Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 5, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: suspended from hosting international matches — yorkshire cricket club holds an emergency meeting to discuss its handling of a damning racism report. former england cricket captain michael vaughan reveals he 5 been named in the investigation — but denies any wrongdoing. opposition parties consider backing an independent anti—sleaze candidate in the by—election triggered by the resignation of tory mp owen paterson. music.
6:01 am
veteran tv presenter and dancer lionel blair has died at the age of 92. good morning, the taxi industry is warning of a shortage of 160,000 staff. demand forjourneys is high but there aren't enough drivers. i am at a call centre to find out why. five goals and three red cards a dramatic return, to england for the new tottenham boss antonio conte but it eventually ends in victory. a bit chilly this morning particularly across england with a widespread frost. while temperatures rise a bit widespread frost. while temperatures rise a hit this weekend, get ready for heavy rain and strong winds. we don't need to. prove anything here. i don't think we're taking a risk. if people think that we were better 40 years ago, fine. _ and we speak to abba as they release their first album in a0 years.
6:02 am
it's friday 5th november. this yorkshire county cricket club will hold an emergency meeting today to discuss the growing fallout from its handling of a report into racial abuse of a former player. an investigation found azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment — but no disciplinary action was taken against any staff. the former england captain michael vaughan has revealed that he is named in the report — but denies any allegations of racism. simonjones reports. a day of reckoning in the racism row. the most successful club in the history of county cricket has remained tight—lipped this week. but as the board meets, heads are expected to roll. an independent panel found the former player azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club. yorkshire apologised, but took no action against any member of staff. this week, yorkshire batsman gary ballance said he regretted using a racial slur during conversations
6:03 am
with his ex—teammate. he's been suspended from england selection indefinitely. now, the former england captain michael vaughan says he, too, was named in the report for allegedly telling a group of asian players, including rafiq, in 2009, that there "were too many of you lot". but in his daily telegraph column, vaughan writes, "this hit me very hard. it was like being struck over the head with a brick. i have been involved in cricket for 30 years, and never once been accused of any remotely similar incident or disciplinary offence as a player or commentator. i completely and categorically deny that i ever said those words." the club has been suspended from hosting international matches by the england and wales cricket board for what it calls the "wholly unacceptable handling" of azeem rafiq's racism claims. it's really important that the ecb sends a message to cricket fans across this country that we will not stand for this. that racism, and anything to do
6:04 am
with racism and discrimination of any kind, has absolutely no place in the game. the club will suffer financially, but the reputational damage may be far greater. simon jones, bbc news. 0pposition parties are discussing not fielding candidates in the by—election triggered by the resignation of conservative mp 0wen paterson. instead, labour, the liberal democrats and green party are in talks to back an independent anti—sleaze option. mr paterson stepped down amid a row over him breaking lobbying rules — something he denies. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. 0wen paterson resigned yesterday saying he was totally innocent, but the commissioner for standards found he had been paid £100,000 a year by two companies, then lobbied government on their behalf. there will now be a by—election to fill his seat, and the opposition parties look certain to make sleaze one of their central themes. to replace him, labour,
6:05 am
the liberal democrats and the greens are already considering jointly backing one anti—sleaze candidate. mr paterson was in parliament on wednesday when the government ordered all conservative mps to vote to block his suspension. the ayes to the right, 200... the opposition shouted "shame". ..232. all: shame! less than 2a hours later in the face of widespread outrage, the government u—turned. mr patterson, once again facing suspension, resigned. last night's vote has created a certain amount of controversy. it is important that standards in this house are done on a cross—party basis. but that has left the government with a problem. good evening. it is a nice evening, i hope you're enjoying it. could you give us your reaction to the resignation of owen paterson? owen has made his statement, and i am sure you have seen it. the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg still wants to change the system for investigating complaints against mps.
6:06 am
but now has to convince the opposition that talk of reform wasn't just about trying to save mr patterson, there really is a need. the labour mp who chairs the existing standards committee told bbc newsnight it is already independent, wholesale reform isn't necessary. our committee already exists. there is absolutely no need for another one, and the way the government has handled this, i'm afraid, does not auger well for cross—party consideration of this matter. and the business secretary is underfire, too. yesterday he said the commissioner who found mr paterson had broken the rules should consider her position. do you think still think the commissioner is going to have a difficult time staying in post? labour has written to the prime minister's ethics adviser saying kwasi kwarteng's comments should be investigated as an attempt to bully the commissioner. the fallout from this affair rumbles on. damian grammaticas, bbc news. let's talk now to our chief political correspondent adam fleming.
6:07 am
adam — you're in glasgow this morning at the united nations climate conference — but the political focus is still miles away in westminster. owen paterson has resigned. there are questions about where all of this leaves politics in westminster. you get mps questioning but this has done for the reputation of all mps and parliament. mps questioning what this means for the prime minister's judgment. and the political parties pondering what it means for the upcoming by—election in owen paterson's soon—to—be former seat. on that i think it will be unlikely there will be a joint anti—sleaze candidate standing against the conservatives, it doesn't look like those cross—party talks are going anywhere with a labour source saying to me if you want to vote for an anti—sleaze candidate you would vote for the labour candidate, which suggests there will be studied by election even though it is not
6:08 am
studied circumstances. separately you have the labour party trying to trigger an investigation by the prime minister's adviser into ministerial standards over the business secretary. i think they will try to resist that. and you are left with the human aspect, even if you agree with the report into owen paterson he was guilty of a breach of parliamentary rules, or an ally of parliamentary rules, or an ally of his as there are many on the backbenches, if you read his statement about what he has gone through personally, it is actually quite moving irrespective of what you think what is happening in politics. adam, thank you. health officials are urging people to ventilate their homes to help stop the spread of covid in the run—up to christmas. as part of a new government campaign, people are being advised to open windows for ten minutes each hour when socialising indoors. research shows that fresh air disperses covid particles and blows them away, lowering the risk of infecting others.
6:09 am
tributes have been paid to the veteran entertainer lionel blair, who's died at the age of 92. ina career spanning nearly 80 years, he worked with some of the biggest names in showbiz, and established himself as a household name for generations. robert townsend looks back at his life. entertainer, presenter, choreographer. in a career spanning more than 70 years, lionel blair came to epitomise the very definition of a variety performer. this his mischievous wit, flamboyant and ever—twinkling eye kept him popular whatever the decade. # it ain't what you do it's the way that you do it - # that's what gets results.# it was an early introduction to the industry at the tender age of 13 when he began acting in musical productions. and it wasn't long until television came calling.
6:10 am
taking him from child performer, to sammy davisjunior�*s dance—off competitor in front of the queen mother at the royal variety performance in 1961. oh, sir. we do have a big head, don't we? how would you like a rap right in your mouth? he was a regular face on tv game shows. it was his role as team captain in the hit series give us a clue that made him a real household name. dancer? you and her... # i got _ dancer? you and her... # i got music! - # i got music! in more recent years he embraced newer tv formats, appearing in reality tv shows. and celebrity big brother. and despite his advancing years that chat show invitations kept coming, one of the last from
6:11 am
the golden era of showbiz. years ago before we had linoleum in the kitchen, my dad would come home. my the kitchen, my dad would come home. my dad was a barber. he would come home and start tapping and i copied him. when i was three years old. i could always tap dance. one of those paying tribute was gyles brandreth who said he would leave behind a legacy of style, smiles and laughter. the thing about lionel blair, whatever age you are, he had a career of 80 years, he is ingrained in my childhood and the world of entertainment. if i think of an all—round entertainer of a certain age, he epitomises that. he seemed like one of the lovely guys to work with. it makes you smile seeing him talk about his childhood, and his career,
6:12 am
about his childhood, and his career, a lot of respect for lionel blair. now the weather with matt. iam not i am not surprised seeing these temperatures. good morning. coldest across england, temperatures in oxford down to —5 an hour ago. glasgow, nine degrees, inside there is something milder. plenty of cloud, outbreaks of rain in the north and west of scotland, showers in cornwall and west wales but they will fade away. plenty of sunshine where you have the first in england but clouding over. most will stay dry. the breeze gradually coming in from a westerly direction lifting temperatures particularly in the north and west. still chilly in the south and east.
6:13 am
the best of the sunshine in kent and sussex and the channel islands. tonight, the winds will bring more cloud and outbreaks of rain, parts of north scotland is where the red bull turn heavy. tonight we should be frost—free but the rain will spread southward tomorrow. some rain this weekend. quite a windy weekend, especially across the north with widespread gales, winds up to 70 miles an hour. sunday is a little bit drier. more details in half—an—hour. as world leaders discuss the planet's future at cop26 in glasgow, young people across the city are joining demonstrations calling for faster action over climate change. swedish activist greta thunberg has made a rallying cry for more supporters to join her. here's more from our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. the faces of some of those taking part in today's march in glasgow.
6:14 am
they say they're frustrated. we are sick and tired of climate inaction. they want change. for me, the biggest issue when it comes to climate change is the continued extraction of fossil fuels. they have demands. what i have to say for world leaders is that they must pay climate - reparations to the communities most affected by the climate crisis. - and want those at the summit to listen to what they say. and my message to the world leaders is that no—one is safe from this climate crisis. greta, do you think glasgow will deliver? greta thunberg, who inspired the school climate strike movement, is in the city during cop. no more blah blah blah. crowd: no more blah blah blah. at a protest earlier this week, she said world leaders were only pretending to take climate change seriously. that movement would only come because of pressure from the public. change is not going to l come from inside there. that is not leadership. this is leadership. this is what leadership looks like. cheering. these young people will be among those leading the march through glasgow.
6:15 am
strike with us, the workers, the youth from glasgow, the local people. dylan has been striking for the climate for the past three years since he was 1a. it is very hard to switch off, i would say, especially the past two years, really, since the cop got announced. it's been full steam ahead the whole time. so it is very all—consuming. just because there's so much to do, there's always more we can do. it feels like you have a constant battle with yourself to do as much as you can. so, um, yeah, i mean, there's definitely been sleepless nights. what do we want? climate justice. when do we want it? now. covid means they're not sure how this will compare to previous marches, but organisers are hoping for thousands, and that it will be impossible to ignore. glasgow is on a global scale. it's a small city. i think it has a lot of heart. and to be honest, i think it's a city that cares a lot about this stuff. and really, it has a long history of protest. it cares aboutjustice. and i think the people here are angry.
6:16 am
so i think that, you know, in terms of spirit, in terms of reaction to the cop, it will match any previous cop. it might even outmatch it. but in terms of bodies on the street, it's difficult to assess because of the pandemic. making their voices heard matters so much to these pupils, they say it's worth missing a day of school. the strength of their feelings is clear. anger at the politicians for not taking action sooner. also grateful that we have this opportunity to even protest because there's tonnes of countries that don't have that opportunity. i feel very strongly about it. you know, it's our world and it's our future. - will you get into trouble for missing school? i think that it's like we're missing lessons to teach the world one. and hoping their calls for change will be heard. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. let's take a look at today's papers which mostly focus on the government reversing its plans to overhaul
6:17 am
the standards system for mp5. the guardian says the conservatives have been "plunged into crisis" after what it describes as a "humiliating u—turn". the i newspaper describes it as a "day of chaos in downing street". mps have told the paper the prime minister is in danger of a "real loss of credibility on the backbenches". the daily mail says it was a "day of farce" after mp owen paterson resigned following the government's decision to withdraw support for the amendment. and the bbc news website offers an in—depth view of the life and career of entertainer lionel blair who has died aged 92. we will speak to some of his friends and colleagues from over the years and colleagues from over the years and find out a little bit more about his life. it was a very rich life. it was, he was a brilliant entertainer, we will celebrate his life today. this story made me think of one of our colleagues who i won't name and
6:18 am
shame on this programme! is your car kept immaculate, charlie? it varies! what is its current state? this is about dirty cars. it is about medium. 0k. mine is clean. it is about medium. 0k. mine is clean- they _ it is about medium. 0k. mine is clean. they are _ it is about medium. 0k. mine is clean. they are a _ it is about medium. 0k. mine is clean. they are a health - it is about medium. 0k. mine is| clean. they are a health danger, grubby cars littered with half eaten snacks, dirty tissues, that is obvious, a breeding ground for bacteria. what made me laugh was this survey found a third of car owners who were asked are so embarrassed by the state of their car they ducked out of giving friends a lift. a colleague here did the same thing, tried to duck out of giving me a lift because his car was so filthy. i was shocked! his or her car? his car, i have narrowed it down. the bottom line is cars are a useful tool, you use it... let
6:19 am
the bottom line is cars are a useful tool, you use it...— tool, you use it... let us talk about paul— tool, you use it... let us talk about paul newman - tool, you use it... let us talk about paul newman now, - tool, you use it... let us talk. about paul newman now, very well—known hollywood actor who died several years ago. he was iconic, a iconic hollywood character, lots have been written by people who knew him. he did a series of interviews, he was recorded and the transcripts of these recordings, of him musing about himself, his life and what he really thought about what created him, and how he thought about things, these havejust been discovered at the newman family home in a bolt. he was interviewed by a journalist, a writer. this stuff had got forgotten about. it will now come out in memoirs. it is him talking about his own life. whereas
6:20 am
in the past people have tried to assume what they knew. it is a glimpse inside. this picture here, when i first saw this, i thought it was a piece of broccoli. it looks like a model. a model island. it is an amazing picture. this is in the lake district, one of the islands on one of the lakes. it is so full of colour. it almost looks like something that is unreal. i am glad you haven't said where it is because it almost wants to be left alone. like a little magic kingdom. the royal navy's largest warship — hms queen elizabeth — is on her way home from herfirst major deployment that's taken her halfway round the world. she's already attracted the interest of both the russian and chinese military as she sailed to the pacific to exercise with allies. our defence correspondent jonathan beale was on board. night and day — for the last six months, britain's biggest warship
6:21 am
has been sailing the high seas. a giant launchpad for the latest f—35jets. notjust british, but american ones too, both flexing their military muscle. right now our18s and 35s are still the most lethal fifth— generation aircraft carrier out there. you know, if you want to make a statement, make a bold statement. i think this is a very bold statement. and, you know, when you do it with partners that's even a bolder statement. here in the operations room they've monitored both russian and chinese jets, warships and submarines, taking an interest as they sailed east. a contest rather than a confrontation, testing out each other�*s defences. the best thing for me personally was the air interactions where we had looked to scramble ourjets, action, our f—35s to go up and form that ring of steel around the aircraft carrier and the strike group from the russian interaction that we had. so, a full spectrum of warfare
6:22 am
which, for me as a warfare officer, is really good. and on here, they believe they've had the upper hand. with these stealth jets harder to detect on most radar. this aircraft carrier has already travelled halfway around the world, more than 40,000 miles. the f—35jets have taken off and landed nearly 2,000 times. but the question is, for what purpose? at the hard end, we're able to demonstrate to russia in the eastern mediterranean, china in the south china sea, exactly what we're about, and what a fifth—generation aircraft carrier does. and at the softer end, our frigates and destroyers have dealt with and engaged with nations around the world in lower level security and defence, but also supporting trade and prosperity. so, incredible value for money. i probably walk about ten miles a day, to be honest. _ look at the size of this thing. most of the 1600 crew, like william augustine who's from the caribbean island
6:23 am
of grenada, rarely see daylight. earlier during this voyage, they had to deal with an outbreak of covid on board. and the pandemic�*s also meant few visits ashore. it's like having a bit of cake, - and your mum telling you, hang fire, don't touch that cake. i'lljust be round the back. and when i come back, you can touch it. - and it'sjust like seeing japan, you're right there. _ but you can't step foot - on the soil and enjoy tokyo. it wasn't the best of times, but it is what it is. - they did dock in oman for a visit by the defence secretary who made clear that this carrier could also be the weapon of choice to combat extremist threats anywhere in the world. with leaving afghanistan, if there is a growing terrorism threat from any parts of the world, this ship can launch if it needs to, a strike capability using, you know, the very best of stealth, to deliver impact on people that might pose imminent threat to the united kingdom or allies. even here, the crew weren't able to venture further than the port.
6:24 am
but home does now beckon. the royal navy's flagship is due back in portsmouth in time for christmas. jonathan beale, bbc news, on board, hms queen elizabeth. they are always such dramatic images from those carriers, incredible. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. bbc london has seen figures from british transport police, which show that reports of sexual harassment on public transport have risen 61% in london since pre—pandemic levels. the force say they are cracking down after setting up a dedicated unit, and are urging victims to report incidents by texting 61016. officers say they hope to create a "hostile environment" for sexual harassment.
6:25 am
if it doesn't feel right, it makes you feel uncomfortable or you think it's making someone else feel uncomfortable, and it's got a sexual element to it, then tell us about it. the rivers trust charity has released a map showing the places in london most covered in sewage. it shows the spots where sewage overflowed and poured into waterways across the uk. ilford, barking and dagenham, and newham were the three worst affected boroughs in london. the london school of economics has become the first uk university to be independently verified as carbon neutral. the university has reduced emissions by 44% since 2005, following a multi—million investment in energy efficiency. the royal botanic gardens at kew is putting its vast collection of plant and fungal specimens online. the 7 million items have been collected over nearly two centuries, including one by charles darwin. the government has provided £15 million of funding to digitise it, enabling researchers around the world to access the data it provides.
6:26 am
the team at kew are so passionate. obviously, they're engaged with governments globally and good causes globally to try and make sure we keep adding to knowledge but also that we actually provide lots of information which is helpful to governments and organisations that are working right at the front line in the battle against climate change. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's just minor delays on the hammersmith and city line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a chilly start this morning. temperatures overnight around 0 celsius. for some, a bit of frost first thing this morning. high pressures is in charge but we are losing the colder air. we are picking up a westerly flow today and replacing it with something a little milder as we head into the weekend. plenty of sunshine around this morning, albeit quite chilly. a warm front sinks south, bringing more cloud this morning into the afternoon. by the end of the day, the odd spot potentially of light rain and drizzle, nothing too significant. temperatures reaching 10 celsius.
6:27 am
this evening of course it's the 5th of november, it's bonfire night. it is looking largely dry — maybe one or two clear spells but staying largely cloudy. gradually through the night, thicker cloud will arrive, especially as we head into dawn on saturday with the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. minimum temperature milder than last night, between 4 and 7 celsius. for saturday, it's looking largely cloudy. the wind strengthens overnight and through saturday itself. for public displays on saturday night for the fireworks, it is looking largely dry with the odd spot of rain. breezy, however, and staying cloudy. it is going to be a very mild night saturday into sunday with temperatures not dropping much below 10 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
6:28 am
coming up on breakfast this morning... fresh from their win at the pride of britain awards, we'll catch up with fundraising pals freddie and hughie. abba released their first studio album in a0 years today. in their only british tv interview, benny and bjorn meet us in stockholm to tell us how the record was made. and we'll meet the family who love science so much, they built their own museum. and they're sharing it with the community for free. a shortage of taxi drivers in the uk is a concern for public safety — that's according to the trade body for the industry. the licensed private hire car association says there's a shortfall
6:29 am
of around 160,000 drivers, with a warning of passengers facing difficulty getting home. sarah corker is at a taxi firm in manchester this morning. sarah, what kind of impact is the issue having there? good morning. that is right. good morning. this is a round—the—clock operation. kenny is at the end of a busy night shift. this sector, across the country, is having as you say some staffing shortages. for the sperm before the pandemic they had 400 drivers. now they only have 300. —— for this firm. workers left the profession, found otherjobs and not all have come back. others have decided to take retirement. problems with the backlog with getting
6:30 am
licences. my colleague has been finding out what impact all of this is having four passengers. welcome to the sugar mill. this 600 capacity venue has been packed to the rafters since it reopened. i've worked in venues for 20 years. i've honestly never known it this bad. but for clubbers and for staff, it's a nightmare getting a taxi once the party is over. i'm leaving at about four o'clock in the morning, maybe even five, and then having to wait until six o'clock in the morning to get a taxi. it's a long time to be stood by yourself in town. and it's, for me, it's the safety issue. so if we go back in time pre—pandemic, i'd probably only be waiting about five, ten minutes. tazz isn'tjust worried for her staff. say if we've got a vulnerable individual, a young woman that's left on her own is making sure that she can get home.
6:31 am
so getting her into a cab, the majority of people are just giving up and walking home. and we don't want lone individuals wandering around the streets just by themselves. now that the nights are getting colder and darker, getting home safely from a night out is crucial. but taxis provide a really vital service at any time of the day, whether it's getting staff into work, whether it's a hospital appointment or evenjust doing the weekly shop. the shortfall of drivers is leading to long waits and high prices. we were there for about two hours, trying to actually get a taxi. it was literally a ten—minute drive — less than — and it took us about two hours to get a taxi. it was so bad. we had to get a taxi on saturday nightand, unbelievable. unbelievable. how long did we wait for one? 40 minutes. to go from my housel to about 15 minutes... 15 minutes' walk away — it's gone to, like, £7 and it's like £3.50. |
6:32 am
you get in and they want the money before you actually go anywhere. a lot of them retired. a lot of them couldn't actually keep the payments up on their vehicles. the national trade body says taxi drivers found otherjobs when their trade dried up during lockdowns. and it's too costly and time consuming to restart. the drivers being faced with a massive, great big outlay. the time he's been probably earning, he or she has been probably earning 15% of what they'd normally do. and some people literally haven't been able to carry on. a taxi licence from a local council can set you back as much as £600. and waiting for the medical and criminal records checks can take months. a handful of councils have been proactive, though. in the summer, torbay council in devon saw this problem coming, and cut the cost of their licence tojust 50 quid. they've got 25 new drivers, but still need at least 25 more. we haven't got any control over what drivers are paid as the christmas season puts extra demand on taxi firms, customers can only hope that more councils take action to make sure everyone
6:33 am
can get home safely. coletta smith, bbc news. well, here is the manager, derek. this company has been here for about 40 years— this company has been here for about 40 years serving the local community. 40 years serving the local community-— 40 years serving the local communi . ., ., , ., community. have you had seen a shortaae community. have you had seen a shortage like _ community. have you had seen a shortage like this _ community. have you had seen a shortage like this before? - community. have you had seen a shortage like this before? not i community. have you had seen a shortage like this before? not in| community. have you had seen a i shortage like this before? not in my lifetime. it is _ shortage like this before? not in my lifetime. it is huge _ shortage like this before? not in my lifetime. it is huge at _ shortage like this before? not in my lifetime. it is huge at the _ shortage like this before? not in my lifetime. it is huge at the moment i lifetime. it is huge at the moment we are _ lifetime. it is huge at the moment we are suffering really bad which is affecting _ we are suffering really bad which is affecting our customers as well. where _ affecting our customers as well. where have the drivers gone? some are retired- — where have the drivers gone? some are retired. we _ where have the drivers gone? some are retired. we lost _ where have the drivers gone? some are retired. we lost a _ where have the drivers gone? some are retired. we lost a few— where have the drivers gone? some are retired. we lost a few drivers through— are retired. we lost a few drivers through covid. others have diversified into doing other stuff, driving _ diversified into doing other stuff, driving an— diversified into doing other stuff, driving an opening take is, basically— driving an opening take is, basically because they could not afford _ basically because they could not afford a — basically because they could not afford a taxi any more, they have lost their— afford a taxi any more, they have lost their vehicles and could not afford _ lost their vehicles and could not afford insurance. that is another reason _ afford insurance. that is another reason as— afford insurance. that is another reason as well.— afford insurance. that is another reason as well. talk me through the rocess reason as well. talk me through the process for —
6:34 am
reason as well. talk me through the process for getting _ reason as well. talk me through the process for getting a _ reason as well. talk me through the process for getting a license. - reason as well. talk me through the process for getting a license. it - reason as well. talk me through the process for getting a license. it is i process for getting a license. it is not straightforward, is it? that is part of the here. in not straightforward, is it? that is part of the here.— not straightforward, is it? that is part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you _ part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you have _ part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you have to _ part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you have to do _ part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you have to do is - part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you have to do is a - part of the here. in manchester, the first thing you have to do is a d35 i first thing you have to do is a dbs check _ first thing you have to do is a dbs check a — first thing you have to do is a dbs check. a background check. that could _ check. a background check. that could take — check. a background check. that could take 12 weeks in total. then they have — could take 12 weeks in total. then they have to go through a test, and knowledge — they have to go through a test, and knowledge test and then a written test and _ knowledge test and then a written test and submit documents as well. the process— test and submit documents as well. the process is quite lengthy. what is the knock-on _ the process is quite lengthy. what is the knock-on four _ the process is quite lengthy. wrist is the knock—on four passengers? passengers are seeing an extra 20 minutes, _ passengers are seeing an extra 20 minutes, 30 minutes, up to an hour sometimes — minutes, 30 minutes, up to an hour sometimes on demand for waiting duty if fitch's _ sometimes on demand for waiting duty if fitch's weather, school time or demand — if fitch's weather, school time or demand goes up. that is pretty much widespread in the industry, to be fair. the latest industry to — the industry, to be fair. the latest industry to warn _ the industry, to be fair. the latest industry to warn of _ the industry, to be fair. the latest industry to warn of normality - the industry, to be fair. the latest| industry to warn of normality being hampered. there are more than a
6:35 am
million vacancies. the competition to get staffing is really fierce. thank you very much. mike, you are taking a look at the sport this morning. this report, these allegations of racism, reports into racism at yorkshire cricket club... regarding a former player. this has absolutely escalated from a band, as well as people who had been named in the report. another level from yesterday. the ultimate sanction of being stripped of threatening being stripped is huge for a county like yorkshire. they stand to lose millions. in 2099 made £6.6 million and were due to host a
6:36 am
test match and a one—day international next summer. a number of the board members are set to announce her resignation today, that is another big development ahead of an emergency meeting which has been called. on top of that, sponsors and partners have continued to cut their ties with the county over their handling of the racism allegations. harrogate spring water became the latest company to withdraw their sponsorship, while nike have said they will no longer be their kit supplier. yorkshire's board will meet today, having previously said it would take no disciplinary action against its employees, players or executives and rafiq and senior yorkshire officials have been called to give evidence to government ministers. it's been clear that throughout this investigation we've had concerns about the manner in which decisions are made, and it's very clear that given the conclusion of the investigation and the subsequent action that's been taken in respect of disciplinary action to those implicated, it's very clear that there has been a lack of realisation of the seriousness
6:37 am
of the issue and the implications for the wider game. again the board has felt compelled to take this action. we can speak now to the cricket journalist george dobell. he first revealed that yorkshire county cricket club, had dismissed the racist comments, azeem rafiq received as banter. that term has certainly come to haunt them. morning, george. so the england and wales cricket board have come down, like a tonne of bricks on the club. more than they could probably ever have imagined. i more than they could probably ever have imagined.— have imagined. i don't know about that. it is have imagined. i don't know about that- it is an _ have imagined. i don't know about that. it is an entirely _ that. it is an entirely proportionate response and i applaud the ecb for doing it. having read the ecb for doing it. having read the report, identikit over—the—top at all. yorkshire has had years to sort themselves out and they failed to do so an action had to be taken out of their hands. the to do so an action had to be taken out of their hands.— out of their hands. the other big sto we out of their hands. the other big story we are _ out of their hands. the other big story we are reporting _ out of their hands. the other big story we are reporting this - out of their hands. the other big i story we are reporting this morning is michael vaughan, who is named in
6:38 am
the report but denies any wrongdoing. he has issued a lengthy statement. he said it is like being hit over the head with a brick. fizim hit over the head with a brick. azim rafi is hit over the head with a brick. azim rafiq is the — hit over the head with a brick. azim rafiq is the one _ hit over the head with a brick. azim rafiq is the one who _ hit over the head with a brick. azim rafiq is the one who was _ hit over the head with a brick. jiz “n rafiq is the one who was complaining about racism and was driven to the brink of suicide and nearly lost a child for the interesting to hear it is all about michael vaughan and his suffering. is all about michael vaughan and his sufferinu. . , is all about michael vaughan and his sufferinu. , ., ., suffering. emergency meeting today with resignations _ suffering. emergency meeting today with resignations expected - suffering. emergency meeting today with resignations expected before i with resignations expected before that. how much further does the club have to go? this that. how much further does the club have to go?— have to go? this is 'ust the start. yesterday was _ have to go? this is 'ust the start. yesterday was very_ have to go? this isjust the start. yesterday was very positive - have to go? this isjust the start. yesterday was very positive day l have to go? this isjust the start. | yesterday was very positive day in history of yorkshire cricket. it can build back and be magnificent cricket club now it has potential to be. we hope in can the supporters will be very proud of it. right now it has a deeply ugly side and the current management have failed. what
6:39 am
we will have today is a fight between the reforming powers and those who absolutely insists nothing needs to change. typically, colin graves is trying to come back in as chair of the club with a remit to save the current coaching team. if yorkshire is to go forward with an untainted reputation, all those people had to go, they have to go, and they have to build back with a new executive and a new coaching team. ., , ., , ., , , team. lots of questions being asked this morning — team. lots of questions being asked this morning about _ team. lots of questions being asked this morning about the _ team. lots of questions being asked this morning about the ecb, - team. lots of questions being asked this morning about the ecb, as - team. lots of questions being asked this morning about the ecb, as well| this morning about the ecb, as well as yorkshire cricket club. if it rebuilds itself, if the resignations come today, as some are speculating, it rebuilds itself, what about it not being diverse with representation from all parts of the community?— community? you are right. that is what they should _ community? you are right. that is what they should have _ community? you are right. that is what they should have been - community? you are right. that is| what they should have been asking themselves for years. several
6:40 am
non—white players have come forward to make complaints of racism. the difference is the others have been silence, either by being bought off all the lead—off of frustration at hitting their heads against a brick. i'm quite certain the culture... what evidence is there of that? ads, what evidence is there of that? few weeks ago i published a piece that suggested... that proved that adil rashid england spinner had also made complaints about the club. it is a very difficult position moment. not everyone wants to go public. they do not want to go public because they do not want to face the threats, the abuse that azim rafiq has faced. he is representing other people, which is part of the ugly side of the club i am talking about. he first complained in 2017. he complained to the club are nothing
6:41 am
happened. he complained to the union, nothing happened. he complained to the ecb and to be fair not a lot happened. only now has something happened with journalism and shaming the game. you cannot rely on the fact that whistle—blowers are sometimes going to be listened to. whistle-blowers are sometimes going to be listened to.— to be listened to. overnight you tweeted how — to be listened to. overnight you tweeted how proud _ to be listened to. overnight you tweeted how proud you - to be listened to. overnight you tweeted how proud you were i to be listened to. overnight you tweeted how proud you were of| to be listened to. overnight you i tweeted how proud you were of azim rafiq. now all of this is coming out and the repercussions are under way. yes, we speak a lot. funnily enough we have never actually met. this relationship having been born in covid times. when i first spoke to him he seemed like a broken man. he lost a child, he lost his career and he has put up with a lot of rubbish. i am so full of all the way he has kept on going. he has never been silence. it does seem that the world is listening. at the moment all we
6:42 am
are doing is locking down, we have to rebuild. the question that asked is a personal one. we had to make sure the new yorkshire is better. —— naga asked. there have to be new voices at that club. plenty more with the emergency meeting coming on later today and set to be resignations. he was the first to break the story. out on to the other sport news this morning. what a return to england for antonio conte! antonio conte began his reign at tottenham with a nervy 3—2 victory over dutch side vitesse in the europa conference league. son heung min opened the scoring early on in what turned into a frantic match with five goals and three red cards, as spurs were reduced to ten men while vitesse finished
6:43 am
with just nine players. the victory leaves spurs second in group g, with plenty for conte to work with. for sure, my players have shown me greater commitment, greater resilience. and i think this is a good aspect because i think this team needed to win also suffering. and it was important. leicester came from behind to draw 1—1 with spartak moscow. they equalised from ryan bertrand's corner — daniel amartey got on the end of a flick—on. but jamie vardy later missed a penalty with 15 minutes remaining and that result means they're third in group c. west ham have qualified for the knockout stages of the europa league. they came from behind to lead 2—1 at racing genk thanks to two goals from said benrahma. it finished 2—2. the belgian side drew level when tomas soucek headed into his own net. but the hammers are still top of group h. rangers needed substitute ianis hagi
6:44 am
to secure them a precious point as they came from behind to draw one all against brondby in denmark. the result leaves the scottish champions third in group a behind sparta prague and they face the czech side next. celtic are a step closer to reaching the knockout stages with a crucial victory over hungarian side ferencvaros. liel abada sealed the win with celtic�*s third to put them, just a point behind second place in group g. lots to get three. what a return to england for antonio conte! mark ramprakash will be speaking to us later. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. things will turn milder in the next
6:45 am
few days. if he had plans outdoors can expect some rain. there will be fireworks displays to attend saturday night into sunday, particularly windy. more especially in the northern half of the uk. severe gales possible in the far north of the uk. the colder air we have had in the last few days not gone just yet. temperatures have had in the last few days not gonejust yet. temperatures in have had in the last few days not gone just yet. temperatures in the north and west and 79 degrees. much colder across england. overnight temperatures were down to —5 in benson, the coldest night of the autumn so far. with that there will be sunshine ran across a good part of england. more clout in the north and west. a few showers and call south—west wales. —— in cornwall. many will be dry. sunniest throughout will be across parts of kent, sussex and the channel
6:46 am
islands. staying fairly cool. elsewhere temperatures up a little bit on yesterday. we will see temperatures around 12, 13. into the evening a you shower is possible if you are off to a display. it does turn wetter overnight. heavy rain by the end of the night and the breeze. to freshen. tonight will not be anywhere as cold as it has been. this area of rain will work its way southwards through the day. a bit of sunshine either side. not a write—off by any means. saturday night into sunday it is looking particularly windy. we could see winds touch severe if not gale. more on that later in the morning. see you later. ptsd is something we understand far better than we used to — and for veterans struggling with the problem can find bonfire night a difficult time. a military charity is warning that firework displays can have a negative effect on those
6:47 am
who've served in the armed forces, and is calling on the public to be mindful. our correspondent tim muffett has more. it can take me straight back to iraq. i'm literally... heart rate goes, i'm taking cover. itjust has such an impact. army veteran mark taylor served in northern ireland, kosovo and iraq. in 2005, he was diagnosed with post—traumatic stress disorder. it was literally a culmination of weeks of constant attack. we have a number of core values in the military, you know, courage, discipline, respect, integrity, loyalty. but one of the big ones for me, and for a lot of servicemen, is that selfless commitment. the army comes first. and when that major core value starts falling away, where you can't be the soldier...
6:48 am
thought, well, "if i can't be a soldier anymore, i may as well not be here." this is a tough time of yearfor mark. when you hear a firework going off, what impact does it have on you? it's just that take cover. it's that instant, you know, what going to happen next? so you're actually looking to like take cover. that much of an effect. yeah, yeah, yeah. i mean, you know, my girlfriend was with me and she was quite surprised. it's just the sheer... oh, come on. why am i feeling like this? but you just cannot get rid of it. the military charity help for heroes has this year launched the firework heroes code. it wants all of us to think carefully about the effects fireworks can have on others — to go to an organized display if possible — but if you are having fireworks at home, to give neighbours an advanced warning. the charity says that if you do know someone who might be affected, then encourage them to seek support.
6:49 am
and it would also like people to consider so—called silent fireworks instead. although they still make some noise, they're much quieter than traditional rockets and bangers. this year, covid has again caused many events to be cancelled. in manchester, leeds, nottingham and other places, firework displays have been called off. and whilst we often hear warnings about the impact fireworks at home can have on pets and the elderly, many believe military veterans have been overlooked. but it's about being considerate about having that consideration for the difficulties that can arise for veterans who have had negative experiences related to explosions. a lot of people will talk about, you know, should fireworks be banned, should they not be sold? and from a psychological perspective, where we're saying actually that's not helpful because avoidance strategies can actually elevate someone's level of distress. this is about a kind of a graded
6:50 am
exposure approach, if you like. so if you support somebody with the difficulty and the distress that they have, then that can help to reduce the kind of the negative association that they have of the experience. what will you be doing tonight? i'm going to be indoors. i shall shut my windows. just be mindful of veterans, just be mindful of where you are setting those fireworks off. fun for many. as the old saying goes, a date to remember, remember, but for some, november the 5th is a day they'd rather forget. tim muffett, bbc news. something i hadn't really thought about before, the notion of how they could affect people. thank you for explaining that. let's explain what is going on behind us. it's been one of the most anticipated comebacks in pop
6:51 am
? and after 40 years, abba are finally back with a new studio album which is released today. in their only british tv interview, benny and bjorn chatted to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson about how the record eventually got made. benny and bjorn in abba's home town. good thing about living in stockholm is that people don't bother you. not in the �*70s, not in the �*80s, not now. they come up now and they're all happy. say, "wow, i'm so happy that you made a couple of new songs." it would have been different had we been based in london or new york or los angeles in our temptations. but we were two couples leading ordinary lives. stockholm is built on 14 islands, including helgeandsholmen, where abba recorded voyage, their first album in 40 years. so this is where a lot of the album was made then. this has really been abba hq.
6:52 am
in that house. that's the studio since ten years back. everything is done in there. the idea of making a whole album was not part of the original plan. abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show, which will feature digital recreations of the band in concerts, looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good. so we said, "maybe we should do a couple more." and we did. and then we said, "maybe we should do a few more. so we have an album. bjorn, you're sounding very laid back. you got any more nerves? i mean, this is a big deal, 40 years between albums! yes, yes.
6:53 am
it's emotionally very difficult to grasp, actually, that we we did what we did. oh, it's dawning on me now that it's actually happening, you know. we don't need to prove anything here. i don't think we're taking a risk because if people think that we were better 40 years ago, fine. and the ladies were so happy. yeah. as were we, of course. but the ladies, ooh, they can still do it. yeah. and they're also happy that they don't have to do this. why don't they? where are they? because we told them, you know, we talked about it. so if we do this, "what's going to happen?" and they both said, "we don't want to do this." and we said, "we can take care of it." we're not as pretty as they are, but we do the work. # you're not the man you should have been. the album revisits old themes, including the end of a marriage. # i let you down somehow.# abba probably have the most famous divorces in pop, outside
6:54 am
of fleetwood mac. does it get discussed still? were there big apologies to make this happen? i never talked about my divorce with anyone. apart from frieda at the time, no, no. # the winner takes it all. # the loser standing small...# people have read a lot of it into various lyrics. and, of course, there is some of that in the lyrics, but most is fiction. but the emotions are there. yeah, yeah. but not the exact situation. no, exactly. and as for the live show featuring the so—called abbatars, it will have its premiere next may in a purpose—built venue in london. the use of motion capture meant that abbaa spent five weeks performing the songs in a tv studio and sacrifices had to be made. i love the story.
6:55 am
you had to shave the beards for the abbatar show. yeah. just how traumatic was that for you two? again, just a decision. if it has to be done, you know, it has to be done. and i tried. is there no other way we can do this? do i really, really have to? oh, i hated it. oh, i looked weird, and i... 0h, i'll never shave it off again — that's for sure. # waterloo, i was defeated. # you won the war.# eurovision, 13 years since the uk has made the top ten. we have been bottom the last two contests. what does the uk need to do? better songs. if you were asked nicely, would you ever consider writing the uk entry? i don't know. no! are you sure? what's the risk? you can't be worse than last.
6:56 am
no, but it needs to be a really good act to write for. yeah. dua lipa! yes. and if abba end up writing dua lipa a song, then this is where it will happen. we're in in my studio, my room. and i come here every day. i've done so for the past 30 years, i've been here for 30 years. but after waiting 40 years for abba to get back together, the reunion could be very short. i've said, "that's it." you know, i don't want to do another abba album. but i mean, i'm not alone in this. there are four of us. yeah. if they twist my arm, i might change my mind, but i think it's... 0h! good to know, good to know. where do you stand on it? i never say never. but i agree with benny. i don't think... i think that was, you know, our goodbye. i think you can twist his arm, bjorn?
6:57 am
the ladies might be able to do that. yeah. it'll take them to do it, actually. yeah, i think so. for me, abba doesn't lose its magic. they have left us hanging. and abba's new album, voyage, is out today. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. bbc london has seen figures from british transport police which show that reports of sexual harassment on public transport have risen 61% in london since pre—pandemic levels. the force say they are cracking down after setting up a dedicated unit, and are urging victims to report incidents by texting 61016. officers say they hope to create a hostile environment for sexual harassment.
6:58 am
if it doesn't feel right, it makes you feel uncomfortable or you think it's making someone else feel uncomfortable, and it's got a sexual element to it, then tell us about it. the rivers trust charity has released a map showing the places in london most covered in sewage. it shows the spots where sewage overflowed and poured into waterways across the uk. ilford, barking and dagenham and newham were the three worst affected boroughs in london. the london school of economics has become the first uk university to be independently verified as carbon neutral. the university has reduced emissions by 44% since 2005 following a multi—million—pound investment in energy efficiency. the royal botanic gardens at kew is putting its vast collection of plant and fungal specimens online. the seven million items have been collected over nearly two centuries — including one by charles darwin. the government has provided £15 million of funding to digitise it, enabling researchers around the world to access
6:59 am
the data it provides. the team at kew are so passionate. obviously, they're engaged with governments globally and good causes globally to try and make sure we keep adding to knowledge but also that we actually provide lots of information which is helpful to governments and organisations that are working right at the front line in the battle against climate change. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. just minor delays on the hammersmith and city line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a chilly start this morning. temperatures overnight around 0 celsius. for some, a bit of frost first thing this morning. high pressures is in charge but we are losing the colder air. we are picking up a westerly flow today and replacing it with something a little milder as we head into the weekend. plenty of sunshine around this morning, albeit quite chilly. a warm front sinks south, bringing more cloud this morning into the afternoon. by the end of the day, the odd spot potentially
7:00 am
of light rain and drizzle, nothing too significant. temperatures reaching 10 celsius. this evening of course it's the 5th of november, it's bonfire night. it is looking largely dry — maybe one or two clear spells but staying largely cloudy. gradually through the night, thicker cloud will arrive, especially as we head into dawn on saturday with the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. minimum temperature milder than last night, between 4 and 7 celsius. for saturday, it's looking largely cloudy. the wind strengthens overnight and through saturday itself. for public displays on saturday night for the fireworks, it is looking largely dry with the odd spot of rain. breezy, however, and staying cloudy. it is going to be a very mild night saturday into sunday with temperatures not dropping much below 10 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt
7:01 am
and naga munchetty. our headlines today: suspended from hosting international matches — yorkshire cricket club holds an emergency meeting to discuss its handling of a damning racism report. former england cricket captain michael vaughan reveals he 5 been named in the investigation — but denies any wrongdoing. the prime minister faces a by—election test over owen paterson corruption claims. music. veteran tv presenter and dancer lionel blair has died at the age of 92. after a frosty start to friday particularly for england, turning milder at the weekend but with it we will see some rain and pretty strong winds into sunday. i will have your full forecast here.
7:02 am
it's friday 5th november. yorkshire county cricket club will hold an emergency meeting today to discuss the growing fallout from its handling of a report into racial abuse of a former player. an investigation found azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment — but no disciplinary action was taken. the former england captain michael vaughan has revealed that he is named in the report — but denies any allegations of racism. simonjones reports. a day of reckoning in the racism row. the most successful club in the history of county cricket has remained tight—lipped this week. but as the board meets, heads are expected to roll. an independent panel found the former player azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club. yorkshire apologised, but took no action against any member of staff. this week, yorkshire batsman gary ballance said he regretted using a racial slur during conversations with his ex—teammate. he's been suspended from england selection indefinitely.
7:03 am
now, the former england captain michael vaughan says he, too, was named in the report for allegedly telling a group of asian players, including rafiq, in 2009, that there "were too many of you lot". but in his daily telegraph column, vaughan writes, "this hit me very hard. it was like being struck over the head with a brick. i have been involved in cricket for 30 years, and never once been accused of any remotely similar incident or disciplinary offence as a player or commentator. i completely and categorically deny that i ever said those words." the club has been suspended from hosting international matches by the england and wales cricket board for what it calls the "wholly unacceptable handling" of azeem rafiq's racism claims. it's really important that the ecb sends a message to cricket fans across this country that we will not stand for this. that racism, and anything to do with racism and discrimination of any kind, has absolutely no place in the game. the club will suffer financially,
7:04 am
but the reputational damage may be far greater. simon jones, bbc news. we can talk now to our senior sports news reporter laura scott. laura, what is the mood at the club ahead of the board meeting today? action needed to be seen to be taken. ta ken. exactly. taken. exactly. it has been a truly disastrous week for yorkshire county cricket club and the bbc understands a number of yorkshire's board members are set to announce their resignations today ahead of that emergency board meeting. it comes under immense pressure on those in charge here at yorkshire to step down over their handling of the situation which the england and wales cricket board board called holy and acceptable. what the ecb clearly had to grapple with in working out what action to take against the county was the risk of
7:05 am
the financial implications which are significant, and removing england matches. at the risk of being seen not to do enough, given many people have spoken of what they think could be really significant damage to the work being done to promote inclusivity in cricket. now we have to individuals who have said they are named in a report, we saw gary ballance earlier in the week saying he had used that racial slur against rozema feek —— azeem rafiq, and for that he has been suspended from international selection. we had michael vaughan last night strongly denying the claims made against him. it only adds to the damage of this week. on my way here today i passed signs of recalling the miracle of headingley and what has happened this week, could see this described as the misery of headingley. thank you very much.
7:06 am
pressure is growing on the government to address claims of corruption, after the mp owen paterson resigned following a row over lobbying rules. he was found to have breached the regulation, but his suspension was put on hold after mps voted to change the rules. less than 24 hours later, ministers backtracked on the plans. paterson has since resigned, triggering a by—election in his north shropshire constituency. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. adam, this has had a huge impact on all sides of the political divide? you are in glasgow but the goings—on in westminster have dominated headlines. what next, in amongst these are strong words like corruption being bandied around? good morning. there are ministers who have been at cop26 while this has been unfolding at westminster thinking this is a distraction from what they would like the country to be talking about, the fight against
7:07 am
climate change, at a conference that seems to be going pretty well. there are a few moving parts, the by—election, owen paterson has resigned as mp. we don't know when the by—election will be held. we know the opposition parties had some exploratory talks about having a joint candidate, an anti—sleaze candidate. those talks don't seem to have gone anywhere, labour will field their own person. then there were conversations at westminster about what this means for the reputation of mps and parliament in general. questions among conservative mps about the prime minister'sjudgment and conservative mps about the prime minister's judgment and the chief whip who organises discipline in parliament because some of them felt this was inevitably what would happen and yet they were forced to vote for the government in this motion a couple of nights ago. then,
7:08 am
labour writing to the ministerial standards investigator who advises the prime minister, asking him to look into comments by the business secretary suggested yesterday apparently that the independent parliamentary standards commissioner who does the investigating of mps did not have a future. a lot of moving parts and emotion around this. thank you. health officials are urging people to ventilate their homes to help stop the spread of covid in the run—up to christmas. as part of a new government campaign, people are being advised to open windows for ten minutes each hour when socialising indoors. research shows that fresh air disperses covid particles and blows them away, lowering the risk of infecting others. tributes have been paid to the veteran entertainer lionel blair who's died at the age of 92. ina career spanning nearly 80 years, he worked with some of the biggest names in showbiz and established himself as a household name for generations. robert townsend looks back at his life.
7:09 am
entertainer, presenter, choreographer. in a career spanning more than 70 years, lionel blair came to epitomise the very definition of a variety performer. his mischievous wit, flamboyant and ever—twinkling eye kept him popular whatever the decade. # it ain't what you do, i it's the way that you do it. # that's what gets results.# it's the way that you do it. i it was an early introduction it's the way that you do it. to the industry at the tender age of 13 when he began acting in musical productions. and it wasn't long until television came calling. taking him from child performer, to sammy davisjunior�*s dance—off competitor in front of the queen mother at the royal variety performance in 1961. oh, sir. we do have a big head, don't we? how would you like a rap right in your mouth?
7:10 am
i liked iliked him i liked him as a man and an artist. he wasa i liked him as a man and an artist. he was a wonderful dancer and he used to be known as the lionel blair dances with him, he was better than all of them. lionel, we will miss you. he was a regular face on tv game shows. but it was his role as team captain in the hit series give us a clue that made him a real household name. girl..dancer? you...and her... # i got music! in more recent years he embraced newer tv formats, appearing in reality tv shows like the real marigold hotel. and celebrity big brother. and despite his advancing years, the chat show invitations kept on coming, from one of the last from the golden era of showbiz.
7:11 am
in our kitchen years ago before we had lino in the kitchen, you see, and my dad would come home. and my dad was a barber. but he'd come home and start tapping, and i copied him. i was only three years old. but i could always tap dance. among those paying tribute to lionel is friend and broadcaster gyles brandreth who said he would leave behind a legacy of style, smiles and laughter. on days like today you read articles about his life and you learn so much but you realise, for me personally, he was woven into my life when i was a child, he had an 80 year career. so lovely here and there is tributes, we will be speaking to some of his friends throughout the programme to find out more about the life he led and it was a really interesting life.
7:12 am
here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. this is the scene above the bbc buildings in central london. a bit nippy. -i nippy. —1 on the outskirts of london. ads, —1 on the outskirts of london. a beautiful start across parts of england where the coldest conditions are, temperatures widely below freezing. temperatures around 11 degrees celsius so milder air creeping in. ate few spots of rain here and there north and west of scotland, isolated showers pushing southwards. cloud will spread across all parts of the uk, sunniest for the longest across kent, sussex and the longest across kent, sussex and the channel islands. temperatures a
7:13 am
degree up on yesterday. tonight will be milder, but heavy rain pushing into the north and west of scotland. a few showers at the start of saturday but nowhere near as chilly as this morning. tomorrow we start with rain across scotland, northern ireland, pushing southwards. staying driest on saturday in southern counties of england. a milder day for all of us with temperatures around 12. saturday evening, a blustery night, particularly across the north with plenty of showers. on sunday we could see winds touching gale force or severe gale force in the north of the country. on sunday, a drier picture, heavy showers with strong winds in the far north. most places will have sunny spells. feeling cooler again. we will start with frost.
7:14 am
the first pill designed to treat symptomatic cases of coronavirus has been approved by the uk medicines regulator. the tablet — known as molnupiravir — has been described by the health secretary sajid javid as a game—changer. did i get that right? you have got that right — so, how does it work? essentially, the main purpose of the pill is to prevent the virus from multiplying, keeping levels low in the body, and therefore reducing the severity of the disease. it should be taken as soon as possible following a positive covid—19 test, and within the first five days. the drug is recommended for people who have had a positive covid test, and have at least one risk factor for developing severe illness — like obesity, diabetes or heart disease. in clinical trials, the pill was found to cut the risk of hospitalisation or death by about half. the uk has initially ordered 480,000 courses to be delivered by the end of the year.
7:15 am
professor tom solomon is the director of the uk's emerging infections research unit, and joins us now. good to see you again. people will be very interested in this, can you explain the basics, where does this job come from? this is a drug developed before this pandemic— this is a drug developed before this pandemic to treat other viral infections. but at the start of the pandemic— infections. but at the start of the pandemic it was tested on the covid bari5, _ pandemic it was tested on the covid baris, first — pandemic it was tested on the covid baris, first in a laboratory, and a small— baris, first in a laboratory, and a small number of patients to see if it could _ small number of patients to see if it could be — small number of patients to see if it could be safely given —— —— on the covid — it could be safely given —— —— on the covid virus. and it reduces the need _ the covid virus. and it reduces the need for— the covid virus. and it reduces the need for people to go to hospital. you describe it being used for other things, are we talking about flu? for a range of different viruses, used _ for a range of different viruses, used a — for a range of different viruses, used a little bit in flu. it hadn't had as—
7:16 am
used a little bit in flu. it hadn't had as big _ used a little bit in flu. it hadn't had as big as it now will in covid-19 _ covid—19. someone has been com-19. — someone has been approved —— it has been approved, will it be in use tomorrow? studies have shown it can be safely given _ studies have shown it can be safely given to _ studies have shown it can be safely given to people with covid—19, in liverpool. — given to people with covid—19, in liverpool, by a colleague of mine a year ago _ liverpool, by a colleague of mine a yearago. he liverpool, by a colleague of mine a year ago. he showed the highest dose could be _ year ago. he showed the highest dose could be safely given. the next step was to— could be safely given. the next step was to say— could be safely given. the next step was to say it can be given but does it work? _ was to say it can be given but does it work? those larger studies were completed — it work? those larger studies were completed a month ago and showed a reduction _ completed a month ago and showed a reduction in _ completed a month ago and showed a reduction in people who go to hospital— reduction in people who go to hospital by about half. the uk regulator has been the first in the world _ regulator has been the first in the world to _ regulator has been the first in the world to approve it so it can be used _ world to approve it so it can be used now _ used now. we - used now. we have it on order, say used now. — we have it on order, say tomorrow someone contracts covid and thinks i could do with this pill, what person would be entitled to take that once they have had a diagnosis and are beginning to get symptoms?
7:17 am
it will be used for people with mild or moderate covid, initially for people — or moderate covid, initially for people with an risk factor for severe — people with an risk factor for severe disease such as the elderly or people — severe disease such as the elderly or people with diabetes or heart disease — or people with diabetes or heart disease or— or people with diabetes or heart disease or obesity. we have ordered enough _ disease or obesity. we have ordered enough for— disease or obesity. we have ordered enough for 50,000 people. what is not clear— enough for 50,000 people. what is not clear yet is how we will make sure, _ not clear yet is how we will make sure. if— not clear yet is how we will make sure. if you — not clear yet is how we will make sure, if you spread that among every pharmacy, _ sure, if you spread that among every pharmacy, you wouldn't have much, said the _ pharmacy, you wouldn't have much, said the logistics of making sure it -ets said the logistics of making sure it gets to _ said the logistics of making sure it gets to people who need it quickly is the _ gets to people who need it quickly is the next step. you _ is the next step. you would need to go to your gp. if you feel unwell, you get the covert— if you feel unwell, you get the covert test done, you know you are positive, _ covert test done, you know you are positive, what is unclear is how we make _ positive, what is unclear is how we make sure — positive, what is unclear is how we make sure we get the drug rapidly to those _ make sure we get the drug rapidly to those who— make sure we get the drug rapidly to those who need it, whether it is via the gp_ those who need it, whether it is via the gp or— those who need it, whether it is via the gp or a — those who need it, whether it is via the gp or a central mechanism. that— the gp or a central mechanism. that has— the gp or a central mechanism. that has yet to be worked out. anyone who has suffered with covid and hopefully for people with relatively minor conditions, there can be different symptoms. the way
7:18 am
people can be affected is different. is this drug across the board helping with the various things people tend to suffer from? what we know is the most common things— what we know is the most common things people suffer with are a cough. — things people suffer with are a cough, fever, headache, shortness of breath— cough, fever, headache, shortness of breath if— cough, fever, headache, shortness of breath if it— cough, fever, headache, shortness of breath if it becomes more severe. what _ breath if it becomes more severe. what this— breath if it becomes more severe. what this drug will do, and we know some _ what this drug will do, and we know some people are fine, at home in bed for a week_ some people are fine, at home in bed for a week and get over it. the ones that cause _ for a week and get over it. the ones that cause a — for a week and get over it. the ones that cause a problem nationally are those _ that cause a problem nationally are those who— that cause a problem nationally are those who end up in hospital. we saw hospitals _ those who end up in hospital. we saw hospitals can get to the point where they are _ hospitals can get to the point where they are almost overwhelmed. this dru- they are almost overwhelmed. this drug is— they are almost overwhelmed. this drug is given to people at that stage — drug is given to people at that stage and stops the disease developing into a more severe disease — developing into a more severe disease where they need to go to hospitat— disease where they need to go to hospital in about half the patients, and stops — hospital in about half the patients, and stops those at risk of death. can you — and stops those at risk of death. can you explain the science. so, you have covid, it is a virus and multiplies. you take this drug,
7:19 am
molnupiravir, what does it do to the virus? when the virus is inside the body, it goes— when the virus is inside the body, it goes into — when the virus is inside the body, it goes into the cells, the lungs to begin— it goes into the cells, the lungs to begin with. — it goes into the cells, the lungs to begin with, and wants to reproduce to spread _ begin with, and wants to reproduce to spread around your body and to be coughed _ to spread around your body and to be coughed out on to someone else. the dru- coughed out on to someone else. the drug interrupts the genetic code of the virus — drug interrupts the genetic code of the virus. the way a virus makes baby— the virus. the way a virus makes baby versus _ the virus. the way a virus makes baby versus is... one last question, going back to the basics, social distancing, advisory of course, new messaging about ventilation in homes. this is ten minutes per hourfor some ventilation in homes. this is ten minutes per hour for some form ventilation in homes. this is ten minutes per hourfor some form of ventilation. this is a government campaign as i understand — this is a government campaign as i understand being launched today. it
7:20 am
is common— understand being launched today. it is common sense. we have known from the start— is common sense. we have known from the start one _ is common sense. we have known from the start one way of reducing risks is spending — the start one way of reducing risks is spending more time outdoors or in fresh _ is spending more time outdoors or in fresh air~ _ is spending more time outdoors or in fresh air. over christmas people will be _ fresh air. over christmas people will be getting together. if you open _ will be getting together. if you open the windows for ten minutes every— open the windows for ten minutes every hour— open the windows for ten minutes every hour or have the door is open to keep _ every hour or have the door is open to keep the — every hour or have the door is open to keep the air flowing, any virus someone — to keep the air flowing, any virus someone is — to keep the air flowing, any virus someone is unwittingly coughing into the air— someone is unwittingly coughing into the air will— someone is unwittingly coughing into the air will be blown away and it will reduce the chances of the virus being _ will reduce the chances of the virus being passed on by people who weren't— being passed on by people who weren't aware. you would hope anyone with a _ weren't aware. you would hope anyone with a cough— weren't aware. you would hope anyone with a cough would get tested and if they are _ with a cough would get tested and if they are positive they would keep away _ they are positive they would keep away from family or friends. always _ away from family or friends. always good to talk to you, thank you. we've been reporting from the climate conference in glasgow all week, and while world leaders are making pledges to protect the planet in the future — some areas are already dealing with the consequences of the crisis. and it's notjust an issue facing the developing world, our climate editor, justin rowlatt, is in alaska.
7:21 am
they had over two feet of rain in four days in southern alaska this week, shattering rainfall records. they are getting used to unusual weather here, average temperatures are rising twice as fast in the far north as they are elsewhere in the world. a century ago, the glacier came all the way down here, the entire valley was present. as recently as the 19805 they built this visitor centre because you could see sill 5ee this visitor centre because you could see sill see the glacier in the valley. since then it has retreated around the corner and you can't see it at all. evidence say climate experts ofjust how much our world is changing. in alaska and other arctic areas, we spend _ in alaska and other arctic areas, we spend a _ in alaska and other arctic areas, we spend a lot — in alaska and other arctic areas, we spend a lot of the year near the freezing — spend a lot of the year near the freezing line. when you race attempt is even _ freezing line. when you race attempt is even a _ freezing line. when you race attempt is even a little bit you see dramatic— is even a little bit you see dramatic changes in the landscape and that— dramatic changes in the landscape and that is— dramatic changes in the landscape and that is what we see all around us, we _ and that is what we see all around us, we see — and that is what we see all around us, we see places that used to have ice att—
7:22 am
us, we see places that used to have ice at! year— us, we see places that used to have ice at! year in — us, we see places that used to have ice all year in the landscape and that is— ice all year in the landscape and that is what we see all around us, we see _ that is what we see all around us, we see places that used to have ice all we see places that used to have ice at! year— we see places that used to have ice at! year in _ we see places that used to have ice all year in iglesias, aux no further into spring — all year in iglesias, aux no further into spring or summer, now no longer have that _ have that. these days if you want to have that. — these days if you want to see the ice it is now a tough hike up and over a high pass. this is all that remains of the once mighty portage glacier. a tiny fraction of what it once was. the mountain glaciers are just belting here in alaska, they are melting all over the world, with potentially severe consequences for tens of millions of people in communities that depend on the ice for their water supply. if we don't have glaziers we no longer have drinking water for cities, we might not have hydropower potential, especially for agricultural needs, water may be only in winter but not summer months in the dry period when there would be no water. the melting ice in alaska is also adding to global sea level rise and
7:23 am
thatis adding to global sea level rise and that is part of the climate challenge for communities elsewhere in america's most northerly state. yes, my house used to be about 20 feet out— yes, my house used to be about 20 feet out where you see the water break _ break. the island here break. — the island here is on the front line of climate change. as temperatures rise, less sea ice forms, exposing the coast. it is getting later and later every year to— it is getting later and later every year to freeze up. it is tough. but -ot year to freeze up. it is tough. but got to— year to freeze up. it is tough. but got to keep — year to freeze up. it is tough. but got to keep going. as _ got to keep going. as the climate changes, the animals and fish that people here used to live on are getting harder to find. right now we are supposed to be fishing and up the river. now we have got two wait until, like, december, probablyjanuary, to start going up again. parts of the main road have washed
7:24 am
away and now the airstrip that is the community's lifeline to the outside world is threatened. if it gets to the runway, then, we can't _ if it gets to the runway, then, we can't use — if it gets to the runway, then, we can't use it — if it gets to the runway, then, we can't use it any more. we use runway for mehdi — can't use it any more. we use runway for mehdi vac, forgetting all our food flown in, all our mail, and passenger— food flown in, all our mail, and passenger service. the _ passenger service. the plan is to move the entire town on to the mainland. it will cost an estimated $180 million, and means access to the sea will be much more difficult. but it says dennis they have got no choice. what is happening here is ultimately going to happen in california, in new york, every community or city on the coast needs to know what the heckis the coast needs to know what the heck is going on here because if not they will start washing away. dennis wants what is happening to his community to stand as a warning to the world.
7:25 am
i tell you what, that makes you think carefully, that didn't says it is going to happen in california and other close and they need to look here for examples to learn. it is first hand accounts of people living in it, while the politicians and others are talking about it, these are people whose lives are being directly affected. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. bbc london has seen figures from british transport police which show that reports of sexual harassment on public transport have risen 61% in london since pre—pandemic levels. the force say they are cracking down on sexual harassment after setting up a dedicated unit, and are urging victims to report
7:26 am
incidents by texting 61016. mahalia is one of many women to have been sexually harassment on the tube. she didn t report at the time, she said she s more likely to now, due to high—profile coverage on violence against women. will i take london transport when i take the tube? i want to feel like a man, not thinking about my going to get raped or groped? because of what has happened to sabina and sarah, just so sad, because now it's at the forefront of everyone's minds, might as well report it because it will be taken more seriously rather than before. the london school of economics has become the first uk university to be independently verified as carbon neutral. the university has reduced emissions by 44% since 2005, following a multi—million pound investment in energy efficiency. the royal botanic gardens at kew is putting its vast collection of plant
7:27 am
and fungal specimens online. the 7 million items have been collected over nearly two centuries including one by charles darwin. the government has provided £15 million of funding to digitise it, enabling researchers around the world to access the data it provides. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's just minor delays on the bakerloo, district and hammersmith and city lines. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a chilly start this morning. temperatures overnight around 0 celsius. for some, a bit of frost first thing this morning. high pressures is in charge but we are losing the colder air. we are picking up a westerly flow today and replacing it with something a little milder as we head into the weekend. plenty of sunshine around this morning, albeit quite chilly. a warm front sinks south, bringing more cloud this morning into the afternoon. by the end of the day,
7:28 am
the odd spot potentially of light rain and drizzle, nothing too significant. temperatures reaching 10 celsius. this evening of course it's the 5th of november, it's bonfire night. it is looking largely dry — maybe one or two clear spells but staying largely cloudy. gradually through the night, thicker cloud will arrive, especially as we head into dawn on saturday with the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. minimum temperature milder than last night, between 4 and 7 celsius. for saturday, it's looking largely cloudy. the wind strengthens overnight and through saturday itself. for public displays on saturday night for the fireworks, it is looking largely dry with the odd spot of rain. breezy, however, and staying cloudy. it is going to be a very mild night saturday into sunday with temperatures not dropping much below 10 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website. bye for now.
7:29 am
hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. time now for the sport. yorkshire cricket club dominating the sport in a row over racism. it seems today will be a very important day. a massive story surrounding the treatment of azim rafiq. michael vaughan saying he has been named in the report that categorically denies all allegations against him while yorkshire could be stripped of hosting all england matches. over 6 million it will potentially cost going on previous summers. all the sponsors as well that come with hosting england games, the media coverage as well. a number of yorkshire's board members are set to announce their resignations today, ahead of a meeting, called to discuss this racism crisis, that has engulfed the club.
7:30 am
on top of being stripped of england matches, sponsors and partners have continued to cut their ties with the county, who's headingley home is in leeds, over their handling of the racism allegations. harrogate spring water became the latest company to withdraw their sponsorship, over the treatment of azeem rafiq, while nike will no longer be their kit supplier. yorkshire previously said it would take no disciplinary action against its employees, players or executives, but now with the raft of resignations expected, the senior correspondent from crickinfo, told us earlier, this is a chance to start to change, and for the club to become more diverse. look, at the moment, all we are doing is looking down. we have to rebuild. the question naga asked is a personal one really. we have to make sure the new yorkshire is better. i'm absolutely sure we can do that. today is a big day and there have to be new voices at that club. antonio conte began his reign at tottenham with a nervy 3—2 victory over dutch side vitesse in the europa conference
7:31 am
league. they did win in the end but it was a nervous encounter. son heung min opened the scoring early on in what turned into a frantic match with five goals and three red cards, as spurs were reduced to 10 men while vitesse finished with just nine players. the victory leaves spurs second in group g with plenty for conte to work with. i don't like when this crazy game. i want a stable team. when there is the possibility to kill the opponent, you must kill. foreshore, my players have shown me great commitment.
7:32 am
leicester came from behind to draw 1—1 with spartak moscow. they equalised from ryan bertrand's corner — daniel amartey got on the end of a flick—on. but jamie vardy later missed a penalty with 15 minutes remaining and that result means they're third in group c. west ham have qualified for the knockout stages of the europa league — they came from behind to lead 2—1 at racing genk thanks to two goals from said benrahma. it finished 2—2, the belgian side drew level when tomas soucek headed into his own net. but the hammers are still top of group h. rangers needed substitute ianis hagi to secure them a precious point as they came from behind to draw 1—1 against brondby in denmark. the result leaves the scottish champions third in group a behind sparta prague and they face the czech side next. celtic are a step closer to reaching the knockout stages with a crucial victory over hungarian side ferencvaros. liel abada sealed the win with celtic�*s third to put them just
7:33 am
a point behind second place in group g. this competition is such a marathon, the europa league. still trying to jostle for position in the groups. spurs new manager and another one. into the fire. a decent first game at least, the result. he will not have had too much impact. he has been quite critical though, saying the standard that tottenham is at. he has the players, it is the and playing in the right way, isn't it? we have robbie savage coming shortly talking to us about macclesfield fc, the club he was involved in buying. he took over a year ago. by way of contrast with the yorkshire cricket story, i'm not drawing parallels article, it is very much about
7:34 am
community, isn't it? trying to rebuild the club from scratch. fascinating to hear how robbie escaping being the manager, the director of football, trying to coach young players. the way you can treat young players is so difficult. robbie savage will be here in about ten minutes or so. adam fleming is in glasgow at the moment. lots of things. cop is globally important that we are focusing on the politics in westminster. to say there has been a backlash against the government in recent days is a slight understatement. it recent days is a slight understatement. ., , , ., understatement. it has been a weird week for the — understatement. it has been a weird week for the government. _ understatement. it has been a weird week for the government. boris i week for the government. boris johnson left here in quite a high, it had gone really well. then you get what you could call the crushing level of what has been happening at
7:35 am
westminster a few days later. let's talk about that with nadhim zahawi. let's talk about why you are here festival which is to talk about education and climate change. —— first of all. what sort of things will children be learning? fine first of all. what sort of things will children be learning? one thing i will announce _ will children be learning? one thing i will announce is _ will children be learning? one thing i will announce is the _ will children be learning? one thing i will announce is the model- will children be learning? one thing i will announce is the model for- i will announce is the model for primary— i will announce is the model for primary schools, young minds, to support— primary schools, young minds, to support and — primary schools, young minds, to support and enrich the curriculum for teachers to be able to teach young _ for teachers to be able to teach young people about climate change and also _ young people about climate change and also about some of the technology and incredible science behind _ technology and incredible science behind it — technology and incredible science behind it. we are also going further, _ behind it. we are also going further, actually publishing our strategy. — further, actually publishing our strategy, our sustainability and climate — strategy, our sustainability and climate change strategy and will work _ climate change strategy and will work with the teaching profession in the next _ work with the teaching profession in the next four or five months, we can publish _ the next four or five months, we can publish it— the next four or five months, we can publish it in— the next four or five months, we can publish it in april of next year, which — publish it in april of next year, which witi— publish it in april of next year, which will again offer lots of materials and support, to teach it through— materials and support, to teach it
7:36 am
through stem, science subjects, geography and citizenship. the other ti'iii'il geography and citizenship. the other thing is _ geography and citizenship. the other thing is a _ geography and citizenship. the other thing is a national education park. our thing is a national education park. 0ur nursery— thing is a national education park. our nursery schools, colleges, universities, between them have land equivalent— universities, between them have land equivalent to key—macro universities, between them have land equivalent to key— macro citizens are burning _ equivalent to key— macro citizens are burning in _ equivalent to key— macro citizens are burning in. we will bring that land together— burning in. we will bring that land together virtually, through geospatial measurement, young people will be _ geospatial measurement, young people will be able to learn about biodiversity and improve those parks — biodiversity and improve those parks i— biodiversity and improve those parks. i hope other schools can then from _ parks. i hope other schools can then from each _ parks. i hope other schools can then from each other and that climate change _ from each other and that climate change awards, new awards for young people _ change awards, new awards for young people we _ change awards, new awards for young people. we will co—create them with young _ people. we will co—create them with young people and it will become a really— young people and it will become a really significant part of what we do in _ really significant part of what we do in this— really significant part of what we do in this country. do you think there _ do in this country. do you think there is— do in this country. do you think there is a — do in this country. do you think there is a risk everything happening this week_ there is a risk everything happening this week has been overshadowed by the owen _ this week has been overshadowed by the owen paterson affair? i hope not. the owen paterson affair? i hope not this — the owen paterson affair? i hope not this is — the owen paterson affair? i hope not. this is about youth education and empowerment of youth. so important. today is education day. i
7:37 am
am bringing — important. today is education day. i am bringing together education ministers to learn what other countries _ ministers to learn what other countries are doing. every new school — countries are doing. every new school we _ countries are doing. every new school we build in the uk, we are building _ school we build in the uk, we are building 50 to shake a 500 in total over the _ building 50 to shake a 500 in total over the decade, they will be net zero in _ over the decade, they will be net zero in operation. i went to see one in coventry— zero in operation. i went to see one in coventry where it has been built in coventry where it has been built in a factory— in coventry where it has been built in a factory in coventry. a £30 million. — in a factory in coventry. a £30 million, £40 million investment. what _ million, £40 million investment. what sparked the chaos in westminster this week. you did not vote with the government, did you? i actually did. i take collective responsibility. i also take collective responsibility to say we made _ collective responsibility to say we made a _ collective responsibility to say we made a mistake and i think it was right— made a mistake and i think it was right for— made a mistake and i think it was right for the leader of the house to id right for the leader of the house to go to— right for the leader of the house to go to the _ right for the leader of the house to go to the house and said a mistake but we _ go to the house and said a mistake but we should not have conflated the issue of— but we should not have conflated the issue of fairness of process, so the right— issue of fairness of process, so the right of— issue of fairness of process, so the right of appeal. i think that is right — right of appeal. i think that is right my— right of appeal. i think that is right. my appeal to other parliamentarians from all parties, let's come —
7:38 am
parliamentarians from all parties, let's come together and make it work but we _ let's come together and make it work but we should not have conflated that with — but we should not have conflated that with the specific case of owen paterson — that with the specific case of owen paterson. it is important to separate _ paterson. it is important to separate these things out. to admit a mistake _ separate these things out. to admit a mistake is— separate these things out. to admit a mistake is the right thing to do and a _ a mistake is the right thing to do and a grown—up thing to do but are caused _ and a grown—up thing to do but are caused by— and a grown—up thing to do but are caused by simply making the wrong decision _ caused by simply making the wrong decision. he caused by simply making the wrong decision. ., ., decision. he made the wrong decision? _ decision. he made the wrong decision? i— decision. he made the wrong decision? i take _ decision. he made the wrong decision? i take collective i decision? i take collective responsibility. _ decision? i take collective responsibility. it - decision? i take collective responsibility. it was i decision? i take collective responsibility. it was a i decision? i take collective i responsibility. it was a measure decision? i take collective - responsibility. it was a measure by andrea _ responsibility. it was a measure by andrea leadsom... it responsibility. it was a measure by andrea leadsom. . ._ responsibility. it was a measure by andrea leadsom. .. it was her fault? if ou andrea leadsom. .. it was her fault? if you agree — andrea leadsom. .. it was her fault? if you agree we _ andrea leadsom. .. it was her fault? if you agree we need _ andrea leadsom. .. it was her fault? if you agree we need a _ andrea leadsom. .. it was her fault? if you agree we need a fairer - if you agree we need a fairer system _ if you agree we need a fairer system. many professionals have a i’i l i'it system. many professionals have a right of— system. many professionals have a right of appeal in the economy. it should _ right of appeal in the economy. it should be — right of appeal in the economy. it should be the same for all mps. i urge _ should be the same for all mps. i urge my— should be the same for all mps. i urge my colleagues to come together, shed politics and make it work really— shed politics and make it work really well. if you also agree it is wrong _ really well. if you also agree it is wrong to — really well. if you also agree it is wrong to conflate because it infused the whole _ wrong to conflate because it infused the whole process. why owen paterson? it was right we went back
7:39 am
and said _ paterson? it was right we went back and said we — paterson? it was right we went back and said we made a mistake collectively. we went to the commons to say, _ collectively. we went to the commons to say, let's _ collectively. we went to the commons to say, let's separate those things out and _ to say, let's separate those things out and do — to say, let's separate those things out and do it properly because fairness — out and do it properly because fairness is _ out and do it properly because fairness is important. you out and do it properly because fairness is important. you read the standards committee _ fairness is important. you read the standards committee report i fairness is important. you read the standards committee report into i fairness is important. you read the l standards committee report into the owen paterson case and it is clear what they think. here is right? whose side are you on? as full owen paterson, _ whose side are you on? as full owen paterson, he — whose side are you on? as full owen paterson, he has resigned.— paterson, he has resigned. doesn't matter. i haven't _ paterson, he has resigned. doesn't matter. i haven't read _ paterson, he has resigned. doesn't matter. i haven't read the - paterson, he has resigned. doesn't matter. i haven't read the report. l matter. i haven't read the report. it be matter. i haven't read the report. it be unfair _ matter. i haven't read the report. it be unfair of _ matter. i haven't read the report. it be unfair of me... _ matter. i haven't read the report. it be unfair of me... you - matter. i haven't read the report. it be unfair of me... you voted i matter. i haven't read the report. | it be unfair of me... you voted on this without... — it be unfair of me... you voted on this without... i— it be unfair of me... you voted on this without... i have _ it be unfair of me... you voted on this without... i have looked i it be unfair of me... you voted on this without... i have looked at i it be unfair of me... you voted on | this without... i have looked at the re ort, this without... i have looked at the reort, i this without... i have looked at the report. i have _ this without... i have looked at the report, i have not _ this without... i have looked at the report, i have not gone _ this without... i have looked at the report, i have not gone into i this without... i have looked at the report, i have not gone into detail. i report, i have not gone into detail. alan says— report, i have not gone into detail. alan says much of it is contested. something — alan says much of it is contested. something like 14 people have sent statements it is contested. the committee hasjudged on that statements it is contested. the committee has judged on that and jacob _ committee has judged on that and jacob rees mogg came back to the house _ jacob rees mogg came back to the house and said we will have a vote on that— house and said we will have a vote on that this — house and said we will have a vote on that this coming week. of course events— on that this coming week. of course events have —
7:40 am
on that this coming week. of course events have overtaken it because owen _ events have overtaken it because owen has — events have overtaken it because owen has resigned on this. the important — owen has resigned on this. the important thing to focus on is that we want _ important thing to focus on is that we want a — important thing to focus on is that we want a process that carries the confidence — we want a process that carries the confidence of the nation. that is right _ confidence of the nation. that is right mps — confidence of the nation. that is right. mps of all parties should have _ right. mps of all parties should have the — right. mps of all parties should have the right of appeal. i am quite surrised have the right of appeal. i am quite surprised you _ have the right of appeal. i am quite surprised you voted _ have the right of appeal. i am quite surprised you voted on _ have the right of appeal. i am quite surprised you voted on something l surprised you voted on something really important you have not read. i did not go into the detail. you asked _ i did not go into the detail. you asked mew _ i did not go into the detail. you asked me... he contested it. i i did not go into the detail. you asked me... he contested it. lam trying _ asked me... he contested it. lam trying to— asked me... he contested it. lam trying to say— asked me... he contested it. lam trying to say what he contested. i cannot _ trying to say what he contested. i cannot stand here in front of you and say — cannot stand here in front of you and say i — cannot stand here in front of you and say i know will the details of the i4— and say i know will the details of the 14 statements that were made. 0k, the 14 statements that were made. ok. i_ the 14 statements that were made. ok. i get— the 14 statements that were made. ok, i get you. do you think the reputation of parliament is enhanced or decreased? i reputation of parliament is enhanced or decreased?— or decreased? ithink, if i were lookin: or decreased? ithink, if i were looking at— or decreased? ithink, if i were looking at this _ or decreased? ithink, if i were looking at this and _ or decreased? ithink, if i were looking at this and thinking i or decreased? i think, if i were i looking at this and thinking about the process, then of course the right— the process, then of course the right to — the process, then of course the right to do _ the process, then of course the right to do this to focus on making the process— right to do this to focus on making the process fairer. you viewers would — the process fairer. you viewers would understand that in many professions. you have to have the right _ professions. you have to have the right of— professions. you have to have the right of appeal. it is right to put
7:41 am
energy— right of appeal. it is right to put energy into that. i think the mistake _ energy into that. i think the mistake and i am absolutely able to say to _ mistake and i am absolutely able to say to you _ mistake and i am absolutely able to say to you we did make a mistake and it is right _ say to you we did make a mistake and it is right to— say to you we did make a mistake and it is right to move very quickly, within— it is right to move very quickly, within 24—hour scan say actually you know _ within 24—hour scan say actually you know what? — within 24—hour scan say actually you know what? we should not have conflated — know what? we should not have conflated these things. that is a mistake — conflated these things. that is a mistake and something rightly your viewers _ mistake and something rightly your viewers were saying, why did you make _ viewers were saying, why did you make that — viewers were saying, why did you make that mistake? all i can say is iam— make that mistake? all i can say is i am sorry, — make that mistake? all i can say is i am sorry, we made that mistake but it was— i am sorry, we made that mistake but it was right _ i am sorry, we made that mistake but it was right to move quickly. it is much _ it was right to move quickly. it is much more — it was right to move quickly. it is much more human. i would it was right to move quickly. it is much more human. iwould prefer a leader— much more human. iwould prefer a leader who — much more human. iwould prefer a leader who is — much more human. iwould prefer a leader who is able to reflect and come _ leader who is able to reflect and come back and say we made a mistake rather— come back and say we made a mistake rather than _ come back and say we made a mistake rather than one who simply ploughs on the _ rather than one who simply ploughs on the head. this rather than one who simply ploughs on the head-— on the head. this was the result of an investigation _ on the head. this was the result of an investigation by _ on the head. this was the result of an investigation by the _ on the head. this was the result of| an investigation by the independent commissionerfor standards, commissioner for standards, katherine stone. she was questioned as to whether she should stay in post. should she stay to the end of her turn next year? it is post. should she stay to the end of her turn next year?— her turn next year? it is really important _ her turn next year? it is really important to _ her turn next year? it is really important to remember i her turn next year? it is really important to remember and l her turn next year? it is really i important to remember and echo the words _ important to remember and echo the words of— important to remember and echo the words of the speaker in parliament that katherine stone works for the
7:42 am
legislature, for parliament. it is ”p legislature, for parliament. it is up to— legislature, for parliament. it is up to parliament how that professional relationship works and how it _ professional relationship works and how it is _ professional relationship works and how it is scrutinised and i don't want _ how it is scrutinised and i don't want to— how it is scrutinised and i don't want to go— how it is scrutinised and i don't want to go any further than that. should _ want to go any further than that. should the language had been a bit more careful yesterday. i do should the language had been a bit more careful yesterday.— more carefulyesterday. i do not think kwasi _ more carefulyesterday. i do not think kwasi disagrees _ more carefulyesterday. i do not think kwasi disagrees with i more carefulyesterday. i do not think kwasi disagrees with me i more carefulyesterday. i do not| think kwasi disagrees with me in more careful yesterday. i do not i think kwasi disagrees with me in any way. katherine stone and her position— way. katherine stone and her position is up to parliament. i do not think— position is up to parliament. i do not think he _ position is up to parliament. i do not think he will disagree with that — not think he will disagree with that is— not think he will disagree with that. . not think he will disagree with that. , ., , ., not think he will disagree with that. , ., ,., ., not think he will disagree with that. , ., ., ., that. is owen paterson a los for olitics? that. is owen paterson a los for politics? he _ that. is owen paterson a los for politics? he has _ that. is owen paterson a los for politics? he has put _ that. is owen paterson a los for politics? he has put 24 - that. is owen paterson a los for politics? he has put 24 years i that. is owen paterson a los for politics? he has put 24 years ofi that. is owen paterson a los for. politics? he has put 24 years of his life into politics _ politics? he has put 24 years of his life into politics and _ politics? he has put 24 years of his life into politics and has _ politics? he has put 24 years of his life into politics and has done i politics? he has put 24 years of hisj life into politics and has done many great _ life into politics and has done many great things in politics. his campaign against suicide prevention, and it— campaign against suicide prevention, and it is— campaign against suicide prevention, and it is worthjust remembering, i had to— and it is worthjust remembering, i had to say— and it is worthjust remembering, i had to say this because part of it may be — had to say this because part of it may be human nature and compassion. a family— may be human nature and compassion. a family has _ may be human nature and compassion. a family has lost a mother, a husband _ a family has lost a mother, a husband has lost a wife and is devastated by the suicide of rose.
7:43 am
it devastated by the suicide of rose. it doesn't — devastated by the suicide of rose. it doesn't take away from the fact that paid — it doesn't take away from the fact that paid lobbying is wrong and the prime _ that paid lobbying is wrong and the prime minister has been very clear on that— prime minister has been very clear on that over— prime minister has been very clear on that over many, many years. he took on that over many, many years. took about the on that over many, many years. he: took about the new appeals process for mp5 going through the process, with that apply retrospectively for mp5 who have gone through it in the mps who have gone through it in the past or any four new cases quest what it is important for parliament and deliberation on how we created the appeals process. i and deliberation on how we created the appeals process.— the appeals process. i don't think a minister or — the appeals process. i don't think a minister or any _ the appeals process. i don't think a minister or any member _ the appeals process. i don't think a minister or any member of - the appeals process. i don't think a minister or any member of the i minister or any member of the government should decide that. it should _ government should decide that. it should be — government should decide that. it should be very much on a cross—party basis _ should be very much on a cross—party basis we _ should be very much on a cross—party basis. we should put forward proposals. my appeal is to schedule politics. _ proposals. my appeal is to schedule politics, let's not play politics. it politics, let's not play politics. it is _ politics, let's not play politics. it is a — politics, let's not play politics. it is a much bigger thing. i am sure people _ it is a much bigger thing. i am sure people understand a right of appeal is fair~ _ people understand a right of appeal is fair~ it— people understand a right of appeal is fair. it speaks to british values _ is fair. it speaks to british values. let's get it right on a cross—party basis. do values. let's get it right on a cross-party basis.— values. let's get it right on a cross-party basis. do you think that could be a committee _ cross-party basis. do you think that could be a committee of— cross-party basis. do you think that could be a committee of mps i cross-party basis. do you think that could be a committee of mps or i could be a committee of mp5 or retired judge? could be a committee of mps or retired judge?—
7:44 am
could be a committee of mps or retired judge? could be a committee of mps or retired 'udte? ., ., , ~ retired 'udge? how does it look? we ut retiredjudge? how does it look? we put proposals _ retiredjudge? how does it look? we put proposals forward. _ retiredjudge? how does it look? we put proposals forward. the _ retiredjudge? how does it look? we put proposals forward. the leader i retiredjudge? how does it look? we put proposals forward. the leader of| put proposals forward. the leader of the house _ put proposals forward. the leader of the house wants to look at how to do that. the house wants to look at how to do that we _ the house wants to look at how to do that. we should have cross—party discussions — that. we should have cross—party discussions on that the full what the structure looks like. all i would — the structure looks like. all i would say to you, having an appeals process _ would say to you, having an appeals process that is robust and carries the confidence of the nation is the i’ili'it the confidence of the nation is the right thing — the confidence of the nation is the right thing to do. it is the confidence of the nation is the right thing to do.— right thing to do. it is not about my opinions. — right thing to do. it is not about my opinions. it _ right thing to do. it is not about my opinions, it is _ right thing to do. it is not about my opinions, it is all _ right thing to do. it is not about my opinions, it is all about i right thing to do. it is not about l my opinions, it is all about yours. enjoy your day at cop. having talked to people on other sides of the argument, the idea there will be cross—party consensus and agreement about the process for changing the rules, i think the minister is being quite optimistic that will happen. very interesting conversation you just had. we are going to talk about football now, grassroots football. it is not people at the top, it is somewhere down below where it is all about community. and the fans are such a
7:45 am
big part of the story. last year, macclesfield town football club went bust after more than 140 years. when businessman robert smethurst saw it up for sale, he didn't think twice about trying to save it, and recruited his friend, former premier league star robbie savage, to help. turns out robbie savage is quite a good person to have in your i think. now their journey to rebuild the club is the focus of a new documentary. let's take a look. why on earth would you buy a football club? think about it. too late, he said, i bought it. ten minutes of the phone call and he's like, "yes, i'm in, i'm in." i have never seen a football club for sale on rightmove, so that's a first. the old main stand, give us a cheer! as the season gets closer, there have been anger, laughter, arguments. i didn't need to do this but the reality is i am passionate to make this club a success. the chairman doesn't need worry, we've got magic- man and myself. star lane, let's make some noise!
7:46 am
it's a full—time job, like 24—hours a day. come on, you silkmen. do not come off that pitch with any regrets. robbie and robertjoin us in the studio. morning. morning. i am loving the relationship. _ morning. morning. i am loving the relationship, loving _ morning. morning. i am loving the relationship, loving the _ morning. morning. i am loving the relationship, loving the fact i morning. morning. i am loving the relationship, loving the fact you i relationship, loving the fact you had robbie on your phone book. you say in the documentary it was on right move, on sale. you call him up and say, hallo, nate. i right move, on sale. you call him up and say, hallo, nate.— and say, hallo, nate. i went out the nitht and say, hallo, nate. i went out the night before — and say, hallo, nate. i went out the night before with _ and say, hallo, nate. i went out the night before with a _ and say, hallo, nate. i went out the night before with a couple _ and say, hallo, nate. i went out the night before with a couple of i and say, hallo, nate. i went out the night before with a couple of pals. l night before with a couple of pals. we had a great night. it was bought the following day. at that point i thought, obviously, i know the business side but i have no idea about the football side, believe it or not. i rang my good friend robbie who lives down the road from me and that was that. did who lives down the road from me and that was that-— that was that. did you have any concerns about _
7:47 am
that was that. did you have any concerns about having... i that was that. did you have any concerns about having... do i that was that. did you have any| concerns about having... do not that was that. did you have any i concerns about having... do not be part of this? quite a big personality clash quite outspoken, and perhaps unbending sometimes and having that working relationship. when you are friends, it is very different. he when you are friends, it is very different. . . when you are friends, it is very different. ., , ,., when you are friends, it is very different. ., , ., ~ different. he has the same work ethic as me- _ different. he has the same work ethic as me. we _ different. he has the same work ethic as me. we have _ different. he has the same work ethic as me. we have been i different. he has the same work| ethic as me. we have been there since seven o'clock in the morning till late at night. he is a great character. you need that kind of personality within the organisation. no offence. ., ., ,, ., no offence. none taken. i am passionate — no offence. none taken. i am passionate stop _ no offence. none taken. i am passionate stop as _ no offence. none taken. i am passionate stop as rob i no offence. none taken. i am passionate stop as rob says, | no offence. none taken. i am i passionate stop as rob says, we no offence. none taken. i am - passionate stop as rob says, we have the same work ethic, we are very intense. to get where we both got to come i was not a very good footballer, i did have much ability but my work ethic and desire me through. it is a great relationship. neither of us could have done it without our staff. did neither of us could have done it without our staff.— neither of us could have done it without our staff. did you miss a tueue without our staff. did you miss a queue when _ without our staff. did you miss a queue when you _ without our staff. did you miss a queue when you said _ without our staff. did you miss a queue when you said you i without our staff. did you miss a queue when you said you were i without our staff. did you miss a i queue when you said you were not a very good footballer to say you were
7:48 am
great? sorry about that. he very good footballer to say you were great? sorry about that.— great? sorry about that. he missed it. how great? sorry about that. he missed it- how much _ great? sorry about that. he missed it. how much is _ great? sorry about that. he missed it. how much is a _ great? sorry about that. he missed it. how much is a football - great? sorry about that. he missed it. how much is a football club? it i it. how much is a football club? it was under — it. how much is a football club? it was under half _ it. how much is a football club? it was under half a _ it. how much is a football club? it was under half a million. - it. how much is a football club? it| was under half a million. 500,000 and the club _ was under half a million. 500,000 and the club is _ was under half a million. 500,000 and the club is yours. _ was under half a million. 500,000 and the club is yours. you - was under half a million. 500,000 and the club is yours. you have i was under half a million. 500,000 and the club is yours. you have a l and the club is yours. you have a pitch and some buildings, which we are seeing. it pitch and some buildings, which we are seeint. . . pitch and some buildings, which we are seeint. ., , , pitch and some buildings, which we are seeing-_ it- pitch and some buildings, which we are seeing._ it was i are seeing. it was terrible. it was terrible, falling _ are seeing. it was terrible. it was terrible, falling apart. _ are seeing. it was terrible. it was terrible, falling apart. we i are seeing. it was terrible. it was terrible, falling apart. we have i terrible, falling apart. we have spent — terrible, falling apart. we have spent a — terrible, falling apart. we have spent a lot of money and done a lot of work _ spent a lot of money and done a lot of work. ., , ., ., of work. there are some real characters- _ of work. there are some real characters. my _ of work. there are some real characters. my favourite i of work. there are some real characters. my favourite bit i of work. there are some real| characters. my favourite bit of of work. there are some real- characters. my favourite bit of this film other characters who had been a long time. give us a little introduction to the groundsman. iie introduction to the groundsman. he has introduction to the groundsman. he: has been a full 57 years. never on the payroll. the first thing we did was to get him on the payroll to feel part of it. he was to get him on the payroll to feel part of it.— feel part of it. he had been working there.
7:49 am
feel part of it. he had been working there- tidying _ feel part of it. he had been working there- tidying up — feel part of it. he had been working there. tidying up and _ feel part of it. he had been working there. tidying up and being - there. tidying up and being assistant — there. tidying up and being assistant groundsman. i there. tidying up and being assistant groundsman. you i there. tidying up and being i assistant groundsman. you see there. tidying up and being - assistant groundsman. you see him there. tidying up and being _ assistant groundsman. you see him on the tractor every morning he is there religiously. and bob trafford. these people are fundamental to the community. for us it gives us the biggest pleasure to see those people and staff getting plaudits. we are accountable. withoutjimbo and bob trafford, lindsay and rachel and all the staff. we have 85 star. we didn't have one player in the first team. ., ., , , ., team. you have six weeks before the first match- — team. you have six weeks before the first match. you _ team. you have six weeks before the first match. you say _ team. you have six weeks before the first match. you say as _ team. you have six weeks before the first match. you say as the _ team. you have six weeks before the first match. you say as the owner i first match. you say as the owner cannot we haven't got any players. we didn't. zero. i cannot we haven't got any players. we didn't. zero.— cannot we haven't got any players. we didn't. zero. i don't understand. we didn't. zero. i don't understand. we were bussed _ we didn't. zero. i don't understand. we were bussed to _ we didn't. zero. i don't understand. we were bussed to sell _ we didn't. zero. i don't understand. we were bussed to sell everybody i we were bussed to sell everybody left, not one player. truth? we were bussed to sell everybody left, not one player.— we were bussed to sell everybody left, not one player. why didn't you
7:50 am
sin left, not one player. why didn't you sign anybody? _ left, not one player. why didn't you sign anybody? -- — left, not one player. why didn't you sign anybody? -- we _ left, not one player. why didn't you sign anybody? -- we were. - left, not one player. why didn't you sign anybody? -- we were. work i sign anybody? -- we were. work on the stadium. _ sign anybody? -- we were. work on the stadium, construction _ sign anybody? -- we were. work on the stadium, construction was i the stadium, construction was allowed. we had to have trial games. we cannot believe we are top of the league from not having a player. there is a lot ofjealousy, people are envious. everyone thinks they can do a betterjob. the manager is very experienced. it is amazing what we had done. very experienced. it is amazing what we had done-— we had done. everybody thinks they can do a better _ we had done. everybody thinks they can do a betterjob— we had done. everybody thinks they can do a betterjob than _ we had done. everybody thinks they can do a betterjob than the - can do a betterjob than the manager. i can do a better 'ob than the manager._ can do a better 'ob than the manager. can do a better 'ob than the manater. ., ., ., manager. i cannot. i am not the manager. — manager. i cannot. i am not the manager. doesn't _ manager. i cannot. i am not the manager. doesn't stop - manager. i cannot. i am not the manager. doesn't stop you i manager. i cannot. i am not the| manager. doesn't stop you from interfering — manager. doesn't stop you from interfering with _ manager. doesn't stop you from interfering with the _ manager. doesn't stop you from interfering with the game, i manager. doesn't stop you from interfering with the game, does| manager. doesn't stop you from i interfering with the game, does it? as a lot of people commented on the dock tree, i am director of football. when you are at manchester united, i'm sure it is much easier. putting glasses back behind the bar here. my passion runs away with me.
7:51 am
maybe i shouldn't get involved as i do but that is me.— maybe i shouldn't get involved as i do but that is me. shall we explain what i am alluding _ do but that is me. shall we explain what i am alluding to? _ do but that is me. shall we explain what i am alluding to? i'm - do but that is me. shall we explain what i am alluding to? i'm talking | what i am alluding to? i'm talking about you running to the side of the pitch when you are not allowed. you go into the team room at half—time and scream and shout. go into the team room at half-time and scream and shout.— go into the team room at half-time and scream and shout. kick-off! you are looking — and scream and shout. kick-off! you are looking at _ and scream and shout. kick-off! you are looking at me _ and scream and shout. kick-off! you are looking at me in _ and scream and shout. kick-off! you are looking at me in disgust, - and scream and shout. kick-off! you are looking at me in disgust, the i are looking at me in disgust, the pair of you. am i undermining the manager? pair of you. am i undermining the manater? . . pair of you. am i undermining the manater? , ., , ., manager? yes. that is what people will ask. manager? yes. that is what people will ask- are _ manager? yes. that is what people will ask. are you? _ manager? yes. that is what people will ask. are you? the _ manager? yes. that is what people will ask. are you? the manager i manager? yes. that is what people | will ask. are you? the manager and his assistant. _ will ask. are you? the manager and his assistant, they _ will ask. are you? the manager and his assistant, they have _ will ask. are you? the manager and his assistant, they have asked i will ask. are you? the manager and his assistant, they have asked me i will ask. are you? the manager and | his assistant, they have asked me to do that. i his assistant, they have asked me to do that. ., . ., do that. i would undermine him. who did the players _ do that. i would undermine him. who did the players listen _ do that. i would undermine him. who did the players listen to? _ do that. i would undermine him. who did the players listen to? the - did the players listen to? the manater did the players listen to? the manager met _ did the players listen to? the manager met the _ did the players listen to? ila: manager met the manager. these questions have all been asked. i am not director of football at manchester united. iie not director of football at manchester united. ., ~' ., manchester united. he would like to be. what manchester united. he would like to be- what did — manchester united. he would like to be. what did you _
7:52 am
manchester united. he would like to be. what did you say? _ manchester united. he would like to be. what did you say? he _ manchester united. he would like to be. what did you say? he would i manchester united. he would like to be. what did you say? he would like to be. i be. what did you say? he would like to be- i making _ be. what did you say? he would like to be. i making money— be. what did you say? he would like to be. i making money now? - be. what did you say? he would like to be. i making money now? he i be. what did you say? he would like to be. i making money now? he put| to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 to be. i making money now? he put in £4-5 million- — to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 million. we — to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 million. we have _ to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 million. we have spent _ to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 million. we have spent a - to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 million. we have spent a lot i to be. i making money now? he put in £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of. £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of mone , £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of money. 4.5 — £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of money, 4.5 million. _ £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of money, 4.5 million. new— £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of money, 4.5 million. new hitches, i £4.5 million. we have spent a lot of. money, 4.5 million. new hitches, new bars. _ money, 4.5 million. new hitches, new bars. new— money, 4.5 million. new hitches, new bars, new gyms. we are making money and we _ bars, new gyms. we are making money and we probablyjust about make even _ and we probablyjust about make even -- — and we probablyjust about make even. —— new pictures. and we probablyjust about make even. -- new pictures.— and we probablyjust about make even. -- new pictures. other fans comint even. -- new pictures. other fans coming up — even. -- new pictures. other fans coming up to _ even. -- new pictures. other fans coming up to you _ even. -- new pictures. other fans coming up to you and _ even. -- new pictures. other fans coming up to you and saying i even. -- new pictures. other fans coming up to you and saying they| even. -- new pictures. other fans i coming up to you and saying they are happy? coming up to you and saying they are ha . . ? , coming up to you and saying they are ha . ? , ~ coming up to you and saying they are ha . . ? , ~ , ., ., , ., happy? yes. we should only get a coule of happy? yes. we should only get a couple of hundred _ happy? yes. we should only get a couple of hundred fans _ happy? yes. we should only get a couple of hundred fans at - happy? yes. we should only get a couple of hundred fans at this - happy? yes. we should only get a| couple of hundred fans at this level but they— couple of hundred fans at this level but they are getting 3500 and which is incredible. if but they are getting 3500 and which is incredible.— is incredible. if you are short of a -la er, is incredible. if you are short of a player. rul _ is incredible. if you are short of a player. rul add — is incredible. if you are short of a player, rul add to _ is incredible. if you are short of a player, rul add to just _ is incredible. if you are short of a player, rul add to just play? - player, rul add to just play? myself? —— are you allowed? i am registered. is
7:53 am
myself? -- are you allowed? i am registered-— registered. is that a possibility? no. you think _ registered. is that a possibility? no. you think you _ registered. is that a possibility? no. you think you could - registered. is that a possibility? no. you think you could step . registered. is that a possibility? | no. you think you could step out there and be _ no. you think you could step out there and be ok? _ no. you think you could step out there and be ok? i _ no. you think you could step out there and be ok? i would - no. you think you could step out l there and be ok? i would probably still be the best _ there and be ok? i would probably still be the best player. _ there and be ok? i would probably still be the best player. that - there and be ok? i would probably still be the best player. that is - still be the best player. that is art two still be the best player. that is part two of _ still be the best player. that is part two of the _ still be the best player. that is part two of the documentary. i still be the best player. that is i part two of the documentary. get robbie savage into training with all the youngsters in the first—team... one thing we are proud of is we have the savage foundation free football. 450 the savage foundation free football. a50 children through the door accessing free football. without this man, the community wouldn't have a football club. they should thank this man, not me. watching the film, it thank this man, not me. watching the film. it probably _ thank this man, not me. watching the film, it probably is _ thank this man, not me. watching the film, it probably is all _ thank this man, not me. watching the film, it probably is all about _ film, it probably is all about community. we will watch with interest and see how it goes. why don't you... ? come on. it is interest and see how it goes. why don't you... ? come on.— interest and see how it goes. why don't you... ? come on. it is out on bbc iplayer— don't you... ? come on. it is out on bbc iplayer tonight _ don't you... ? come on. it is out on bbc iplayer tonight at _ don't you... ? come on. it is out on bbc iplayer tonight at five - don't you... ? come on. it is out on bbc iplayer tonight at five o'clock. l
7:54 am
bbc iplayer tonight at five o'clock. then next saturday at 11pm. bbc iplayer tonight at five o'clock. then next saturday at "pm. it is called making macclesfield. it is not about me, it is about this man here. usually it is but not on this occasion. ., , , ., , , occasion. robbie savage, slightly averare occasion. robbie savage, slightly average footballer, _ occasion. robbie savage, slightly average footballer, making - occasion. robbie savage, slightly| average footballer, making matter must fail. ,, , r, r, average footballer, making matter mustfail. ,, , . ., , must fail. slightly average is ri . ht. must fail. slightly average is right- -- _ must fail. slightly average is right. -- making _ must fail. slightly average is i right. -- making macclesfield. during lockdown, many parents found ways to make home—schooling more creative — but the jones family in cornwall have taken it to another level. what started out as a playtime with some magnets has ended with the family building their own science museum — and now they're opening it to the community for free. emma ruminski reports. we are the jones family. welcome to our science museum. roy, natalia, skylerand ben, have created a magical space for children to experiment. this one is called i colourful shadows. here they can learn about anything from light, gravity and engineering, to sound.
7:55 am
this is a tyrannosaurus. here is an orchid. the idea for discoveringa2, a science museum for children, was born out of lockdown play at home. we don't actually have any background in science. we were playing with some magnetic toys, and realised, hang on, this is a really cool thing to play with. and then we looked around and realised there was no science museum. it is actually quite hard for anyone in cornwall on their income to actually get to a science exhibition. this is the... the family wanted to learn about science in an interactive and immersive way, and share it with the community for free. it is really good how it is interactive. you can like actually touch the stuff and do stuff with it. this is levitation. the idea is to give children a chance to experiment and learn about how the world works for themselves.
7:56 am
i think it is incredible. it is what we want, to change children's opinions about science, get them hands on. the community interest company they started raised about £25,000 in order to create it. this one is a pendulum. local artists made each exhibits using recycled materials. we have created everything from the walls to the exhibits, from second—hand or waste materials that we found at the scrap store. it is amazing what they have managed to fit into two small rooms. science exhibits, lilght exhibits, and this amazingly beautiful infinity forest. reimagining reality is free for visitors to book via the eventbrite website. but a donation would help the museum become permanent. that's the family's next project. emma ruminski, bbc news.
7:57 am
can't be bored of science, ever. once you capture the imagination. thank you for having me. once you capture someone's imagination with science it is really difficult thing to let go because it is storytelling.— to let go because it is sto ellina. . ., to let go because it is sto ellin.. ., ., storytelling. that is a way to make it exciting- — storytelling. that is a way to make it exciting- it _ storytelling. that is a way to make it exciting. it is. _ storytelling. that is a way to make it exciting. it is. our— storytelling. that is a way to make it exciting. it is. our kids - storytelling. that is a way to make it exciting. it is. our kids are - it exciting. it is. our kids are facin: it exciting. it is. our kids are facing tough _ it exciting. it is. our kids are facing tough questions - it exciting. it is. our kids are facing tough questions these it exciting. it is. our kids are - facing tough questions these days and science is usually answer. we want to get them excited. science is extremely fun and natural for children to explore their world. you don't have to _ children to explore their world. you don't have to be in an amazing laboratory somewhere. the is stuff you can do. i think you have a couple of experiments, all safe and what you are allowed to do at home. all safe and easy to do at home, like that amazing family. how cool is that museum? i did mad science
7:58 am
live sessions. parents would gather up live sessions. parents would gather up a list of materials and experiment along with me. there is so much science to be done with things you can find around the house full—time going to give you a couple of examples, explorations that will spark that interest. this bottle has some vinegar, a couple of tablespoons. i have built a balloon with baking soda. what we are going to do this if we can do the age old volcano experiment. we know there is an action between these two chemicals. could you use the gas to blow up a billing without using your breath? let's see if we can give it a try? —— a balloon. we will pop this into the baking soda. we have a balloon that can be blown up without any breath. this is quite amazing for kids because they can actually
7:59 am
see the reaction. science experimentation is all about asking questions, we want kids to have confidence to start to explore and solve problems. we can further this biker if i had less vinegar and more baking soda, it would get smaller, bigger? baking soda, it would get smaller, bi aer? ~ ., ~ baking soda, it would get smaller, biner? ~ ., ~' , ,, bigger? worked very well lets see if the second one _ bigger? worked very well lets see if the second one works _ bigger? worked very well lets see if the second one works equally - bigger? worked very well lets see if the second one works equally well. | the second one works equally well. another thing we can do is explore air. you cannot see it that see how it acts on other things. that will tell you a lot. if i take a balloon and a hairdryer, i can, watch what my hairdryer does. in my mind something very interesting you might not expect. ok. something very interesting you might not exect. ., ., ., , ., not expect. ok. you have to explain. what is going — not expect. ok. you have to explain. what is going on? — not expect. ok. you have to explain. what is going on? how— not expect. ok. you have to explain. what is going on? how did _ not expect. ok. you have to explain. what is going on? how did it - not expect. ok. you have to explain. | what is going on? how did it happen? this is the basic _
8:00 am
what is going on? how did it happen? this is the basic concept _ what is going on? how did it happen? this is the basic concept of _ what is going on? how did it happen? this is the basic concept of how - this is the basic concept of how aeroplanes fly. it actually flows around the billy making a pocket around the billy making a pocket around a balloon. it is holding the balloon down while holding it up. tilt it to the side and you will see how an aeroplane wing backs and how the cushion of air is lifting the aeroplane up. can the cushion of air is lifting the aeroplane up— the cushion of air is lifting the aero--laneu. ., ., ., ., aeroplane up. can you do it again? t in: this aeroplane up. can you do it again? trying this at _ aeroplane up. can you do it again? trying this at home, _ aeroplane up. can you do it again? trying this at home, the _ aeroplane up. can you do it again? trying this at home, the extension| trying this at home, the extension to this is, with a bigger billing go higher or lower? i know you will be trying this today. are you ready? fabulous, just brilliant, thank you so much, i know people around the country will be doing that. stay with us, headlines coming up.
8:01 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: the chairman of yorkshire cricket club has resigned ahead of an emergency meeting to discuss its handling of a damning racism report. the former england captain michael vaughan reveals he 5 been named in the investigation — but denies any wrongdoing. the prime minister faces a by—election test over owen paterson's corruption claims. music.
8:02 am
veteran tv presenter and dancer lionel blair has died at the age of 92. good morning. the taxi industry has a shortage of over 160,000 drivers. demand forjourneys is high but there aren't enough workers. i am at there aren't enough workers. i am at the call centre to find out why. this morning it is a cold start across england. not as chilly this weekend. it will be windy at times. i will have your full forecast later. we don't need to- prove anything here. i don't think we're taking a risk. if people think that we were better 40 years ago, fine. _ and we speak to abba as they release their first album in a0 years. it's friday 5th november. our main story.
8:03 am
in the last few minutes, the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has resigned amid increasing pressure over the club's handling of a report into racial abuse of a former player. he says, i take responsibility for failing to take appropriate and timely action. roger hutton has stepped down after an investigation found azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment. the former england captain michael vaughan has revealed that he is named in the report — but denies any allegations of racism. simonjones reports. a day of reckoning in the racism row. the most successful club in the history of county cricket has remained tight—tipped this week. but as the board meets, heads are expected to roll. an independent panel found the former player azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club.
8:04 am
yorkshire apologised, but took no action against any member of staff. this week, yorkshire batsman gary ballance said he regretted using a racial slur during conversations with his ex—teammate. he's been suspended from england selection indefinitely. now, the former england captain michael vaughan says he, too, was named in the report for allegedly telling a group of asian players, including rafiq, in 2009, that there "were too many of you lot". but in his daily telegraph column, vaughan writes, the club has been suspended from hosting international matches by the england and wales cricket board for what it calls the "wholly unacceptable handling" of azeem rafiq's racism claims.
8:05 am
it's really important that the ecb sends a message to cricket fans across this country that we will not stand for this. that racism, and anything to do with racism and discrimination of any kind, has absolutely no place in the game. the club will suffer financially, but the reputational damage may be far greater. simon jones, bbc news. we can talk now to our senior sports news reporter laura scott who's at headingley. laura — this comes amid increasing pressure on the club? we have had that news, a statement from the chairman, roger hatton, who has resigned, tell us more about what he said? he has issued a lengthy statement talking about the process that was followed, and his apology to azeem rafiq for saying that the board did not take this seriously enough and did not accept the difficulties he was going through. he said he had
8:06 am
experience during his time that a culture that refuses to accept change or challenge. he apologised unreservedly to azeem rafiq saying the club should have recognised at the club should have recognised at the time the serious allegations of racism. in a statement he does it say other board members have also decided to step down, this comes amid mounting political pressure on the board, a commercial crisis at the board, a commercial crisis at the club, and the unprecedented punishments from the england and wales cricket board last night. in this statement, he was highly critical of the ecb. he says he approached them to ask for their help and intervention in this matter and he said, i was saddened when they declined to help, as i felt it was a matter of great importance for the game as a whole. this morning we have heard from the ecb chief executive tom harrison who said earlier today he would find it difficult for hatton to stay on, he said there was a full governance
8:07 am
review into the yorkshire leadership. but clearly roger hatton sent the ecb hasn't done enough. heads rolling here on a day of reckoning. we have only just reckoning. we have onlyjust received that statement. looking through some of the wording of the statement. one of the wording of the statement. one of the things roger said is he was sorry he could not persuade executive members of the blood to recognise the gravity of the situation and show care and contrition. it is already implying his position is he was trying to get other people to take it seriously. he goes on to say executive members should all resign. we know there has been political pressure on the entire board to resign, notjust the chairman. today at an emergency board meeting perhaps that will follow. he says there has been a constant unwillingness from the executive members on board and senior
8:08 am
management at the club to apologise and accept racism and to forward. during my time as chairman i take responsibility forfailing during my time as chairman i take responsibility for failing to persuade them. he said that frustration was shared by the nonexecutive members. this has been the most disastrous and damaging week in yorkshire's long history. i passed here signs talking about the miracle of headingley, this is quickly becoming the misery of headingley. worth saying we will speak to former england cricketer mark ramprakash england cricketer mark rampra kash later england cricketer mark ramprakash later in the programme. pressure is growing on the government to address claims of corruption, after the mp owen paterson resigned following a row over lobbying rules. he was found to have breached the regulation, but his suspension was put on hold after mps voted to change the rules. less than 2a hours later, ministers backtracked on the plans. paterson has since resigned, triggering a by—election in his north shropshire constituency.
8:09 am
let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. adam, this has had a huge impact on all sides of the political divide? you were talking to nadhim zahawi about this and the impact it has had on the view of the government and we saw yesterday damning headlines on all the front pages. and this u—turn. we got something quite rare from the minister today, he admitted, the education secretary, the government had done the wrong thing by linking the individual case of owen paterson who was found guilty by parliament's disciplinary watchdog of an egregious breach of rules about what mps can do when they have a second job, and a change to the overall process for how mps are investigated. here is how the education secretary put it to us. i take collective responsibility, i am part— i take collective responsibility, i am part of— i take collective responsibility, i am part of the government and the cabinet _ am part of the government and the
8:10 am
cabinet i_ am part of the government and the cabinet. i also take collective responsibility to say we made a mistake — responsibility to say we made a mistake and i think it was right for the leader— mistake and i think it was right for the leader of hasjacob rees—mogg over behalf of the government to go to the _ over behalf of the government to go to the house and said mistake was we should _ to the house and said mistake was we should not— to the house and said mistake was we should not have conflated the issue of fairness — should not have conflated the issue of fairness or process, so the right of fairness or process, so the right of appeal. — of fairness or process, so the right of appeal, and i think that is right — of appeal, and i think that is right my— of appeal, and i think that is right. my appeal to other parliamentarians, let us make that work _ parliamentarians, let us make that work we _ parliamentarians, let us make that work. we should not have conflated that with _ work. we should not have conflated that with a — work. we should not have conflated that with a specific case of owen paterson — that with a specific case of owen paterson. the banister has been clear— paterson. the banister has been clear paid — paterson. the banister has been clear paid lobbying is wrong and it is important we those things out. to admit _ is important we those things out. to admit a _ is important we those things out. to admit a mistake is the right thing to do _ admit a mistake is the right thing to do and — admit a mistake is the right thing to do. and the grown—up thing to do. and that _ to do. and the grown—up thing to do. and that is _ to do. and the grown—up thing to do. and that is how the government is handling it. in terms of the process now, owen paterson's resignation means there will be a by—election in his constituency of shropshire north. the opposition parties sided with the idea of running a joint candidate against tory sleaze. those
8:11 am
talks haven't got anywhere and labour will stand their own candidate in that by—election now that there will be a fresh tory face in that race. separately labour have written to the ministerial standards adviser to ask him to look at comments made by the business secretary yesterday kwasi kwarteng where he appeared to suggest the woman in parliament who looks at mps's contact katherine stone might not have much of a future. that is rumbling along as well. thank you for taking us through it all. tributes have been paid to the veteran entertainer lionel blair who's died at the age of 92. in a career spanning nearly 80 years, he worked with some of the biggest names in showbiz, and established himself as a household name for generations. robert townsend looks back at his life. entertainer, presenter, choreographer. in a career spanning more than 70 years, lionel blair came
8:12 am
to epitomise the very definition of a variety performer. his mischievous wit, flamboyant and ever—twinkling eye kept him popular whatever the decade. # it ain't what you do, . it's the way that you do it. # that's what gets results.# it's the way that you do it. i it was an early introduction it's the way that you do it. to the industry at the tender age of 13 when he began acting in musical productions. and it wasn't long until television came calling. taking him from child performer, to sammy davisjunior�*s dance—off competitor in front of the queen mother at the royal variety performance in 1961. oh, sir. we do have a big head, don't we? how would you like a rap right in your mouth? i liked him as a man and as an artist. he was a wonderful dancer and he used to be with what was known as the lionel blair dancers
8:13 am
with him, he was prettier than all of them! lionel, we will miss you. he was a regular face on tv game shows. but it was his role as team captain on the hit series give us a clue that made him a real household name. girl..dancer? you...and her... # i got music! in more recent years he embraced newer tv formats, this appearing in reality shows like the real marigold hotel. and celebrity big brother. and despite his advancing years, the chat show invitations kept on coming, for one of the last from the golden era of showbiz. in our kitchen years ago before we had lino in the kitchen, you see, and my dad would come home. and my dad was a barber. but he'd come home and start tapping, and i copied him. i was only three years old.
8:14 am
but i could always tap dance. among those paying tribute to lionel is friend and broadcaster gyles brandreth who said he would leave behind a legacy of style, smiles and laughter. is lovely seeing that report. lionel blair so loved by many generations. we will speak to one of his oldest friends christopher biggins to find out more about his life on stage and on television. let us take you to london. here is the view. the sun is shining, the sky is blue with a little bit of cloud. but let that picture not deceive you, it is chilly. but varied temperatures across the country. good morning, matt. north and west a different
8:15 am
story. good morning. across england we have widespread frost, with temperatures down to —5 not far from oxford, the coldest morning of the autumn so far. i have dropped my clicker, i won't get far without that. it is chilly out there but as you saw sally across many parts of england but it will cloud over. still the odd sunny spell but a few showers mainly in north and west scotland. staying sunny in the channel islands, kent and sussex. temperatures are still on the cool side compared to what we saw last week. into this evening, milder with south—westerly winds but persistent rain pushing into the north and west of scotland. temperatures won't drop as far, a milder start to tomorrow.
8:16 am
mcleod, showers in the west, persistent rain in scotland and northern ireland. brighter in the afternoon but breezy. temperatures climbing up a little. into saturday evening, that patchy rain and drizzle will push southwards. a blustering night across the north. sunday, gales and severe gales across the north. to the south and east it will be windy but should stay dry and sunny all day long. thank you, we will see you later. it's been almost a year since we first met hughie and freddie, the best friends raising money for the hospital where hughie's being treated for leukaemia. they've just won a pride of britain award for their astonishing work — but they're already planning their next fundraiser. in a moment they'll tell us more, but first, let's take a look at their special night. music.
8:17 am
you guys will be best friends for your whole life, won't you? yes. i am so proud of you. and i am super proud of you. can i shake your hand? yes. it is a great honour to meet you. and it is a privilege to meet you. is this your first time hosting for bbc breakfast? yes. it's very cool. you have done a good job so far. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage, hughie higginson and freddie xavi. yes, the bond between us is unbreakable, we will be friends forever. he is my best friend for life and basically we are brothers. applause. # fly me away... laughter. to overcome everything that
8:18 am
you have gone through, it'sjust so inspiring. yeah, man, it's my honour to give you guys this amazing pride of britain award. cheering. freddie and hughie! very smart young men. looking more casual today. very smart young men. looking more casualtoday. let very smart young men. looking more casual today. let us introduce you now. we're nowjoined in the studio by hughie, freddie. hughie's dad kieran
8:19 am
and freddie's mum sarah. good morning. it has been a busy few days. crazy. what about that night, who wants to pick it up, that moment in time, you are in there, in that amazing place, the pride of britain awards, then you get up on stage, describe what that was it like? it was really good. everyone was 'ust it was really good. everyone was just celebrating, they were all clapping. it was really nice to be able to— clapping. it was really nice to be able to walk up to the stage with all the _ able to walk up to the stage with all the applause. hughie, what was it like for you? it wasjust a hughie, what was it like for you? it was just a crazy atmosphere. there _ it was just a crazy atmosphere. there were _ it was just a crazy atmosphere. there were so _ it was just a crazy atmosphere. there were so many _ it was just a crazy atmosphere. there were so many people - it was just a crazy atmosphere. there were so many people in| it was just a crazy atmosphere. - there were so many people in that room: _ there were so many people in that room. and — there were so many people in that room. and to— there were so many people in that room. and to be— there were so many people in that room, and to be able _ there were so many people in that room, and to be able to _ there were so many people in that room, and to be able to walk- there were so many people in that room, and to be able to walk up. there were so many people in that| room, and to be able to walk up on that stage. — room, and to be able to walk up on that stage. and _ room, and to be able to walk up on that stage, and talk _ room, and to be able to walk up on that stage, and talk in _ room, and to be able to walk up on that stage, and talk in front - room, and to be able to walk up on that stage, and talk in front of- room, and to be able to walk up on that stage, and talk in front of all. that stage, and talk in front of all those _ that stage, and talk in front of all those people. _ that stage, and talk in front of all those people. it _ that stage, and talk in front of all those people, it was _ that stage, and talk in front of all those people, it was so _ that stage, and talk in front of all those people, it was so great - that stage, and talk in front of all those people, it was so great to i that stage, and talk in front of all. those people, it was so great to do that _ that. i what that. - what did you that. — what did you say? that. what did ou sa ? , ., what did you say? they were asking us questions- _ what did you say? they were asking us questions. it _ what did you say? they were asking us questions. it was _ what did you say? they were asking us questions. it was just _ what did you say? they were asking us questions. it wasjust like - what did you say? they were asking us questions. it wasjust like an - us questions. it wasjust like an interview. —
8:20 am
us questions. it wasjust like an interview, but— us questions. it wasjust like an interview, but then, _ us questions. it wasjust like an interview, but then, i— us questions. it wasjust like an interview, but then, i started i interview, but then, i started singing _ interview, but then, i started singing and— interview, but then, i started singing and i_ interview, but then, i started singing. and i was— interview, but then, i started singing. and i was singing. interview, but then, i started| singing. and i was singing his interview, but then, i started - singing. and i was singing his song at the _ singing. and i was singing his song at the time, — singing. and i was singing his song at the time, and _ singing. and i was singing his song at the time, and he _ singing. and i was singing his song at the time, and he walked - singing. and i was singing his song at the time, and he walked out- at the time, and he walked out behind — at the time, and he walked out behind me! _ behind me! and - behind me! and he - behind me! i and he gave behind me! - and he gave you a behind me! _ and he gave you a hug. yes. it was crazy. did he appreciate the song? yes — did he appreciate the song? yes look _ did he appreciate the song? yes. look. how— did he appreciate the song? yes. look. how about - did he appreciate the song? yes. look. how about that! l did he appreciate the song? - yes. look. how about that! that is a bit special. what comes across, you are very confident up there on stage. that is not a normal place for a young man your age to be. among those stars. but i guess because you are together because thatis because you are together because that is the whole point about this, you are mates. all of that stuff is true, it is yours now, you have the trophies to show for it, but at the heart of it is because you are powell's. tell us about that friendship? well, we have had it for all our
8:21 am
lives _ well, we have had it for all our lives we — well, we have had it for all our lives. we have known each other since _ lives. we have known each other since we — lives. we have known each other since we were really little. yes, _ since we were really little. yes. just _ since we were really little. yes, just over this past year, it has become, _ yes, just over this past year, it has become, the _ yes, just over this past year, it has become, the bond - yes, just over this past year, it has become, the bond has - yes, just over this past year, it - has become, the bond has become stronger— has become, the bond has become stronger and — has become, the bond has become stronger and stronger— has become, the bond has become stronger and stronger and - has become, the bond has become stronger and stronger and is - has become, the bond has becomel stronger and stronger and is almost unbreakable — stronger and stronger and is almost unbreakable now. _ unbreakable now. how _ unbreakable now. how often - unbreakable now. how often do - unbreakable now. how often do you| unbreakable now. - how often do you chat to unbreakable now. _ how often do you chat to each other? every day. call each other or see each other? see each other. when you are doing the downtime stuff, when it is not about fund raising, what do you do? we sometimes play on the playstation, go to the park, get something to eat, get something to drink _ drink. '- drink. lam seeing drink. - i am seeing two drink. — i am seeing two parents here who drink. i am seein- two parents here who are i am seeing two parents here who are beaming with pride. i mean, tell us a little bit about how it has been for you? this year has been a roller—coaster yearfor this year has been a roller—coaster year for the whole country, but throw in what we have had to deal with with hughie's illness, it has been a crazy year. what do boys set
8:22 am
out to do at the beginning was just to try and help a few, a little way along at the children's hospital and it has turned into something beyond belief. can i ask how things are at the moment, that is what a lot of people watching you this morning want to know how you are. i am doing really well. so, i started _ i am doing really well. so, i started a _ i am doing really well. so, i started a different phase of treatment. i still have to one half years— treatment. i still have to one half years of— treatment. i still have to one half years of treatment left but it is easier— years of treatment left but it is easier stuff and yes, i am on the right— easier stuff and yes, i am on the right path — right path. it - right path. it is - right path. it is all down to the right path. — it is all down to the consultants, doctors, nurses at the royal manchester children's hospital who got hughie back on his feet to where he is today. he was a poorly boy a year ago. to see him as he is now. we still have treatment ahead of us but we are on that road and we will get there.
8:23 am
sarah, i see you smiling, everyone is happy and pleased things are going well, but you must be so proud of freddie, the passion. just to be there for your friend. we said this _ just to be there for your friend. we said this before, we didn't expect this, _ said this before, we didn't expect this, for— said this before, we didn't expect this, for freddie, the main thing was being — this, for freddie, the main thing was being there for his friend going through— was being there for his friend going through a _ was being there for his friend going through a really tough time. for everything to have happened as it is, we _ everything to have happened as it is, we are — everything to have happened as it is, we are so proud. and _ is, we are so proud. and the _ is, we are so proud. and the feedback, from people in the hospital as well, notjust hughie, thatis hospital as well, notjust hughie, that is when you know what you are doing matters. yes. what do people say to you? yes. what do --eole sa to ou? what do people say to you? everyone is 'ust like what do people say to you? everyone is just like saying _ what do people say to you? everyone isjust like saying well _ what do people say to you? everyone isjust like saying well done, - what do people say to you? everyone isjust like saying well done, and - isjust like saying well done, and it is so— isjust like saying well done, and it is so good _ isjust like saying well done, and it is so good what _ isjust like saying well done, and it is so good what i— isjust like saying well done, and it is so good what i have - isjust like saying well done, and it is so good what i have done. . it is so good what i have done. you _ it is so good what i have done. you are — it is so good what i have done. you are talking _ it is so good what i have done. you are talking in _ it is so good what i have done. you are talking in the - it is so good what i have done. you are talking in the past - it is so good what i have done. l you are talking in the past tense about what you have done but you are not stopping. there is something new, are you going to tell us about it? yes, we are planning on doing, we
8:24 am
are running — yes, we are planning on doing, we are running around every english football— are running around every english football league, light, the pitch of every— football league, light, the pitch of every english football league ground, — every english football league ground, we want to do 2k around every— ground, we want to do 2k around every single one, because there are 92. so. _ every single one, because there are 92 so. for— every single one, because there are 92. so, forthe other eight, sorry, my maths! — 92. so, forthe other eight, sorry, my maths! for the other eight, we will do _ my maths! for the other eight, we will do fa— my maths! for the other eight, we will do fa cup finals, women's games, — will do fa cup finals, women's games, we want to do that. no, — games, we want to do that. no, you _ games, we want to do that. no, you are right, we are going to, because the thing is the power of this programme and national television, there is not one manager i would say who is able to say no to you right now. so you have got it booked in. when will it happen? booked in. when will it ha en? . , booked in. when will it ha en? , . when will it happen? the boys have dreamt this — when will it happen? the boys have dreamt this up. _ when will it happen? the boys have dreamt this up. freddie _ when will it happen? the boys have dreamt this up. freddie ran - when will it happen? the boys have dreamt this up. freddie ran around | dreamt this up. freddie ran around burnley at accrington when he was doing his talent so that sparked something that they wanted to continue the same thing. they love football. i think they have had this
8:25 am
idea to do all the football league clubs. it is something that will help raise awareness around the country. can i ask, there will be people watching the programme this morning, as your dad said, people have been struggling for different reasons during the pandemic. the importance of friendship is one of those things. what do you say to people who maybe haven't contacted their friends enough, maybe they are thinking, i should friends enough, maybe they are thinking, ishould have friends enough, maybe they are thinking, i should have got in touch, what words of wisdom have you got? it is really important to have one important — it is really important to have one important friend. _ it is really important to have one important friend. and _ it is really important to have one important friend. and if- it is really important to have one important friend. and if anybody| it is really important to have one l important friend. and if anybody is going _ important friend. and if anybody is going through _ important friend. and if anybody is going through a _ important friend. and if anybody is going through a tough _ important friend. and if anybody is going through a tough time, - important friend. and if anybody is going through a tough time, a - important friend. and if anybody is| going through a tough time, a good friend _ going through a tough time, a good friend is— going through a tough time, a good friend is the — going through a tough time, a good friend is the best _ going through a tough time, a good friend is the best treatment, - going through a tough time, a good friend is the best treatment, and ii friend is the best treatment, and i have _ friend is the best treatment, and i have learned — friend is the best treatment, and i have learned that _ friend is the best treatment, and i have learned that with _ friend is the best treatment, and i have learned that with freddie. i have learned that with freddie. you need — have learned that with freddie. you need a _ have learned that with freddie. you need a good _ have learned that with freddie. you need a good friend. - you need a good friend. are _ you need a good friend. are you _ you need a good friend. are you all— you need a good friend. are you all right? - you need a good friend. are you all right? it -
8:26 am
you need a good friend. | are you all right? it gets you need a good friend. - are you all right? it gets me you need a good friend. _ are you all right? it gets me every time. can ijust thank all the bbc breakfast viewers. it has been phenomenal what you guys have done for the boys, their generosity of the viewers is phenomenal. even now people are searching for hughie and freddie and going on the just giving page and still donating. it is amazing. sarah, is there anything you want to say? sarah, is there anything you want to sa ? ., , , ., , , ., say? honestly, it has been an incredible _ say? honestly, it has been an incredible 12 _ say? honestly, it has been an incredible 12 months. - say? honestly, it has been an incredible 12 months. it- say? honestly, it has been an incredible 12 months. it has . say? honestly, it has been an i incredible 12 months. it has been the worst— incredible 12 months. it has been the worst time because we have seen what hughie has gone through. and then you _ what hughie has gone through. and then you have had this running alongside _ then you have had this running alongside it and it has helped hughie — alongside it and it has helped hughie through it. we couldn't have done it— hughie through it. we couldn't have done it without the viewers and the support— done it without the viewers and the support of— done it without the viewers and the support of everyone here, we are really _ support of everyone here, we are really thankful for that. it really thankful for that. it has _ really thankful for that. it has been great having you here. good luck. good luck with the next challenge as well, thank you for talking to us. the daily mirror pride of britain awards is available on itv hub. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
8:27 am
good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. bbc london has seen figures from british transport police which show that reports of sexual harassment on public transport have risen 61% in london since pre—pandemic levels. the force say they are cracking down after setting up a dedicated unit, and are urging victims to report incidents by texting 61016. officers say they hope to create a "hostile environment" for sexual harassment. if it doesn't feel right, it makes you feel uncomfortable or you think it's making someone else feel uncomfortable, and it's got a sexual element to it, then tell us about it. the rivers trust charity has released a map showing the places in london most covered in sewage. it shows the spots where sewage overflowed and poured into waterways across the uk — ilford, barking and dagenham, and newham were the three worst
8:28 am
affected boroughs in london. the royal botanic gardens at kew is putting its vast collection of plant and fungal specimens online. the 7 million items have been collected over nearly two centuries, including one by charles darwin. the government has provided £15 million of funding to digitise it, enabling researchers around the world to access the data it provides. the team at kew are so passionate. obviously, they're engaged with governments globally and good causes globally to try and make sure we keep adding to knowledge but also that we actually provide lots of information which is helpful to governments and organisations that are working right at the front line in the battle against climate change. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. on the tube... there are minor delays on the bakerloo and hammersmith and city lines— also tfl rail. and the piccadilly line is part suspended eastbound between acton town and hyde park corner. on the trains...
8:29 am
east midlands, thameslink: 20 min delays between st pancras international and luton — because of an earlier broken down train. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a chilly start this morning. temperatures overnight around 0 celsius. for some, a bit of frost first thing this morning. high pressure is in charge but we are losing the colder air. we are picking up a westerly flow today and replacing it with something a little milder as we head into the weekend. plenty of sunshine around this morning, albeit quite chilly. a warm front sinks south, bringing more cloud this morning into the afternoon. by the end of the day, the odd spot potentially of light rain and drizzle, nothing too significant. temperatures reaching 10 celsius. this evening of course it's the 5th of november, it's bonfire night. it is looking largely dry — maybe one or two clear spells but staying largely cloudy. gradually through the night, thicker cloud will arrive, especially as we head into dawn on saturday with the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. minimum temperature milder than last night, between a and 7 celsius.
8:30 am
for saturday, it's looking largely cloudy. the wind strengthens overnight and through saturday itself. for public displays on saturday night for the fireworks, it is looking largely dry with the odd spot of rain. breezy, however, and staying cloudy. it is going to be a very mild night saturday into sunday with temperatures not dropping much below 10 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 'morning live' follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store with kim and rav morning to you. coming up: a record number of people seeking treatment for depression and anxiety. some online adverts for unregulated counselling could be taking advantage. we find out the standards you should expect from your
8:31 am
therapist so you can get the help you need without being ripped off. it is the skin rash which can be triggered — it is the skin rash which can be triggered by anxiety or the weather stop and _ triggered by anxiety or the weather stop and whether antihistamines are the answer~ — stop and whether antihistamines are the answer. . . stop and whether antihistamines are the answer. , , ., the answer. gethin is live from cop26. the answer. gethin is live from copzs. morning. _ the answer. gethin is live from copzs. morning. what- the answer. gethin is live from copzs. morning. what is - the answer. gethin is live from - cop26. morning. what is happening today? cop26. morning. what is happening toda ? ., , cop26. morning. what is happening toda ? ., cop26. morning. what is happening toda? ., , today? today is all about us. the theme is public _ today? today is all about us. the theme is public empowerment i today? today is all about us. the | theme is public empowerment and today? today is all about us. the - theme is public empowerment and the youth. i include myself in both those categories. i look forward to telling you all about it later. hate telling you all about it later. we let to that _ telling you all about it later. we let to that as _ telling you all about it later. we let to that as well. ahead of national bbc radio singalong for children in need, we are told how music raises awareness for mental health. .. . .. , music raises awareness for mental health. .. . ._ ., health. the last day for the rickshaw — health. the last day for the rickshaw relay _ health. the last day for the rickshaw relay challenge. l health. the last day for the i rickshaw relay challenge. we health. the last day for the - rickshaw relay challenge. we will be
8:32 am
live again with matt baker and the team on the final leg of their journeys. team on the final leg of their journeys-— team on the final leg of their 'ourne s. ., , , journeys. gold and brass accessories are the top trend. _ journeys. gold and brass accessories are the top trend. how— journeys. gold and brass accessories are the top trend. how they - journeys. gold and brass accessories are the top trend. how they scratch l are the top trend. how they scratch to plaster mirror was transformed into a metallic masterpiece. —— this scratched plaster mirror. mike now with the sport. this has been developing throughout the morning this morning. yorkshire cricket club. the understand now the chairman, roger hutton, has resigned. this is very significant development. notjust the resignation and that he does expect others to follow to help the club, his words, myth forward and find a new way. on the head of a big emergency meeting of the board later today at headingley. in a strongly worded, resignation statement, roger hutton, the chairman, of yorkshire, says he's experienced, a culture there, that refuses
8:33 am
to accept change or challenge. he speaks of his regret, that he could not persuade other board members, at the yorkshire based club, to recognise the gravity of the situation, surrounding the treatment of azeem rafiq, and says there was a constant unwillingless, amongt others there to apologise and accept rascism and look forward. he's also critical of the england and wales cricket board, saying he had asked them for help and their intervention, before they stripped yorkshire of hosting england games next summer — which would cost the club millions. and this is separate to the financial blows, of more sponsors withdrawing their support. we can speak now to former england batsman mark ramprakash. thank you for your time this morning. what's you reaction to this resignation of the chairman, roger hutton? i think it is inevitable really they were coming under such pressure for the way that things yorkshire had handled the investigation and the fact there were no real
8:34 am
ramifications are consequences to those who azim rafiq has named. we do not know... the findings are not public of that report but clearly roger hutton as chairman of the club, takes a huge responsibility. you are right, his comments are really interesting. he could have been talking about any number of county clubs who perhaps have board members or committee members of a certain age, a certain race, who perhaps do not fancy change my own experiences of yorkshire are positive. i went up the first in 1988 and i have always had a good time there. the public there are very knowledgeable. however azim rafiq's allegations are very serious and things have dragged on for so long. the fact that investigation really was toothless and it has needed the ecb to step in. when you
8:35 am
said dragged — needed the ecb to step in. when you said dragged on _ needed the ecb to step in. when you said dragged on for _ needed the ecb to step in. when you said dragged on for this _ needed the ecb to step in. when you said dragged on for this story - needed the ecb to step in. when you said dragged on for this story has - said dragged on for this story has been going on this week alone, the latest developments. has it come too latest developments. has it come too late the first resignation? yes. late the first resignation? yes, absolutely- _ late the first resignation? yes, absolutely. everyone _ late the first resignation? yes, absolutely. everyone involved| late the first resignation? 1a: absolutely. everyone involved has been hugely frustrated and clearly roger hutton has been. you are right where he has made some very interesting comments. the other people involved, there needed to be some more statements, i think, coming out and recognising that the environment was not right. with seven counts of the a3, the allegations that azim rafiq made seven of them were upheld. there was an apology to azim rafiq but no consequences. that is the thing that really grates. we have heard sajid javid getting involved in this situation, saying the ecb must take action swiftly and decisively,
8:36 am
otherwise it is not fit for purpose. they had done that. the ramifications for yorkshire as a club are huge. they have been suspended of hosting international matches, which is a really serious punishment financially. it has to make club look long and at itself. what is your reaction to the statement from your former colleague michael bourne, who says he is named in a report that categorically denies any wrongdoing? he says it has been like hitting him with a brick. i has been like hitting him with a brick. .. ., , , , ., brick. i am not surprised that michael has _ brick. i am not surprised that michael has come _ brick. i am not surprised that michael has come out - brick. i am not surprised that michael has come out and i brick. i am not surprised thati michael has come out and try brick. i am not surprised that i michael has come out and try to brick. i am not surprised that - michael has come out and try to take ownership of the story. there were rumours about him being involved. he is not the only one, others have been named. my own personal experience with michael as i have got on very well with him and never heard him be racist. as azim rafiq
8:37 am
has said, while he has named people involved, it is not about those individuals but about getting systemic change in a club like yorkshire where change has proven to be very difficult. the club has failed to evolve quick enough in the way that society is changing and our attitudes towards race and racism. is it time for the whole report to be made completely public so we see everything in it? i be made completely public so we see everything in it?— everything in it? i think we would all like to see _ everything in it? i think we would all like to see what _ everything in it? i think we would all like to see what is _ everything in it? i think we would all like to see what is in - everything in it? i think we would all like to see what is in it. i everything in it? i think we would all like to see what is in it. there| all like to see what is in it. there may be legal ramifications for it to be made public and may not be possible. what i am looking forward to is azim rafiq, roger hutton, and other individuals appearing before the department of culture media and sport in parliament to get a full and frank disclosure of their views
8:38 am
and frank disclosure of their views and i think then we will really start to get more openness about what has happened and then hopefully a plan about what could happen in the future. ~ a plan about what could happen in the future. ,. ., ., , the future. ok, mark kermode really a- reciate the future. ok, mark kermode really appreciate your _ the future. ok, mark kermode really appreciate your time _ the future. ok, mark kermode really appreciate your time this _ the future. ok, mark kermode really appreciate your time this morning i the future. ok, mark kermode reallyi appreciate your time this morning on the developing story. —— ok, mark, really appreciate your time stop we will update you tomorrow. more throughout the morning, of course. a shortage of taxi drivers in the uk is a concern for public safety — that's according to the trade body for the industry. the licensed private hire car association says there's a shortfall of around 160,000 drivers, with a warning of passengers facing difficulty getting home. sarah corker is at a taxi firm in manchester this morning. sarah, what kind of impact is the issue having there? yes, good morning. cresta cars is one of the city's biggest private
8:39 am
hire taxi firms. the sector is facing a big shortage of workers at the moment. they are busy in the coring at the moment. since the start of the pandemic they have had a real drop in the number of drivers. pre—pandemic there were aoo drivers. pre—pandemic there were aoo drivers are now they only have 300. during lockdown demand forjourneys of course plummeted. that meant workers left the profession and got jobs elsewhere and they have not come back in the same numbers. at the same time others decided to retire and there are problems in terms of a backlog with licensing. my terms of a backlog with licensing. my colleague has been finding out what impact all of this has been having four passengers. welcome to the sugar mill. this 600—capacity venue has been packed to the rafters since it reopened. i've worked in venues for 20 years. i've honestly never known it this bad. but for clubbers and for staff, it's a nightmare getting a taxi once the party is over. i'm leaving at about four o'clock
8:40 am
in the morning, maybe even five, and then having to wait until six o'clock in the morning to get a taxi. it's a long time to be stood by yourself in town. and it's, for me, it's the safety issue. so if we go back in time pre—pandemic, i'd probably only be waiting about five, ten minutes. taz isn't just worried for her staff. say if we've got a vulnerable individual, a young woman that's left on her own is making sure that she can get home. so getting her into a cab, the majority of people are just giving up and walking home. and we don't want [one individuals wandering around the streets just by themselves. now that the nights are getting colder and darker, getting home safely from a night out is crucial. but taxis provide a really vital service at any time of the day, whether it's getting staff into work, whether it's a hospital appointment or evenjust doing the weekly shop.
8:41 am
the shortfall of drivers is leading to long waits and high prices. we were there for about two hours, trying to actually get a taxi. it was literally a ten—minute drive — less than — and it took us about two hours to get a taxi. it was so bad. we had to get a taxi on saturday nightand, unbelievable. unbelievable. how long did we wait for one? 40 minutes. ao minutes. to go from my housel to about 15 minutes... 15 minutes' walk away — it's gone to, like, £7. and it's normally £3.50. you get in and they want the money before you actually go anywhere. a lot of them retired. a lot of them couldn't actually keep the payments up on their vehicles. the national trade body says taxi drivers found otherjobs when their trade dried up during lockdowns. and it's too costly and time consuming to restart. the driver's being faced with a massive, great big outlay. the time he's been probably earning, he or she has been probably earning 15% of what they'd normally do. and some people literally haven't been able to carry on.
8:42 am
a taxi licence from a local council can set you back as much as £600. and waiting for the medical and criminal records checks can take months. a handful of councils have been proactive, though. in the summer, torbay council in devon saw this problem coming, and cut the cost of their licence tojust 50 quid. they've got 25 new drivers, but still need at least 25 more. as the christmas season puts extra demand on taxi firms, customers can only hope that more councils take action to make sure everyone can get home safely. coletta smith, bbc news. local authorities are trying to streamline the process to get more drivers in. . , streamline the process to get more drivers in. , , ., ., drivers in. firstly, where have all the drivers _ drivers in. firstly, where have all the drivers gone? _ drivers in. firstly, where have all the drivers gone? good - drivers in. firstly, where have alli the drivers gone? good morning. drivers in. firstly, where have all- the drivers gone? good morning. the
8:43 am
drivers— the drivers gone? good morning. the drivers in— the drivers gone? good morning. the drivers in the — the drivers gone? good morning. the drivers in the last few years, because _ drivers in the last few years, because of coronavirus, there was no work. _ because of coronavirus, there was no work. and _ because of coronavirus, there was no work, and they shifted to other industries _ work, and they shifted to other industries like food places, doing deliveries, etc, and other companies like working — deliveries, etc, and other companies like working for online companies doing _ like working for online companies doing deliveries. that is one of the major— doing deliveries. that is one of the major effects in the taxi trade in the private hire trade. that is why there _ the private hire trade. that is why there is— the private hire trade. that is why there is a — the private hire trade. that is why there is a shortage of drivers throughout the country. at the moment demand _ throughout the country. at the moment demand is _ throughout the country. at the moment demand is high i throughout the country. at the moment demand is high for. throughout the country. at the i moment demand is high forjourneys but there are not enough journeys to go around to fulfil the jobs. —— and not enough drivers. what is the knock—on impact? hate not enough drivers. what is the knock-on impact?— not enough drivers. what is the knock-on impact? not enough drivers. what is the knock-on imact? . ., ., .. .. knock-on impact? we have not had an increase in manchester _ knock-on impact? we have not had an increase in manchester for _ knock-on impact? we have not had an increase in manchester for ten - increase in manchester for ten years. — increase in manchester for ten years, hackney carriage or private hire. _ years, hackney carriage or private hire, because that has to be approved _ hire, because that has to be approved by the council. it is important i think the licensing should — important i think the licensing should relax the knowledge test, which _ should relax the knowledge test, which is — should relax the knowledge test, which is a — should relax the knowledge test, which is a bit outdated. that is why
8:44 am
we have _ which is a bit outdated. that is why we have drivers going out to other areas _ we have drivers going out to other areas there — we have drivers going out to other areas there is no knowledge test. that is— areas there is no knowledge test. that is what they need to do here for the _ that is what they need to do here for the time being so we have drivers— for the time being so we have drivers in— for the time being so we have drivers in greater manchester. gk, drivers in greater manchester. ok, thank ou drivers in greater manchester. ok, thank you very _ drivers in greater manchester. ii. thank you very much for that. as you heard, it is about making it easier to get new drivers into the trade. more broadly the taxi sector is one of many industries at the moment to warn staffing shortages are really hampering their ability to operate normally. across the uk there are more than a million job vacancies at the moment but a competition to get workers is really fierce.— workers is really fierce. thank you very much- _ it's been one of the most anticipated comebacks in pop and after ao years, abba are finally back with a new studio album which is released today. in their only british tv interview, benny and bjorn chatted to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson about how the record
8:45 am
eventually got made. benny and bjorn in abba's home town. the good thing about living in stockholm is that people don't bother you. not in the '70s, not in the '80s, not now. they come up now and they're all happy. say, "wow, i'm so happy that you made a couple of new songs." it would have been different had we been based in london or new york or los angeles in our temptations. but we were two couples leading ordinary lives. bloody boring. stockholm is built on 1a islands, including helgeandsholmen, where abba recorded voyage, their first album in a0 years. so this is where a lot of the album was made then. this has really been abba hq. in that house. that's the studio since ten years back. everything is done in there. the idea of making a whole album
8:46 am
was not part of the original plan. abba had only gone back into the studio to record a couple of new tracks for next year's live show, which will feature digital recreations of the band in concerts, looking like they did in 1979. we had two songs. we enjoyed those. we thought they were really good. so we said, "maybe we should do a couple more." and we did. and then we said, "maybe we should do a few more. so we have an album. bjorn, you're sounding very laid back. you got any more nerves? i mean, this is a big deal, ao years between albums! yes, yes. it's emotionally very difficult to grasp, actually, that we did what we did. oh, it's dawning on me now that it's actually happening, you know. we don't need to prove anything here. i don't think we're taking
8:47 am
a risk because if people think that we were better ao years ago, fine. and the ladies were so happy. yeah. as were we, of course. but the ladies, ooh, they can still do it. yeah. and they're also happy that they don't have to do this. why don't they? where are they? because we told them, you know, we talked about it. so if we do this, "what's going to happen?" and they both said, "we don't want to do this." and we said, "we can take care of it." we're not as pretty as they are, but we do the work. are agnietha and frieda shy then? why don't they like it? it's just the glamour, whatever that is, doesn't even interest them any more. like it does us! or it everdid. when you hear the album's got 100,000 pre—sales in the uk, that dave grohl wept when he heard your new tracks... i love dave grohl! do you wish, ever, you think we should have done albums over the years? why have we waited ao years?
8:48 am
we had other things to do, you see. but, i mean, it never seemed to come up the occasion for it before the abbatars. then i can't remember at any time us discussing... no, never. this is the 30—year—old digital synthesiser—cum—music station, which was crucial to the making of voyage. so how much of the album was done on this? 100%. really? apart from real drums. one, two guitarists, and a bass player that plays bass on other songs. the rest is this — and the girls. and there they are.
8:49 am
was good timing. this is a big time for albums. ed shearan's going to number one this week, your album's out. we've got adele at the end of the month. yeah. are you ready for a christmas chart battle with those two? i don't care. this is not a competition. if we're number one, or number 16, i don't really mind. you're more competitive than that! come on. no, no, no. not to ed shearan. why? he's a good bloke. adele is a great singer. yes, you know. on the other hand, i wouldn't mind being number one over christmas. it would be kind of nice! # you're not the manl you should have been. the album revisits old themes, including the end of a marriage. # i let you down somehow.# abba probably have the most famous divorces in pop, outside of fleetwood mac. does it get discussed still? were there big apologies to make this happen? i never talked about my divorce with anyone. apart from frieda at the time. no.
8:50 am
# the winner takes it all. # the loser standing small...# people have read a lot of it into various lyrics. and, of course, there is some of that in the lyrics, but most is fiction. but the emotions are there. yeah, yeah. but not the exact situation. no, exactly. and as for the live show featuring the so—called abbatars, it will have its premiere next may in a purpose—built venue in london. that is so lifelike. it's quite amazing. that is what's been made for the show. yeah. the use of motion capture meant that abba spent five weeks performing the songs in a tv studio and sacrifices had to be made. i love the story. you had to shave the beards for the abbatar show.
8:51 am
yeah. just how traumatic was that for you two? again, just a decision. if it has to be done, you know, it has to be done. and i tried. is there no other way we can do this? do i really, really have to? oh, i hated it. oh, i looked weird, and i... oh, i'll never shave it off again — that's for sure. # waterloo, i was defeated. # you won the war.# eurovision, 13 years since the uk has made the top ten. we have been bottom the last two contests. what does the uk need to do? better songs. we had to take it seriously. i think that's a difference in attitude. because for us, it was the only way out. we've not been taking it seriously enough, the uk? no. i don't think you have. i think the attitude has been to laugh at the eurovision, which is laughable in a way.
8:52 am
we've announced a new tactic this year. they've got the team behind dua lipa and lana del ray to pick the act. what do you make of that as a tactic? good. promising. picking an act is one thing, writing a song is different. you need both — a great song and a good act, no? if you were asked nicely, would you ever consider writing the uk entry? i don't know. no! are you sure? what's the risk? you can't be worse than last. no, but it needs to be a really good act to write for. yeah. dua lipa! yes. and if abba end up writing dua lipa a song, then this is where it will happen. we're in my studio, my room. and i come here every day. i've done so for the past 30 years, i've been here for 30 years.
8:53 am
but after waiting ao years for abba to get back together, the reunion could be very short. i've said, "that's it." you know, i don't want to do another abba album. but i mean, i'm not alone in this. there are four of us. yeah. if they twist my arm, i might change my mind, but i think it's... 0h! good to know, good to know. where do you stand on it? i never say never. but i agree with benny. i don't think... i think that was, you know, our goodbye. i think you can twist his arm, bjorn? the ladies might be able to do that. yeah. it'll take them to do it, actually. yeah, i think so. do you know? i did see colin and spoke to him about that interview. i reckon he could have sat there and
8:54 am
thrown titbits and watch the muse over life and ideas and just with the kind of bluntness and confidence and just take on the world. i loved that. it always occurs to me, whenever speak to any of the band members, there is an eternal fascination between the dynamic. i know they say the two female singers didn't want to be part of the publicity thing but it remains out there. you always wonder what the dynamic is like as the years had gone by. theyjust seem very relaxed. the music is released today. "a powerhouse of positivity" — is how the legendary entertainer lionel blair has been described, following his death at the age of 92. he was a self—taught dancer, inspired by fred astaire and ginger rogers, and he became a household name for generations. actress and star
8:55 am
of 'allo 'allo vicki michelle toured with lionel. such a sad thing to be talking about. what a great life to celebrate!— about. what a great life to celebrate! .. , ., ., about. what a great life to celebrate! ., ., ., ~ celebrate! he was amazing. i worked with him for— celebrate! he was amazing. i worked with him for years _ celebrate! he was amazing. i worked with him for years in _ celebrate! he was amazing. i worked with him for years in a _ celebrate! he was amazing. i worked with him for years in a play _ celebrate! he was amazing. i worked with him for years in a play called i with him for years in a play called don'tjust for dinner. he was the most amazing man, such a shock. i was not prepared for it. i didn't know he wasn't well or how it happened. he was mr entertainment, everyone loved him. we got dialogue from him. we got the line else, lionel blair. —— me lionels. we were on tour and they did a gotcha, noel edmonds. we were on stage and he knew nothing about it. i did. noel
8:56 am
was heckling the crowd, heckling us. he stood up for me, bless him, and he gave noel, who looked like an old man, the blair stair, which became famous. it was brilliant, he was such a gentleman. the blairflares was such an east end rhyming slang. used to say, here, lionel, you have got your lionels on, flares. he used to say, here, lionel, you have got your lionels on, flares.- got your lionels on, flares. he was very dapper— got your lionels on, flares. he was very dapper stop — got your lionels on, flares. he was very dapper stop l _ got your lionels on, flares. he was very dapper stop i have _ got your lionels on, flares. he was very dapper stop i have been i got your lionels on, flares. he was i very dapper stop i have been reading a few things, people talking about him, talented and really hard—working stock professionally he started working so young, didn't he? we used to see him on the radio, give us a clue. sammy davisjunior.
8:57 am
he was a workaholic, never stopped. even when not on stage, people came up even when not on stage, people came up to him, they loved him. not many people are loved by the general public and will carry on being loved. he was celebrity and the sense of the word. he embraced it and loved being the centre of attention. and loved being the centre of attention-— and loved being the centre of attention. . ., , , ., ., ,. attention. just as you were talking, we are showing _ attention. just as you were talking, we are showing a _ attention. just as you were talking, we are showing a few— attention. just as you were talking, we are showing a few images i attention. just as you were talking, we are showing a few images from| attention. just as you were talking, i we are showing a few images from the past. i am not sure which child it was but there was a picture of the three of them holding their sons between them. there we are. there is a picture and you probably cannot see it. hearing from other people, family was massively important to him. children, grandchildren. then he will be a huge loss.— he will be a huge loss. massively im ortant he will be a huge loss. massively important stop — he will be a huge loss. massively important stop i _ he will be a huge loss. massively important stop i didn't _ he will be a huge loss. massively important stop i didn't realise i he will be a huge loss. massively. important stop i didn't realise how old he was because he was ever useful. his children adored him, we
8:58 am
used to go on holiday with him. lionel used to go. it was very important to him, his family life. he was a great man, a great entertainer, and all—round fabulous bloke, always partying and full of life and energy. it is so sad that he has gone because he was ever useful, ever useful. i he has gone because he was ever useful, ever useful.— useful, ever useful. i read somewhere _ useful, ever useful. i read somewhere he _ useful, ever useful. i read somewhere he did - useful, ever useful. i read somewhere he did not i useful, ever useful. i read| somewhere he did not like useful, ever useful. i read - somewhere he did not like anyone useful, ever useful. i read _ somewhere he did not like anyone to know how old he was. —— youthful. ao know how old he was. —— youthful. a0 is not a bad age, trust me! he was very proud of his acting skills. he was known as an entertainer. he really loved acting. he was known as an entertainer. he really loved acting.— was known as an entertainer. he really loved acting. he did. he was
8:59 am
fantastic stop _ really loved acting. he did. he was fantastic stop we _ really loved acting. he did. he was fantastic stop we did _ really loved acting. he did. he was fantastic stop we did a _ really loved acting. he did. he was fantastic stop we did a show, i really loved acting. he did. he wasi fantastic stop we did a show, don't dress for dinner. we were at bournemouth, the end of the peer, and we went to jersey. bournemouth, the end of the peer, and we went tojersey. he played my husband in it. it was a great place, a farce. he was brilliant in it, so good. it was one of the most successful tours for the play. the general public adored it. he was truly brilliant in it.— general public adored it. he was truly brilliant in it. thank you for tellin: us truly brilliant in it. thank you for telling us some _ truly brilliant in it. thank you for telling us some of— truly brilliant in it. thank you for telling us some of the _ truly brilliant in it. thank you for telling us some of the stories i truly brilliant in it. thank you for telling us some of the stories of| telling us some of the stories of your memories over the years. thank your memories over the years. thank you so much. lovely to see you. one of the many tributes to lionel blair, who sadly died today at the age of 92. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
9:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the chairman of yorkshire county cricket club resigns over the racism row as the board prepare to hold an emergency meeting. roger hutton apologises to azeem rafiq and criticises the culture at the club, saying it refused to change — and he's accused the ecb of declining to help. former england captain michael vaughan says he was named in yorkshire's azeem rafiq report but "totally denies any "allegation of racism". a senior cabinet minister admits the government made a mistake over its handling of the owen paterson case — amid criticism of the prime minister. we made a mistake.
9:01 am
we reflected within 2a hours. we made a mistake, collectively, and we've

39 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on