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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 4, 2021 9:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm christian fraser. the conservative mp at the center of a row over standards in public office has quit after a major government u—turn. owen paterson resigned after the prime minister abandoned plans to rip up the parliaments standards system, in order to block the mp�*s suspension. a world first — a pill — designed to treat covid — is approved by the uk medicines regulator. workers in the biggest economies are leaving theirjobs in record numbers — in what has been dubbed the great resignation. we'll look at why — and what employers might do to stop it. plus the hunt for the los angeles jetpack man looks like it's been solved — we will explain.
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the conservative mp at the centre of a row over parliamentary standards has resigned today saying he will remain a public servant "outside the cruel world of politics". the former northern ireland minister, owen paterson was found to have broken lobbying rules and had been facing a 30 day suspension, which might have trigged a recall in his constituency. except yesterday his fellow mps voted not to uphold the suspension— and instead voted to overhaul the standards watchdog, the very body that had ruled against him. after an intense backlash from all directions this morning — the government has performed an embarrasing u—turn. our political editor laura kuenssberg has the detail. a different kind of protest. a different kind of attack to green activists busy in westminster today.
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sleaze is the accusation against the government, corruption, the claim. a former minister has now quit as an mp after he was found to have lobbied the government more than a dozen times for companies who paid him thousands of pounds. standing down, owen paterson said... the ayes to the right, 250... but downing street had tied to save him. tories last night voted to tear up the rules he broke. loud commotion. but listen to the atmosphere in there. order! what have you done to this place? dozens of conservatives, outraged, stayed away. but number ten had backed the attempt to overhaul the system
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that monitors behaviour that would've saved him. the immediate backlash was bruising. nearly all of the front pages damning, the internet alive with claims of sleaze, political rivals immediately sharpening attacks. many tories, too, were appalled. so, by mid—morning, ministers were back in the commons ditching the idea. and in effect ditching owen paterson, too. last night's vote has created a certain amount of controversy. it is important that standards in this house are done on a cross—party basis. while there is a very strong feeling on both sides of the house that there is a need for an appeals process, there is equally a strong feeling that this should not be based on a single case or applied retrospectively. in other words, changing the rules that mr paterson broke is off for now. but the opposition says it's a wider pattern. corrupt. i mean, there's no other
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word for it, i'm afraid. and often in a situation like this, you have a prime minister who is trying to lead on public standards. what you've got with this prime minister is a prime minister who is leading his troops through the sewer, and so it is a complete mess of their own making. it's a very strong accusation to say this is corrupt. well, it is corrupt because there was a clear finding after due process. borisjohnson says he's sorry to see mr paterson go, but outrage at how the prime minister tried to use parliament will take time to fade. jack blanchard is uk political editor for politico europe. this editorfor politico europe. u—turn is interesting. i done this u—turn is interesting. it was donein this u—turn is interesting. it was done in such a hurry that eoin paterson didn't even know it it happened until the bbc called him as he was walking around the supermarket today. he he was walking around the supermarket today. he was walking around the su ermarket toda . ., , ., , ., , supermarket today. he was oblivious. yeah, and supermarket today. he was oblivious. yeah. and it's— supermarket today. he was oblivious. yeah, and it's indicative _ supermarket today. he was oblivious. yeah, and it's indicative of _ supermarket today. he was oblivious. yeah, and it's indicative ofjust - yeah, and it's indicative ofjust how shambolic the last 48 hours have been for the government that they
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didn't even manage to tip off the guy that they gone through all this trouble to try to protect in the first place. seriously, it's not often you see a government lurching around this dramatically. it was something that frankly would've passed a lot of people body, i think if eoin paterson had just accepted his punishment at the start of the week of 30s suspension for the comments were made a few headlines, a genuine thing people were moved on. instead instead of making this into such a battle the government trying to scrap the whole system of standards to giant save him has turned this into something that will be front page news day after day and will be remembered for a long time to come. in will be remembered for a long time to come. . ., will be remembered for a long time to come. ., ., ., will be remembered for a long time tocome. ., ., ., to come. in a way eoin paterson has on them a — to come. in a way eoin paterson has on them a favour _ to come. in a way eoin paterson has on them a favour because _ to come. in a way eoin paterson has on them a favour because of- to come. in a way eoin paterson has on them a favour because of course| on them a favour because of course he resigned before it came back for a vote. was he pushed her did he walk of his own free will? i a vote. was he pushed her did he walk of his own free will?- walk of his own free will? i think he did walk _ walk of his own free will? i think he did walk of _ walk of his own free will? i think he did walk of his _ walk of his own free will? i think he did walk of his own _ walk of his own free will? i think he did walk of his own free - walk of his own free will? i think he did walk of his own free welll walk of his own free will? i think. he did walk of his own free well but you've got colleagues of his saying they wish he had done it a day or two ago and save them all this bother. i took at the end the day thatis bother. i took at the end the day that is only one person responsible
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for the way the government is reacting to this and that is the prime minister. and it's pretty clear that he made a massive misjudgment in thinking that he could get away with just tearing up the rule book to save one of his mates. this is a prime minister who as we know likes to play around with rules and see what he can get away with. you'll remember him trying to parochial parliament before that was deemed illegal by the high court. i'm afraid this is another example of that but he came back to bite them big time this time. if you just look at the front page of the newspapers this morning you can imagine how they are feeling in downing street when they realised that upset just about everybody and trying to do this. the government has few friends, _ trying to do this. the government has few friends, it's _ trying to do this. the government has few friends, it's fair _ trying to do this. the government has few friends, it's fair to - trying to do this. the government has few friends, it's fair to say - has few friends, it's fair to say tonight. even the telegraph who the prime minister used to write foretells it doing a closeted omni shadows with up like the grand old duke of york they say he marches a strip to the top avail and then he marches them down again. is that how the backbenchers feel tonight?
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angela richardson one of the pps is in the house, lost herjob yesterday and was reinstated before lunch time. i and was reinstated before lunch time. ~' ., .,, and was reinstated before lunch time. ~' ., time. i think the almost most important _ time. i think the almost most important thing _ time. i think the almost most important thing of _ time. i think the almost most important thing of all - time. i think the almost most important thing of all this - time. i think the almost most important thing of all this is l time. i think the almost most l important thing of all this is the impact it's going to have had and is having right now on those backbench tory mps. they were furious at being asked to go through it and vote for this scrapping of the rules. most of them thought it was a terrible idea, lots had huge misgivings about it, a big rebellion and many stayed away from the vote altogether, some rebel. lots more put their heads down and did their duty. reportedly one or two of them in tears as they did so. having done that to say the prime minister go rushing away from the whole idea or againjust prime minister go rushing away from the whole idea or again just a few hours later once he saw the front pages you can imagine how angry that makes people, we have ministers out this morning going on tv defending this morning going on tv defending this decision only to find a few hours later it had been abandoned. so they look like they've got a lot of egg on their face. it's so they look like they've got a lot of egg on theirface. it's not so they look like they've got a lot
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of egg on their face. it's not the sort of leadership that people like to see. of course is not the first time borisjohnson is on us. you remember a whole row with marcus rashford about free school meals, the government defended, defended position and at the last minute suddenly you turned and caved in. it's becoming a bit of a pattern. and is not what mps like to see from their leader. and is not what mps like to see from their leader-— their leader. jack, good to talk to ou. the uk has become the first country in the world to approve an antiviral pill against covid. the drug, called molnew—piravir is the first treatment of its kind. in trials it was shown to have halved the chances of dying or being hospitalised. the government has bought enough supplies to treat nearly half a million covid patients. our medical editor fergus walsh reports. a pill that can stop covid in its tracks — it's been the goal of scientists since the pandemic began. now there is molnupiravir, and it's likely to be the first of many antiviral treatments.
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anne—marie tested positive for coronavirus on tuesday and has just started a five—day course of molnupiravir as part of a trial in liverpool. she's had cancer, and so is more vulnerable to covid. it is absolutely a life—and—death situation. i do have a family that i need to think about, and i need to be here for them. and if this gives me the opportunity to be around for my son's wedding and everything else, then so be it. when coronavirus infects cells, it makes multiple copies of itself. molnupiravir, originally designed to treat flu, introduces errors in the virus�*s genetic code, which hampers its ability to spread. it's over a year since the clinical research facility at royal liverpool university hospital began testing molnupiravir on patients. global trials have shown it halves the chances of dying
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or being hospitalised with covid. to have a drug like this, to have an antiviral that potent, that's able to be taken orally is a very important moment and does mark a milestone in our discovery of effective medicines against covid. the uk has ordered 480,000 courses of molnupiravir, with the first doses expected to arrive here later this month. it's being approved for people with at least one risk factor for covid, such as being over 60, obese or having heart disease. it's most effective when given within five days of symptoms appearing. the cost of the drug has not been revealed, but in the us, it's £500 per patient. the uk was the first country in the world to authorise the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines,
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and now regulators here have again led the way by approving molnupiravir. it will be months before doctors know how effective it is outside trials. but antivirals look set to play a key role in keeping covid patients out of hospital. fergus walsh, bbc news. another valuable tool in the armoury. another valuable tool in the armoury. as america's passes another grim milstone — president biden has set a new deadline to get millions more vaccinated. companies with more than a hundred people will have to ensure their entire workforce has had the jab by january the fourth or be prepared to test them every week. but will it work? yesterday the united states passed 750 thousand deaths from covid. that an area the size of alaska or vermont or wyoming. and an average of 1,100 americans are still dying daily from coronavirus, the vast majority of them unvaccinated. around 70% of adults have been fully vaccinated, 80% have received at least one shot.
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the new mandate will apply to over 84 million people in the country — including all healthcare workers and government contractors. of that number around 31 million are esimated to be unvaccinated, some 60% of companies say they will demand employees are vaccinated so in theory — that could result in an extra 22/23 millionjabs. we can now speak to dr peter hotez who's co—director of the center for vaccine development at texas children s hospital. lovely to have you back in the programme. the white house said an hour ago it doesn't think this new mandate will exacerbate the supply chain problems. it's a gamble but you can see why the president thinks it might work. you can see why the president thinks it might work-— it might work. well, the president and the country _ it might work. well, the president and the country is _ it might work. well, the president and the country is getting - it might work. well, the president and the country is getting a - it might work. well, the president and the country is getting a bit - and the country is getting a bit desperate because we've stalled in terms of vaccinating the american people. so less than 60% of the us population has been vaccinated. we just lost over 100,000 americans
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over the summer and fall to covid—19. who were unvaccinated despite the widespread availability of vaccine. so 100,000 americans lost because of vaccine defiance or as i call it, the victims of anti—vaccine, anti—science aggression, coming from elements of the far right and is well as a group of nongovernmental organisations. these are lives that never had to be lost. i think with the president is doing is looking at this and saying, how can we close the gap? we really need another 25, 30% of the us population vaccinated. that's a substantial number so what are the options for the federal government under terms of what their powers are? i think working through the department of labor through these vaccine mandates is a piece of it. although it by itself won't be adequate. although it by itself won't be adequate-— although it by itself won't be adeuate. ., ., . ., adequate. your paediatric doctor, ou come adequate. your paediatric doctor, you come from — adequate. your paediatric doctor, you come from a _ adequate. your paediatric doctor, you come from a paediatric - adequate. your paediatric doctor, i you come from a paediatric hospital, of course you got the green light this week on vaccinating five to 11—year—olds who were 28 million of
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them of course many of them would have carried covid unweighted lead, pass it on to older relatives with the are using lots of parents coming forward and what sort of impact do you think it will have over the winter? in you think it will have over the winter? , ., , you think it will have over the winter? , , , ., winter? in the first day yesterday a texas children _ winter? in the first day yesterday a texas children hospitals _ winter? in the first day yesterday a texas children hospitals we - winter? in the first day yesterday a texas children hospitals we had - winter? in the first day yesterday a i texas children hospitals we had tens of thousands of children vaccinated in our hospital system. so that's very exciting. whether or not we will drop off is in uncertain. it’s will drop off is in uncertain. it's a third of— will drop off is in uncertain. it's a third of it _ will drop off is in uncertain. it's a third of it does, will they need another dose somewhere down the line? �* .,, another dose somewhere down the line? �* . ., , , ., line? almost certainly it will be a two dose vaccine _ line? almost certainly it will be a two dose vaccine just _ line? almost certainly it will be a two dose vaccine just like - line? almost certainly it will be a two dose vaccine just like for- line? almost certainly it will be a two dose vaccine just like for the | two dose vaccine just like for the adults and possibly a booster six months to a year down the line after that. i months to a year down the line after that. ., ., ., ~ ., ,., months to a year down the line after that. ., ., ., ~ ., ., that. i want to talk to you about some research _ that. i want to talk to you about some research that's _ that. i want to talk to you about some research that's been - that. i want to talk to you about j some research that's been done that. i want to talk to you about - some research that's been done here in the uk and it's been reported in nature magazine this week. the university of oxford scientists that they've uncovered a gene that they think doubles the risk of lung failure and death from covid. and 60% of people from south asian
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backgrounds and 15% of people from european ancestry carry this gene. which perhaps shed some light on why certain communities here in the uk and in south asia have suffered disproportionately.— and in south asia have suffered disproportionately. certainly india has been devastated. _ disproportionately. certainly india has been devastated. i _ disproportionately. certainly india has been devastated. i think - disproportionately. certainly india has been devastated. i think the i has been devastated. i think the numbers that were reported in terms of the number of lives lost have been underestimated. but again is another wake—up call that we have to be more successful in vaccinating the entire world. especially the southern hemisphere we come up short the african continent is largely unvaccinated, so much of southeast asia, and latin america. we are such a brutal north south hemisphere divide was up that's one of the things we are trying to do now with our low cost protein vaccine that we hope will be read soon. we are learning a lot about this virus, we are learning how it binds tighter to the receptor, how it activates the
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receptor, how it replicates better, quite different from previous corona viruses. this is another important piece in uncovering why this is such an a horrific disease. i piece in uncovering why this is such an a horrific disease.— an a horrific disease. i suppose some peeple — an a horrific disease. i suppose some people reading _ an a horrific disease. i suppose some people reading that - an a horrific disease. i suppose some people reading that that| an a horrific disease. i suppose i some people reading that that will be worth the thing is, get the vaccine. and we need to get it out into our asian communities. that is absolutely right. _ into our asian communities. that is absolutely right. this _ into our asian communities. that is absolutely right. this has _ into our asian communities. that is absolutely right. this has to - into our asian communities. that is absolutely right. this has to be - into our asian communities. that is absolutely right. this has to be the | absolutely right. this has to be the global priority. unfortunately, our policymakers have focused on speed and innovation in order vaccinate north america and western europe, the uk, nordic countries as quickly as possible but it's left the rest of the world bereft of vaccine so we are trying to fill that gap.— are trying to fill that gap. always aood to are trying to fill that gap. always good to talk _ are trying to fill that gap. always good to talk to _ are trying to fill that gap. always good to talk to you. _ are trying to fill that gap. always good to talk to you. thank - are trying to fill that gap. always good to talk to you. thank you i are trying to fill that gap. always | good to talk to you. thank you for coming on. stay with us on bbc news, still to come — one in four brits are thinking of leaving theirjob in the next few months, according to a new survey. we'll discuss what employers should be doing to keep hold of staff.
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yorkshire county cricket club being banned from hosting international and major matches over the club's response to racism experienced by former player azeem rafiq. our correspondentjon donisson has spoken to the chairman of the england and wales cricket board, tom harrison over its decision. it's been clear over the last few days the situation that has emanated from what's going on in yorkshire has become a very significant issue for the wider game. once the situation became one which is clear there was going to be significant reputational damage ecb felt compelled to step in and take the supplementary action. what are you specifically concerned about how york shire county cricket club is being run? it's been clear that throughout this investigation we've had concerns about the manner in which decisions are made. and it's very clear that given the conclusion of the investigation
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and subsequent action that's been taken and respective disciplinary action to those implicated, it's very clear that there has been a lack of realisation of the seriousness of the issue and the implications for the wider game. again, the board had felt compelled to take this action we have today you mention the wider game, is it so york shire county cricket club specific problem or is it wider in england and wales cricket? right now this is clearly a situation which is impacted yourkshire, it's emanated from allegations that emerge from yorkshire county cricket club. the allegations however have an implication for the whole game. it's really important that ecb sends a message to cricket fans across this country that we will not stand for this, that racism and anything to do with racism and discrimination of any kind has absolutely no place in the game. that's the very clear message we wanted to send through the action we take in today.
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are you feeling restless in yourjob? are you already looking at what else is out there? well, you're not alone. in america it's called the great resignation and it's happening everywhere. after 18 months of pandemic—induced reflection there are many people who want more from their lives and a newjob is seemingly top of the list. in the us a record 4.3 million americans voluntarily quit theirjobs in august alone according to data from the us department of labor. meanwhile here in the uk a survey by the recruitment firm ranstad found almost one in four british workers are actively planning to changejobs in the next few months. it's a problem for employers. it costs money to find new talent, to train them up. it's a drain on productivity. not to mention the problem it is causing to supply chains. emma harvey is an hr consultant
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and owner of candid hr. shejoins me now from leeds. clearly there is a great number of people who've taken stock of their lives and want something different. are they moving jobs or are some of them going to work for themselves? i think it's a bit of both, to be honest. i think the pandemics given people time to reflect and evaluate what they like from life and what they'd like from work. and given them a real opportunity to go and do different things. what them a real opportunity to go and do different things.— different things. what are people lookin: for different things. what are people looking for are _ different things. what are people looking for are considering - different things. what are people looking for are considering in - different things. what are people looking for are considering in a i different things. what are people i looking for are considering in a new job? i looking for are considering in a new “ob? ~' , , looking for are considering in a new “ob? ~ , , , job? i think flexibility is huge. those employers _ job? i think flexibility is huge. those employers who - job? i think flexibility is huge. those employers who been i job? i think flexibility is huge. l those employers who been able job? i think flexibility is huge. i those employers who been able to demonstrate some level of flexibility which is always working from home, there are other ways to do it. the game changer in whether people stay at their current business or whether they look for opportunities elsewhere. [30 business or whether they look for opportunities elsewhere.- opportunities elsewhere. do you think that homeworking - opportunities elsewhere. do you think that homeworking is i opportunities elsewhere. do you think that homeworking is here | opportunities elsewhere. do you i think that homeworking is here to stay? i think that homeworking is here to sta ? ~ , think that homeworking is here to sta ? ~' , ., think that homeworking is here to sta ? ~ , ., stay? ithink it is. for those factors that _ stay? ithink it is. for those factors that in _ stay? ithink it is. for those factors that in able - stay? ithink it is. for those factors that in able it. i stay? ithink it is. for those factors that in able it. like i stay? i think it is. for those i factors that in able it. like office receptors where the hybrid model
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works for both social interaction and work events. but most working from home people really want to. i think we've learned that you don't really have to choose between work life balance there is just balance. so if you can do yourjob well and to do yourjob well while walking a dog or picking the kids up then it's a win—win situation. [30 dog or picking the kids up then it's a win-win situation.— dog or picking the kids up then it's a win-win situation. do you see any evidence in — a win-win situation. do you see any evidence in the _ a win-win situation. do you see any evidence in the adverts _ a win-win situation. do you see any evidence in the adverts that - evidence in the adverts that you're seeing forjobs? do you see any evidence that wages are going up? yes, i think some people in some areas, that's happening for sure. and where scenes are ridiculous increases and counter offers. what i would say is this is rarely about money. sure, it helps in its attractive at the start but it's not attractive at the start but it's not a long—term motivator. there are many other low—cost and no—cost options that employees can use to retain and attract people. what retain and attract people. what advice are _ retain and attract people. what advice are you _ retain and attract people. what advice are you giving _ retain and attract people. what advice are you giving to - retain and attract people. what advice are you giving to employees to retain talent?—
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to retain talent? there is a lot of thins, to retain talent? there is a lot of things, actually. _ to retain talent? there is a lot of things, actually. one _ to retain talent? there is a lot of things, actually. one of- to retain talent? there is a lot of things, actually. one of the i to retain talent? there is a lot of. things, actually. one of the things that were doing is saying it starts at recruitment so higher that is best people in the first place, onboarding is crucial so the first 30-90 onboarding is crucial so the first 30—90 days are vital. we advocate running engagement surveys or pulse surveys. so people can keep track of whether people are likely to stay with the business or move on. one tactic that we particularly like is quite contemporary approach is a stay interview. a lot of companies use exit interviews but we argue by that stage is too late because people have checked out mentally at least. if we do stay interviews with good people and find out what they say about the company, whether they like what they say that we can actually put things in place to keep them. �* , ., , actually put things in place to keep them. , , ., ., , them. are you seeing the shortages in particular— them. are you seeing the shortages in particular sectors, _ them. are you seeing the shortages in particular sectors, is _ them. are you seeing the shortages in particular sectors, is it _ them. are you seeing the shortages in particular sectors, is it low - in particular sectors, is it low skilled worker people just don't want to go back to those county jobs? is a jobs where you see older people, what kind of sectors are you looking at? i people, what kind of sectors are you lookin: at? ~ ., ., ., �*,
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looking at? i think a lot of it's been widely — looking at? i think a lot of it's been widely reported - looking at? i think a lot of it's been widely reported that i been widely reported that hospitality has struggled, said supply chain struggle, it's really those sectors. sorry for the supply chain and hospitality. and also those sectors where they've been unable or unwilling to offer flexibility. really interesting. thank you very much indeed. let s get some of the day s other news. australian police have charged a thirty—six year old man with the abduction of a four year old girl , clio smith. her disappearance from a campsite caused a national outcry. authorities say the man has no connection with the family. cleo was found playing with dolls inside a locked house eighteen days after she went missing. this is the moment a 34 year old man attempted to evade police capture byjumping from the top
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of a bridge in florida after losing control of a stolen van. lee county sheriff's office said it started when officers attempted to pull the vehcle over saturday evening — when the driver sped off. wait for it... and hejumped into the river. and hejumped into the river. he was later taken to a hospital and is facing charges of vehicle theft and eluding police. for the last year the good people of los angeles have been trying to solve a mystery. an unidentified flying object — high above the city has been spreading fear. three separate pilots have reported seeing this object hovering at 3,000 feet — and all of them came to the same conclusion. it was a man wearing a jetpack. who was this mysterious figure, and why had he never made himself known? the investigators have been pouring over police helicopter footage and have made a breakthrough — jetpack man is a halloween, life sized balloon.
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possibly depicting jack skellington, from the 93 tim burton film the nightmare before christmas. anyway — nightmare solved. hello. after a colder than average week so far temperatures are about to edge upwards once again. now with the cold weather this week there's been some frost, sunshine by day a sunny view from cumbria on thursday, big change after all the rain last week but things are now changing again. around this area of high pressure this weather front is moving southwards during friday has cloud, the chance of a little rain along at but more significantly is introducing somewhat milder air coming in from the atlantic. this is not a massive warm up, this isjust taking temperatures closer to the seasonal average once again. perhaps a little bit above at times into the start of next week. but that change is coming with much more cloud, some patchy rain especially
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into northwest scotland. a few brighter breaks at time through the east of high ground and particularly across eastern parts of the uk. but temperatures for more places back just into double figures. this is a westerly breeze starting to pick up rather than the northerly of the last couple of days. bonfire night you may encounter the odd spot of light rain and drizzle and some rain in northwest scotland but otherwise it's essentially dry. this area of low pressure will bring some wetter weather overnight and into saturday across scotland and northern ireland. turns things much windier as well. now some of this rain will be on the heavy side but it will weaken quite considerably as it moves its way southwards during saturday and into saturday night. so for wales and parts of england they'll be some patchy rain moving its way south, brighter skies following into parts of scotland for the end of the day. again, the wind picking up close to this low pressure system and around some of the coast of northern scotland the strong winds gusting
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60,70 miles an hour coupled by high tides will produce some dangerous conditions particularly in coastal areas. and further strong winds on sunday with showers blowing through here before the winds slowly ease later in the day. it'll be blustery across the uk, sunday is the dryer day of the weekend, some cloud, some spells of sunshine and feeling a bit cooler as those temperatures might suggest because of the wind. it'll be a chillier night again on sunday night going into monday with this ridge of high pressure but we will also see some more atlantic weather fronts approaching during monday. and they look as if they'll bring some outbreaks of rain into northern ireland and across scotland. where as much of wales and england will stay dry, this eastern area is seeing the lion's share of any sunshine on monday. across the board just about, temperatures are into double figures with up as we go from monday into tuesday we have this weather front then. it really isn't moving very quickly as it tries to edge southwards. also out in the atlantic we've got what's left of a tropical weather system that may
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just enhance some of the moisture feeding along this weather front and turn some of the outbreaks of rain, tuesday and wednesday a little bit heavier. but notice it really isn't moving very far, just starting to edge more towards parts of northern england at this stage. and what's left for the remainder of the week is the idea that we've always got high pressure close to southern areas of the uk, a low pressure system missing us to the west but the weather fronts hitting us with some rain. and that rains going to be more substantial toward scotland and northern ireland, it will weaken as it moves its way southwards. so for next week then, we are on the mild side, those loge pressure systems giving us the wettest weather to the north and west of the uk, closer to high pressure the further south and east you are, it will be dryer in comparison. and that is your latest weather for the week ahead.
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tonight at ten — the conservative mp owen paterson resigns after a furious backlash and a major government u—turn in the wake of a vote about his conduct. the former cabinet minister — who was found to have broken lobbying rules — was again facing suspension, after yesterday's vote to review the disciplinary system was put on hold. instead owen paterson announced he was leaving what he called "the cruel world of politics". also tonight... all right, david, you're under arrest on suspicion of the murders of wendy knell and caroline pierce. a hospital electrician admits murdering two women and sexually abusing at least 100 dead bodies in mortuaries in kent. yorkshire county cricket club has been suspended from hosting england matches, amid a row over racism at the club.
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cervical cancer has been virtually eradicated in young women

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