us from glasgow. labour has ruled out standing aside in favour of a cross—party "anti—sleaze" candidate
10:23 am
in the by—election to replace the tory mp owen paterson. mr paterson announced his resignation after the government changed its mind over blocking his suspension from parliament for breaking lobbying rules. a senior cabinet minister has admitted the party made a �*mistake' in the way it handled the paterson controversy. our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. owen paterson resigned yesterday saying he was totally innocent, but the commissioner for standards found he had been paid £100,000 a year by two companies, then lobbied government on their behalf. there will now be a by—election to fill his seat, and the opposition parties look certain to make sleaze one of their central themes. mr paterson was in parliament on wednesday, when the government ordered all conservative mps to vote to block his suspension. the ayes to the right, 250... the opposition shouted "shame". ..232. all: shame! less than 2a hours later in the face of widespread outrage, the government u—turned.
10:24 am
mr paterson, once again facing suspension, resigned. last night's vote has created a certain amount of controversy. it is important that standards in this house are done on a cross—party basis. but that's left the government with a problem... good evening. it's a nice evening, i hope you're enjoying it. could you give us your reaction to the resignation of owen paterson? look, owen has made his statement, and i'm sure you have seen it. the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg, still wants to change the system for investigating complaints against mps. but now has to convince the opposition that talk of reform wasn't just about trying to save mr patterson, there really is a need. the labour mp who chairs the existing standards committee told bbc newsnight it is already independent, wholesale reform isn't necessary. our committee already exists. there's absolutely no need for another one, and the way the government has
10:25 am
handled this, i'm afraid, does not auger well for cross—party consideration of this matter. and the business secretary is underfire, too. yesterday, he said the commissioner who found mr paterson had broken the rules should consider her position. do you still think the commissioner's going to have a difficult time staying in post? no. labour has written to the prime minister's ethics adviser saying kwasi kwarteng's comments should be investigated as an attempt to bully the commissioner. the fallout from this affair rumbles on. damian grammaticas, bbc news. i've been getting reaction from the conservative peer lord barwell, who was downing street chief of staff in theresa may's government. it is clearly a terrible mistake that number ten and the government as a whole made in trying to get owen paterson off the hook and change the rules. if you are asking me why it happened, it is not
10:26 am
easy for me to answer, since it was politically bad for the government, the conservative party, and for owen himself. my best guess, and i do not think a lot of your viewers will have sympathy with it, here goes, sometimes in life, when one of our friends does something wrong, there is a natural to see the best in them, in this case in particular, given the tragic events that owen and his family have been through with his wife very sadly taking her own life, there would have been understandable compassion for him. therefore, what went wrong, i think, is that nobody around the prime minister said to him, i understand you are sorry for owen paterson, you feel he has been hard done by, but this will look terrible if you do this, or maybe somebody did say that but the prime minister didn't listen to him. either way, that speaks to a problem in terms of the way the government is handling these issues. explain for our viewers the structure of how these decisions are made.
10:27 am
a lot of criticism in some newspapers this morning about the chief whip. the chief whip would not have acted unilaterally? he would have been instructed by the prime minister? it is possible that the chief whip advised the prime minister to do it and the prime minister agreed, or possible that the chief whip was told by the prime minister to do it. i am not in the room, i cannot tell you. but it is not plausible that there was not a conversation between the prime minister and the chief whip, and i suspect the leader of the house, jacob rees mogg, would have been involved in the decision—making as well. prime minister and advisers in number ten, the whips, the leader of the house, would have been the people i suspect involved in the decision—making. how unusual is it to be whipped, a three line whip,
10:28 am
on something like this? not unprecedented, but unusual. normally on house business the government would be applying three line whips. i thinkjacob rees mogg made his statement trying to execute this u—turn yesterday he acknowledged that the mistake had been to conflate how he handled this individual case with the concerns some people had about the rules and how they were working generally. it is never right, i think, to try and change the rules in the middle of a case. he has acknowledged that, and the two have now been separated. when you were working for your boss you were used to a lot of disgruntled tory mps being behind you. how much damage has this done to borisjohnson at the moment? walking all his mps up to the top and then sending them back down again. in the short term it has done a lot of damage. there are a few things mps hate more than being ordered to vote for something that they know is going to get them a lot of criticism in their constituencies, and then the government
10:29 am
changes its mind, and they've taken all that pain for nothing. it will have been very damaging for mps. the question is whether the government learns from this. it is not the first time. think back to dominic cummings at barnard castle, it is not the first time the government has misread the public mood in making sure the rules are applied uniformly to everyone, it is not a perception of one set of rules for one group of people and another for someone else. what is important from the point of view of conservative mps is that the government learns from this and does not repeat this mistake. brexit minister lord frost will hold talks with one of brussels' top officials as efforts continue to resolve disputes over northern ireland and fishing rights. lord frost will meet european commission vice—president, maros sefcovic in brussels, with the uk and european union still at loggerheads over the northern ireland protocol. in the past few minutes, the brexit minister has been speaking to journalists ahead
10:30 am
of his meeting with mr sefcovic. we hope to make some progress but, honestly, the gap between us is still quite significant. but let's see where we can get to. iubiiilii —— will you trigger article 16 today? -- will you trigger article 16 toda ? ~ ., �* ., . -- will you trigger article 16 toda? today? we won't trigger article 16 but it is very _ today? we won't trigger article 16 but it is very much _ today? we won't trigger article 16 but it is very much on _ today? we won't trigger article 16 but it is very much on the - today? we won't trigger article 16 but it is very much on the table. | today? we won't trigger article 16 | but it is very much on the table. is that likelihood increasing? becoming a closer prospect? time that likelihood increasing? becoming a closer prospect?— a closer prospect? time is running out on these _ a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks. _ a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks. if— a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks. if we _ a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks. if we are i a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks. if we are to i out on these talks. if we are to make progress, we need to make progress soon and our preference is to make progress and see if we can reach an agreement. hour to make progress and see if we can reach an agreement.— reach an agreement. how long can this no on reach an agreement. how long can this go on for? _ reach an agreement. how long can this go on for? what _ reach an agreement. how long can this go on for? what would - reach an agreement. how long can this go on for? what would it i reach an agreement. how long can this go on for? what would it take | this go on for? what would it take to not— this go on for? what would it take to not trigger article 16? if we this go on for? what would it take to not trigger article 16?— to not trigger article 16? if we can reach an agreement, _ to not trigger article 16? if we can reach an agreement, a _ to not trigger article 16? if we can | reach an agreement, a consensual agreement on the protocol that provides a sustainable solution then thatis provides a sustainable solution then that is the best way forward how long can this go on for, zero frost, these talks, stretch on for before you make a decision? i'm not going to give any timescales and hypotheticals. we are trying to
10:31 am
reach agreement and we are working very hard and we will carry on trying. very hard and we will carry on t inc. ., , ., very hard and we will carry on t in. ., ., ., trying. have you sort of legal advice? is — trying. have you sort of legal advice? is there _ trying. have you sort of legal advice? is there anything i trying. have you sort of legal| advice? is there anything that trying. have you sort of legal i advice? is there anything that can ha en advice? is there anything that can happen today _ advice? is there anything that can happen today in — advice? is there anything that can happen today in those _ advice? is there anything that can happen today in those talks i advice? is there anything that can happen today in those talks that l happen today in those talks that could _ happen today in those talks that could change... happen today in those talks that could change. . ._ could change... inaudible there is a _ could change... inaudible there is a significant i could change... inaudible there is a significant gap i could change... inaudible - there is a significant gap between us. if that gap narrows and the commission listen to what we have said in the paper and look at the situation in northern ireland, maybe that will help us move things forward. thanks very much, everybody. forward. thanks very much, everybody-— brussels correspondentjessica parker is there now. peace, tranquillity and a meeting of minds? hat peace, tranquillity and a meeting of minds? ., , ., , , ~ minds? not quite perhaps i think. this is around _ minds? not quite perhaps i think. this is around the _ minds? not quite perhaps i think. this is around the third _ minds? not quite perhaps i think. this is around the third set - minds? not quite perhaps i think. this is around the third set of i this is around the third set of talks after three weeks of technical discussions that the two sides had been having over what to do about the northern ireland protocol. as people might be aware, the united kingdom want to make some wider ranging and significant changes to the agreement that it did sign up to with the european union, as to how arrangements with northern ireland work. of course, northern ireland is
10:32 am
stayed in the eu's single market essentially for goods in order to avoid checks between northern ireland and the republic of ireland but there have been concerns to businesses and deep concerns in the unionist community. those are some of the issues at stake. the uk saying it wants significant changes and the eu came forward with a set of proposals not long ago to cut checks and paperwork. the uk is basically saying what the eu has come up with is just not enough and, as you heard from lord frost as he goes on to talks with sefovic, he is saying significant gaps remain. the question is how long the process can go on for. i asked lord frost that as he arrived to talk to reporters will stop he wouldn't be drawn on a timeframe but he said time was running out. we will expect to hear something today would the european vice president has gone today. i expect from what i am hearing from both sides, these talks will dribble
10:33 am
on into next week.— both sides, these talks will dribble on into next week. break down the two issues. — on into next week. break down the two issues. the — on into next week. break down the two issues, the northern _ on into next week. break down the two issues, the northern ireland . two issues, the northern ireland protocol. he was asked whether the uk would be triggering article 16. for our viewers, uk would be triggering article 16. for ourviewers, in uk would be triggering article 16. for our viewers, in a nutshell, explain what that is and then we will come unto fishing.— explain what that is and then we will come unto fishing. article 16 is a provision — will come unto fishing. article 16 is a provision that _ will come unto fishing. article 16 is a provision that could - is a provision that could potentially allow either side to suspend parts of the protocol if it thinks that there are sufficient reasons to do so. the united kingdom has actually said that threshold and that he has already been met. the eu does not agree. there is deep suspicion in brush —— in brussels that the uk is on the verge almost of triggering article 16, which they would see is quite a dramatic move. sources i have spoken to in the british government really insisting they are not about to hit the red button on that one. but as we had from lord frost, it remains a possibility for sub—questions remain. it is not clear exactly what the united kingdom would do via triggering article 16. there is a
10:34 am
process involved in doing that that means it wouldn't probably be an overnight procedure. there is still quite a lot of mystery about what that could look like if that happens and it does remain an if.— and it does remain an if. briefly, on fishing. _ and it does remain an if. briefly, on fishing, more _ and it does remain an if. briefly, on fishing, more licences - and it does remain an if. briefly, | on fishing, more licences granted and it does remain an if. briefly, i on fishing, more licences granted to french boats or not? you on fishing, more licences granted to french boats or not?— french boats or not? you could see some change _ french boats or not? you could see some change in _ french boats or not? you could see some change in the _ french boats or not? you could see some change in the numbers. i french boats or not? you could see i some change in the numbers. various debates going on in those talks around replacement of vessels, temporary licences and a number of outstanding boats that had been refused licences, as well. the united kingdom is saying that insufficient evidence has basically been provided by those boats. the french are very cross about this. they think that the agreement that was signed isn't being honoured. those talks also continuing. for now, it looks like french threats to take retaliatory measures have been put off. lord frost, the brexit minister will catch up again with france's european affairs minister early next week.— early next week. jess, with the latest from _ early next week. jess, with the latest from brussels, - early next week. jess, with the latest from brussels, thank i early next week. jess, with the | latest from brussels, thank you early next week. jess, with the i latest from brussels, thank you very much.
10:35 am
as we've been hearing, young people across glasgow are joining protests calling for more to be done to combat climate change. the swedish activist greta thunberg will be there, and has called for more supporters to join in. well, we can cross over to kelvingrove in glasgow now — where the youth march is starting — and join our correspondent, catriona renton. how many people are there so far? behind us already quite a group gathering. we are not expecting the march to officially gather until 11 o'clock and then get under way after that. organisers here are predicting thousands of people will be here. i think we can probably safely say thatis think we can probably safely say that is true, looking at the number of people that have gathered here already. of course, this is all about cop26. we expect this to be the biggest protest so far since the conference got under way earlier this week. i am joined by two ladies from fridays for futures. anna brown and sky mariner. fridays for futures is the movement to set up by greta thunberg. tell us all about this and
10:36 am
what you are expecting today. the movement started a few years ago and in glasgow— movement started a few years ago and in glasgow we have been building up to cop26 _ in glasgow we have been building up to cop26 for quite a while because it was— to cop26 for quite a while because it was delayed by the pandemic. we are glad _ it was delayed by the pandemic. we are glad to — it was delayed by the pandemic. we are glad to be here today. today is all about _ are glad to be here today. today is all about showing that people have power _ all about showing that people have power and notjust all about showing that people have power and not just a all about showing that people have power and notjust a conference centre — power and notjust a conference centre the _ power and notjust a conference centre. the power is here with the people _ centre. the power is here with the people in— centre. the power is here with the people in solidarity with everyone. workers. — people in solidarity with everyone. workers, students, young people from all across— workers, students, young people from all across the world. sky, workers, students, young people from all across the world.— all across the world. sky, we have seen lots of _ all across the world. sky, we have seen lots of people _ all across the world. sky, we have seen lots of people here. - all across the world. sky, we have seen lots of people here. you i all across the world. sky, we have seen lots of people here. you are | all across the world. sky, we have l seen lots of people here. you are 18 years old. it is your generation here speaking out today, isn't it? what do you want these world leaders to take away from this? this is a big protest of people of your age group and beyond.— big protest of people of your age group and beyond. yeah, take a look behind us, look— group and beyond. yeah, take a look behind us, look how— group and beyond. yeah, take a look behind us, look how many _ group and beyond. yeah, take a look behind us, look how many young i behind us, look how many young people _ behind us, look how many young people have woken up, taken their self to _ people have woken up, taken their self to this— people have woken up, taken their self to this park and they are voicing — self to this park and they are voicing their opinions. this is a movement _ voicing their opinions. this is a movement. there is no movement that has as— movement. there is no movement that has as many— movement. there is no movement that has as many young people as this movement— has as many young people as this movement currently. i hope that world _ movement currently. i hope that world leaders will look at that and see the _ world leaders will look at that and see the situation and know that young _ see the situation and know that young people are passionate about this and _
10:37 am
young people are passionate about this and we need to be passionate. you have _ this and we need to be passionate. you have been organising this for quite a long time, haven't you? tell me about the amount of work that has gone into it and what you are hoping to get out of it. what is it going to get out of it. what is it going to be like along the route? so, there is obviously a lot going on, today. there is obviously a lot going on, toda . �* , , ., ., there is obviously a lot going on, toda . �*, , ., ., ., today. there's been a lot of organising _ today. there's been a lot of organising being _ today. there's been a lot of organising being put- today. there's been a lot of organising being put into i today. there's been a lot ofj organising being put into it. everyone is welcome at our strikes with solidarity with the workers. purely young people have organised fridays for future. we juggle that with part—time jobs and studies, etc. it takes a lot of work with all of us. there is a lot of forms and bureaucracy which we don't like but this is the good part. we are looking forward to today and we think a lot will happen and it will be really good. we will march to hear until george square and we will have a big rally with everyone and it will be amazing. tell have a big rally with everyone and it will be amazing.— it will be amazing. tell me about the relationship _ it will be amazing. tell me about the relationship with _ it will be amazing. tell me about the relationship with the - it will be amazing. tell me about the relationship with the police. | the relationship with the police. there are a lot of police around glasgow, we know that. of course. because of the profile of the event. how are you engaging with them? is it all going well? iauntie how are you engaging with them? is it all going well?— it all going well? we have spoken to them. our security _ it all going well? we have spoken to them. our security plans _ it all going well? we have spoken to
10:38 am
them. our security plans for - it all going well? we have spoken to them. our security plans for today. | them. our security plans for today. and i were set up. we have been very clear what our needs are and what we want from them and how we are not afraid to interfere and also comply. we are looking at a peaceful process, we are looking at people getting a very serious message out but with a lot of good humour? exactly. we like our protests and strikes _ exactly. we like our protests and strikes to — exactly. we like our protests and strikes to be a company —positive plays. _ strikes to be a company —positive plays, friendly and welcoming. everyone — plays, friendly and welcoming. everyone is welcome. you will find friends _ everyone is welcome. you will find friends here no matter what —— completely positive place. we do not want to _ completely positive place. we do not want to destroy buildings! and overthrow the government! we are here to _ overthrow the government! we are here to spread our message and show how hereto spread our message and show how much— here to spread our message and show how much work we are willing to put into this _ how much work we are willing to put into this movement. you how much work we are willing to put into this movement.— into this movement. you are both local girls- — into this movement. you are both local girls- how— into this movement. you are both local girls. how is _ into this movement. you are both local girls. how is this _ into this movement. you are both local girls. how is this impacting i local girls. how is this impacting on people that live around glasgow? do you think ordinary glaswegians that may aren't or haven't been so engaged with the movement today are maybe waking up and thinking there is a big issue here and we should be finding out more about it? do you think you are educating people? t think you are educating people? i think you are educating people? i
10:39 am
think cop26 has brought climate change a lot more to the forefront in glasgow and communities locally had community action groups with young people. there are two sides put up the issue of the disruption, the road closures that are annoying people, the university has gone back online and things. also the good things, people getting educated. we are seeing a lot more community participation with the people's summit starting on sunday. there are definitely two sides to it. it has brought it to the forefront. people are seeing the issues that those in power are causing. whether that is climate change, road closures or shutting down the world for them. i am going to let you get back to organising today's event. you will see, of course, there are thousands of people gathering here. we don't know what the final number could be. there have been predictions of around 10,000 perhaps more. we will keep you in touch with what is going on throughout the day. but i think what we are hearing from anna and sky is that this is about a serious message with some good humour. ok, we will be back with you as the match progresses. thank you very
10:40 am
much indeed. as the march progresses. as we know, climate change is already reshaping our world. some regions are warming much faster than others. our environment editor, justin rowlatt, is taking a road trip, travelling from alaska to california, where even in one of the richest countries in the world, they are still struggling to cope. the top of our world is changing. warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. and it is destroying communities. yeah, my house used to be about 20 feet, out where you see the water break. the island of shishmaref is on the front line of climate change. as temperatures rise, less sea ice forms, exposing the coast. it's getting later and later every year for this ocean to freeze up. it's tough. but... got to keep going.
10:41 am
as the climate changes, the animals and fish the people here used to live on are getting harder to find. right now, we're supposed to be fishing in the lagoon and up the rivers. now we've got to wait until, like, december, probablyjanuary, to start going up again. parts of the main road have washed away, and now the airstrip that is the community's lifeline to the outside world is threatened. if it gets to the runway, then, we can't use it any more. we use the runway for medivacs, we use the runway for getting all our food flown in, all our mail. the plan is to move the entire town on to the mainland. it will cost an estimated $180 million, and means access to the sea will be much more difficult. but, says dennis, they've got no choice. what's happening here in shishmaref is ultimately going to happen in california, in new york.
10:42 am
every community or city on the coast needs to know what the heck�*s going on here because, if not, they're going to start washing away. dennis wants what's happening to his community to stand as a warning to the world. justin rowlatt, bbc news, alaska. plenty more onjustin's trip on the website, as well. staying with the cop summit, a new report by oxfam has outlined just how unequal the burden of global emissions of greenhouse gases is. by 2030 to reach net zero, we can only emit as much co2 as the planet can absorb. the report looked at what emissions should be, if that amount was divided equally among every adult on the planet. without major change by 2030, researchers found
10:43 am
the carbon footprint of the world's richest 1%, which will be classed as anyone earning more than $170,000, will be 30 times higher than what's needed to stop the planet from warming more than 1.5c. they then broadened that out to the richest 10%, which will include people earning over $55,000 a year, and found that group will emit nine times more than their share. it follows on from research last year that found that the 1% emit twice as much greenhouse gas emissions as the poorest 50% combined. we can speak now to the bbc�*s population reporter stephanie hegarty. the richest emit more. why is that? the richest emit more. why is that? the interesting _ the richest emit more. why is that? the interesting thing _ the richest emit more. why is that? the interesting thing is, _ the richest emit more. why is that? the interesting thing is, who - the richest emit more. why is that? the interesting thing is, who are i the interesting thing is, who are the richest 1%? we all think about the richest 1%? we all think about the super and their lifestyles, things like superyacht pea and private jets, things like superyacht pea and privatejets, they things like superyacht pea and private jets, they have things like superyacht pea and privatejets, they have huge emissions. the interesting thing
10:44 am
here is that globally, the richest 1% is anyone earning over $170,000. that's about £120,000. that would be maybe the upper middle class here. things like having second homes, multiple cars in the house, eating a very meat intensive diet. maybe eating out a lot. these are things that are really contributing to the carbon footprint of the 1%. and that will be 30 times higher than what is needed if we were to all emit the amount to keep the planet at net zero. when you widen it out to the 10%, anyone earning over $55,000, that's about £30,000, that's the middle classes here stop to understand this better, i spoke to different families around the world and i spoke to a family in the us who drive three cars, they eat meat four or five times a week and they have to cool their home in the summer and heat it in the winter. compared to an english teacher i spoke to in the middle classes on a comfortable salary, he doesn't have
10:45 am
ac, he doesn't have a car. he says they are for rich people. he takes a maupay to work. you can see how different the emissions in the middle classes are in wealthy countries and poor countries are —— he takes a maupay to work. to countries and poor countries are -- he takes a maupay to work.- he takes a maupay to work. to pick u n he takes a maupay to work. to pick u- on that he takes a maupay to work. to pick up on that point. — he takes a maupay to work. to pick up on that point, the _ he takes a maupay to work. to pick up on that point, the middle i he takes a maupay to work. to pick| up on that point, the middle classes are —— in less wealthy countries are doing more to reduce. == are -- in less wealthy countries are doing more to reduce.— are -- in less wealthy countries are doing more to reduce. -- he takes a moeds doing more to reduce. -- he takes a mopeds to — doing more to reduce. -- he takes a mopeds to work. _ doing more to reduce. -- he takes a mopeds to work. is _ doing more to reduce. -- he takes a mopeds to work. is that _ doing more to reduce. -- he takes a mopeds to work. is that education? | doing more to reduce. -- he takes a. mopeds to work. is that education? a lot of this is — mopeds to work. is that education? a lot of this is to _ mopeds to work. is that education? a lot of this is to do _ mopeds to work. is that education? a lot of this is to do with _ lot of this is to do with commitments made by governments. a country like china. it gets criticised quite a lot for being the world's largest emitter but that is a huge population. a huge population of lower—middle—class people whose energy system will change as they start to use of renewables. their carbon footprint will reduce drastically. but china is a very unequal country. the richest people in china will continue to emit huge amounts of carbon. their carbon footprint will grow. but the games will really be made among the middle classes and lower middle classes. ——
10:46 am
the games. classes and lower middle classes. -- the games-— the games. oxford site -- oxfam scientist, what _ the games. oxford site -- oxfam scientist, what are _ the games. oxford site -- oxfam scientist, what are they - the games. oxford site -- oxfam scientist, what are they calling i scientist, what are they calling for? ~ ., . , ., scientist, what are they calling for? ., , for? more taxes on carbon intensive lifes le. for? more taxes on carbon intensive lifestyle. suvs. _ for? more taxes on carbon intensive lifestyle. suvs, second _ for? more taxes on carbon intensive lifestyle. suvs, second homes, i lifestyle. suvs, second homes, eating more meat. we know these things aren't very popular and are not being considered very widely by government. not being considered very widely by government-— let's turn to coronavirus — and a warning from the world health organization that europe is once again at the epicentre of the pandemic. the who says europe could face another half a million deaths before the end of winter if the outbreak isn't brought under control. the continent has recorded a 55% rise in cases over the past four weeks, despite the availability of vaccines. courtney bembridge has this report. romania's hospitals are at breaking point as the country struggles to deal with the fourth wave of coronavirus infections. more than 3,000 romanians have died with covid—19 over the past week, most of them unvaccinated.
10:47 am
the country has the second—lowest vaccination rate in the european union ? just over a third of the adult population has had two doses. the rate of vaccination has slowed across the continent in recent months. the world health organization says people have become complacent. european countries have the capacity, they have the vaccine access, they have the money, they have the systems in place that they can react. many other regions don't necessarily have those capacities in place, so i think it's a warning shot for the world to see what's happening in europe, despite the availability of vaccination. infections are up right across europe. germany had a record number of cases this week. in the netherlands, hospitalisations were up by almost a third, and latvia, lithuania and estonia are recording some of their highest daily figures. if we stay on this trajectory, we could see another half a million
10:48 am
covid—19 deaths in europe and central asia by the 1st of february, next year. several european countries are now bringing back some restrictions, including mandatory face coverings, limits on nonessential shops, and encouraging people to work remotely. the us space agency, nasa, has unveiled a system it hopes it might use to protect the earth from asteroids. in what's being described as the first planetary defence test mission — a satellite will be launched into space — and crashed into a pair of asteroids — to try and change their course. the bbc�*s tim allman has the story. space is vast, and full of wonder. countless stars, countless planets and countless lumps of rock streaking through the cosmos. earth has always been a potential target, exposed and vulnerable — until now.
10:49 am
this is a computer simulation of dart, the double asteroid redirection test, which could be our first line of defence if one of those lumps of rock comes heading our way. nature has given us a setup where we have an asteroid, a binary asteroid, that's approaching close to earth so that we can observe from earth—based observatories, but this is a test. and this is how the test will work. astronomers have long been aware of a pair of asteroids called didymos and dimorphous. sometime later next year, dart will target then, smash into them, trying to alter their course. these asteroids are no danger to us, but others might well be. if there was an asteroid that was a threat to the earth, what you'd want to do, this technique with would, be many years in advance, decades in advance, such that you would just give this asteroid a small nudge
10:50 am
which would add up to a big change in its future position, and then the asteroid and the earth wouldn't be on a collision course. of course, earth hasn't always been so lucky. around 65 million years ago, a large asteroid crashed into our planets, asteroid crashed into our planet, killing off the dinosaurs. it's happened before. it could happen again. but dart may come to the rescue. tim allman, bbc news. it's been one of the most anticipated comebacks in pop. after a0 years, abba are finally back with a new studio album. in their only british tv interview, benny andersson and bjorn ulvaeus colin paterson, in stockholm about how the record eventually got from the group chatted to the bbc�*s entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, in stockholm about how the record eventually got made. stockholm is built on 1a islands, including skeppsholmen, where abba recorded voyage, their first album in a0 years. so, this is where a lot of the album was made, then, this is really abba hq?
10:51 am
in that house. that's the studio, since ten years back. everything is done in there. the idea of making a whole album was not part of the original plan. abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show, which will feature digital recreations of the band in concert, looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good, so we said, "maybe we should do a couple more". and we did. and then we said, "maybe we should do a few more!" so we have an album. bjorn, he's sounding very laid back. have you got any more nerves? i mean, this is a big deal, a0 years between albums! yes! yes. it's, emotionally, very difficult to grasp, actually,
10:52 am
that we did what we did. it's dawning on me now that it's actually happening, you know? we don't need to prove anything here. i don't think we're taking a risk, because if people think that we were better a0 years ago, fine. and the ladies were so happy, as were we, of course, but the ladies, mm, they can still do it! and they're also happy that they don't have to do this! yeah, why don't they? where are they? because we told them. we talked about it, we said, "if we do this, what's going to happen?" and they both said, "we don't want to do this". and we said, "we can take care of it". we're not as pretty as they are, but we do the work. # you're not the man- you should have been...# the album revisits old themes, including the end of a marriage. abba probably have the most famous divorces in pop,
10:53 am
outside of fleetwood mac. does it get discussed still, were there big apologies to make this happen? i never talked about my divorce with anyone! apart from frida, at the time. no. # i've been reloaded, yeah.# and, as for the live show, featuring the so—called abbatars, it will have its premier next may in a purpose—built venue in london. the use of motion capture meant that abba spent five weeks performing the songs in a tv studio and sacrifices had to be made. i love the story. you had to shave the beards for the abbatar show. just how traumatic was that for you two? oh, no, again, just a decision. if it has to be done it has to be done. till the end, i tried! "is there no other way we can do this? "do i really, really have to?" oh, i hated it! oh, i looked weird!
10:54 am
and i... i'll never shave it off again, that's for sure. but after waiting a0 years for abba to get back together, the reunion could be very short. i've said that's it, you know. i don't want to do another abba album. but, i mean, i'm not alone in this. the four of us... yeah. if they twist my arm, i might change my mind, but i think this is it... oh, good to know! good to know! where do you stand on it? i never say never, but i agree with benny, i think that was our goodbye. i think you could twist his arm, bjorn. the ladies might be able to do that. it'll take them to do it, actually! yeah, i think so. before we go, let's take you to italy, where one nativity scene this year is extremely topical.
10:55 am
craftsmen in italy have given the three kings something else to carry when they visit babyjesus. yes, a covid vaccination certificate, as well as the gold, frankincense and myrrh. since each king has a covid pass, entering the manger doesn't present any issues. artists in naples create diferent nativity scenes each year to reflect the times. in 2020, the wise men wore masks and were socially distanced. tributes have been paid to the british veteran entertainer lionel blair, who's died at the age of 92. in a career spanning nearly 80 years, he worked with some of the biggest names in showbiz and established himself as a household name for generations. he was best known for his role as the team captain on the hit tv
10:56 am
you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. with the temperature close to —5 in parts of oxfordshire this morning, it was the coldest night of autumn so far. but this weekend the frost will disappear. it will turn a little bit milder but on the flip side of that, we will see a bit of rain at times. still some dry and bright weather but quite windy, especially saturday night into sunday. gales or severe gales in the northern half of the uk. here we see most of the breeze today here but a gentle breeze for most. after that sunny but frosty start across parts of central and eastern england, most will cloud over. still some sunny spells here and there but cloudiest in north and west scotland with outbreaks of rain. sunniest for longest in the channel islands and parts of kent and sussex. after a chilly start, temperatures still only up to around 10 degrees, but we've lost the breeze of recent days, so perhaps it won't feel quite as cold.
10:57 am
as we go into the evening and overnight, we started and overnight, we start to switch our winds into a more of a south—westerly direction. that brings lots of cloud across the country and eventually some heavy and persistent rain to the north and west of scotland. also seeing some splashes of rain across other western areas but note the temperatures, frost free tonight, much milder for many. that is because we are in this slice of milder air between two weather fronts. the bulk of the rain to begin with is closer to the area of low pressure. that is where are going to see the wettest conditions in the morning. scotland and northern ireland. persistent rain along western coasts of scotland during the morning. but that weather system will be on the move through the day. through the afternoon, scotland and northern ireland will brighten up. staying dry with some sunny spells in the southern counties of england and east anglia. but northern england, wales and the north midlands will see some outbreaks of rain develop as we go through the day. temperatures, though, across the board in the south—westerly winds will be higher than we have seen over the last day or so. as we go into the night, strong winds across the country, particularly in the north, with plenty of showers here. the weather fronts, which will only
10:58 am
bring a little bit of rain through saturday evening in southern counties, will gradually depart. but this area of low pressure pushes its way east and we start to see the strongest of the winds through the night into sunday morning. we could see wins top 60, maybe 70 miles an hour in the far north of scotland. gales around the coast further south. it will be a blustery start to sunday. it will be quite a bright one, though, even though it is breezy. some showers around and most frequent across northern scotland. the odd one further south but many will have a predominantly dry day on sunday but after a slightly milder day on saturday, it will feel a bit cooler again. see you soon.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the club's handling of racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. roger hutton criticises the culture at the club, saying it refused to change — and he's accused the ecb of declining to help. former england captain michael vaughan says he was named in yorkshire's report on rafiq — but "totally denies any allegation of racism". a senior cabinet minister admits the government made a mistake over its handling of the owen paterson case — amid criticism of the prime minister. we made a mistake. we reflected within 2a hours. we made a mistake, collectively, and we've come to the commons and said, "look, let's separate these things out "and let's do this properly",
11:01 am
because fairness is important. the role young people can play in tackling global warming young people gather to protest over climate change at the summit in glasgow. official figures show sexual harassment on public transport has jumped by nearly two thirds compared with before the pandemic. and here we go again — abba have told the bbc they would be willing to help end the uk's two—decade defeat at eurovision. the chairman of yorkshire cricket club, roger hutton, has resigned over the club's response to the racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. it comes after an investigation found mr rafiq was a victim of "racial harassment and bullying"
11:02 am
— after which the club said they would take no disciplinary action. mr hutton — who had been under mounting pressure to step down — "apologised unreservedly" to 30—year—old rafiq. he said the club "should have recognised at the time the serious allegations of racism". he also accused the club of "a culture that refuses to accept change or challenge". he was also highly critical of the england and wales cricket board, claiming the governing body "declined to help". the ecb have issued a statement responding to that saying... they want him to say that... —— they went on to say that...
11:03 am
mr hutton's resignation came before an emergency board meeting today, amid calls for �*heads to roll�* at the club. azeem rafiq, who represented yorkshire in two stints between 2008 and 2018, said "institutional racism" at the club had left him close to taking his own life. an independent panel found the former player had been a victim of harassment and bullying well at the club but it took no action against any member of staff. this week, yorkshire batsman gary ballance said he regretted using a racial slur driven conversations with his xt mate. he has been suspended from england selection indefinitely. now the former england captain said he too was named in the pot for allegedly telling a group of asian
11:04 am
players, including azeem rafiq, in 2009 that the team and if you lot. but in his telegraph column he writes... the club has been suspended from hosting international matches by the england and wales cricket board for what it called the wholly unacceptable handling of azeem rafiq's racism claims. it is really important _ rafiq's racism claims. it is really important the — rafiq's racism claims. it is really important the ecb _ rafiq's racism claims. it is really important the ecb sends - rafiq's racism claims. it is really important the ecb sends a i rafiq's racism claims. it is really i important the ecb sends a message to cricket fans across the country that we will not stand for this, that racism and anything to do with racism and anything to do with racism and anything to do with racism and disconnection of any kind has absolutely no place in the game. —— discrimination of any time. the
11:05 am
-- discrimination of any time. the department _ —— discrimination of any time. the department tarmac departing chairman says he looks forward to the day when... john holder is the only person of colour to have been an umpire in britain in 150 years of test cricket. he explained earlier that the problem runs much deeper than cricket itself. it is notjust cricket's problem, it's a society problem. this sort of language is used towards non—white people day in and day out in our country. this is probably one of the first times that a player has actually raised his head above the parapet and actually complained, but this has been going on... i mean, there are a couple of former surrey players, monte lynch and lonsdale skinner, who as youngsters upon joining surrey years ago were abused by the then surrey second xi coach. abused racially. abused racially. so this is nothing new. let's talk to simon hughes,
11:06 am
editor of the cricketer magazine. yorkshire county to the club is now engulfed in scandal and controversy. what is your reaction to the resignation of the chair the board. i think it is really sad in a way because he is actually a reformer and he was trying his best to get the rest of the yorkshire board to understand the severity of this and he was also handed what you might call a hospital pass, really, because he arrived as chairman, really, when this whole issue was already under way. the investigation and the claims already under way so he took it on board and think she has tried his best to instigate cultural change, attitude change in the yorkshire establishment and the board generally. he has obviously failed because they were slow to deal with this and their general handling of it has been appalling and i guess he had to be the fall quy and i guess he had to be the fall guy but, in a way, someone designing
11:07 am
like thisjust guy but, in a way, someone designing like this just destabilises and delays the ultimate opportunity for change. it delays the ultimate opportunity for chance. , , , ., delays the ultimate opportunity for chante, , , change. it is interesting you say that because — change. it is interesting you say that because in _ change. it is interesting you say that because in a _ change. it is interesting you say that because in a statement i change. it is interesting you say that because in a statement he | that because in a statement he released earlier this morning roger hutton says that azeem rafiq left the club in august 20 18, 18 months before he actuallyjoined the board. there is a board meeting going on right now. what do you suppose is being said? i right now. what do you suppose is being said?— being said? i think there will be a lot of mudslinging _ being said? i think there will be a lot of mudslinging going - being said? i think there will be a lot of mudslinging going on i being said? i think there will be a i lot of mudslinging going on because there clearly are, sort of, two factions in the yorkshire board, some who feel that changes are necessary and some who feel it is absolutely fundamental and i guess it is not easy because some of these views are very entrenched and it is a very complicated story generally. azeem rafiq's hulk, kind of, korea is shrouded in controversy and it is very difficult getting to the bottom of it but in the end i guess most of the board will probably resign which, again, just delays the whole process. what we're trying to
11:08 am
achieve here as cultural change and as soon as you get resignations you know, time to reappoint new people, butjust know, time to reappoint new people, but just delays the know, time to reappoint new people, butjust delays the opportunity for change. but just delays the opportunity for chance. �* ., but just delays the opportunity for chance. . ., . , but just delays the opportunity for chance. �* ., . , ., ., change. and how much is yorkshire a very specific — change. and how much is yorkshire a very specific case _ change. and how much is yorkshire a very specific case and _ change. and how much is yorkshire a very specific case and how _ change. and how much is yorkshire a very specific case and how much i change. and how much is yorkshire a very specific case and how much is i very specific case and how much is this sort of thing replicated in other clubs. it this sort of thing replicated in other clubs.— this sort of thing replicated in other clubs. , ., , ., other clubs. it is a good question and i... other clubs. it is a good question and i- -- in _ other clubs. it is a good question and i... in all— other clubs. it is a good question and i... in all honesty, _ other clubs. it is a good question and i... in all honesty, i- other clubs. it is a good question and i... in all honesty, i don't i and i... in all honesty, i don't know. i have spoken to tom harrison about this, the chief executive of the ecb before privately and he has looked very worried whenever we talk about this particular subject, saying, yes, it is kind of game wide, it is nationwide. i haven't seen it myself. you know, i haven't beenin seen it myself. you know, i haven't been in dressing rooms, county cricket dressing rooms for a few years but i certainly never saw any when i was playing and i've not heard of any, kind of, other major incidents but, you know, i'm a white
11:09 am
male. you know, i'm not as sensitive to these kinds of issues is, obviously, agents or blacks would be so i suppose in a way sports reflect society —— asians. if it is going on in one place it probably is, generally, occurring in other teams as well. what i would say is i think cricket is a very culturally diverse spot, ethnically diverse sport. i think it is one of the better sports for embracing diversity. obviously, there is more that needs to be done but i'm in the middle, actually, of making a documentary at the moment about england's cricketing world cup team, the winning world cup in 2019 and that was the most incredibly diverse team with asians and west indian, people of west indian origin and obviously whites and people from yorkshire and so on and they were incredibly harmonious in the way they operated and that was actually a strength of the time. i’m they operated and that was actually a strength of the time.— a strength of the time. i'm 'ust auoin to a strength of the time. i'm 'ust going to put in i a strength of the time. i'm 'ust going to put in there i a strength of the time. i'm just going to put in there because l
11:10 am
a strength of the time. i'm just i going to put in there because that might be the case for the players but i don't know if you had just before you we had a clip from john holder... , ., ., , , before you we had a clip from john| holder- - -— is holder... yes, i heard that, yes. is the only person — holder... yes, i heard that, yes. is the only person of _ holder... yes, i heard that, yes. is the only person of colour— holder... yes, i heard that, yes. is the only person of colour to - holder... yes, i heard that, yes. is the only person of colour to have i the only person of colour to have been an umpire in british test cricket in hundred and 50 years. that speaks for itself, doesn't it? yes, it does. it is extraordinary. why can't they put my finger on exactly why that is. obviously people of colour had to put themselves forward to be considered as umpires and they had to start low down the spectrum. but as umpires and they had to start low down the spectrum.— down the spectrum. but they had to feel it was a — down the spectrum. but they had to feel it was a welcoming _ down the spectrum. but they had to | feel it was a welcoming environment. yes, and i know talking about cricketers of black or african origin they do feel in the same way as people come obviously, of asian origin, they do feel, sort of, alienated, they feel isolated, they don't feel they have a place where people will listen to them or people
11:11 am
that win listen to them. undoubtedly the game does need to change. i think cricket is in a better state than some other sports but clearly we need to do lot more.— than some other sports but clearly we need to do lot more. great to get our we need to do lot more. great to get your thoughts _ we need to do lot more. great to get your thoughts that _ we need to do lot more. great to get your thoughts that is _ we need to do lot more. great to get your thoughts that is simon - we need to do lot more. great to get your thoughts that is simon hughesl your thoughts that is simon hughes from the cricketers —— the cricketer. labour has ruled out standing aside in favour of a cross—party "anti—sleaze" candidate in the by—election to replace the tory mp owen paterson. mr paterson announced his resignation after the government changed its mind over
11:12 am
blocking his suspension from parliament for breaking lobbying rules. a senior cabinet minister has admitted the party made a �*mistake' in the way it handled the paterson controversy. our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. let's talk to our political correspondent ione wells. there has been a furious backlash notjust in the media but also by opposition parties but also within the conservative party themselves that the many mps and government ministers as well pretty annoyed that they were, essentially, kind of, wheeled out to defend the government, to vote with the government, to vote with the government over this issue, only for them to backtrack on their plans and for owen paterson to then resign. now, early the x do my education secretary nadhim zahawi did accept that the government had made a mistake when it came to the judgment on this but it stops short of saying he would that mistake. i take collective responsibility. i'm part of the government, in part of the cabinet. i also take collective responsibility to say we made a mistake. and i think it was right for the leader of the house, jacob rees—mogg, on behalf of the government, to go to the house and say,
11:13 am
actually, the mistake was we shouldn't have conflated the issue of fairness of process, so, the right of appeal, and i think that's right, and my appeal to other parliamentarians from all parties — let's come together to make that work. but we shouldn't have conflated that with the specific case of owen paterson. the prime minister's always been clear that paid lobbying is wrong and i think it's important that we separate those two things out and to admit a mistake, i think, is the right thing to do. and the grown—up thing to do. and assess me if you people feeling the heat of the survey, first of all the heat of the survey, first of all the prime minister not very happy he has led the charge that we like the troops to go and vote, defend the government, some of whom had to defend the government on the airways only for the plants to then be scrapped and they are pointing to the fact that this is the first time
11:14 am
in the �*s leadership that the government have proposed plans only for a u—turn to then be announced days if not i later so certainly the prime minister got some heat on him yesterday and also the chief whip and murk spencer after mps were whipped with a three line whip to vote on the government on this issue. he is certainly feeling a lot of pressure on this today as well. i have been told that some mps who were considering of staining this vote, they were then told if they did do that they would certainly lose certain positions they had been given or sacrifice getting positions again in the future so certainly mps feel like they were given a lot of pressure to vote with the whip on that issue only for that decision to be changed but, interestingly, the farm at downing street chief of staff under theresa may says the mistake here was made by friends of owen paterson himself rallying around him for a cause mistakenly withoutjudging what around him for a cause mistakenly without judging what the around him for a cause mistakenly withoutjudging what the outcome of that would be. i
11:15 am
withoutjudging what the outcome of that would be— that would be. i think it is clearly a terrible mistake _ that would be. i think it is clearly a terrible mistake that _ that would be. i think it is clearly a terrible mistake that number i that would be. i think it is clearly i a terrible mistake that number ten on the government as a whole made in trying to get owen paterson off the hook and change the rules. if you are asking me why it happened it is not easy for me to answer since it clearly, politically, was bad for the government, the conservative party and fell on himself but my best guess is that, and i don't think any of your viewers will have a lot of sympathy with it, but here goes. sometimes in life when one of ourfriends do something goes. sometimes in life when one of our friends do something wrong there is a sort of naturally see the best in them and in this case in particular, given the tragic events that one and his family have been through with his wife very suddenly taking her own life they would have been a lot of understandable compassion for him. so, you know, an apology from the cabinet ministers today. a screeching u—turn via the government. are there people in the conservative benches saying, look,
11:16 am
they made a mistake but this was a mistake that was completely foreseeable well before it was made? that is right. there are certainly a lot of mps feeling like that. in fact, there were some mps even before this vote happened he were admitting that they were pretty glad that they weren't going to be voting on it for whatever reason. perhaps they weren't able to be present in parliament at the time and certainly there were mps at the time saying that they should have been foreseen, not just that they should have been foreseen, notjust because of the opposition that was likely to come from the office, the other side of the benches, from labour, from the snp, from the liberal democrats, but also within their own party, too. there are many, particularly some of those newer intake of mps were only elected in 2019 who feel like this is the case of some of the sort of, more old—timers, some of his friends, those closer to owen paterson, sort of, rallying around him and perhaps misjudging the fact that actually constituents and voters wouldn't be best pleased with the, sort of, image of this looking like people are rallying around to
11:17 am
visit one of their own.— like people are rallying around to visit one of their own. as world leaders discuss climate action at the cop26 summit in glasgow, young people across the city are joining protests calling for more to be done. the swedish activist greta thunberg is there, and she's calling for more supporters tojoin in. well, last week a group called the alliance of ceo climate leaders this is the situation live in glasgow with lots of people gathered to protest. well, last week a group called the alliance of ceo climate leaders wrote an open letter to cop26 urging more action. one of its members isjesper brodin, the ceo of the ingka group, which runs ikea. he sin glasgow for the conference and joins me now. good morning to you. thanks so much forjoining us on bbc news. so, you have written collectively to the cop conference. what is it that you have
11:18 am
said? what you calling for? i conference. what is it that you have said? what you calling for?- said? what you calling for? i think it is actually _ said? what you calling for? i think it is actually a _ said? what you calling for? i think it is actually a bit _ said? what you calling for? i think it is actually a bit of— said? what you calling for? i think it is actually a bit of a _ said? what you calling for? i think it is actually a bit of a historic i it is actually a bit of a historic moment because it's the first time as far as i know that we have close to 100 big corporate switch together, of course, have a huge responsibility when it comes to climate footprint and not only come together to collaborate and help each other commit and move the barrier to take responsibility and the climate but also saying that we need to address, show up to politicians, to the government, the leaders of the world, to both declare this is what we believe in and this is what we are ready to do but also what we want them to supporters with and the less then includes strong calls for, basically, facing out the wrong type of incentives —— phasing out the wrong type of incentives, help first movers but also get ready for mitigation for the period that we have ahead of us. it is fascinating to hear you _ have ahead of us. it is fascinating to hear you speak _ have ahead of us. it is fascinating to hear you speak like _ have ahead of us. it is fascinating to hear you speak like this - have ahead of us. it is fascinating to hear you speak like this are i have ahead of us. it is fascinating i to hear you speak like this are many people will welcome your general aspiration. is there not a
11:19 am
fundamental contradiction in the source of business that you have with these aspirations? mean, you are selling goods to people and you need them to consume, you need them to buy more. that is your business model. , , , ., . , , model. yes. this is an incredibly important _ model. yes. this is an incredibly important topic _ model. yes. this is an incredibly important topic and _ model. yes. this is an incredibly important topic and i _ model. yes. this is an incredibly important topic and i believe i model. yes. this is an incredibly i important topic and i believe myself it is riddled with a loss of myths that we need to, basically, bus together. so consumption is and will be part of humanity in the future. what we need to do now as fast as possible as part of the climate journey is to make sure that we go from linear to circular consumption model. that includes renewables and recyclability and, of course, all aspects of building and renewable energy and so forth into the model and that is totally unsynchronised with, basically, our own climate pledge, which is to be climate positive by 2030, and it is basically lined with all of the transition that needs to happen with
11:20 am
an ikea, ikea's network, but also within society at large. 50 i an ikea, ikea's network, but also within society at large.— within society at large. so i hear our within society at large. so i hear your message — within society at large. so i hear your message about _ within society at large. so i hear your message about ending i within society at large. so i hear your message about ending the | your message about ending the reliance on fossil fuels but there is the other side of the coin which is the other side of the coin which is all about consumerism and getting people to buy more and i heard she used the word recyclability. i mean, the point is that people need to buy less, don't they? they need to hang onto their products more and that conflicts with what your business is about. how do you recognise these two things? i about. how do you recognise these two things?— two things? i would actually argue auainst two things? i would actually argue against that- _ two things? i would actually argue against that. so _ two things? i would actually argue against that. so i _ two things? i would actually argue against that. so i agree _ two things? i would actually argue against that. so i agree with i two things? i would actually argue against that. so i agree with you l against that. so i agree with you that the unnecessary consumption patterns need to be shifted but it is not going to be good enough because we will still consume. in our line of business, it is not so much about luxury consumption, it is people who need their bedroom to sleep in, kitchen to sit in, and that type of consumption is not going to go away. basically the challenge we are taking on is to make sure that that consumption is made in a sustainable way and we
11:21 am
have lots of points that are already in place in many parts of our product and value chain so how do we actually create a circle around renewable consumption of the future? is that the coronet? if we then avoid unnecessary consumption it is, of course, bonus, but it is not going to be the only way to get right. going to be the only way to get riuht. , , ., going to be the only way to get riiht, , ., going to be the only way to get riuht. , ., , ., right. just one last question if i ma , right. just one last question if i may. there _ right. just one last question if i may, there has _ right. just one last question if i may, there has been _ right. just one last question if i may, there has been a - right. just one last question if i may, there has been a lot - right. just one last question if i may, there has been a lot of. may, there has been a lot of interest in the fact that ikea is going to open a store in the centre of london at oxford circus just up the road from where we are. again, how does that work with people coming to buy their flat packs in the centre of london? can be expected driving? and expected carriers of when public transport? well, we will soon find out. tells! from an it _ well, we will soon find out. tells! from an it perspective _ well, we will soon find out. tells! from an it perspective it - well, we will soon find out. tells! from an it perspective it is - well, we will soon find out. tells! from an it perspective it is an - from an it perspective it is an exciting part because we have a lot of people living in cities and fewer people have a vehicle of their own so the service model in itf we can
11:22 am
support people still in an affordable way to buy from us —— service model in ikea. not only what we can experience and explore but what made us, i would say, sustained ikea throughout the pandemic. what we do now is that we place ikea in the heart of london and we invite londoners to be part of the inspiration, the shopping experience, and i am sure that some products will be there but then other locally, bulkier products will probably be for home delivery, i assume we will see on the day we are open. assume we will see on the day we are 0 en. . ., assume we will see on the day we are oen, . ., ., ~' assume we will see on the day we are oen. . ., . ~ ., assume we will see on the day we are oen. . ., ., ~' ., y” assume we will see on the day we are oen. . ., ., ~' ., ., ~' assume we will see on the day we are oen. l l, l, ~ l, l, ~ open. nice to talk to you. thank you very much- — open. nice to talk to you. thank you very much- jesper — open. nice to talk to you. thank you very much. jesper bowden, - open. nice to talk to you. thank you very much. jesper bowden, the - open. nice to talk to you. thank you very much. jesper bowden, the ceo| open. nice to talk to you. thank you i very much. jesper bowden, the ceo of the group that includes ikea. thank you so much. students at 37 universities across the uk face disruption after a vote for industrial action by academic and administrative staff in a dispute over pensions. universities uk says changes are required to avoid escalating contribution costs. the vote does not mean that
11:23 am
industrial action is inevitable. the university and college union is expecting the results of another ballot on pay and conditions later today. joining me now isjo grady the general secretary of the university and college union the ucu. good morning tea. what is going to happen now? academics at 37 institutions out have over 60 have supported this action. i do think this action is necessarylike is this action is necessarylike 3 important to say that first and foremost it is deeply regrettable that we hear again and it is not what anyone wanted after the last 18 months but to cut a long story short and it is your question our members are having their pensions cut after are having their pensions cut after a decade of cuts amounting to £240,000 from their pension and, at this moment in time, we are looking at a further 35% from their guaranteed pension income and if we are talking about action and disruption we were in dispute about this in 2018 and universities uk
11:24 am
tried to launch a cut like this then and they said pretty much the exact same thing you just quoted, we can't go on like this, but they were wrong then and wrong now. this scheme is viable, has unprecedented assets of the many and what we're seeing is evaluation conducted in march 2020 which everyone watching will remember. the world was almost in a, kind of, a global economic shutdown and they are using that valuation to say either cost will increase benefits need to be cut and we are saying that is not the case and they to work with us, revoke those cuts, come up with some short—term solutions and then, as you say, action could be avoided altogether. but why should students be penalised for this ongoing row that you are having with universities? because academics took strike action in 2018, in 2019, last year before the pandemic staff at 74 universities held a strike, then we have a pandemic with 18 months,
11:25 am
essentially, of disruption to university students education. how can you justify doing that again? i mean, i genuinely think the question needs to be because the disruption you havejust needs to be because the disruption you have just outlined needs to be because the disruption you havejust outlined is huge and when you list it like that i want to know why vice chancellors, many of her own earn 250, £300,000, i've allowed to keep mismanaging their institutions. these pension cuts are not required and our action, every time you just lifted it that push back the cuts they want to make, these are employee initiated disputes because they are intent on attacking staff pay and conditions and they are the same staff who went above and beyond the students during the last 18 months because the disruption that student housing the last 18 months was not the fault of staff in universities, it was the mismanagement by vice chancellors and the mismanagement by government and the mismanagement by government and i hear you and the mismanagement by government and i hearyou and i am and the mismanagement by government and i hear you and i am a former academic, in the general secretary of the union now but i used to teach. ourstudents of the union now but i used to teach. our students understand that our working conditions in their
11:26 am
working conditions... i don't think any be watching this programme would accept a 35% reduction in their pension income when it doesn't need to happen. and that is why we are where we are. but to happen. and that is why we are where we are-— to happen. and that is why we are where we are. but students are, by and large. — where we are. but students are, by and large. pay _ where we are. but students are, by and large, pay £9,000 _ where we are. but students are, by and large, pay £9,000 a _ where we are. but students are, by and large, pay £9,000 a year - where we are. but students are, by and large, pay £9,000 a year for i where we are. but students are, by| and large, pay £9,000 a year for an and large, pay £9,000 a yearfor an education that if you go on strike they again will not be receiving? and that is the question for the people who are mismanaging these institutions. we don't charge fees and wouldn't we take strike action we lose pay. why vice chancellors to initiating industrial action when it is not required and we have actuarial advice, even uss, the company that manages the scheme have said employers can afford to pay more. evaluation, as i am saying, was conducted when we were literally in an economic shutdown. i understand and agree that student should be hopping mad. they should be hopping mad with the people who manage the institutions and he would rather see this disruption then the
11:27 am
cuts. l, l, l, l, ~ l, rather see this disruption then the cuts. l, l, ~ l, , l, rather see this disruption then the cuts. l, l, ~ l, l, ~ cuts. 0k, good to talk to you. thank ou ve cuts. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you very much- _ cuts. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you very much- joe _ cuts. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you very much. joe grady _ cuts. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you very much. joe grady from - cuts. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you very much. joe grady from the l you very much. joe grady from the university and college union. thank you. let's go back to that youth climate protest in glasgow — we can cross over to kelvingrove — where the march is starting — and join our correspondent, catriona renton. hi, there. we are looking like it is getting under way here now. you will see lying out there behind us —— lined up there behind us thousands of people getting ready to match. they have come to glasgow to go to a valley and there has been music and the star of the show, greta thunberg, defended the friday to future movement. —— friday to the future movement. —— friday to the future movement. —— friday to the future movement. we understand that she is somewhere in the middle of that massive crowd and there. of course, she is the person who initiated this whole movement when she sat outside asking swedish politicians to rescue climate change
11:28 am
just might recognise climate change and i will today when you can see the size of this now global movement when people here from all over the world, we have spoken to people from russia, ireland, america, all over, to get their voices heard. they are saying that they want the people inside that conference whole to hear what. .. inside that conference whole to hear what... has to say. one of the organisers just telling me there that i can't wait for her generation to get into power for change that people have to hear them now and that that is why so many of them are taking to the streets. they say they will not be quiet until their voices are heard and what they say is very serious issue that has to be taken seriously and they need world leaders to deliver on the promises that they have made so far. they say that they have made so far. they say that they have made so far. they say that the hard work really begins now to make them deliver. it cannotjust
11:29 am
be, as greta thunberg has been calling it, blah blah blah. it has got to be absolute action now, as they are saying now. you can see that there are thousands of people, families here as well, family atmosphere very much building. the police are here. there is a police presence. the organisers say that they have been working with the police, building links and looking forward to this day for two years now because of course this was all put off because of the pandemic so they have been working, they say, with the authorities, with the police were very long time to make today run as smoothly as possible. now you will see behind me that there are certainly more photographs being taken. it is looking like 1130 was the official kick—off time and it is looking like it is going to be 1130. i think they keep moving slightly closer to us so we are looking forward to seeing them walk past seeing who is on that score. it is notjust young people, but there
11:30 am
are also striking been workers who have been striking throughout cop26 wanting to get their voice heard so this is a very serious issue with again serious issues in hand. katrina, many thanks. katrina went in there and apologies and some of the interference on the line there. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt , cloudy afternoon of the best part will be across sussex and kent and we could see showers around across western scotland but they are around northern ireland and western parts of wales and a dry day for a south—west england but temperatures should be up on recent days and still feeling chilly towards the southin still feeling chilly towards the south in the use. it will be milder tonight and for all of us in milder night with temperatures staying above frost levels by some degree, but later in the night persistent
11:31 am
rain into the west of scotland and the highlands and western isles will sit through much of saturday morning. a few other showers in the west but it will turn wetter through northern ireland and into northern england, wales on the far north of the midlands. scotland and northern ireland brighten up in the afternoon into sunshine and showers but windy conditions to come from saturday night to sunday morning. more on that later. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the club's handling of racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. roger hutton criticises the culture at the club, saying it refused to change — and he's accused the ecb of declining to help. former england captain michael vaughan says he was named in yorkshire's report on rafiq — but "totally denies any allegation of racism". a senior cabinet minister admits the government made a mistake over its handling of the owen paterson case — amid criticism
11:32 am
of the prime minister. of the prime minister. we made a mistake. we reflected within 24 hours. we made a mistake, collectively, and we've come to the commons and said, "look, let's separate these things out "and let's do this property", because fairness is important. young people gather to protest over climate change at the summit in glasgow. official figures show sexual harassment on public transport has jumped by nearly two thirds compared with before the pandemic. and here we go again, abba have told the bbc they would be willing to help end the uk's two decade defeat at eurovision. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. yorkshire county cricket�*s former chairman roger hutton has urged other board members to follow his lead and resign. he says its time to make way
11:33 am
for a new path for the club which, he says, refuses to accept change or challenge. hutton was writing in a statement after his resignation. the club have also lost key sponsers and kit deals, after saying they won't take disciplinary action against employees, despite "racial harrassment and bullying" against azeem rafiq. hutton also apologised unreservedly to the former player. more resignations are expected to follow. the senior correspondent from the website cricinfo told us earlier this is a chance for the board to address its diversity issues. look, at the moment, all we're doing is knocking down. we have to rebuild. the question that naga asked is a personal one, really. we have to make sure the new yorkshire is better. i'm absolutely sure we can do that. today is a big day and there have to be new voices at that club.
11:34 am
well, in a separate development, the former england captain michael vaughan says he was named in yorkshire's report into racism at the club but "totally denies any allegation of racism". according to vaughn, the report alledges he told a group of asian players, including rafiq: "too many of you lot, we need to do something about it." but vaughan says he "completely and categorically denies" saying that. earlier, we spoke to former england player mark ramprakash. azeem rafiq has also said, publicly, that whilst he has named people involved, it's not about those individuals. it's more about trying to get systemic change in a club like yorkshire, which change has proven to be very difficult. and the club, i think, has failed to evolve quick enough in the way that society is changing, and our attitudes towards race and racism. some rugby news now and the rfu have confirmed that owen farrell will miss the captain's run today ahead of tomorrows match with tonga after testing positive for covid.
11:35 am
he'll remain in isolation ahead of another lateral flow and pcr test later today so it is not yet clear whether he will have to miss the game. meanwhile saracen's number 8 poppy cleall has been named as england women's captain for the first time when they face new zealand this sunday. regular skipper sarah hunter is on the bench as head coach simon middleton makes five changes to the side that beat the world champions last week. some football news just breaking in the last hour and barcelona are set to announce xavi hernandez�*s dramatic return to the club as coach — replacing ronald koeman who was sacked last month. xavi's current side — qatari club al sadd — have confirmed that a deal has been agreed, with barca paying a release clause. xavi has been coaching in qatar since 2019 and will now rejoin the club where he enjoyed huge success as a player. don't forget cricket's t20 world cup continues new zealand are up against namibia. both sides can still qualify for the semi finals.
11:36 am
after being put into bat, new zealand are 156—4 in the final over later on india play scotland. there's commentary on slive sports extra and coverage on the website. some news to bring you from pfizer, who say a clinical trial of their first ever kind of pill to treat coronavirus has sown it is highly effective. l, l l, iv , effective. the drug achieved an 89% reduction in — effective. the drug achieved an 8996 reduction in risk _ effective. the drug achieved an 8996 reduction in risk of _ effective. the drug achieved an 8996 reduction in risk of hospitalisation . reduction in risk of hospitalisation or death amongst adult patients with covid at high risk of progressing to severe illness, so that is the statementjust released by pfizer and we will bring you more on that and we will bring you more on that and i hope to speak to one of our health correspondence about the significance of this shortly.
11:37 am
the brexit minister lord frost says there's still a significant gap between the uk and the eu as he continues talks in brussels on disputes over northern ireland and fishing rights. lord frost is meeting european commissioner maros sefcovic, with the uk and european union still at loggerheads over the northern ireland protocol. this is what he said before heading into the talks this morning. we hope to make some progress, but honestly, the gap between us is still quite significant, but let's see where we can get to. imilli still quite significant, but let's see where we can get to. will you trir aer see where we can get to. will you trigger article _ see where we can get to. will you trigger article 16 _ see where we can get to. will you trigger article 16 today? - see where we can get to. will you trigger article 16 today? we - see where we can get to. will you trigger article 16 today? we will l trigger article 16 today? we will not trigger article 16 today? we will rrot trigger _ trigger article 16 today? we will not trigger article _ trigger article 16 today? we will not trigger article 16 _ trigger article 16 today? we will not trigger article 16 today - trigger article 16 today? we will not trigger article 16 today but i not trigger article 16 today but article 16 is very much on the table and has been sincejuly. iis article 16 is very much on the table and has been since july._ and has been since july. is that likely would — and has been since july. is that likely would increase _ and has been since july. is that likely would increase in? - and has been since july. is that likely would increase in? is - and has been since july. is that likely would increase in? is it l likely would increase in? is it becoming a closer prospect? time is runnina becoming a closer prospect? time is running out — becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on _ becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on these _ becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks _ becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks and - becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks and if- becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks and if we | running out on these talks and if we are to make progress, we need to make it soon end our preference is to make progress and see if we can reach an agreement. what to make progress and see if we can reach an agreement.— reach an agreement. what would it take to rrot — reach an agreement. what would it take to not trigger _ reach an agreement. what would it take to not trigger article _
11:38 am
reach an agreement. what would it take to not trigger article 16? - reach an agreement. what would it take to not trigger article 16? if - take to not trigger article 16? if we can reach an agreement, potential agreement, on the protocol that provides a sustainable solution then thatis provides a sustainable solution then that is the best way forward. hour that is the best way forward. how lona can that is the best way forward. how long can these — that is the best way forward. how long can these talks _ that is the best way forward. how long can these talks stretch on for before you make a decision? i’m long can these talks stretch on for before you make a decision? i'm not auoin to before you make a decision? i'm not going to give — before you make a decision? i'm not going to give any — before you make a decision? i'm not going to give any timescales, - before you make a decision? i'm not going to give any timescales, or - before you make a decision? i'm not going to give any timescales, or any| going to give any timescales, or any hypotheticals. when trying to reach agreement and we are working hard and we are going to carry on trying. is there anything that can happen in today's talks that would change the cause of progress?— cause of progress? there is a significant — cause of progress? there is a significant gap _ cause of progress? there is a significant gap between - cause of progress? there is a significant gap between us i cause of progress? there is a l significant gap between us and cause of progress? there is a i significant gap between us and if that gap narrows and the commission listens to what we have said in the command paper and look at the situation in northern ireland then maybe that will help us move things forward. thanks very much, everybody. forward. thanks very much, everybody-— forward. thanks very much, everybody. brussels correspondent jessica parker is there now i think this is around the third set of talks after a three—week set of technical discussions the two sides of had over what to do about the
11:39 am
northern ireland protocol as people might be aware, the uk wants to make some wide—ranging, significant changes to the agreement that it did sign up to with the european union as to how arrangements with the northern ireland work and of course northern ireland work and of course northern ireland work and of course northern ireland stayed in the eu single market for goods in order to avoid checks between northern ireland and the republic of ireland but there have been concerns about disruption and deep concerns in the unionist community as well, so those are some of the issues at stake with the uk saying significant changes and the eu came forward with a set of proposals not long ago to cut checks and paperwork. the uk is basically so that what the eu has come up with is not enough and as you heard from lord frost, he says significant gaps remain and the question is how long can the process go on for. that was a question i asked lord frost as the right to talk to reporters and he was not being drawn at a timeframe but said time was running out. we expect
11:40 am
something from the two sides later today as to how today's discussions with the european vice president have gone, but i expect from what i'm hearing from both sides that these talks will dribble on into next week. a teenager has been convicted of the killing of keon lincoln — a 15—year—old schoolboy who was stabbed and shot outside his home in birmingham earlier this year. yesterday four teenagers who took part in the attack — including the gunman, who s just 14 — were found guilty of murder. today, kieron donaldson who supplied the weapons but wasn t there when keon died, was convicted of manslaughter. our midlands correspondent phil mackie reports from birmingham crown court. yes, the verdict just yes, the verdictjust coming in which says that we heard that the two teenagers ? i am so sorry we are clearly having a few problems with
11:41 am
the line. louie clearly having a few problems with the line. ~ , l, the line. we will try to re-establish _ the line. we will try to re-establish that - the line. we will try to re-establish that line | the line. we will try to i re-establish that line and go the line. we will try to _ re-establish that line and go back re—establish that line and go back to him as soon as possible. health officials are urging people to ventilate their homes to help stop the spread of covid in the run—up to christmas. as part of a new government campaign, people are being advised to open windows for 10 minutes each hour when socialising indoors. research shows that fresh air disperses covid particles and blows them away. reports of sexual harassment on public transport have gone up by 63% since pre—covid levels, according to figures from the british transport police. the force is cracking down on this behaviour, after setting up a specialist unit two years ago to tackle it. some victims say they're more encouraged to report incidents because of a rise in the coverage of violence against women. but others are still hesitant. meghan owen has more. when i take the tube, i want to feel like a man, not thinking about, "am i
11:42 am
going to get raped or groped?" like millions of other women, mahalia gets public transport home from work every day, but earlier this year, this happened. i from work every day, but earlier this year, this happened.- this year, this happened. i was nearly home — this year, this happened. i was nearly home and _ this year, this happened. i was nearly home and two _ this year, this happened. i was nearly home and two young i this year, this happened. i —" nearly home and two young boys came on and they started making sexual suggestions and getting louder and louder. i took my earphones out and i was like, yes, and they suggested i was like, yes, and they suggested i did something and i was completely shocked. when i did stand up for myself, they got aggressive. i felt violated. there were other men on the tube that didn't do nothing. i was thinking about reporting it, but ijust was thinking about reporting it, but i just thought there's no point. was thinking about reporting it, but ijust thought there's no point. but reporting it is exactly what british transport police one. ii it reporting it is exactly what british transport police one.— transport police one. if it doesn't feel riaht transport police one. if it doesn't feel right and _ transport police one. if it doesn't feel right and makes _ transport police one. if it doesn't feel right and makes you - transport police one. if it doesn't feel right and makes you feel i feel right and makes you feel uncomfortable or it's making someone else feel— uncomfortable or it's making someone else feel uncomfortable and it's got a central_ else feel uncomfortable and it's got a central element to it, then tell us about— a central element to it, then tell us about it _ a central element to it, then tell us about it. some of that behaviour
11:43 am
is leading _ us about it. some of that behaviour is leading to those more serious sexual— is leading to those more serious sexual offences. the is leading to those more serious sexual offences.— is leading to those more serious sexual offences. the force as a tax number, 61016, _ sexual offences. the force as a tax number, 61016, four— sexual offences. the force as a tax number, 61016, four victims i sexual offences. the force as a tax number, 61016, four victims to i sexual offences. the force as a tax. number, 61016, four victims to alert police to sexual harassment. the information _ police to sexual harassment. the information will _ police to sexual harassment. tie: information will be passed police to sexual harassment. ti2 information will be passed to the cctv department by the radio and this enables the officers to go and find the incident as it is happening and get images of the suspect straight away and to get those images to offices on the ground immediately so we can go after the perpetrators of the offences on our network. �* , perpetrators of the offences on our network. �* l l l, l l, , perpetrators of the offences on our network. �* l l ll l ll l , network. there's been a sharp rise in the number _ network. there's been a sharp rise in the number of _ network. there's been a sharp rise in the number of reports _ network. there's been a sharp rise in the number of reports of - network. there's been a sharp rise in the number of reports of sexual| in the number of reports of sexual harassment on public transport, up 63% from april to october this year compared to the same timeframe before coronavirus. with an increase in reporting and more of a focus on recording incidents of sexual harassment on public transport, it seems like a step in the right direction but we've spoken to many people, particularly women, who stillfeel people, particularly women, who still feel hesitant to report to the police. some people i've spoken to, predominantly women, are hesitant to
11:44 am
report these incidents due to a lack of trust in the system at the moment. what would you say to them? i absolutely understand that but my request _ i absolutely understand that but my request is— i absolutely understand that but my request is reported, tell us about it. request is reported, tell us about it there's— request is reported, tell us about it. there's lots of ways you can report — it. there's lots of ways you can report it — it. there's lots of ways you can report it and we need to have that information we need to work together with the _ information we need to work together with the community. the information we need to work together with the community.— with the community. the murder of sarah everard _ with the community. the murder of sarah everard as _ with the community. the murder of sarah everard as she _ with the community. the murder of sarah everard as she walked i with the community. the murder of sarah everard as she walked home | with the community. the murder of i sarah everard as she walked home in south london earlier this year has pushed violence against women right to the top of the issues facing policing in the uk. i to the top of the issues facing policing in the uk.— to the top of the issues facing policing in the uk. i think now, only because — policing in the uk. i think now, only because of _ policing in the uk. i think now, only because of what _ policing in the uk. i think now, only because of what has i policing in the uk. i think now, i only because of what has happened to sabina and sarah, which is so sad and now it is at the forefront of everybody�*s mind, you might as well report it because it will be taken more seriously. caitl n sim has co—founded a platform where women can report instances of harassment on public transport. good morning to you and thank you
11:45 am
forjoining us. why have you set up this platform? why did you feel the need to? indie this platform? why did you feel the need to? ~ l l this platform? why did you feel the need to? l l l , this platform? why did you feel the needto? l l l l ll l, need to? we set up this platform after being _ need to? we set up this platform after being harassed _ need to? we set up this platform after being harassed a _ need to? we set up this platform after being harassed a number i need to? we set up this platform after being harassed a number of times and feeling like there is no option, no alternative if you haven't had a really serious incident and we know there are so many micro aggressions and instances of violence against women that are beyond what people consider more than minor scale that are going completely un— acknowledged and nobody is accounting for them, so that was the aim behind setting up the platform. 50. that was the aim behind setting up the platform-— the platform. so, women have re orted the platform. so, women have reported micro- _ the platform. so, women have reported micro- aggressions i the platform. so, women have| reported micro- aggressions to the platform. so, women have i reported micro- aggressions to the reported micro— aggressions to the relevant authorities, to the relevant authorities, to the relevant transport police and have just been fobbed off? yes. relevant transport police and have just been fobbed off?— just been fobbed off? yes, we've even had a _ just been fobbed off? yes, we've even had a lot _ just been fobbed off? yes, we've even had a lot of— just been fobbed off? yes, we've even had a lot of women - just been fobbed off? yes, we've even had a lot of women who i just been fobbed off? yes, we've i even had a lot of women who share their stories with us, they are looking for a sense of closure and they want a space where they can talk about the story and it's really
11:46 am
a whole range. it can be instances that you think, oh, ok, that's minor instances but it's actually very major and people have very negative experiences with the police. i can see it must _ experiences with the police. i can see it must be _ experiences with the police. i can see it must be therapeutic i experiences with the police. i can see it must be therapeutic and a great release to women to have a platform on which to speak out, but what do you do with that information? do you get the police involved? that information? do you get the police involved? �* l, l, �* involved? at the moment we don't currently get _ involved? at the moment we don't currently get the _ involved? at the moment we don't currently get the police _ involved? at the moment we don't currently get the police involved i currently get the police involved because we know the police will always be a barrier of entry to some women and we want to capture the women and we want to capture the women who don't feel like the police are there option, so at the moment we are working to gather the data and fill that gender ? gender data gap and we have the focus that all of the data will go open source and anybody from researchers and journalists, anybody interested can see the data and acknowledge the problem and begin working on ways to
11:47 am
address it from a survivor led point of view. ll ll ~ address it from a survivor led point of view. ll ll ,, i l, ~ address it from a survivor led point of view. ll ll «i i l, i of view. caitlin, thank you. and i should say _ of view. caitlin, thank you. and i should say we — of view. caitlin, thank you. and i should say we have _ of view. caitlin, thank you. and i should say we have a _ of view. caitlin, thank you. and i should say we have a statement| of view. caitlin, thank you. and i i should say we have a statement from the british transport police from detective chief inspector sarah white who says that all loan normally an increase in reported crime is seen as negative, we welcome the increased reporting of sexual offences because it tells us that more people are understanding that more people are understanding that all types of unwarranted sexual behaviour are acceptable and having the confidence to tell us what has happened to them. that is a statement from british transport police. let's go back now to the news about the further conviction in the death of keon lincoln. phil mackie is at birmingham crown court. ciaran donaldson was the fifth defendant in this case, his 18 years old, and all of them are teenagers who have been convicted in the killing of keon lincoln and he was committed on a majority decision of manslaughter rather than murder and
11:48 am
had not been part of the attack in which keon died injanuary in broad daylight outside his house in handsworth but had supplied the weapons which were used in the attack. keon lincoln was a 15 —year—old schoolboy who would have been 16 injuly this year, typical, fun loving boy according to his family who had been taking part in lessons that day because we were in lockdown and had gone out to speak to someone in the street when i wiped a stolen car up and outjumped a number of people armed with knives and a gun and killed him. the whole attack was captured on cctv which was certain ? shown in court and lasted barely 40 seconds. the government is a 14—year—old who was convicted of murder yesterday along with his 16 —year—old friend and two others. reports need to be carried out on the two youngest, the 14 and 16—year—old, and there were two other people involved in the attack who have not been detained and went
11:49 am
on trial here. the driver of the car and another person carrying a knife and another person carrying a knife and seen on the cctv. they've not been identified and west midlands police are still trying to find out who they were carrying out investigations and they have arrested two people have been released under investigation. keon's mother charmaine has been in court through the week while the jury have been deliberating and i spoke to her and saw her often during the process and saw her often during the process and it's been a very difficult time of her and she's been quite upset at times so we don't know she will come out but we do think that they felt if these people were convicted it would give them a milestone on the way to closure at the end of this case, so a reminder, for teenagers convicted of murder yesterday and another teenager convicted of manslaughter today. phil matthew their reporting outside birmingham crown court. the drug company pfizer says a clinical trial of a pill is a
11:50 am
great ? treat covid 19 has shown it is highly effective and jim reid is here to explain more. this sounds significant. it here to explain more. this sounds siunificant. l l, here to explain more. this sounds significant-— significant. it is. you remember last ear significant. it is. you remember last year we _ significant. it is. you remember last year we had _ significant. it is. you remember last year we had a _ significant. it is. you remember last year we had a raft - significant. it is. you remember last year we had a raft of i significant. it is. you remember- last year we had a raft of companies reporting positive results from their vaccines for covid and we are starting to see the same thing this year but this time it's not vaccines, it is treatments, so it's aimed at people who have already caught covid who might be vulnerable, elderly, have underlying health conditions so we had the uk drugs regulator approving the first pill to treat covid in that way and today clinical trial results for a different bill developed by pfizer, and again they are very, very strong, so this one, if you give this pill in the trial within three to five days of catching covid, then it cuts the risk of hospitalisation in that very vulnerable group by 89%, which is very positive. there
11:51 am
were no deaths at all from covid in the group that took the pill and in the group that took the pill and in the group that took the dummy pill, the group that took the dummy pill, the placebo in this trial, there were ten deaths, so these are the kind of treatments that are likely to be used going forward. they won't be for everyone, they will be for that very much smaller group of vulnerable, elderly people that might and if it from treatment like this. the uk has already ordered 250,000 causes of this pfizer drug. no details on when it will be available but you imagine they will push for authorisation from the regulatory bodies soon. jim. push for authorisation from the regulatory bodies soon. jim, thank ou ve regulatory bodies soon. jim, thank you very much- — its day five of cop26 — the climate change conference in glasgow. today s all about hearing from young people and looking at how important education is when it comes to climate issues. we re spending the day at a school in birmingham, that s using the day to get kids more involved with the environment of their local community, and what they can do to reduce air
11:52 am
pollution on their journey to school. let's cross over to the saltley academy, tojoin the bbc asian network's pria rai. yes, rita, as you say, at cop26 it's a letter about what the politicians have to die and more about what young people want to see for their futures because at the end of the day, whatever we do or don't hear from cop26, it's going to affect the future lives of children, young people, the very people who are around me. now where i am at the sulkily academy, we are not too far from allan rock, and there's about 1,200 kids to go to the school and it's an area that is one of the most populated parts of birmingham city and also got one of the youngest demographics as well. some of the climate issues that affect children at a school like this are things like high levels of air pollution and a lack of access to green spaces
11:53 am
and a lack of access to green spaces and i've got peter wright with us, the head teacher, and peter, those are two things that you are trying to do something about today here at the school. l l l, l ll , to do something about today here at the school. l l l, l ll i ll i the school. yes, historically friday is the youth _ the school. yes, historically friday is the youth day — the school. yes, historically friday is the youth day of _ the school. yes, historically friday is the youth day of cop26 - the school. yes, historically friday is the youth day of cop26 and i the school. yes, historically friday is the youth day of cop26 and we | the school. yes, historically friday i is the youth day of cop26 and we are bringing _ is the youth day of cop26 and we are bringing those really important events — bringing those really important events about climate change to the academy, _ events about climate change to the academy, so this morning we had a workshop _ academy, so this morning we had a workshop from doctors and clinicians from the _ workshop from doctors and clinicians from the birmingham children's hospital— from the birmingham children's hospital to help our children become experts _ hospital to help our children become experts on _ hospital to help our children become experts on asthma and understand the important _ experts on asthma and understand the important links between asthma and air pollution and we've had an air quality— air pollution and we've had an air quality monitor installed on the streets — quality monitor installed on the streets so students can look at the quality _ streets so students can look at the quality of — streets so students can look at the quality of the air outside in our busy— quality of the air outside in our busy streets and compare that to the air quality— busy streets and compare that to the air quality all over the world. and importantly today we are planting and redesigning an outdoor space and there will— and redesigning an outdoor space and there will be an outdoor classroom in planting — there will be an outdoor classroom in planting trees and looking at the ways in— in planting trees and looking at the ways in which what we can do that will have — ways in which what we can do that will have a — ways in which what we can do that will have a positive impact on climate — will have a positive impact on climate change. we
11:54 am
will have a positive impact on climate change.— will have a positive impact on climate change. we will be at the school all day _ climate change. we will be at the school all day so _ climate change. we will be at the school all day so we _ climate change. we will be at the school all day so we will - climate change. we will be at the school all day so we will see i climate change. we will be at the | school all day so we will see some of those things that peter is talking about through the day but loads of kids getting involved and two of them here with me, tanya and irene. tell me, what is it that you are interested about? we irene. tell me, what is it that you are interested about?— irene. tell me, what is it that you are interested about? we had experts cominu in are interested about? we had experts coming in and — are interested about? we had experts coming in and we _ are interested about? we had experts coming in and we were _ are interested about? we had experts coming in and we were learning i are interested about? we had experts coming in and we were learning about\ coming in and we were learning about the links_ coming in and we were learning about the links of— coming in and we were learning about the links of air quality and asthma and how— the links of air quality and asthma and how it — the links of air quality and asthma and how it affects young people specifically. is and how it affects young people specifically-— and how it affects young people secificall . , , i, specifically. is there something you have learned _ specifically. is there something you have learned today _ specifically. is there something you have learned today that _ specifically. is there something you have learned today that perhaps . specifically. is there something you l have learned today that perhaps you did not know before? i’zre have learned today that perhaps you did not know before?— did not know before? i've learned that a lot of _ did not know before? i've learned that a lot of youths _ did not know before? i've learned that a lot of youths offer - did not know before? i've learned that a lot of youths offer with - that a lot of youths offer with asthma — that a lot of youths offer with asthma and not a lot of people dispose — asthma and not a lot of people dispose of inhalers correctly. one way to _ dispose of inhalers correctly. one way to dispose properly is incineration and you can go to the pharmacy— incineration and you can go to the pharmacy and ask if they will do it pmperty— pharmacy and ask if they will do it properly and if not, go to the pharmacy— properly and if not, go to the pharmacy and ask and your inhaler -ets pharmacy and ask and your inhaler gets disposed wrong or the gases can contribute _ gets disposed wrong or the gases can contribute to the c02 and then they -et contribute to the c02 and then they get released wrong. that contribute to the c02 and then they get released wrong.— get released wrong. that is quite a fact. you become _ get released wrong. that is quite a fact. you become quite _ get released wrong. that is quite a fact. you become quite an - get released wrong. that is quite a fact. you become quite an expert i get released wrong. that is quite a | fact. you become quite an expert in a short amount of time and they've had loads of experts teaching the kids these things that i and these
11:55 am
are just some of the workshops that have been going on. one of the guys they have got in to help is from birmingham children's hospital. with us here as well now, so doctor, in your experience, birmingham is a city, it's a place that's often dubbed a car city and reports say that air pollution can contribute 900 deaths each year, so what impact do you see on the health of kids? poor air quality of ex children and youngsters — poor air quality of ex children and youngsters all age groups and in those _ youngsters all age groups and in those with an underlying problem such as _ those with an underlying problem such as asthma, we know that poor air quality— such as asthma, we know that poor air quality causes an asthma attack and it— air quality causes an asthma attack and it affects their heart, their immune — and it affects their heart, their immune system as well as the development, but more worryingly poor air— development, but more worryingly poor air quality has an impact on the development of the unborn child. we know— the development of the unborn child. we know when pregnant mothers are exposed _ we know when pregnant mothers are exposed to— we know when pregnant mothers are exposed to poor air quality there is an effect— exposed to poor air quality there is an effect on how the baby grows inside _ an effect on how the baby grows inside their womb, so it does have a bil inside their womb, so it does have a
11:56 am
big impact — inside their womb, so it does have a bi im act. ~ inside their womb, so it does have a big impact-— big impact. when, sometimes, the health impacts _ big impact. when, sometimes, the health impacts are _ big impact. when, sometimes, the health impacts are not _ big impact. when, sometimes, the health impacts are not as - big impact. when, sometimes, the health impacts are not as dramatic| health impacts are not as dramatic or obvious or they could be longer term, how do you get that message across, especially to young people? let's be under no illusion, poor air quality— let's be under no illusion, poor air quality is _ let's be under no illusion, poor air quality is affecting the health of our children and youngsters and affecting — our children and youngsters and affecting their ability to achieve their— affecting their ability to achieve their potential and we need to do more _ their potential and we need to do more of— their potential and we need to do more of the activities we have done at the _ more of the activities we have done at the school today. it's been amazing _ at the school today. it's been amazing to talk about this and amazing — amazing to talk about this and amazing to talk about this and amazing to share our knowledge, and also with— amazing to share our knowledge, and also with involving youngsters to create _ also with involving youngsters to create solutions to these problems and in _ create solutions to these problems and in addition we have to do our bit, and in addition we have to do our bit. each — and in addition we have to do our bit, each one of us needs to think about— bit, each one of us needs to think about how— bit, each one of us needs to think about how we can contribute to improving — about how we can contribute to improving air quality. it is our responsibility, each and every person— responsibility, each and every person is— responsibility, each and every person is responsibility, i think. as you — person is responsibility, i think. as you can _ person is responsibility, i think. as you can see, lots of issues to talk about it throughout the day here at the academy, and of those, around the country as well we are seeing lots of kids raising climate
11:57 am
issues and that is what the kids here will be doing throughout the day. here will be doing throughout the da . a , here will be doing throughout the da. . now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. with a temperature close to —5 in parts of oxfordshire this morning it was the coldest night of autumn so far but this weekend the frost will disappear and it will turn milder but on the flip side we will see a bit more rain at times and there will be dry and bright weather but it will be quite windy, especially saturday night into sunday with gales or severe gales in the northern half of the uk. it's here we see most of the breeze today, but a gentle breeze for most and after the sunny but frosty start across central and eastern england most will cloud over and there will be sunny spells here and there and it is cloudy and north—west along with outbreaks of rain and certainly in the channel islands and parts of kent and sussex. after a chilly start temperature is still only up to 10 but we've lost the breeze of recent days and it won't feel quite as cold. as we go into the evening and overnight we start to switch the
11:58 am
wind into a south—westerly direction which brings lots of cloud across the country and heavy and persistent rain to the north and west of scotland and we're also seeing splashes of rain across western but not the temperatures and it will be a frost free night and much milder night tonight. that is because we are in this slice of milder air sandwiched between two weather fronts and the bulk of the rain is closer to the area of low pressure where we will see the wettest conditions in scotland and northern ireland with persistent rain along the western coast of scotland during the western coast of scotland during the morning but the weather system will be on the move through the day so through the afternoon scotland and northern ireland will brighten up and northern ireland will brighten up and it will stay dry and sunny spells in the southern counties of england, but northern england, wales on the north midlands will see outbreaks of rain developers we go through the day. temperatures across the board in the south—westerly winds will be higher than we have seen the past day or so. as we go into the night, strong winds across the country, particularly in the north with plenty of showers here and the weather fronts which will only bring a bit of rain through
11:59 am
saturday evening in southern counties will gradually depart but as the low pressure pushes eastwards we see the strongest of the winds through the night into sunday morning we could see them top 60 or 70mph in the far north of scotland and gales around the coast further south, so it will be a blustery start to sunday and quite bright one though, even though it is breezy. some showers around, most frequent in northern scotland and the odd one further south but many will have a predominantly dry day on sunday but after a milder day on saturday it will feel that cooler again. see you soon.
12:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the club's handling of racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. roger hutton criticises the culture at the club, saying it refused to change — and he's accused the ecb of declining to help. the drug company, pfizer, says it's developed a new covid pill that's 89% effective at preventing hospitalisation and death in adults at risk of developing severe disease. a teenager has been convicted of the killing of 15 year—old keon lincoln, who was stabbed and shot outside his home in birmingham earlier this year. a senior cabinet minister admits the government made a mistake over its handling of the owen paterson case — amid criticism of the prime minister.
12:01 pm
look, we made a mistake. we reflected within 2a hours. we made a mistake, collectively, and we've come to the commons and said, "look, let's separate these things out "and let's do this properly", because fairness is important. young people gather to protest over climate change at the summit in glasgow. and here we go again — abba have told the bbc they would be willing to help end the uk's two decade defeat at eurovision. good afternoon. the chairman of yorkshire cricket club, roger hutton, has resigned over the club's response to the racism experienced by one of its former
12:02 pm
players, azeem rafiq. it comes after an investigation found mr rafiq was a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" — after which the club said they would take no disciplinary action. mr hutton — who had been under mounting pressure to step down — "apologised unreservedly" to 30—year—old rafiq. he said the club "should have recognised at the time the serious allegations of racism". he also accused the club of "a culture that refuses to accept change or challenge". he was also highly critical of the england and wales cricket board, claiming the governing body "declined to help". the ecb have issued a statement responding to that. it said...
12:03 pm
his resignation came before an emergency board meeting today, amid calls for �*heads to roll�* at the club. azeem rafiq, who represented yorkshire in two stints between 2008 and 2018, said "institutional racism" at the club had left him close to taking his own life. simonjones reports. "a club with a culture that refuses to accept change or challenge." the words of the outgoing chairman roger hutton as he apologised unreservedly to azeem rafiq, saying he had not been shown care or contrition. an independent panel found that the former player had been a victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club, but it took no action against any member of staff. this week, yorkshire batsman gary ballance said he regretted using a racial slur driven conversation with his ex—teammate. he's been suspended from england selection indefinitely. now the former england captain michael vaughan says he too was named in the report for allegedly telling a group of asian players, including rafiq, in 2009 that there were "too many of you lot." but in his telegraph
12:04 pm
column he writes... the club has been suspended from hosting international matches by the england and wales cricket board for what it calls the "wholly unacceptable handling" of azeem rafiq's racism claims. it's really important the ecb sends a message to cricket fans across the country that we will not stand for this, that racism and anything to do with racism and discrimination of any kind has absolutely no place in the game. the departing chairman is calling for more people to go and says he looks forward to the day when yorkshire cricket club is a great club again. simon jones, bbc news. john holder is the only person of colour to have been an umpire
12:05 pm
in britain in 150 years of test cricket. he said the problems run much deeper than cricket itself. it is notjust cricket's problem, it's a society problem. this sort of language is used towards non—white people day in and day out in our country. this is probably one of the first times that a player has actually raised his head above the parapet and actually complained, but this has been going on... i mean, there are a couple of former surrey players, monte lynch and lonsdale skinner, who as youngsters upon joining surrey years ago were abused by the then surrey second xi coach — abused racially. so this is nothing new. earlier i spoke to simon hughes, editor of the cricketer magazine for his reaction to today's events.
12:06 pm
well, i think it's really sad, in a way, because, actually, he is a reformer and he was trying his best to get the rest of the yorkshire board to understand the severity of this. and he was also handed what you might call a hospital pass, really, because he arrived as chairman, really, when this whole issue was already under way. the investigation and the claims were already under way, so he took it on board and think he's tried his best to instigate cultural change, attitude change in the yorkshire establishment and the board generally. he's obviously failed because they were slow to deal with this and their general handling of it has been appalling and i guess he had to be the fall guy but, in a way, someone resigning like thisjust destabilises and delays the ultimate opportunity for change. yeah, it's interesting you say that because in a statement he released earlier this morning roger hutton says that azeem rafiq left the club in august 2018, 18 months
12:07 pm
before he actuallyjoined the board. i mean, there is a board meeting going on right now. what do you suppose is being said? i think there'll be a lot of mudslinging going on because there clearly are, sort of, two factions some who feel that change isn't necessary and some who feel it's absolutely fundamental and i guess it is not easy because some of these views are very entrenched and it's a very complicated story generally. azeem rafiq's whole, kind of, career is shrouded in controversy and it is very difficult getting to the bottom of it, but in the end i guess most of the board will probably resign, which, again, just delays the whole process. what we're trying to achieve here as cultural change and as soon as you get resignations and need time to reappoint new people, thatjust delays
12:08 pm
the opportunity for change. that was simon hughes of the cricketer magazine talking to me a little earlier. a teenager has been convicted of the killing of keon lincoln — a is—year—old schoolboy who was stabbed and shot outside his home in birmingham earlier this year. yesterday four teenagers who took part in the attack — including the gunman, who s just iii — were found guilty of murder. today, kieron donaldson who supplied the weapons but wasn t there when keon died, was convicted of manslaughter. phil mackie reports this was keon lincoln, a typical teenager messing around with his family and friends. injanuary, after a day spent movement lessons because of lockdown, a group of teenagers murdered him outside his house. it appeared carefully planned. they devote to his home in a stolen white ford. he was standing in the street. at this moment it stopped in the attack began. it is taken from cctv footage which showed key on being chased, stabbed and
12:09 pm
then shot dead. this shrine is here to murk a spot near to where keon was stabbed and fatally shot. the whole attack lasted less than 30 seconds in the first people who are outside to see what happened with his mother and twin sister. i outside to see what happened with his mother and twin sister.- his mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots _ his mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots and _ his mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots and my _ his mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots and my first - his mother and twin sister. i heard the gunshots and my first thought | the gunshots and my first thought was where is my sun. ifound out that there was somebody up the road and, yes, it was my boy. a, that there was somebody up the road and, yes, it was my boy.— and, yes, it was my boy. a week after he died. — and, yes, it was my boy. a week after he died, the _ and, yes, it was my boy. a week after he died, the community . after he died, the community gathered to remember him an appeal for calm. the situation that within with the post-cold war needs to stop and we have to now learn to respect each other and love each other in the way that we ought to love each other. me the way that we ought to love each other. ~ . ., the way that we ought to love each other. . ., y the way that we ought to love each other. . ., y ., ., _ other. we can only do that by -auttin other. we can only do that by putting away — other. we can only do that by putting away the _ other. we can only do that by putting away the knife - other. we can only do that by putting away the knife and - other. we can only do that by putting away the knife and the| other. we can only do that by - putting away the knife and the gun. the stoten — putting away the knife and the gun. the stolen car was abandoned a couple of miles away. in it they
12:10 pm
found a knife and a mass with dna. there was more cctv footage with phone records which led to the arrest and opened it so much conviction of four teenagers murders. two of them are 18 on the other two can't be named because of their ages, they are 1a and 16. another 18—year—old was convicted of manslaughter. the another 18-year-old was convicted of manslaughter-— manslaughter. the weapons that are bein: manslaughter. the weapons that are being used. — manslaughter. the weapons that are being used, there _ manslaughter. the weapons that are being used, there tell— manslaughter. the weapons that are being used, there tell of— manslaughter. the weapons that are being used, there tell of a _ manslaughter. the weapons that are being used, there tell of a fine - being used, there tell of a fine weapons — being used, there tell of a fine weapons to— being used, there tell of a fine weapons to think _ being used, there tell of a fine weapons to think that - being used, there tell of a fine weapons to think that you - being used, there tell of a fine weapons to think that you the i weapons to think that you the knives. — weapons to think that you the knives. they— weapons to think that you the knives, they are _ weapons to think that you the knives, they are more - weapons to think that you the knives, they are more like - weapons to think that you the - knives, they are more like swords —— terrifying _ knives, they are more like swords —— terrifying weapons. _ knives, they are more like swords —— terrifying weapons. the _ knives, they are more like swords —— terrifying weapons. the weapons - knives, they are more like swords ——| terrifying weapons. the weapons that people _ terrifying weapons. the weapons that people are _ terrifying weapons. the weapons that people are getting _ terrifying weapons. the weapons that people are getting hold _ terrifying weapons. the weapons that people are getting hold of, _ terrifying weapons. the weapons that people are getting hold of, they- people are getting hold of, they should — people are getting hold of, they should never— people are getting hold of, they should never be _ people are getting hold of, they should never be getting - people are getting hold of, they should never be getting hold . people are getting hold of, they should never be getting hold of| should never be getting hold of weapons — should never be getting hold of weapons such _ should never be getting hold of weapons such as _ should never be getting hold of weapons such as those. - should never be getting hold of weapons such as those. it - should never be getting hold of weapons such as those. it is i weapons such as those. it is unnecessary _ weapons such as those. it is unnecessary. it— weapons such as those. it is unnecessary. it never- weapons such as those. it is. unnecessary. it never needed weapons such as those. it is - unnecessary. it never needed to happen — unnecessary. it never needed to happen so _ unnecessary. it never needed to happen. so we. _ unnecessary. it never needed to happen. so we. you— unnecessary. it never needed to happen. so we, you know, - unnecessary. it never needed to| happen. so we, you know, trying unnecessary. it never needed to . happen. so we, you know, trying to come _ happen. so we, you know, trying to come to— happen. so we, you know, trying to come to terms _ happen. so we, you know, trying to come to terms with _ happen. so we, you know, trying to come to terms with that _ happen. so we, you know, trying to come to terms with that and - happen. so we, you know, trying to come to terms with that and so - happen. so we, you know, trying to come to terms with that and so wel come to terms with that and so we 'ust come to terms with that and so we just want— come to terms with that and so we just want closure. _ come to terms with that and so we just want closure. we _ come to terms with that and so we just want closure.— just want closure. we still don't know why _ just want closure. we still don't know why keon _ just want closure. we still don't know why keon lincoln - just want closure. we still don't know why keon lincoln was - just want closure. we still don't i know why keon lincoln was killed but he has become another teenage casualty in a city that has lost too many young lives in recent years.
12:11 pm
will mackie, bbc news, birmingham. in the last hour, the pharmaceutical manufacturer pfizer, has said that a clinical trial of a pill to treat covid—19, shows that the drug is highly effective. the product is called paxlovid, and it is reported to have achieved an 89% reduction in the risk of hospitalization or death — that's among adult patients with coronavirus who are at high risk of progressing to severe illness. we are starting to see the same thing this year but this time it's not vaccines, it is treatments, so it's aimed at people who have already caught covid who might be
12:12 pm
vulnerable, elderly, have underlying health conditions so we had the uk drugs regulator approving the first pill to treat covid in that way and today clinical trial results for a different pill this time developed by the us drug company pfizer, company pfizer, and, again, they're very, very strong, so this one, if you give this pill in the trial within three to five days of catching covid, then it cuts the risk of hospitalisation in that vulnerable group by 89%, which is very positive. there were no deaths at all from covid in the group that took the pill. in the group that took the dummy pill, the placebo in this trial, there were ten deaths. so you can see these are the kind products, the kind of treatments that are likely to be used going forward. they won't be for everyone, they will be for that very much smaller group of vulnerable, elderly people that might and if it from treatment like this. the uk has already purchased 250,000 causes of this pfizer drug. no details yet on when it
12:13 pm
will become available. you'd imagine that they will push for authorisation from the drug regulatory bodies very soon. new statistics and from the office of national statistics. they say one in 50 people had covid—19 which is the equivalent of about 1.1 million people, the same proportion of people estimated to have coronavirus at the peak of the second wave in early january so that is the latest from the office for national statistics. we're going to show you now some pictures from outside the cop26 summit in glasgow where protesters have been gathering, this is a youth protest and greta thunberg is expected to attend
12:14 pm
she is expected to address the crowd at some stage this afternoon. at this point, we say goodbye now to viewers on bbc two. the headlines on bbc news... the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the club's handling of racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. the drug company, pfizer, says it's developed a new covid pill that's 89% effective at preventing hospitalisation and death in adults at risk of developing severe disease. a teenager has been convicted of the killing of 15 year—old keon lincoln, who was stabbed and shot outside his home in birmingham earlier this year.
12:15 pm
now for the sport. good afternoon. yorkshire county cricket�*s former chairman roger hutton has urged other board members to follow his lead and resign. he says its time to make way for a new path for the club which, he says, refuses to accept change or challenge. hutton was writing in a statement after his resignation. the club have also lost key sponsers and kit deals, after saying they won't take disciplinary action against employees, despite "racial harrassment and bullying" against azeem rafiq. hutton also apologised unreservedly to the former player — more resignations are expected to follow. he's been speaking to our sports editor dan roan before that we have heard from the chief of the spun the cricket info website. the question was asked... we have to make sure that the new yorkshire is better and i are absolutely sure that we can do that but today is a
12:16 pm
big day and have to be new voices at that club. we big day and have to be new voices at that club. ~ ., , ., , big day and have to be new voices at that club. ~ .,, ., , ., that club. we hope to bring some of that club. we hope to bring some of that exclusive _ that club. we hope to bring some of that exclusive interview _ that club. we hope to bring some of that exclusive interview from - that club. we hope to bring some of that exclusive interview from roger| that exclusive interview from roger hutton, the former chairman of yorkshire county cricket club, later on this happening. some rugby news now and the rfu have confirmed that owen farrell will miss the captain's run today ahead of tomorrow's match with tonga. after testing positive for covid he'll remain, in isolation ahead of another lateral flow and pcr test later today so it is not yet clear whether he will have to miss the game. meanwhile saracen's number 8 poppy cleall has been named as england women's captain for the first time when they face new zealand this sunday. regular skipper sarah hunter is on the bench as head coach simon middleton makes five changes to the side that beat the world champions last week. a barcelona are set to announce xavi hernandez�*s dramatic return
12:17 pm
to the club as coach — replacing ronald koeman who was sacked last month. xavi's current side — qatari club al sadd — have confirmed that a deal has been agreed, with barca paying a release clause. xavi has been coaching in qatar since 2019 and will now rejoin the club where he enjoyed huge success as a player. don't forget cricket's t20 world cup continues — new zealand are up against namibia. both sides can still qualify for the semi finals. namibia are chasing 164 to win — they're 47 without loss. eight overs. later on india play scotland. there's commentary on slive sports extra and coverage on the website bbc.co.uk/sport but for me, i will see a lot of them one o'clock news at 130. i can. labour has ruled out standing aside in favour of a cross—party "anti—sleaze" candidate in the by—election to replace the tory mp owen paterson. mr paterson announced his resignation after the government changed its mind over blocking his suspension from parliament for breaking lobbying rules. a senior cabinet minister has
12:18 pm
admitted the party made a 'mistake' in the way it handled the paterson controversy. earlier i spoke to our political correspondent lone wells. this is the latest development in what has been around bubbling over for the last couple of days now and since owen paterson's resignation and since the government's u—turn over its plans to, essentially, overhaul the system via which mp�*s conduct is policed and judged there has been a furious backlash notjust in the media but also by opposition parties but also within the conservative party themselves. there aren't many mps and government ministers as well pretty annoyed that they were, essentially, kind of come that wheeled out to defend the government, to vote with the government, to vote with the government on this issue, only for them to backtrack on their plans and for owen paterson to then resign. early at the education secretary nadhim zahawi did accept that the government had made a mistake when it came to theirjudgment on this but did stop short of saying who exactly made a mistake.
12:19 pm
i take collective responsibility. i'm part of the government, in part of the cabinet. i also take collective responsibility to say we made a mistake. and i think it was right for the leader of the house, jacob rees—mogg, on behalf of the government, to go to the house and say, actually, the mistake was we shouldn't have conflated the issue of fairness of process, so, the right of appeal, and i think that's right, and my appeal to other parliamentarians from all parties — let's come together to make that work. but we shouldn't have conflated that with the specific case of owen paterson. the prime minister's always been clear that paid lobbying is wrong and i think it's important that we separate those two things out and to admit a mistake, i think, is the right thing to do, and the grown—up thing to do. so, nadhim zahawi they're accepting that the government had made a mistake but notes that he didn't exactly say who took the ultimate decision for this, who exactly is to blame for that mistake which the government is now feeling under pressure from. now, there are certainly a few individuals who are feeling the heat of this today. first of all, of course the prime
12:20 pm
minister, some of his own mps not very happy that he, sort of, led the charge there to wheel out the troops, essentially, to go and vote and defend the government, some of whom had to defend the airwaves only for the plans to then be scrapped. and it has been pointed out that this is in the first time in a boris johnson's leadership that the government have proposed plans only for a u—turn to then be announced days if not even i later so certainly the finest are feeling some heat on this today. also the chief whip and murk spencer after mps were whipped with the three line whip to vote with the government on this issue. now, he's set me feeling a lot of pressure from this today as well. i've been told by some mps who were considering abstaining on this vote that they were then told if they did do that they would potentially lose certain positions that they had been given or sacrifice getting certain positions, again, in the future, so certainly mps feel like they were given a lot of pressure to vote with the whip on this issue only for that decision to
12:21 pm
be changed. but, interestingly, the former to downing street chief of staff under theresa may gavin barwell says the mistake here was made by friends of owen paterson himself rallying around him for a cause mistakenly withoutjudging cause mistakenly without judging what cause mistakenly withoutjudging what the outcome of that would be. i think it's clearly a terrible mistake that number 10 and the government as a whole made in trying to get owen paterson off the hook and change the rules. if you're asking me why it happened, it's not easy for me to answer because it clearly politically was bad for the government, the conservative party and for owen himself, but my best guess is that — and don't think many of your viewers will have a lot of sympathy with it, but here goes... that sometimes in life, you know, when one of our friends does something wrong there is a, sort of, natural see the best in them, and in this case in particular, given the tragic events that owen and his family have been through,
12:22 pm
with his wife very sadly taking her own life, there would have been a lot of understandable compassion for him. hmm. so an apology from the cabinet minister today, a screeching u—turn by the government. other people in the conservative benches saying, look, they made a mistake but this was a mistake that was completely foreseeable well before it was made? that is right. there are certainly a lot of mps feeling like that. in fact, there were some mps even before this event happened we were admitting that they were pretty glad that they weren't going to be voting on it for whatever reason. perhaps they weren't able to be present in parliament at the time and certainly there were mps at the time saying that this should have been foreseen, not just that this should have been foreseen, notjust because of the opposition that was likely to come from the other side of the benches, from labour, from the snp, from the liberal democrats, but also within their own party, too. there are many, particularly some of those newer intake of mps who were only elected in 2019 who feel like this was a case of some of the, sort of,
12:23 pm
more old—timers, some of his friends, those closer to owen paterson sort of rallying around him and perhaps misjudging the fact that actually constituents and voters wouldn't be best pleased with the image of this that people like him actually rallying round to protect one of their own. lone wells reporting there. as part the event programme at the cop26, the wildlife charity born free will be hosting and chairing a 'state of the earth' event — with a key focus on habitat, wildlife protection and animal welfare at home and abroad. the session will be based on the format of the bbc�*s question time. to tell us more i'm joined by will travers, the president of the born free, and his mother, the actor, author and wildlife campaigner virginia mckenna. thank you both so much forjoining us on bbc news. so, bone free is hosting and sharing the state of the earth question time event. that is so much to talk about, isn't there? i was wondering what you hope
12:24 pm
specifically to talk about? —— born free. it specifically to talk about? -- born free. . . specifically to talk about? -- born free. , . ., ~ ., specifically to talk about? -- born free. , . .,~ ., , , free. it is hard to know because the auestion free. it is hard to know because the question time _ free. it is hard to know because the question time format _ free. it is hard to know because the question time format is _ free. it is hard to know because the question time format is exactly - question time format is exactly that, we are waiting to see what questions will have a covid—safe book packed audience that is a sell—out and going to be streamed as well. i think people, from our perspective, i think what people will want to talk about and to explore at the issues facing biodiversity. the fact that we've got a million species that are threatened with extinction at the moment that many of them are threatened because of anthropocentric change, that means things that humans are doing, whether they destroying habitat whether they destroying habitat whether they destroying habitat whether they asked polluting our seas or our air and also what we are doing to the climate, which is making the climate intolerable to certain species. species that can't adapt. i mean, one of the fundamental things about human beings is that we adapt to circumstances far better than animals, otheranimals are, because
12:25 pm
they've evolved to live in a niche and can't, kind, move anywhere else. polar bears cattle and live somewhere else. they have to live where they've evolved to live so it is going to be a fascinating event. virginia, you have been involved in wildlife conservation for many decades. it was not been a major concern of yours. since when have beenin concern of yours. since when have been in the climate change was a big factor in this area?— factor in this area? well, i'm not an expert _ factor in this area? well, i'm not an expert on _ factor in this area? well, i'm not an expert on anything _ factor in this area? well, i'm not an expert on anything to - factor in this area? well, i'm not an expert on anything to do - factor in this area? well, i'm not an expert on anything to do with | an expert on anything to do with climate — an expert on anything to do with climate change, but, in a way, it is quite _ climate change, but, in a way, it is quite recent. — climate change, but, in a way, it is quite recent, as faras i'm concerned. it has obviously been happening slowly, slowly, bit by bit for a long. — happening slowly, slowly, bit by bit for a long, long time but the impact of the _ for a long, long time but the impact of the overheating and everything else which affects so many species so gravely, — else which affects so many species so gravely, so seriously has suddenly, sort of, launched itself upon— suddenly, sort of, launched itself upon us— suddenly, sort of, launched itself upon us into our consciousness, as you say— upon us into our consciousness, as you say the — upon us into our consciousness, as you say the polar reasons melting
12:26 pm
the forests and hot places getting hotter— the forests and hot places getting hotter and also it is not only that, it is a _ hotter and also it is not only that, it is a human _ hotter and also it is not only that, it is a human being is destroying the natural habitat as well which aggregates the situation in the same way as— aggregates the situation in the same way as the _ aggregates the situation in the same way as the forest been cut down so there _ way as the forest been cut down so there is— way as the forest been cut down so there is no— way as the forest been cut down so there is no shade and it is a very serious — there is no shade and it is a very serious time _ there is no shade and it is a very serious time and i think we should all come _ serious time and i think we should all come together whatever our beliefs — all come together whatever our beliefs in — all come together whatever our beliefs in any kind of way, we should — beliefs in any kind of way, we should beat united on trying to cope with this _ should beat united on trying to cope with this for humans as well as animals— with this for humans as well as animals because it could be an absolute — animals because it could be an absolute disaster. as animals because it could be an absolute disaster.— animals because it could be an absolute disaster. as well as being absolute disaster. as well as being a campaigner— absolute disaster. as well as being a campaigner and _ absolute disaster. as well as being a campaigner and an _ absolute disaster. as well as being a campaigner and an activist, - a campaigner and an activist, viewers will remember you, of course, for your long career as an actor and very specifically, i think, feel role in the born free, a film that was released in 1966. i just want to listen to a little clip of that. ~ . u. just want to listen to a little clip of that. ~ . .. ., , just want to listen to a little clip of that. ~ . . , ., just want to listen to a little clip ofthat. . . . , ., , ., of that. what can any of us do anyway? _ of that. what can any of us do anyway? nothing _ of that. what can any of us do anyway? nothing except - of that. what can any of us do anyway? nothing except that l of that. what can any of us do i anyway? nothing except that she won't be free. _ anyway? nothing except that she won't be free. and _ anyway? nothing except that she won't be free. and his _ anyway? nothing except that she won't be free. and his freedom i anyway? nothing except that she | won't be free. and his freedom so important? _ won't be free. and his freedom so important? yes. _ won't be free. and his freedom so important? yes. she _ won't be free. and his freedom so important? yes. she was - won't be free. and his freedom so important? yes. she was born - won't be free. and his freedom so| important? yes. she was born free and she has _
12:27 pm
important? yes. she was born free and she has the _ important? yes. she was born free and she has the right _ important? yes. she was born free and she has the right to _ important? yes. she was born free and she has the right to live - important? yes. she was born free and she has the right to live free. i and she has the right to live free. i don't want her to go to a zoo. i want to set her free. you must have heard that music thousands of times in your life. how much did playing that role inspire you to become involved in wildlife conservation?— conservation? well, completely, reall . conservation? well, completely, really- that _ conservation? well, completely, really. that was _ conservation? well, completely, really. that was the _ conservation? well, completely, really. that was the first - conservation? well, completely, really. that was the first step, . conservation? well, completely, l really. that was the first step, and it was thanks to george adamson himself he was our guide and i were mentor and also was in charge of all the animal work we did on the film. he was a total inspiration, completely devoted to saving and protecting wildlife in the point, in the wild, not in captivity, and so, really, through that, and then my husband bill, his life changed
12:28 pm
completely, more than mine at first because he started to make documentary films and he stopped, in a way, being an actor and became a film producer. we made many, many films about wild animals and it was the death of an elephant at london zoo that started our work all those many years ago and we were called zoo check because we were looking at wild life in captivity and i was fervently opposed to that today as i was then. find fervently opposed to that today as i was then. �* . fervently opposed to that today as i was then. �* , . , . fervently opposed to that today as i was then. �* , ., . i. was then. and this was a film your mother starting _ was then. and this was a film your mother starting over _ was then. and this was a film your mother starting over 50 _ was then. and this was a film your mother starting over 50 years - was then. and this was a film your mother starting over 50 years ago | mother starting over 50 years ago but you are still a great believer in the importance of films and documentaries to raise the cause of, raise awareness of the importance of climate change?— climate change? absolutely, and we have seen some _ climate change? absolutely, and we have seen some extraordinary - climate change? absolutely, and we have seen some extraordinary films| have seen some extraordinary films that have been produced. the body of work sir david attenborough has produced over many decades surely as the gold standard for what we
12:29 pm
produced and what has inspired so many people and generations of people to become involved but the next stage is, frankly, to move from what i would call blue—chip productions to activist productions, so we need to turn our passive viewing into activism because without taxes is nothing will change, which is why both virginia and i are so pleased to be involved with the new impact from cult ego flex. so, think netflix but call it ego flicks and i am sure other platforms of available but the deal there is that you watch, you engage, you won power, and the new act, and it is going to be packed full of difficult subjects but told in a positive way because we can be consumed with despair and, as sir david said, at cop himself, actually, what we need is hope. and mayjust actually, what we need is hope. and may just add actually, what we need is hope. and mayjust add something to that?
12:30 pm
please do. i mayjust add something to that? please do. . , . ., , mayjust add something to that? please do. . , . ., please do. i have such hope for the --eole please do. i have such hope for the people who — please do. i have such hope for the people who are _ please do. i have such hope for the people who are absolutely - people who are absolutely extraordinary today. they are not afraid to go out and say what we think and feel. they do with respect, great passion and vigour and i will follow them till the end of my days. and i will follow them till the end of my days-— and i will follow them till the end ofm das. . n ., . of my days. virginia mckenna, will travers, thank— of my days. virginia mckenna, will travers, thank you _ of my days. virginia mckenna, will travers, thank you both _ of my days. virginia mckenna, will travers, thank you both very - of my days. virginia mckenna, will travers, thank you both very much j travers, thank you both very much indeed and it is very appropriate that the genius is that because i want to take black to glasgow now where there are photos taking place outside cop26 by young people. i will travers, thank you both very much indeed and it is very appropriate that the genius is that because i want to take black to glasgow now where there are photos taking place outside cop26 by young people. our correspondent alexander the live pictures there. alexander, it's all about the youth and young people and i hope you can hear me ok because there is a carnival atmosphere here already. these are not the people who have come from the rally or the march, they have come straight to george square and it's a realfamily come straight to george square and it's a real family atmosphere and young people picnicking on the
12:31 pm
grass, blowing bubbles and also behind me you can see the stage behind me you can see the stage behind me you can see the stage behind me which is set up for later and we will be hearing speeches there and i think we will be hearing from greta thunberg, the swedish activist later on this afternoon and as i said, we are here in the centre of glasgow, in the city centre and the rally and march, they will be coming about a mile and a half away and we might see them arriving in a square in the next hour but they will be coming from kelvingrove park and we expect at least a couple of thousand, and then the speeches will happen here and we expect to hear from greta thunberg and were not sure exactly what she will say but there is a helicopter above me as well so we are fighting against the noise, but greta thunberg has said about cop26 that this is not a climate conference and she said this
12:32 pm
was two weeks of celebrating business as usual and more blah, blah, blah. she is likely to repeat the phrase upon the stage later that she's become famous for later in glasgow. she's become famous for later in glasuow. ~ ., ., she's become famous for later in glasuow. a, ., i. . glasgow. more from you later, alexandra. _ glasgow. more from you later, alexandra, but _ glasgow. more from you later, alexandra, but thank - glasgow. more from you later, alexandra, but thank you - glasgow. more from you later, alexandra, but thank you very | glasgow. more from you later, - alexandra, but thank you very much. it's turned a little milder in glasgow today there was a frost across a large part of england to begin with but in all areas temperatures edging up a little as we go into the weekend and with more cloud around and even though the cloud around and even though the cloud is increasing, most places are dry and you might encounter more in the hills of cumbria especially north—west scotland although to the east of the high ground, still some sunshine and for much of the day in the far east of england, and temperatures are higher than they have been but feeling chilly in east anglia and south—east england. a largely dry bonfire night but
12:33 pm
further rest in northern scotland and no frost around tonight, so these are the temperatures as we start the day tomorrow. with a lot of cloud around to move through scotland and northern ireland into northern england, especially to the west of the pennines, the midlands, eastern and southern england seeing dry weather bar a few showers until we get into the evening with light and patchy rain around and temperatures between ten and 40 c and a windier day than normal.
12:34 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the club's handling of racism experienced by one of its former players, azeem rafiq. roger hutton criticises the culture at the club, saying it refused to change — and he's accused the ecb of declining to help. the drug company, pfizer, says it's developed a new covid pill that's 89% effective at preventing hospitalisation and death in adults at risk of developing severe disease. a teenager has been convicted of the killing of 15 year—old keon lincoln, who was stabbed and shot outside his home in birmingham earlier this year. a senior cabinet minister admits the government made a mistake over its handling of the owen paterson case — amid criticism of the prime minister. we made a mistake. we reflected within 2a hours.
12:35 pm
we made a mistake, collectively, and we've come to the commons and said, "look, let's separate these things out "and let's do this properly", because fairness is important. young people gather to protest over climate change at the summit in glasgow. and here we go again, abba have told the bbc they would be willing to help end the uk's two decade defeat at eurovision. the brexit minister lord frost says there's still a significant gap between the uk and the eu as he continues talks in brussels on disputes over northern ireland and fishing rights. lord frost is meeting european commissioner maros sefcovic, with the uk and european union still at loggerheads over the northern ireland protocol. this is what he said before heading into the talks this morning. we hope to make some progress,
12:36 pm
but honestly, the gap between us is still quite significant, but let's see where we can get to. will you trigger article 16 today? we will not trigger article 16 today but article 16 is very much on the table and has been sincejuly. is that likely would increase in? is it becoming a closer prospect? time is running out on these talks and if we are to make progress, we need to make it soon and our preference is to make progress and see if we can reach an agreement. what would it take to not trigger article 16? if we can reach an agreement, potential agreement, on the protocol that provides a sustainable solution then that is the best way forward. how long can these talks stretch on for before you make a decision? i'm not going to give any timescales, or any hypotheticals. we're trying to reach agreement and we are working hard and we are going to carry on trying. is there anything that can happen in today's talks that would change
12:37 pm
the cause of progress? there is a significant gap between us and if that gap narrows and the commission listens to what we have said in the command paper and look at the situation in northern ireland then maybe that will help us move things forward. thanks very much, everybody. brussels correspondent jessica parker is there now i think this is around the third set of talks after a three—week set of technical discussions the two sides had over what to do about the northern ireland protocol and as people might be aware, the uk wants to make some wide—ranging, significant changes to the agreement that it did sign up to with the european union as to how arrangements with northern ireland work and of course northern ireland stayed in the eu single market for goods in order to avoid checks between northern ireland and the republic of ireland but there have been concerns about disruption and deep concerns
12:38 pm
in the unionist community as well, so those are some of the issues at stake with the uk saying it wants significant changes and the eu came forward with a set of proposals not long ago to cut checks and paperwork. the uk is basically saying that what the eu has come up with is not enough and as you heard from lord frost, he says significant gaps remain and the question is how long can the process go on for. that was a question i asked lord frost as he arrived to talk to reporters and he was not being drawn at a timeframe but said time was running out. we expect something from the two sides later today as to how today's discussions with the european vice president have gone, but i expect from what i'm hearing from both sides that these talks will dribble on into next week. we're reaching the end of the week at cop26 — the climate change conference in glasgow.
12:39 pm
today s all about hearing from young people and looking at how important education is when it comes to climate issues. we re spending the day at a school in birmingham, that s using the day to get kids more involved with the environment of their local community, and what they can do to reduce air pollution on their journey to school. let's cross over to the saltley academy, to join the bbc asian network's pria rai. yes, as you say, the focus at cop26 todayis yes, as you say, the focus at cop26 today is not the focus on politicians as much and we might hear strategies to reward kids for climate action but it's more about what students and young people want for their futures but sultry academy is not far from a place called alum rock are not far from birmingham city centre ? saltley academy. it's a very urban environment and very built—up and that is something they're trying to do something about at school because a recent report
12:40 pm
from the environment agency suggests that if everybody did have more access to green spaces, it would actually save the nhs around £2,000,000,000 in treatment costs so it is something important and i've got peter white, the head teacher with me here and access to green space, giving the kids a connection with nature is something you are passionate about and you're trying to do something about. we passionate about and you're trying to do something about.— to do something about. we are blessed to _ to do something about. we are blessed to have _ to do something about. we are blessed to have some - to do something about. we are blessed to have some really i to do something about. we are| blessed to have some really big grounds — blessed to have some really big grounds and playing fields and a really_ grounds and playing fields and a really big access to the green space but what _ really big access to the green space but what we don't have yet is a classroom _ but what we don't have yet is a classroom environment where we can teach _ classroom environment where we can teach and _ classroom environment where we can teach and see our learning take place _ teach and see our learning take place in — teach and see our learning take place in the outdoor environment allowing — place in the outdoor environment allowing students the connection to nature _ allowing students the connection to nature so— allowing students the connection to nature so today my students are planning — nature so today my students are planning a — nature so today my students are planning a redevelopment of quite a lane planning a redevelopment of quite a large piece of land on our site to be an— large piece of land on our site to be an outdoor teaching space and it can be _ be an outdoor teaching space and it can be that — be an outdoor teaching space and it can be that welcome place for peace and tranquillity for students with a place _ and tranquillity for students with a place where real learning can take
12:41 pm
place _ place where real learning can take place and — place where real learning can take place and today we are looking at the impact of what planting trees can have — the impact of what planting trees can have on climate change and ultimately looking at what we can do to make _ ultimately looking at what we can do to make that difference. that ultimately looking at what we can do to make that difference.— to make that difference. that is rare for an _ to make that difference. that is rare for an urban _ to make that difference. that is rare for an urban inner-city - to make that difference. that is . rare for an urban inner-city school. rare for an urban inner—city school. yes, i think we are really lucky and we need _ yes, i think we are really lucky and we need to— yes, i think we are really lucky and we need to make the most of the green _ we need to make the most of the green space while we have got it because — green space while we have got it because it — green space while we have got it because it might not be here forever~ _ because it might not be here forever. . . because it might not be here forever. , . . ., , forever. peter is a particularly kind head _ forever. peter is a particularly kind head teacher— forever. peter is a particularly kind head teacher because - forever. peter is a particularly kind head teacher because he | forever. peter is a particularly l kind head teacher because he is letting the kids do some of the design for that work and overhear there are loads of kids who are basically designing what they want the green space to look like andrew rubin, lets say hello to you, so this is ruben and tell me what you are designing and what you want your outdoor space to look like. this ear is outdoor space to look like. this year is my _ outdoor space to look like. this year is my outdoor _ outdoor space to look like. this year is my outdoor design and currently— year is my outdoor design and currently l _ year is my outdoor design and currently i am _ year is my outdoor design and currently i am colouring - year is my outdoor design and currently i am colouring it - year is my outdoor design and currently i am colouring it in, i year is my outdoor design and l currently i am colouring it in, so let me _ currently i am colouring it in, so let me tell— currently i am colouring it in, so let me tell you _ currently i am colouring it in, so let me tell you about _ currently i am colouring it in, so let me tell you about my - currently i am colouring it in, so| let me tell you about my design. here _ let me tell you about my design. here are — let me tell you about my design. here are the _ let me tell you about my design. here are the entrances, - let me tell you about my design. here are the entrances, and - let me tell you about my design. | here are the entrances, and here let me tell you about my design. i here are the entrances, and here is the overhead — here are the entrances, and here is the overhead sign _ here are the entrances, and here is the overhead sign so _ here are the entrances, and here is the overhead sign so people - here are the entrances, and here is the overhead sign so people can . here are the entrances, and here isi the overhead sign so people can feel welcome _ the overhead sign so people can feel welcome when — the overhead sign so people can feel welcome when they— the overhead sign so people can feel welcome when they come _ the overhead sign so people can feel welcome when they come in. - the overhead sign so people can feel welcome when they come in.- welcome when they come in. you've aot
12:42 pm
welcome when they come in. you've not a welcome when they come in. you've got a lovely — welcome when they come in. you've got a lovely tree _ welcome when they come in. you've got a lovely tree in _ welcome when they come in. you've got a lovely tree in the _ welcome when they come in. you've got a lovely tree in the middle - welcome when they come in. you've got a lovely tree in the middle and l got a lovely tree in the middle and next year we have your friend, so why would it be important and why would you like to be able to spend more time learning outdoors? i feel it rovides more time learning outdoors? i feel it provides the _ more time learning outdoors? i feel it provides the students _ more time learning outdoors? i feel it provides the students at - more time learning outdoors? i feel it provides the students at saltley academy— it provides the students at saltley academy to breathe and relax and i feel it _ academy to breathe and relax and i feel it invites a lot of species of nature — feel it invites a lot of species of nature and _ feel it invites a lot of species of nature and i feel like seeing that we can— nature and i feel like seeing that we can admire how beautiful nature is an incorporating trees and stuff will also _ is an incorporating trees and stuff will also help purify the air a bit so that— will also help purify the air a bit so that will be beneficial. where ou no to so that will be beneficial. where you go to school _ so that will be beneficial. where you go to school and _ so that will be beneficial. where you go to school and live, - so that will be beneficial. where you go to school and live, do - so that will be beneficial. where | you go to school and live, do you have much nature in natural environments around you? if i have much nature in natural environments around you? if i had to seak environments around you? if i had to speak personally. — environments around you? if i had to speak personally. my _ environments around you? if i had to speak personally, my mum _ environments around you? if i had to speak personally, my mum does - environments around you? if i had to speak personally, my mum does like| speak personally, my mum does like to garden. _ speak personally, my mum does like to garden, so i am familiar with plants— to garden, so i am familiar with plants around the house and in the garden. _ plants around the house and in the garden. so — plants around the house and in the garden. so i — plants around the house and in the garden, so i would say yes. that plants around the house and in the garden, so i would say yes.- garden, so i would say yes. that is brilliant. and — garden, so i would say yes. that is brilliant. and making _ garden, so i would say yes. that is brilliant. and making it _ garden, so i would say yes. that is brilliant. and making it all- garden, so i would say yes. that is| brilliant. and making it all happen, the school working with severn trent
12:43 pm
water and rick is working with saltley academy to make this happen but this is one of many projects, isn't it? but this is one of many pro'ects, isn't it? ~ ,,., , ., ._ but this is one of many pro'ects, isn't it? ~ , , ., ., but this is one of many pro'ects, isn'tit? ~ , ., ., isn't it? absolutely, today on youth da it is isn't it? absolutely, today on youth day it is important _ isn't it? absolutely, today on youth day it is important that _ isn't it? absolutely, today on youth day it is important that we - isn't it? absolutely, today on youth day it is important that we see - isn't it? absolutely, today on youth day it is important that we see that and that— day it is important that we see that and that seven trent as the carbon neutral— and that seven trent as the carbon neutral supporter of the commonwealth games, which is happening in birmingham next year is that solely— happening in birmingham next year is that solely academy is one of the first to _ that solely academy is one of the first to be — that solely academy is one of the first to be announced and accepted and we _ first to be announced and accepted and we are — first to be announced and accepted and we are looking at 72 tiny forests— and we are looking at 72 tiny forests in— and we are looking at 72 tiny forests in and around birmingham where _ forests in and around birmingham where urban green spaces are at a premium. — where urban green spaces are at a remium. l, .., , where urban green spaces are at a remium. 1, , , ., where urban green spaces are at a remium. , . , premium. basically at saltley there is a sace premium. basically at saltley there is a space that _ premium. basically at saltley there is a space that can _ premium. basically at saltley there is a space that can be _ premium. basically at saltley there is a space that can be redeveloped | is a space that can be redeveloped and be turned into what is called a tiny forest, whether it be mental health, physical health or environmental benefits, why is it important?— environmental benefits, why is it important? environmental benefits, why is it imortant? ., ., important? there is a whole host of benefits that _ important? there is a whole host of benefits that everyone _ important? there is a whole host of benefits that everyone involved - important? there is a whole host of benefits that everyone involved in l benefits that everyone involved in this can _ benefits that everyone involved in this can have and that ranges from carbon— this can have and that ranges from carbon drop, biodiversity growth and improvements and getting people out into the _
12:44 pm
improvements and getting people out into the green spaces that had not been _ into the green spaces that had not been used — into the green spaces that had not been used potentially to their full must _ been used potentially to their full must and — been used potentially to their full must and also to have the idea to monitor— must and also to have the idea to monitor the forest so the students .row monitor the forest so the students grow up— monitor the forest so the students grow up while the forest row on the schools— grow up while the forest row on the schools as _ grow up while the forest row on the schools as well, so that looks at flood _ schools as well, so that looks at flood risk — schools as well, so that looks at flood risk and how the trees grow and gives— flood risk and how the trees grow and gives them an outdoor space for them _ and gives them an outdoor space for them to— and gives them an outdoor space for them to learning.— them to learning. amazing and the kids will be growing _ them to learning. amazing and the kids will be growing with _ them to learning. amazing and the kids will be growing with the - them to learning. amazing and thej kids will be growing with the forest almost so it's good to see it's not just one day of action, but we will be here for the whole day to see what else they have going on. we look forward to it. who is most responsible for climate change and who was most affected by it and he should take the lead in trying to fix it? these are the big questions at the heart of climate justice. the poorest and most
12:45 pm
vulnerable people around the world are the least likely to cause the pollution leading to climate change. if you look at the greenhouse gas emissions that are heating the planet up, the richest 1% of the earths population are responsible for more than the poorest 50%, yet the poor are often the most likely to be affected by its most detrimental impacts. farmland turning into desert, sea level rises threatening homes or extreme weather events like flash floods and wildfires. these things can happen anywhere, but the poorest countries have far fewer resources to deal with them. climate justice all means taking account of historical emissions and it is true that china produces the most greenhouse gases in the world at the moment but over the last 250 years, the us and europe have produced far more. the rich world has accepted responsibility for these emissions but our promise to send
12:46 pm
$io0,000,000,000 a but our promise to send $100,000,000,000 a year to developing countries by 2020, to help them adapt to climate change and to build a greener economy is in the future hasn't yet been met. climate justice is not only about numbers. it's really about people. the school strikes were climate have drawn a lot of attention to this, demanding that fair solutions are found between rich and poor. that means supporting the very poorest countries in making sure they are not forced to take on huge amounts of debt, but also tackling inequality between people in richer societies. whether it's about how you heat your home or maybe the switch to electric cars, forcing change onto people who can't afford it isn't going to work. so governments are going to have to help people pay for it. a tax on carbon is one suggestion, so people and especially companies that use the most pay the most. whatever happens, it's going to cost a lot less than acting too slowly to deal with global warming, and there is
12:47 pm
good reason to believe that the green revolution can create millions of newjobs around the world. but whether you look at the whole world orjust whether you look at the whole world or just a whether you look at the whole world orjust a local area where you live, the transition to a more sustainable economy and sustainable planet is only going to work if it's going to be fair. the uk s largest membership body of therapists has raised concerns that unqualified practitioners, who offer mental health treatments online, are potentially exploiting vulnerable people seeking help. the british association for counselling and psychotherapy is calling for more awareness of the correct way to seek help from registered professionals. reporterjordan dunbar has been to meet those affected. itjust kind of hit me out of the blue. i was struggling quite bad, so, i wanted help quite urgently. jake suffered badly with anxiety in his last year of university. he started to look for support and treatment online.
12:48 pm
he soon came across attracting advertising on social media, promising to cure anxiety and backed with lots of patient recommendations. when a person has got quite a large following and has had ocd and has got over it and is now treating, you know, you think that that's a great sign. because, firstly, they know how to get you better and, secondly, they've been through it. so you think you've struck gold. and you haven't. jake signed up for phone sessions but the treatment wasn't what he expected. and things started to go wrong. so, you could buy individual sessions and they would be, you know, much more expensive. £200 and, you know, getting to nearly £300. the sessions would consistently be cut short. the lowest for me was 20 minutes of a 50 minute session, which is less than half then you should get. so you got your money back, right? no compensation, no mention of, "ok, that session was cut short, but will make it up
12:49 pm
or you can have another one". the government advises people to seek treatment from practitioners who are part of professional bodies on the professional standards authorities register, because there will be things like a complaints system and a code of ethics. currently, it's completely legal in the uk for anyone to call themselves a therapist, psychotherapist, or a counsellor. you don't need any training or any qualifications. the training that i went through was really rigorous. it was really demanding. i feel angry for members of the public, who are potentially being exploited by these people. and harmed. what harm is being done. laura tried to find mental health support online, too. she was looking for help with her ocd symptoms when she was approached on social media by a company offering to cure her. part of her treatment required her to film herself. we were asked to video ourselves in distress, . to show the world, basically. and it was...
12:50 pm
we were told that it - would be helping people. so, you know, you felt guilty. and if it wasn't quite right, l we were told to do it again. and so, you're in distress, i then try to act, you know... and it was just so unethical. as the popularity and amount of mental health treatment online increases, there are growing calls to look at tightening up the regulations in the industry, to make sure that treatment is helping patients and not harming them. jordan dunbar, bbc news. and you can watch the programme "i can cure you: online mental health cures" here on the bbc news channel on saturday the 6th november at 8.30pm. it'll be repeated on sunday 7th november at 2.30pm. tributes have been paid to the veteran entertainer lionel blair, who's died at the age of 92. ina career spanning nearly 80 years, he worked with some of the biggest names in showbiz and established himself as a household name for generations.
12:51 pm
he was best known for his role as the team captain on the hit tv series, give us a clue. its been one of the most anticipated comebacks in pop. after 40 years, abba are finally back with a new studio album. in their only british tv interview, benny andersson and bj rn ulvaeus from the group chatted to the bbc�*s entertainment correspondent colin paterson in stockholm about how the record eventually got made. stockholm is built on 1a islands, including skeppsholmen, where abba recorded voyage, their first album in 40 years. so, this is where a lot of the album was made, then, this is really abba hq? in that house. that's the studio, since ten years back. everything is done in there. the idea of making a whole album
12:52 pm
was not part of the original plan. abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show, which will feature digital recreations of the band in concert, looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good, so we said, "maybe we should do a couple more". and we did. and then we said, "maybe we should do a few more!" so we have an album. bjorn, he's sounding very laid back. have you got any more nerves? i mean, this is a big deal, 40 years between albums! yes! yes. it's, emotionally, very difficult to grasp, actually, that we did what we did. it's dawning on me now that it's actually happening, you know? we don't need to prove anything here.
12:53 pm
i don't think we're taking a risk, because if people think that we were better 40 years ago, fine. and the ladies were so happy, as were we, of course, but the ladies, mm, they can still do it! and they're also happy that they don't have to do this! yeah, why don't they? where are they? because we told them. we talked about it, we said, "if we do this, what's going to happen?" and they both said, "we don't want to do this". and we said, "we can take care of it". we're not as pretty as they are, but we do the work. # you're not the man- you should have been...# the album revisits old themes, including the end of a marriage. abba probably have the most famous divorces in pop, outside of fleetwood mac. does it get discussed still, were there big apologies to make this happen? i never talked about my divorce with anyone! apart from frida, at the time.
12:54 pm
no. # i've been reloaded, yeah.# and, as for the live show, featuring the so—called abbatars, it will have its premier next may in a purpose—built venue in london. the use of motion capture meant that abba spent five weeks performing the songs in a tv studio and sacrifices had to be made. i love the story. you had to shave the beards for the abbatar show. just how traumatic was that for you two? oh, no, again, just a decision. if it has to be done it has to be done. till the end, i tried! "is there no other way we can do this? "do i really, really have to?" oh, i hated it! oh, i looked weird! and i... i'll never shave it off again, that's for sure. but after waiting 40 years for abba to get back together, the reunion could be very short. i've said that's it, you know.
12:55 pm
i don't want to do another abba album. but, i mean, i'm not alone in this. the four of us... yeah. if they twist my arm, i might change my mind, but i think this is it... oh, good to know! good to know! where do you stand on it? i never say never, but i agree with benny, i think that was our goodbye. i think you could twist his arm, bjorn. the ladies might be able to do that. it'll take them to do it, actually! yeah, i think so. that doesn't take us all back. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. cloudy skies out there for many and it's turning milder. it was 9 in glasgow first thing this morning whereas across a large part of england it stayed clearfor long enough last night for a frost and in
12:56 pm
benson in oxfordshire the temperature was close to —5, the lowest reading of the season so far and it was the frosty parts of england that had sunshine this morning on the satellite picture from earlier shows the cloud moving in from the west and changing the wind direction from the chilly northerly to a less cold westerly around this area of high pressure from the atlantic and behind the weather front moving south is that keeps on moving south it is squeezing away the chilly conditions from the far south—east of england. in the flow of air coming in from the atlantic there is plenty of cloud and not a huge amount of rain and may be light rain and drizzle from the figures cloud and western areas and more persistent rain in north—west scotland. to the east of the high ground and across many eastern parts of the uk, few sunny spells and bright skies for much of the day into kent and east sussex and as for the temperatures, they are a little higher than they have been but still quite chilly in east anglia and south—east england before the milder airfilters in. a dry
12:57 pm
bonfire night for many places but still some rain across northern scotland, turning heavy in the north—west with the stronger wind as the night goes on. no frost around with largely cloudy skies going into the morning. tomorrow we will bring an area of brain south across scotland, through northern ireland and into northern england and i will be heaviest to the west of the pennines and into wales were as much of the midlands and southern england will stay mainly dry until we get to the later stages of the afternoon and evening. behind the area of rain, brightening up in northern ireland and scotland. blustery showers in northern scotland and it is turning windy across all parts but particularly northern scotland, and bear this in but particularly northern scotland, and bearthis in mind, but particularly northern scotland, and bear this in mind, for any organised fireworks displays on saturday evening as we will have strong, gusty winds, especially in coastal areas and it could be 70mph for a time and into sunday morning coupled with high tides, it could produce dangerous waves on the coast so windy early on sunday with plenty of showers before the wind it eases and for many places on sunday the
12:58 pm
chance of a shower but most will stay dry, sunny spells especially in eastern parts and temperatures are still on the mild side.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns — in the wake of the club's inaction around racism. thousands of young activists are marching through the streets of glasgow this lunchtime, demanding politicians at the cop26 meeting take serious action on climate change. we have a special report from alaska where climate change is threatening the very existence of one island community. azeem rafiq was found to have enjoyed bullying and racism when he was a player at yorkshire. now roger hudson has apologised unreservedly.
1:01 pm
i would say that what

70 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on