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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 4, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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or applied retrospectively. what you've got with this prime minister is a prime minister who is leading his troops through the sewer, and so it's a complete mess of their own making. the uk becomes the first country in the world to approve the use of an anti—viral pill to treat covid—19. a 63—year—old man is found responsible for killing a fellow resident — 93—year—old eileen dean — at a care home in south—east london. rates of cervical cancer are estimated to have been reduced by up to 90% in some age groups because of the success of the hpv vaccine. dozens of countries commit to ending their dependence on coal at the glasgow climate talks, but big producers like china refuse to sign up. and from paper to person — penpals finally meet, after exchanging letters throughout the pandemic. is that for me? yes! thank you!
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good afternoon and welcome to the programme. after a furious backlash from opposition parties and some conservative mps, downing street has signalled it's stepping back from plans to change the way mps' conduct is policed. yesterday, borisjohnson backed a shake—up of the standards watchdog, and supported mps who blocked the suspension of a former conservative minister, owen paterson, who'd contravened lobbying rules — a claim he denies. but labour, the liberal democrats and the snp refused to cooperate with the government's plans, and accused ministers of corruption. with the latest from westminster, here's our political correspondent, chris mason.
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the ayes to the right, 250. the noes to the left, 232. yesterday's vote in the moments after and in the hours since has caused a huge row. order. it was all about this man, owen paterson, who used to be a cabinet minister. he was found by an independent process to have broken the rules over the very well—paid work he did for companies alongside being an mp. but conservative mps were told to vote against him being suspended and back a shake—up of the system. that prompted an absolute hammering from the opposition, from some tories, from the newspapers and from the chair of the committee on standards in public life. the political system in this country does not belong to one party or even to one government. it is a common good that we have all inherited from our forebears and that we all have a responsibility to preserve and to improve.
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perhaps little wonder, then, that the government has now changed its mind. i fear last night's debate conflated the individual case with the general concern. this link needs to be broken. therefore i and others will be looking to work on a cross—party basis to achieve improvements in our system for future cases. we will bring forward more detailed proposals once there have been cross—party discussions. in other words, owen paterson will face a vote on being suspended and then the possibility of a by—election soon. it's no wonder that this morning they are waking up and asking themselves what on earth they have done because what they have done is corrupt. and often in a situation like this you have a prime minister who is trying to lead on public standards. what you have with this prime minister is one who is leading his troops through the sewer. the labour mp who chairs the commons standards committee is glad mr paterson will now face a vote on his suspension because... the terrible thing about yesterday
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was you cannot change the rules at the very last minute for a named individual. that is, by definition, the opposite ofjustice. that is injustice, it is the polar opposite of the rule of law. plenty of mps on all sides are open—mouthed at what has happened here. and the fate of owen paterson, plus the system for regulating mps' behaviour, hasn't yet been worked out. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, joins me. the sound of screeching tyres in parliament this morning. is everyone happy now? plat parliament this morning. is everyone ha-- now? ., ., , parliament this morning. is everyone ha-- now? ., , parliament this morning. is everyone happy now?— happy now? not really, but probably ha ier happy now? not really, but probably happier than — happy now? not really, but probably happier than they — happy now? not really, but probably happier than they were _ happy now? not really, but probably happier than they were last - happy now? not really, but probably happier than they were last night, i happier than they were last night, certainly. yes, it is a screeching u—turn. i don't think the government really had much choice this morning in the face of the opposition from the labour party and others in
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parliament, as well as many conservative mps who were deeply uneasy at what the government was doing, as you saw in chris's report there. the attempt to pursue this new cross party committee which would look at changing the way the rules that mps have to abide by were written, potentially, but certainly how they were enforced just wasn't going to work without the support of parties across the house. it is an area in which the government can only go so far in trying to assert its will without cross—party support and so, that is why, i think, we saw jacob rees—mogg stand up this morning and announced that the government was not going to proceed with that. it will have to try to come up with a different way forward. it has said it wants to do that on a cross—party basis, but it is not exactly starting now from a point of much goodwill, having annoyed so many people in the last 24 annoyed so many people in the last 2a hours in the way it has pursued this attempt to reform the whole
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system. so this attempt to reform the whole s stem. ., ., ,, , ., system. so what happens to owen paterson new? _ system. so what happens to owen paterson now? because _ system. so what happens to owen paterson now? because he - system. so what happens to owen paterson now? because he was i system. so what happens to owen l paterson now? because he was due system. so what happens to owen - paterson now? because he was due to be suspended for 30 days. it is still going to sit as an mp until another investigation? it is unlikely there _ another investigation? it is unlikely there will - another investigation? it is unlikely there will be - another investigation? it 3 unlikely there will be another investigation. but there will be another vote. investigation. but there will be anothervote. it investigation. but there will be another vote. it seems from that report from the parliamentary commissioner will stand and the parliamentary committee on standards, their recommendation as to the sanction owen paterson should face will stand and we will expect to vote possibly next week, but we are not sure exactly when, specifically on owen paterson and whether he should be suspended for 30 days. that will now be treated as an individual case, without any accompanying attempts to reform the system in general, which is what got the government into so much trouble. so he may well still end up being suspended. last night he came out very forcefully and said he welcomed the vote in parliament as an opportunity to clear his name, but it is unclear really now whether he
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will get any more opportunity to do that. g ., . . will get any more opportunity to do that. g ., ., ., ., , that. ok, jonathan, thanks very much. joining me now is the labour's shadow international trade secretary, emily thornberry. doesn't anyone who is facing suspension have the right to appeal? yes, and there are rights to appeal within this system, so you go before the commission and if you don't like what she says you can go before the committee and then if you don't like that you can go before the whole house, so there are a number of different ways in which you can appeal and remember this system was first put in place when we had a very long period of conservative government, when mps began to think it was ok... tory mps, frankly, who began to think it was ok to accept wads of cash in brown envelopes in order to ask questions. and so, these rules were introduced, and now after a long period of conservative rule again we have mps thinking again that it is ok to accept, this
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time, half £1 million, it would seem, of cash. i don't know how many brown envelopes that would take, but to take wads of cash in order to lobby on behalf of private companies and for his friends to say it is ok. you're talking of course about 1995, when these rules were introduced and the cash for questions scandal then. owen paterson claims that there were 17 character witnesses he wanted to call and he wasn't able to do that, and also that katherine stone had actually publicly said he was guilty before she even took evidence from him. he before she even took evidence from him. . . . , , . before she even took evidence from him. ,, ., . him. he accepts that he received more than _ him. he accepts that he received more than half _ him. he accepts that he received more than half £1 _ him. he accepts that he received more than half £1 million - him. he accepts that he received more than half £1 million worth | him. he accepts that he received | more than half £1 million worth of money and he accepts that... i was not clear on — money and he accepts that... i was not clear on that _ money and he accepts that... i was not clear on that point _ money and he accepts that... i was not clear on that point either. - money and he accepts that... i was not clear on that point either. i - not clear on that point either. i thought it was £100,000 a year over two years, so that is £200,000, is it? �* , , . ' . it? let'sjust cut the difference. hundreds of _ it? let'sjust cut the difference. hundreds of thousands - it? let'sjust cut the difference. hundreds of thousands of - it? let'sjust cut the difference. i hundreds of thousands of pounds, it? let'sjust cut the difference. - hundreds of thousands of pounds, he accepted hundreds of thousands of pounds from private companies and lobbied more than 1a times. you
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know, asking government to do things that was in the interest of those companies. that is cash for questions, that is cash for lobbying, that is corruption, that is wrong and... owen paterson doesn't seem to think it is wrong... and ya, if he thinks it is a defence that it and ya, if he thinks it is a defence thatitis and ya, if he thinks it is a defence that it is cash for whistle—blowing, then that is what he thinks, but what i would have thought that he may be on his own on that one and that the public think that mps are paid enough money as it is to do theirjob properly and theirjob is to look after their constituents not to look after their constituents not to put themselves out so that they can be bought up by companies or giving them hundreds of thousands of pounds to ask questions on behalf of those companies. it is corruption, it is the way that our... you know, we have had rules against this since the 17th century, quite frankly, but the 17th century, quite frankly, but the current regime is since the last time we had a long period of conservative government, when tory mps started taking cash for questions and now we are back here again and last night we had the
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government trying to overturn the whole system and say, we are going to have a new system completely because we don't like the fact that our meat has been found guilty. we are going to change it and we are not going to allow him to be suspended. this morning, we hear that they are not going to do that. it is very unclear what they are going to do instead. we have had a system where it has been a balanced committee, where half of the committee, where half of the committee have been members of the public and half politicians. the suggestion they were putting forward last night was that it was all politicians, the majority conservatives, chaired by a conservatives, chaired by a conservative and that they were going to change all the rules. i5 conservative and that they were going to change all the rules. is it any mitigation _ going to change all the rules. is it any mitigation that the pressure of this investigation contributed, it is clear to him, anyway, to the suicide of his wife?— is clear to him, anyway, to the suicide of his wife? that is awful. i mean, suicide of his wife? that is awful. i mean. it — suicide of his wife? that is awful. i mean. it is _ suicide of his wife? that is awful. i mean, it is absolutely _ suicide of his wife? that is awful. i mean, it is absolutely dreadful. i mean, it is absolutely dreadful that that happened and if the two things are linked, then that is dreadful. but he still took money in order to ask questions and to lobby on behalf of companies. and that is
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still the case. so, you know, he has to be... the case took two years. he has only been suspended for one month. there might be some people who might think he could have been suspended for much longer and it may be that his personal circumstances were taken into account in terms of mitigation. i don't know one way or the other. all i know is we have had a system, it has been running for years... there might be some changes that it might be in the interest of everybody to change and you do that on a cross—party basis. what you don't do is you don't say to the public, thank you very much for the 80 seat majority. we can now do whatever we like. we can do whatever we like, change whatever rules we like and quite frankly we can ignore the rules when it comes to murky funding of the prime minister's flat and upstairs at number ten. we can try and get round the rules when it comes to bullying, you know, with priti patel in the home office. we can decide we are going to change the rules completely when it comes to internal cases and change the
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rules completely when it comes to judicial review, when the government can be taken to court when they have acted illegally. they want to change the rules on that. the point is this. we have a government at the moment who thinks they can do whatever they like, moment who thinks they can do whateverthey like, but moment who thinks they can do whatever they like, but they are omnipotent, and we have a system, we have had a system until now of checks and balances, where you will get the courts holding the government to account, by government ministers have to behave in a certain way, where there are people whose job it is to uphold public decency, proper standards. yet this morning we had a secretary of state on the television saying that the independent parliamentary commission on standards should resign. this is where we are. ok. on standards should resign. this is where we are-— where we are. ok, all right. emily thornberry. _ where we are. ok, all right. emily thornberry, thank _ where we are. ok, all right. emily thornberry, thank you _ where we are. ok, all right. emily thornberry, thank you very - where we are. ok, all right. emily thornberry, thank you very much l where we are. ok, all right. emily i thornberry, thank you very much for joining us on bbc news. the first pill designed to treat covid has been approved by the uk medicines regulator. the tablet will be given twice a day to vulnerable patients recently diagnosed with the disease. joining me now is our health correspondent,
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katharine da costa. the health secretary has described this as a game changer and all the indications are that it will be? yes, this is really good news, particularly for vulnerable groups, so the elderly and people with a weakened immune system who may not respond well to covert vaccines. before we had treatments that were given in hospitals or patients that were seriously ill. this is the first drug that can be given as a pill at home in the early stages of an infection. clinical trials found that the tablet half the risk of hospitalisation and death in at—risk patients. patients will be given a tablet twice a day and the treatment works by stopping the virus making copies of itself, so it reduces the levels of virus in the body... yes. levels of virus in the body... yes, they described _ levels of virus in the body... yes, they described as _ levels of virus in the body... yes, they described as mutating - levels of virus in the body... yes, they described as mutating itself to death, which i thought was a good description. 50 death, which i thought was a good description-— description. so today the uk regulator. — description. so today the uk regulator, the _ description. so today the uk regulator, the nhra, - description. so today the uk i regulator, the nhra, approved description. so today the uk - regulator, the nhra, approved it, said it was effective and said it
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should be given as soon as possible after getting a good positive covid test or within five days of symptom starting and it will be given to people with mild—to—moderate covid with at least one risk factor, so that could be obesity, heart disease, old age. 50 that could be obesity, heart disease, old age.— that could be obesity, heart disease, old age. that could be obesity, heart disease, old are. , disease, old age. so when will they be dispensed? _ disease, old age. so when will they be dispensed? yes, _ disease, old age. so when will they be dispensed? yes, so _ disease, old age. so when will they be dispensed? yes, so the - disease, old age. so when will they be dispensed? yes, so the us - disease, old age. so when will they be dispensed? yes, so the us drug| be dispensed? yes, so the us drug com an be dispensed? yes, so the us drug company behind — be dispensed? yes, so the us drug company behind this _ be dispensed? yes, so the us drug company behind this thinks - be dispensed? yes, so the us drug company behind this thinks they i be dispensed? yes, so the us drug| company behind this thinks they can produce about 10 million courses by the end of the year. the uk government has pre—ordered nearly half a million courses. we don't know how much it is paying for that. the us has ordered that 1.7 million and is paying about 500 pounds per course. the uk government is in talks with the nhs to see how quickly they can roll it out to patients and this will be done through a national study as soon as possible. we have not been given exact details of the timescale yet and there are still some questions about the logistics of how it will be made accessible. it is worth pointing out this is not an alternative to vaccination. people are still urged to get their
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vaccines, their boosters, theirflu jabs, but this is hugely important because no vaccine is 100% effective and some people can't have vaccines or don't respond well to them, so molnupiravir is another weapon in the fight against covid and is helping those most at risk from serious illness, reducing hospital admissions and therefore ultimately pressure on the nhs. ok. admissions and therefore ultimately pressure on the nhs.— admissions and therefore ultimately pressure on the nhs. ok. thank you ve much pressure on the nhs. ok. thank you very much indeed. _ the first major study looking at the effectiveness of a vaccine against the virus most common in causing cervical cancer has found its cutting cases by nearly 90%. researchers say it's so successful, it could mean vaccinated women will need far fewer smear tests in the future, and the charity cancer research uk, says the findings are "historic". the jabs are now routinely offered to schoolchildren between the ages of 11 and 13, as dominic hughes reports. almost all cases of cervical cancer are linked to the human papilloma virus. the hpv vaccine programme
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targeting the virus itself was introduced in the uk in 2008, when girls aged between 11 and 13 were first offered the jab and since september 2019 boys of the same age have also been eligible. it is an issue that is close to laura's heart, after she was diagnosed with cervical cancer in her late 20s. she is keen for her 11—year—old son to get the vaccine when he is old enough. i get the vaccine when he is old enou . h. . get the vaccine when he is old enou:h. ., ., , get the vaccine when he is old enouh. ., ., , , get the vaccine when he is old enou:h. ., ., , ., , enough. i have always been really oen enough. i have always been really 0 en with enough. i have always been really open with them _ enough. i have always been really open with them about _ enough. i have always been really open with them about my - enough. i have always been really open with them about my story i open with them about my story anyway, so the word is always floating around the house anyway because when i was diagnosed i had never heard of hpv, i didn't know what it was until i got that letter, so he will be well educated on why he is having it and what it is for. now the first real—world study of the vaccine shows it has had a dramatic effect. cervical cancer rates were 87% lower in girls who were offered the vaccine when aged 12 and 13. it is estimated that by mid-2019, 12 and 13. it is estimated that by mid—2019, the 12 and 13. it is estimated that by mid-2019, the hpvjab 12 and 13. it is estimated that by mid—2019, the hpvjab programme had prevented around a50 cervical
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cancers and around 17,000 pre—cancers, all of which would have needed some medical intervention. when i first saw the results, ifelt when i first saw the results, i felt you joy. _ when i first saw the results, i felt you joy. but — when i first saw the results, i felt you joy, but also wanted to check them _ you joy, but also wanted to check them to— you joy, but also wanted to check them to make sure that it was real. yes, _ them to make sure that it was real. yes. 35— them to make sure that it was real. yes. 35 years — them to make sure that it was real. yes, 35 years ago, cervical cancer was out _ yes, 35 years ago, cervical cancer was out of— yes, 35 years ago, cervical cancer was out of control in this country, the screening was not working, rates were going _ the screening was not working, rates were going up in women and to go from_ were going up in women and to go from that— were going up in women and to go from that situation from that situation _ from that situation from that situation to today, where we can really _ situation to today, where we can really see — situation to today, where we can really see the end is in sight, it is a tremendous achievement. people are exposed — is a tremendous achievement. people are exposed to _ is a tremendous achievement. people are exposed to hpv _ is a tremendous achievement. people are exposed to hpv when _ is a tremendous achievement. people are exposed to hpv when they - is a tremendous achievement. people l are exposed to hpv when they become sexually active, so while there is an nhs capture programme for women and men up to the age of 25, the benefits for those who are older are minimal. 50 benefits for those who are older are minimal. . .., benefits for those who are older are minimal. . .. ,. , minimal. so cervical screening still remains important. _ minimal. so cervical screening still remains important. as _ minimal. so cervical screening still remains important. as the - minimal. so cervical screening still remains important. as the vaccine | remains important. as the vaccine gets taken up add more and more people are vaccinated, we might see changes to what the screening programme looks like, so that might be how often you go in and what the
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test looks like, but for now it is still really important that if you are invited to cervical screening to consider going. are invited to cervical screening to consider going-— consider going. currently cervical cancer claims _ consider going. currently cervical cancer claims the _ consider going. currently cervical cancer claims the lives _ consider going. currently cervical cancer claims the lives of - consider going. currently cervical cancer claims the lives of around | cancer claims the lives of around 850 women in the uk every year, but researchers believe that in the future a combination of the vaccine and screening could mean hardly anyone goes on to develop the disease. dominic hughes, bbc news. you are watching bbc news. let's just bring you some breaking news we are getting from birmingham crown court. but is it a 1a—year—old gunman and three other teenagers aged between 16 and 18 have been found guilty at birmingham crown court of murdering the schoolboy keon lincoln. jurors are still considering a charge of murder against a fifth defendant. 15—year—old keon lincoln was stabbed, and shot outside his house in birmingham injanuary this year. we'll be hearing the latest from our correspondence at birmingham crown court in the next few minutes on
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that verdict, but as i say the jurors are still considering their verdicts on other charges. the bank of england has left interest rates unchanged at 0.1%. there was much speculation they might rise, head off surging inflation. our economics correspondent, andy verity, is at the bank. this is the bank of england. confounded all the commentators, and a? , ., , ., , ., confounded all the commentators, and a? , ., , ., ~ ., a? yes, that is right, and you know, there have — a? yes, that is right, and you know, there have been _ a? yes, that is right, and you know, there have been 134 _ a? yes, that is right, and you know, there have been 134 meetings - a? yes, that is right, and you know, there have been 134 meetings of- a? yes, that is right, and you know, j there have been 134 meetings of the there have been 13a meetings of the bank of england's monetary policy committee since they cut rates to emergency lows way back in 2009. of those 1aa meetings, they have only actually moves rates five times and they went down first of all, then they went down first of all, then they went down first of all, then they went back up to 0.75%, then the went down to not .1%, so the obvious question the bank of england is being asked, the decision—makers there in a press consonance earlier, they were asked if you're going to
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have the highest inflation next year you have had for ten years, 5%, why are you not doing anything about it or raising interest rates? the answer is they don't yet know how much that rise in the cost of living is global and how much it's is global and how much its domestic. you have had wholesale energy prices around the world surging as demand comes back, as global economies reopen, but supply cannot rise to meet it. there's not enough petrol, for example, to meet or be demand, which is why you have a record price of petrol. the bank of england hopes that is a passing phenomenon and they hope it will rebalance itself, so that the energy prices start to come back down again on the back half of next year. what they don't yet know about is domestic price pressures, so there are example there are about 1 million people on furlough at the end of september when the scheme went up. i don't yet know how many of those people are going to end up on the dole queue and therefore how many people will be available to employers and of course that determines how much pressure there is on employers to raise wages and
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then perhaps to have to raise prices to cover the extra costs, so they are waiting to get more data before they raise rates, but they are warning they will have to do in the next year and that the official rate may rise from its all—time low now not .1% to a whole one percentage point by the end of next year. ok. point by the end of next year. ok, and at point by the end of next year. 0k, andy at threadneedle street, thank you very much indeed. scientists are warning that carbon emissions are set to rebound this year to levels last seen before the pandemic. new research predicts that the amount of co2 released into the atmosphere will rise by almost the same amount that it decreased in 2020. experts say the report underlines the urgency of action needed at summits like cop26. meanwhile, at the climate change conference in glasgow, a further 18 countries have agreed to a plan to stop using coal power plants. it brings the total number of countries backing the plan to a0. but some of the world's largest coal users, including china and the us, have not signed up. coal is the single biggest
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contributor to climate change. drjeni miller is executive director at the global climate and health alliance — shejoins me now. it is pretty clear, isn't it, about the impact of climate change is having on people's health around the world? what is the most serious issue that we are facing at the moment? is that air pollution or is it what climate change is doing to people's habitats and migration and being caught up in wild fires and flooding? being caught up in wild fires and floodin: ? , ., , ., ., flooding? yes, i mean, these are all really significant _ flooding? yes, i mean, these are all really significant impacts. _ flooding? yes, i mean, these are all really significant impacts. it - flooding? yes, i mean, these are all really significant impacts. it is - really significant impacts. it is hard to say that one is worse than the other. clearly the air pollution issueis the other. clearly the air pollution issue is a major, major impact and this is driven by the burning of fossil fuels that drives climate change and is a major source of air pollution. air pollution kills over 7 million people a year, so addressing climate change by phasing out fossil fuels and moving away
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from coal is a fantastic first step. you know, that would have significant improvements, yield significant improvements, yield significant improvements, yield significant improvements for people's health right away, but these other impacts are increasing, we are seeing a heatwave in canada this year killed hundreds of people. we saw 80% of the population of australia are exposed to smoke from wildfires. wildfires in greece and turkey. flooding has been seen around the world, 17 people died in around the world, 17 people died in a hospitalflood in mexico this around the world, 17 people died in a hospital flood in mexico this year stop so all of these impacts are significant and unfortunately growing, as the earth warms. just focusin: growing, as the earth warms. just focusing on _ growing, as the earth warms. just focusing on air _ growing, as the earth warms. just focusing on air pollution, then, can this be turned around quite quickly? when you think of major sporting events, the olympics and things like that, when cars are banned you see quite a sharp uptick, don't you, relatively quickly in people's health? , ., , ., , , health? yes, that is absolutely ri . ht. health? yes, that is absolutely riuht. if health? yes, that is absolutely
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right- if we _ health? yes, that is absolutely right. if we face _ health? yes, that is absolutely right. if we face out _ health? yes, that is absolutely right. if we face out burning i health? yes, that is absolutely i right. if we face out burning coal, burning fossilfuels, reduce emissions from or eliminate emissions from or eliminate emissions from or eliminate emissions from transportation, the air quality improvements happen very, very quickly and the health benefits come right behind that very quickly, so countries who take these actions will see those benefits in their own country in their own populations quite quickly indeed. what about hunger? we talk about flooding and people being forced out of their homes, but what about crop declines as well through soaring temperatures and science not really being able to keep up with that? yes, unfortunately climate change has driven significant exacerbated significant straps in several countries across africa and this has really driven a number of communities kind of to the brink of famine. there are concerns that have been raised by some of the climate research that we could see multiple crop failures in multiple
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breadbasket areas of the world concurrently if we keep on the path that we are on. so it really is a file a dire scenario that we are facing, if we don't tackle this issue. but on the flip side, if we do, there are real opportunities to improve health through the actions that we need to take for climate change. that we need to take for climate chan . e. . , that we need to take for climate chance. ., , , i, ., change. that is the physical health as - ect. change. that is the physical health aspect- what _ change. that is the physical health aspect. what about _ change. that is the physical health aspect. what about the _ change. that is the physical health aspect. what about the mental- change. that is the physical health i aspect. what about the mental health aspects? not only in the developing world, but in the developed world as well, especially perhaps with younger people, children and young adults worried about their future? yes. absolutely. this has really been an emerging issue that has kind of been coming up and been more on the radar, actually, in the health community for the last several years, as more and more people really dialling, the risk and the threat of climate change, people are worried, concerned, it is affecting their mental health. on top of that, people who experienced some of the
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traumatic events like extreme storms and heatwaves and wildfires and so forth can end up with ptsd, so, you know, lingering mental health effects from the trauma of those experiences. and, of course, anybody who is forced to migrate from their home really is extremely vulnerable to mental health issues as well as a number of others. or to mental health issues as well as a number of others.— number of others. dr jeni miller at glasaow number of others. dr jeni miller at glasgow cop26. — number of others. dr jeni miller at glasgow copzs, thank _ number of others. dr jeni miller at glasgow cop26, thank you. - sainsbury s has announced profits of more than half a billion pounds for the six months to the end of september. that compares to a statutory loss of £137 million for the prevous six months. profits have been boosted by higher grocery sales, lower covid costs, and exceptional income after settling legal disputes. sainsbury s ceo says the business is in a good position for christmas, despite continued supply chain problems.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. talking of christmas, it is certainly feeling a lot chillier around london! hello, it may be chilly, but there is plenty of fine weather out there this afternoon before increasing cloud over the next few days and increasing rain and temperatures edge up a bit. some showers this afternoon along the coasts and parts of east anglia and south—east england, brushing pembrokeshire, cornwall, one ortwo for northern ireland, outbreaks of rain pushing into north—west scotland. a chilly day, but yes hopefully some sunshine after the show as well compensate. tonight spilling on across scotland and northern ireland and northern england with some patchy rain and heavy bursts in north—west scotland, with some cloud, temperatures are edging upwards tonight, still some frost across parts of wales and the southern of england and some sunshine tomorrow in south—east england before it clouds over. overall, tomorrow is a cloudy day, turning a bit breezy as well. cloud across western parts and a bit of
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light rain and drizzle, especially across hills, and more persistent rain across north—west scotland. it is a touch milder.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... a government u—turn as it backtracks on plans to overhaul the disciplinary process, for mp5. while there is a very strong feeling on both sides of the house that there is a need for an appeals process, there is equally a strong feeling that this should not be based on a single case or applied retrospectively. what you got with this prime minister— what you got with this prime minister is a prime minister who is leading _ minister is a prime minister who is leading his — minister is a prime minister who is leading his troops to the sewer, and so it is— leading his troops to the sewer, and so it is a _ leading his troops to the sewer, and so it is a complete mess of their own making.
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the uk has become the first country in the world to approve the use of an anti—viral pill to treat covid—19. four teenagers are found guilty of murdering 1a—year—old schoolboy keon lincoln outside his home in handworth. a jury are still considering their deliberations on a fifth defendent. a sixty—three—year old man is found responsible for killing a fellow resident — 90 three—year—old eileen dean — at a care home in south east london dozens of countries commit to ending their dependence on coal at the glasgow climate talks, but big producers like china,refuse to sign up. and we're just going to go back to that news that a 1a—year—old gunman and three other teenagers aged between 16 and 18 have been found guilty at birmingham crown court of murdering schoolboy keon lincoln. jurors are still considering a charge of murder against a fifth defendant. phil mackie is at
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birmingham crown court. vicious, birmingham crown court. brutal murderjust outsic his vicious, brutal murderjust outside his home. vicious, brutal murder 'ust outside his home. , ., ., his home. yes, during one of the many looked _ his home. yes, during one of the many looked on. _ his home. yes, during one of the many looked on. he _ his home. yes, during one of the many looked on. he had - his home. yes, during one of the many looked on. he had spent i his home. yes, during one of the. many looked on. he had spent the his home. yes, during one of the - many looked on. he had spent the day on virtual lessons at school and was talking to a friend at four o'clock in the afternoon when a car pulled up in the afternoon when a car pulled up outside the street and outjumped a group of teenagers, one of them with a gun, he was 1a, and we can't name him, and a group of others with knives. they quickly chase keon lincoln, stabbing him in shooting him while he had foam on the ground. it was a terrible scene because that that he was played in front of jurors after it was caught on cctv and whole attacks lasted more than 30 seconds and it was a very brutal and short, sharp attack. now, those teenagers you mention there, 1a—year—olds and a six—year—old who today can be mentioned were convicted of murder, 218 volt we can mention domain name, they were also convicted of murder.
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there is a fifth defendant, another 18—year—old, who wasn't there on the day, kieran donaldson. he is alleged tjy day, kieran donaldson. he is alleged by the prosecution to supply the weapons. he is also charged with murder, he denies the charge, and thejury has been murder, he denies the charge, and the jury has been sent home for the day and told to come back tomorrow to continue its deliberations on that fifth defendant. the case itself was particularly tragic because, among the first people on the were keon lincoln's twin sister and his mother. his mother has been in court throughout this trial. as i said, it will be back tomorrow to continue deliberating on the fifth defendant but also villa today that they will be sentenced for phil, thanks very much indeed. some more breakin: thanks very much indeed. some more breaking news — thanks very much indeed. some more breaking newsjust _ thanks very much indeed. some more breaking newsjust in _ thanks very much indeed. some more breaking newsjust in the _ thanks very much indeed. some more breaking newsjust in the last - breaking news just in the last couple of moments. that is the owen paterson the 65 field mp for north shropshire caught up in lobbying row in parliament last night has decided
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to stand down as an mp for north shropshire. —— 65—year—old mp. he has said he will remain a public servant but outside the full world of politics. it has huge force in the commons after the government decided to whip its mps to whip its mps —— caused a huge force. whip its mps —— caused a huge force. whip its mps to revise the standards commission for mps after it found that owen paterson had egregiously lobbied 1a firms in 2016 to 2018, earning more than £100,000 a year from both firms. one was run docks and the other company was lynn's country foods. —— one was randox. some said he was whistle—blower and
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others decided he was guilty and described it as the most egregious form of lobbying and a mixture of private and public advocacy and she had suspended him for 30 days. now, as it stood a few hours ago, owen paterson, his sentence was due to be handed down again in the next few weeks but in the last few minutes, as i say, owen paterson, the 65—year—old mp for north shropshire has decided to stand down from the cruel world of politics. he is a former minister. very sadly, he said that his wife, the events of this investigation had led to the suicide of his wife rose. let's get the latest from chris mason who joins us now from westminster. chris, so he has gone but the row over the investigation into mps who error and flout the regulations continues. extraordinary 2a hours on the side
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with owen paterson hibbert westminster. from 2a hours ago where for quite a while he was staring at the prospect of suspension, a sizeable suspension from the commons and the prospect of a recall politician that could have led to a by—election to the events of yesterday afternoon when conservative mps were instructed to vote in a direction which would postpone any sanction for owen paterson but also look ahead at the whole business of how mps conduct is managed. the government then did an about turn over night after getting the absolute about turn in the newspapers, hammering from critics, hammering from the commission for standards in public life in deep, deep discomfort from conservative mps and we have this morning from jacob rees—mogg the lead with a house that, yes, mps would look at the way that mps conduct was examined and ensure that there was some sort of appeals mechanism in it
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but, crucially, that will be detached from the particular case of owen paterson because that was real concern for many mps. opposition mps via some conservatives as well that the government was attempting to rewrite the rule book because of a particular case. now, yesterday meaning mr paterson was a relieved man. he felt that he was going to get what he felt as proper justice, some sort of appeal, some sort of sense that his case could be re—examined but with the government is money going back on its word from last night, detaching that examination of the broader rules from the case it passes and that left mr paterson looking at another vote about his own conduct the coming days. chris bryant, the labour mp who chairs the standards committee was that happiness in this monday and with that would have been the prospect of potentially a 30 day suspension of the commons. with that, the prospect of a recall petition laid down an mp�*s constituency and if 10% of
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registered eligible electors signed that petition and there is a by—election and facing the prospect of that suspension and the potential for a by—election, mr paterson announcing injust for a by—election, mr paterson announcing in just the last couple of minutes that he will tender his resignation as the mp for north shropshire. technically, mps can't actually apply, they have to apply for a crown appointment which is their right to serve as an mp. that is a technicality and will now let joe make no doubt happen in the coming hours of the coming days but mr paterson afraid gifts if spratly difficult cyberman as personal life, as you mention, rose, his wife, took her life last year —— desperately difficult time in his personal life. he said the events around that contributed to her state of prior to taking a lie. contributed to her state of prior to taking a lie-— taking a lie. forgive me for interrupting _ taking a lie. forgive me for interrupting you _ taking a lie. forgive me for interrupting you but - taking a lie. forgive me for interrupting you but i - taking a lie. forgive me for interrupting you but i just l taking a lie. forgive me for i interrupting you but i just got taking a lie. forgive me for - interrupting you but i just got a interrupting you but ijust got a longer statement from owen paterson ijust longer statement from owen paterson i just want to read out for our viewers. owen paterson said... i have today after consultation with my family, with much sadness,
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decided to resign as the mp for north shropshire. the last two years have been an indescribable nightmare for my family and me. my integrity, which i can hold very dear, has been repeatedly and publicly questioned. i maintain that i am totally innocent of what i have been accused of and i acted in old times in the interest of public health and safety. i, my family and those closest to me know the same. i am unable to clear my name under the current system. far, far worse than having my honesty questioned is of course the suicide of my beloved wife rose. she was everything to my children and me. we miss her everyday in the world will always be grey, sad and ultimately meaningless without her. he went on to say the last few days have been horrible for us, worst of all sane people including mps publicly mock and divide those's death and belittle our pain and children's and children have ever asked me to leave politics for my sake as well as theirs and i agree with them. i do not want my wife's death and my resignation to
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become a political football and above all i was for my family. just like i always put my family first. obviously, he seemed under pressure from his family and children to stand down from his post butjust in terms of the cross party support if there was any for him in the city because, as you say, a big, sizeable tory rebellion last night, they were furious about what has happened as well. how much support was there for owen paterson and what he had done across the house. tiara owen paterson and what he had done across the house.— across the house. two things worth mentioning. — across the house. two things worth mentioning, tim. _ across the house. two things worth mentioning, tim. first, _ across the house. two things worth mentioning, tim. first, there - across the house. two things worth mentioning, tim. first, there was l mentioning, tim. first, there was universal, whiteford and the public support within parliament and beyond because of the circumstances with mr paterson's fibre life, the loss of his wife. on that, every mp would acknowledge he has had a very, very difficult time over recent months. but plenty made the argument that you had to examine what he had done and detach the human element, the
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understandably huge human element from it in allowing that independent commissioner to come to a dispassionate conclusion about his behaviour and detached from that, even from mr paterson's case in particular, was a view from many mps that if you're going to have an independent system of the regulation of mp�*s behaviour that sets down the views and thatn —— sets down the rules and forms a judgment as to whether other mps of each those rules are not then it has to be properly independent and shouldn't be able to be overturned at the whim of a government with a sizeable majority in a couple of hours on a wednesday afternoon after a process that has lasted a couple of years to come to its conclusion. now, there is a separate argument that some make that the process in their view took far too long and that made things even harderfor mr took far too long and that made things even harder for mr paterson, particularly in the context of his private life but, yes, that was the view of plenty of mps. private life but, yes, that was the view of plenty of mp5. you cannot go about changing the rules to suit the circumstances of a particular
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individual, even if there are plenty of mps who also acknowledge that there were elements of the system that could do with the vision and once we had last night, the opposition parties saying to the government, look, you want to look again at how these rules are formulated and whether or not there needs to be a better appeals process, then you're going to have to do that on a cross—party basis and we simply won't take parts of the government was staring at a situation where it would have been trying to re—devise a set of rules that would have applied across the house of commons whilst dividing them, cooking them up, involving just the governing party. in other words, a situation where the executive, the government, is deciding the rules under which ledgers the, the commons, the mp5, would be to conduct their affairs, and the simple reality was, that was going to be unsustainable. nothing was going to be to come out of that that would command the support of the house of commons. hence that's above the jacob rees—mogg morning
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this morning the men from mr paterson points my point of view she was pretty much back where it started with this robot was initially delivered. it wasn't going to see a period months passed before the examination of his case under different rules, he was going to be examined under the existing rules and mps would have a simple decision to make as to whether or not to back this suggested suspension or not. and without being told by their parties how they should vote. so this particular case is cole's real anguish for many mps because they were conscious that the vast majority of people beyond westminster there would be huge want of interest on the specifics of this particular case but there will be a senseis particular case but there will be a sense is reflected in newspapers this morning including those that are often supportive of the government that this just like mps trying to murk their own homework and let one of their own side because it was a conservative mp who overturned this perspective suspension, getting one of their mix of the hook, and that that looks and plenty of mps said this this morning
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publicly and privately, absolutely terrible, as far as the conduct of parliament and the elected chamber is concerned, so, for that reason, there was a real desire to see something done on the next consequence of that was leaving mr paterson feeling pretty exposed in the cruel world of politics, as he described it, and so he has decided to stand down as mp rather than face the prospect, which wasn't guaranteed by any means, but the prospect potentially of a by—election in order to keep a seat in the house of commons. by-election in order to keep a seat in the house of commons.- by-election in order to keep a seat in the house of commons. this, stay with us because _ in the house of commons. this, stay with us because another _ in the house of commons. this, stay with us because another person - in the house of commons. this, stay with us because another person just| with us because another person just running with us. ijust want to repeat the breaking news that owen paterson former minister has stood down from his position as mp for north shropshire. owen paterson due to face a 30 day suspension for egregious lobbying, as it was described, for two firms which pay to more than £100,000 a year between 2016 and 2018. the mp, who lost his wife who took her own life last year were saying that he had, after consultation with his family and
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with much sadness, decided to resign as mp for north shropshire in the last two years have been in indescribable nightmare of his family and me. my integrity, which i hold very dear, has been repeatedly and publicly questioned. we will you more of that statement in a moment but let's go back to chris mason who is with us at westminster because chris, what is interesting is that there is no internalfiction here, isn't there? he wanted to clear his name —— and internalfiction. he wanted to clear his name, talks about integrity and now he is standing down so there will always be? over that and ijust wondered how much not anxiety but concern there had been about katherine stone, the commissioner, who had i think publicly or certainly been heard to say that she considered him to have been guilty before even starting the questioning process. yes, and that is what has prompted quite a lot of the concern for mr paterson and some of his conservative colleagues, but they didn't feel like there was a proper process ofjustice around his
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particular circumstances and that he felt he hadn't been given an adequate opportunity to set out his case or for those investigating adequate opportunity to set out his case orfor those investigating him to hear those support of what he had done. his argument always was that he had acted in particular circumstances for the public good, yes, i will be at, whilst working for companies that were paying him. to be clear, mps can have outside interests. they do have to be properly declared but what they cannot do is paid advocacy, in other words, lobby on the half of that company directly to those who they are regularly coming into contact with, ie those in government and those who have levers of power at their disposal. mr paterson felt like he had been operating in the broader public interest and they said as recently as last nightjust before it was published under the circumstances he acted the way that he did where he was found to have broken the rules, if he was
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confronted by those again in the future we would he would act in exactly the same way so there was no sense of contrition from him on a sense of contrition from him on a sense that what he had done in the land was wrong. the view from the report was that this was an egregious breach of the rules and thatis egregious breach of the rules and that is why came to the conclusion that is why came to the conclusion that the suspension should be as clear as it was, though some people feel the misdemeanour that mr paterson was accused of it wasn't severe enough but the severity of that sanction would have been sufficient not only to suspend it from the commons for 30 days but at the other end of what happens in circumstances that also confidentially, as they say, trigger a by—election which would add to the humiliation of an mp who served for a long time at the highest levels of government. but to come back full circle, tin, to your broader point, what we are now left with is parliament now trying to grapple with these particular rules and whether they are fit for purpose.
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can ijust come to that in one moment because ed davey at the lib dems has just tweeted that he says the resignation is a change of heart and he has done the honourable thing. butjust to pick up on what you are saying actually, chris, there has got to be cross—party support on this and is there any appetite for that at the moment? well, certainly this morning labour were being quite guarded. whenjacob rees—mogg, the lead with a house made his announcement during business questions this morning saying that the government was going to detach the owen paterson case from a broad examination of the rules labour were quite guarded as to what extent they'd welcome that they did welcome the decision the government are taken. the gun and lunchtime in the briefing for westminsterjournalists conducted by the fineness of official spokesman, we were told then that the view of the prime minister was that there had to be an appeals process baked into this and that wasn't the case
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at the moment and that should be something that comes out of the conversation that happens as a result of what the government was now proposing, which was trying to set up some sort cross—party body and the government's perspective it should be possible and having detach that owen paterson case and the broader question the rules what we do have any sense of yet is the extent to which labour and the other opposition parties will happily take part in that. or, indeed, the time frame. it was looking like a couple of months last night before the dealings were separated out, before you might�*ve heard about mr paterson's eight visually, muse has overtaken events must in the last 12 or 15 i was they were still parliament is going to have to wrestle with what it does with the oval rule book with the government with the view that it does need to change. with the view that it does need to chance. ., ., ~' with the view that it does need to chance. ., ., ~ ., ., with the view that it does need to chance. ., ., ~' ., ., , with the view that it does need to chance. ., ., , , ., change. looking ahead, this is all uuite change. looking ahead, this is all quite parliamentary _ change. looking ahead, this is all quite parliamentary detail - change. looking ahead, this is all quite parliamentary detail now. change. looking ahead, this is all| quite parliamentary detail now but emergency debate on monday, is that going to happen or not? goad going to happen or not? good question. _ going to happen or not? good question, honest _ going to happen or not? good question, honest answer, - going to happen or not? good question, honest answer, i. going to happen or not? (limp. question, honest answer, i don't know. you can see a case for the lib
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dems, who have secured it, making the argument that it should still go ahead because as i conversation the last few minutes is rather proven there is quite a lot of loose ends to tie a peer and even though some of this, tame, rightly, you acknowledge involves even me disappearing down nsw one westminster rabbit hole, the reason this matters and the reason why reacted in the wake did this morning to what it had decided to do last night is when you get into the particulars get three beltway and three westminster a but in the big picture this matters because the midget leaves for the fleeting viewer in that sense that what happened yesterday looked like an mp letting their mates off the whole or in this case conservative mps letting their conservative mp nate off the hook and that is incredibly dangerous for any political party,
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for any politics, really, dangerous for any political party, forany politics, really, but dangerous for any political party, for any politics, really, but the extent to which it acts as the catalyst undermining the sanctity of democracy, really. i know that sounds pompous but mps are really conscious of that. they are very conscious of that. they are very conscious of that. they are very conscious of where they rank in lists of the most trusted professions. ie, down at the bottom, somewhere near you and me as journalist. they are very conscious of that and they reflect that profoundly and there were plenty looked at what had happened in the last 2a hours and thought this just looks absolutely terrible i think thatis looks absolutely terrible i think that is why the government ended up reversing out of the cul—de—sac it had driven into politically suddenly aware that this was going to be very, very difficult to manage, not least because the other parties weren't going to help them reverse out nicely , weren't going to help them reverse out nicel , ., ~ weren't going to help them reverse out nicel , ., ,, i. , out nicely chris, thank you very much indeed. _ out nicely chris, thank you very much indeed. just _ out nicely chris, thank you very much indeed. just to _ out nicely chris, thank you very much indeed. just to reminder| out nicely chris, thank you very i much indeed. just to reminder far much indeed. just to reminderfar view is that owen paterson has stood down the mp for north shropshire and that follows him being at the centre of that lobbying row suspended for
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30 days originally. the government had whipped mps to call for a new system of looking into what was described as an egregious behaviour when it came to lobbying. there was rebellion, other parties refuse to take part as well. owen paterson said he looked forward to defending his integrity and his name is not even its own patterns in the former minister said at the very top levels of government issued this statement following the suicide of his wife last year. a personal statement, he said, that he had made this decision after consultation with his family and with much sadness decided to resign as mp for north shropshire. the last years, his wife, as i said, took her own life last year and he is that had been an indescribable nightmare for his family and me and my integrity which i hold dear has been repeatedly and publicly questioned. in 19 that i am totally innocent of what i've been g is directed at all times dangers of
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public health and safety. he goes on to say that his children had asked him to leave politics for their sake as was his. he says he doesn't want his family's reputation to become a political football and he was with his family first. that breaking news in the past 20 minutes or so. of course, we will be back to westminster for more reaction to the decision by unpleasant stand on as mp for north shropshire. while we're waiting for more news on westminster mould breaking news that david fuller who you may recall from the case a few days ago has pleaded guilty to both murders of wendy nell and caroline pierce. now, that has happened just in the last five minutes or so crown court. our correspondence on sinus was that just a few days ago cutting the, covering the start of this trial. just talk us through what's happen
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because some really very difficult details emerging of what this man had done. let mejust let me just rest are some distressing details in the same about to pass on anything everybody should be aware of that but we will obviously make sure people can is what we're saying. david fuller is a 67—year—old man who without being found guilty of other has admitted murdering wendy neal and caroline pierce, two young women who were murdered in bedsits and tunbridge wells in kent in 1987 and it became known as the bedsit murders and it was a case which has really been a major, major operation of a kent police to try and bring fuller to justice. he has today really thrown in the towel on his legal battle to defend himself and has accepted he committed those murders. now, in the course of their investigations, police went to his home in tunbridge wells, a home full of all sorts of things that mr fuller had collected over the years, including lots of
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hard drives, and on those hard drives police found them extremely disturbing images. they were videos, and lots of them, david fuller, who was the maintenance man of a hospital, two hospitals, committing sexual acts with dead bodies, and we can say for the first time that there were at least 100 victims of mr fuller. now, clearly, this is a major thing for kent police. they had been telling the victims of this all around the country, as in the relatives of those whose bodies were abused in these hospitals, what has happened, and to date i spoke to the police about this yesterday, they have told everybody who is relative they have identified. there is a hotline as well and i will bring you the details of that we can get the number from the details of that we can get the numberfrom kent the details of that we can get the number from kent police which the details of that we can get the numberfrom kent police which is being opened. now, clearly, this is going to be a big issue for the nhs. was, as i said, the maintenance worker and electricity and who works in two hospitals, the kent and sussex hospital, which is since
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closed and tunbridge wells hospital at pembrey. he had a swipe card and access to all of his hospital including the mortuary. these offences were committed over long period of 20,007 to 2020. the police have obviously been investigating him for not continuing to investigate his crimes in the investigation will last another year and clearly the nhs an of hospital mortuary is full and open question after the end to this trial. doing and how many bodies and victims have been identified because, as you say, thatis been identified because, as you say, that is a huge period of time. it is a huge period of time and this will be very shocking to people, especially live in the area. so the figures are that police have, i believe, that he abused 100 people and the ages of ivy quite greatly. i'm not going to say more at this stage because i think it is not
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appropriate for the ages do vary quite widely. does my ages vary. they have identified 78 of the victims and of course then they can work out who the families and go speak to families. very difficult job. this is an operation that has been taking place in secret for the last few days a week or so involving police forces all over the country as family liaison officers got to speak to the relatives of people who had deceased relatives in those hospitals. and when was he originally questioned about the murders going back to the nineteen eighties? 50. back to the nineteen eighties? so, he wasn't back to the nineteen eighties? if he wasn't identified back to the nineteen eighties? 65 he wasn't identified by the police until 2020, he wasn't identified by the police until2020, until he wasn't identified by the police until 2020, until last year. the reason for this is that back in 1987 there were no mobile phones to trace and dna techniques were quite poor, cctv almost nonexistent. but, in recent years, dna evidence techniques of infield and police use what is called familial dna commissary take samples and look for people who might be related to the
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killer. that narrows down the number of people who might be the killer in doing that they identify the relative of david fuller, they worked out who this relative might be connected to and then they knocked on his door in the winter of last year and made these really horrendous discoveries in his home. and his plea, i mean, he has now admitted murder but did he say she was completely innocent or did he plead manslaughter was a thing like that? ., ,., ., , that? know, so he, at first, the beginning _ that? know, so he, at first, the beginning of— that? know, so he, at first, the beginning of the _ that? know, so he, at first, the beginning of the trial _ that? know, so he, at first, the beginning of the trial he - that? know, so he, at first, the i beginning of the trial he admitted, we can now report this, there has been an order preventing is reporting this but he admitted a wide range of offences including child abuse images, voyeurism, and also these offences committed in the hospital mortuaries. he said he was guilty of manslaughter of wendy nell and caroline pierce. he said the reason he was saying he was guilty of manslaughter was on the basis of diminished responsibility, the court was about to hear psychiatric evidence from three psychiatrists in this case to work out whether that was the sustainable defence. i think
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before we've even got to that point, fuller has decided that his defence doesn't hold up and has told the court today that he is pleading guilty to murder. bud court today that he is pleading guilty to murder. and sentencing? sentencin: guilty to murder. and sentencing? sentencing possibly _ guilty to murder. and sentencing? sentencing possibly not _ guilty to murder. and sentencing? sentencing possibly not today - sentencing possibly not today because there's quite a lot to consider in this case.- because there's quite a lot to consider in this case. quite a lot to consider— consider in this case. quite a lot to consider in _ consider in this case. quite a lot to consider in this _ consider in this case. quite a lot to consider in this case. - consider in this case. quite a lot to consider in this case. time i consider in this case. quite a lot to consider in this case. time to j to consider in this case. time to catch up with some weather. showers bushing pen picture, cornwall, one ortwo picture, cornwall, one or two for northern ireland, outbreaks of rain pushing into north—west scotland and italy feeling day, yes, but hopefully some sunshine away from those showers will compensate. tonight, clouds filling in across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, with some light on patchy rain and some heavier personal for scotland. but the club moving in a
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change of wind direction. temperature is edging upwards as night goes on, still of us of wales and the southern half of england and some sunshine to start with tomorrow in east and south—east england before it plans. overall, tomorrow is a cloudy day turning a bit breezy as well. from the cloud across western parts light freezing drizzle, more persistent rain in north—east scotland. it is a touch milder. has resigned following a backlash over the government decision to overhaul the policing of mps' conduct.
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he had been found to have broken lobbying rules. a man has pleaded guilty to murdering wendy knell and caroline pierce 30 years ago. david fuller killed the two women in kent in 1987. rates of cervical cancer are estimated to have been reduced by up to 90% in some age groups because of the success of the hpv vaccine. four teenagers are found guilty of murdering 1a—year—old schoolboy keon lincoln in birmingham. a jury is still considering a murder charge against a fifth teenager, who's accused of supplying the weapon. dozens of countries commit to ending their dependence on coal at the glasgow climate talks, but big producers like china refuse to sign up.
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this good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. and we start with the breaking news that owen paterson has resigned as an mp after a row over his conduct led to a government u—turn. the conservative member of parliament for north shropshire was found to have broken lobbying rules and was facing suspension — until tory mps blocked it by calling for an overhaul of the mps' standards watchdog instead. they initially had the backing of number 10, but downing street reversed its decision after a furious backlash from opposition parties and some conservative mps. in a statement mr paterson said...
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he went on to say... mr paterson continued to say... let's talk to our political correspondent, chris mason. we spoke to you 20 minutes ago, chris, just as the news broke, what reaction now? we chris, just as the news broke, what reaction now?— reaction now? we have 'ust heard from sir reaction now? we have 'ust heard from sir kerri reaction now? we have 'ust heard from sir keir starmer, _ reaction now? we have just heard from sir keir starmer, the - reaction now? we have just heard from sir keir starmer, the leader| reaction now? we have just heard i from sir keir starmer, the leader of
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the labour party, and he has said in a statement, this has been an unbelievable 2a hours, even by this government's chaotic standards. only yesterday boris johnson government's chaotic standards. only yesterday borisjohnson was government's chaotic standards. only yesterday boris johnson was forcing his mps to rip up the rules on standards in public life. this is a truly damning indictment of this prime minister and, as he puts it, the corrupt government he leads. mr starmer�*s statement goes on, boris johnson must now apologise to the entire country for this grubby attempt to cover up for the misdemeanour of his friends. this is not the first time he has done this, but it must be the last and boris johnson must explain how he intends to fix the immense harm he has done to fix the immense harm he has done to confidence in the probity of him and his mps. so that a response from sir keir starmer. we heard from sir ed davey, the leader of the liberal democrats, as well a few moments ago in broadly similar terms. and yes, quite a turn of events over the last 2a hours a situation where mr owen paterson were staying at the prospect of a suspension to it
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looking like frankie the government had got him off the hook. they argue it was a broad examination of the rules, ratherthan it was a broad examination of the rules, rather than a specific one involving mr paterson, but it didn't come about because owen paterson's suspension was imminent, to one where briefly overnight mr paterson a0 wasn't off the hook then he certainly wouldn't they suspension anytime soon, whilst there was an examination of the rules he had been found to be a breach of, to one where the government this morning, having been criticised at an incredible volume from all sides, deciding to detach mr paterson's case from a broad examination of the rules, therefore meaning mr paterson faced the prospect of this vote again within the next couple of days, with the prospect of a lengthy 30 day suspension from the commons and the potential for 30 day suspension from the commons and the potentialfor a by—election that all looming over him. and the very difficult time he has officially had personally with the loss of his wife. he has clearly decided that he has had enough and he is walking away. yes. decided that he has had enough and he is walking away.—
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decided that he has had enough and he is walking away. yes, i mean, he still maintains _ he is walking away. yes, i mean, he still maintains his _ he is walking away. yes, i mean, he still maintains his innocence. - he is walking away. yes, i mean, he still maintains his innocence. the i still maintains his innocence. the preachings were egregious, according to the standards commissioner. —— the breaches were egregious. just remind us of what he has done. the crux of this — remind us of what he has done. the crux of this is _ remind us of what he has done. iie: crux of this is owen remind us of what he has done. tie: crux of this is owen paterson was working for some firms and earning money for that. that is allowed, mps can have outside financial interests and they are declared in the register of members interests, and whenever they are talking about a topic that might relate to those private interests they declare it on the floor of the house and declare it verbally, so all of this is transparent. what you cannot do is what is called paid advocacy. so as an mp, who might be working for company x, you cannot then be colouring ministers or writing to ministers and saying, this is what we need you to do to help out company x. now, mr patterson said that where he had been accused of doing just that, he was doing it in the public interest, that it was in the public interest, that it was in the interests of the public because of issues around food safety and he
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argued all the way through that there was an exemption in the rules that allowed him to do that and crucially he said he would do it again if that circumstance was to arise again. that the view of the investigators was that was not an adequate excuse. as you say, it had been, in their words, adequate excuse. as you say, it had been, in theirwords, an adequate excuse. as you say, it had been, in their words, an egregious breach of the walls, hence the suggestion of a 30 day suspension, which in and of itself then triggers the prospect of a recall ballot, which means that if 10% of their constituents, voters sign such a thing, there is then a by—election and mr owen paterson was staring at all of these potential scenarios playing out over the coming months and faced with that, having imagined briefly that he might have a reprieve, he has decided to walk away. what has been striking, tim, over the last week or so is that members of his family, one of his daughters gave an interview and wrote a piece in wannabe sunday newspapers, making the argument that she felt her dad had been unfairly
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treated by this investigation, also reflecting by the family hurt around the loss of rose paterson, mr patterson's wife. so the family had done their bit publicly to try to defend their man, in the hope that something might come out that would help him, and it looked like it had last night when the government did what it did. then suddenly this lunchtime it looked like it wouldn't and then mr owen paterson's decision to give up. and then mr owen paterson's decision to rive u. , and then mr owen paterson's decision tor-iveu. , ., ~ and then mr owen paterson's decision tor-iveu. , ., ., to give up. chris, thank you. that is the latest _ to give up. chris, thank you. that is the latest from _ to give up. chris, thank you. that is the latest from westminster. l let's speak to seb payne, whitehall editor at the financial times. he's in our edinburgh studio. you are in edinburgh, but no doubt getting back in touch with everyone at westminster now. a bit of a mess for the government this month? it is one of the most _ for the government this month? it is one of the most chaotic 24 hours boris _ one of the most chaotic 24 hours borisjohnson has had so far for this government. the fact was they marched _ this government. the fact was they marched all the mps up the hill yesterday on a three line whip, which _ yesterday on a three line whip, which is — yesterday on a three line whip, which is normally used for the most crucial— which is normally used for the most crucial government business you can imagine. _ crucial government business you can imagine. to — crucial government business you can imagine, to vote for this new system that would _ imagine, to vote for this new system that would see mr owen paterson's...
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what was _ that would see mr owen paterson's... what was put in front of him put on pause _ what was put in front of him put on pause and — what was put in front of him put on pause and have a committee led by... to investigate how mps are disciplined and that whole thing has fallen— disciplined and that whole thing has fallen apart, combined with the fact that mr_ fallen apart, combined with the fact that mr owen paterson decided to walk away from the house of commons here, _ walk away from the house of commons here, which— walk away from the house of commons here, which in some respect is quite a good _ here, which in some respect is quite a good thing — here, which in some respect is quite a good thing for the government because — a good thing for the government because this draws a line under the issue _ because this draws a line under the issue they— because this draws a line under the issue. they don't have to go through the whole _ issue. they don't have to go through the whole punishment procedure. there _ the whole punishment procedure. there is— the whole punishment procedure. there is obviously going to be a by—election now in his north staffordshire constituency, which is a very— staffordshire constituency, which is a very safe — staffordshire constituency, which is a very safe conservative seat, so in some _ a very safe conservative seat, so in some ways — a very safe conservative seat, so in some ways this draws a line, but really— some ways this draws a line, but really there are so many angry conservative mps and ministers here who have _ conservative mps and ministers here who have put their reputations on the line _ who have put their reputations on the line by— who have put their reputations on the line by voting for something that in— the line by voting for something that in private they were expressing was absolutely appalling and they didnt— was absolutely appalling and they didn't believe it, but they did it because — didn't believe it, but they did it because they were told she would buy their whip, _ because they were told she would buy theirwhip, so i because they were told she would buy their whip, so i think there's a huge — their whip, so i think there's a huge amount of anger be directed now to mark— huge amount of anger be directed now to mark spencer, the chief whip at the conservative party, who was seen as one _ the conservative party, who was seen as one of— the conservative party, who was seen as one of the — the conservative party, who was seen as one of the masterminds of this, as one of the masterminds of this, as well_ as one of the masterminds of this, as well as — as one of the masterminds of this, as well as lots of people asking 'ust as well as lots of people asking just what— as well as lots of people asking just what was going on in downing street— just what was going on in downing street to — just what was going on in downing street to think that this was a good
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idea as _ street to think that this was a good idea as well, a lot of tory mps rebelled — idea as well, a lot of tory mps rebelled as well.— idea as well, a lot of tory mps rebelled as well. ., . . rebelled as well. one of the biggest rebellions recently _ rebelled as well. one of the biggest rebellions recently against - rebelled as well. one of the biggest rebellions recently against the - rebellions recently against the government. take away the individual, though, and how much appetite is there in parliament for reassessing perhaps these standards commissioner and the process? because it strikes one as an outsider that it seems strange that you can't appeal against a decision as dramatic as this to an mp, to be suspended for 30 days! i as dramatic as this to an mp, to be suspended for 30 days!— as dramatic as this to an mp, to be suspended for 30 days! i think there is a wider view _ suspended for 30 days! i think there is a wider view across _ suspended for 30 days! i think there is a wider view across all _ suspended for 30 days! i think there is a wider view across all mps - suspended for 30 days! i think there is a wider view across all mps that i is a wider view across all mps that maybe _ is a wider view across all mps that maybe this — is a wider view across all mps that maybe this committee and the way it works— maybe this committee and the way it works does— maybe this committee and the way it works does need to be examined, but it is a _ works does need to be examined, but it is a question of timing and of course — it is a question of timing and of course i— it is a question of timing and of course i have spoken to people in the cabinet — course i have spoken to people in the cabinet to have said, look, we do need _ the cabinet to have said, look, we do need to— the cabinet to have said, look, we do need to look at this, maybe there does need _ do need to look at this, maybe there does need to be a new system to have some _ does need to be a new system to have some form _ does need to be a new system to have some form of— does need to be a new system to have some form of appeal. all that sort of stuff, _ some form of appeal. all that sort of stuff, but the fact is why we do it at this — of stuff, but the fact is why we do it at this moment and attach it to this case — it at this moment and attach it to this case of— it at this moment and attach it to this case of one individual, that has always— this case of one individual, that has always been a question about why it came _ has always been a question about why it came around at this particular
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moment, — it came around at this particular moment, but the idea that labour, the snp _ moment, but the idea that labour, the snp and the lib dems were going to -o the snp and the lib dems were going to go along with this procedure was really— to go along with this procedure was reallyjust for the birds and it should — reallyjust for the birds and it should have been thought about it downing _ should have been thought about it downing street before they pressed ahead _ downing street before they pressed ahead with this idea that, you know, there _ ahead with this idea that, you know, there were _ ahead with this idea that, you know, there were some indications may be made _ there were some indications may be made through the back channels labour— made through the back channels labour would have gone along with this and _ labour would have gone along with this and ultimately they didn't and that is— this and ultimately they didn't and that is what really killed this thing — that is what really killed this thing stone dead. but the conservatives are in a good position now because they have got to try to restore _ now because they have got to try to restore faith in that, while trying to restore — restore faith in that, while trying to restore both their mps that maybe there is— to restore both their mps that maybe there is a _ to restore both their mps that maybe there is a way of challenging the outcomes— there is a way of challenging the outcomes of this thing and maybe we should _ outcomes of this thing and maybe we should remember as well there are several— should remember as well there are several conservative mps are under investigation by kathryn stone and that the _ investigation by kathryn stone and that the finding of her investigation for those people are also going to be up for scrutiny if mps don't — also going to be up for scrutiny if mps don't have confidence in that, at the _ mps don't have confidence in that, at the same time downing street needs— at the same time downing street needs to — at the same time downing street needs to find some way of reassuring people _ needs to find some way of reassuring people who _ needs to find some way of reassuring people who feel the integrity of parliament has been challenged by the events of the past 24 hours. that _ the events of the past 24 hours. that is _ the events of the past 24 hours. that is interesting, that there are other investigations pending, and is
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that because party there are three conservative mps, that because party there are three conservative mp5, i believe, who are currently under investigation. i couldn't tell you of the top of my head _ couldn't tell you of the top of my head about other parties here. but when _ head about other parties here. but when you — head about other parties here. but when you look at it across the whole piece. _ when you look at it across the whole piece. there — when you look at it across the whole piece, there have been a lot of conservative mps, including the prime _ conservative mps, including the prime minister, borisjohnson, who have been— prime minister, borisjohnson, who have been under investigation by kathryn— have been under investigation by kathryn stone, so when you look at the system — kathryn stone, so when you look at the system of reform and there are of course _ the system of reform and there are of course some people who are saying this is— of course some people who are saying this is about _ of course some people who are saying this is about self interest. they want _ this is about self interest. they want to— this is about self interest. they want to reform this because it has been _ want to reform this because it has been rather uncomfortable for them. ithink— been rather uncomfortable for them. i think there are justified concerns about— i think there are justified concerns about it. _ i think there are justified concerns about it, but you can't take away from _ about it, but you can't take away from the — about it, but you can't take away from the fact there has been a particular— from the fact there has been a particular focus on certain conservatives, which some may see as political— conservatives, which some may see as political bias. — conservatives, which some may see as political bias, some may see father reasons _ political bias, some may see father reasons. ,, , ., reasons. ok. seb payne for the financial times _ reasons. ok. seb payne for the financial times in _ reasons. ok. seb payne for the financial times in edinburgh, i reasons. ok. seb payne for the - financialtimes in edinburgh, thank financial times in edinburgh, thank you very much. it is 3:11pm. four teenagers have been convicted of murdering the schoolboy keon lincoln outside his home in birmingham injanuary. they'll be sentenced later this month. a jury is still considering a murder charge against a fifth teenager. keon lincoln, aged 15, was shot in the stomach
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while on the ground, despite making attempts to escape the attack, but was later pronounced dead. the first pill designed to treat covid has been approved by the uk medicines regulator. the tablet will be given twice a day to vulnerable patients, recently diagnosed with the disease. our health correspondent, katharine da costa, has more. this is really good news, particularly for vulnerable groups, so the elderly and people with a weakened immune system who may not respond well to covid vaccines. before we had treatments that were given in hospitals or patients were given in hospitals to patients that were seriously ill. this is the first drug that can be given as a pill at home in the early stages of an infection. clinical trials found that the tablet, molnupiravir, halved the risk of hospitalisation and death in at—risk patients. patients will be given a tablet twice a day and the treatment works by stopping the virus making copies
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of itself, so it reduces the levels of virus in the body... yes, they described it as mutating itself to death, which i thought was a good description. so today the uk regulator, the mhra, approved it, said it was effective and said it should be given as soon as possible after getting a positive covid test or within five days of symptoms starting and it will be given to people with mild—to—moderate covid with at least one risk factor, so that could be obesity, heart disease, diabetes, old age. so when will they be dispensed? yes, so the us drug company behind this thinks they can produce about 10 million courses by the end of the year. the uk government has pre—ordered nearly half a million courses. we don't know how much it is paying for that. the us has ordered about 1.7 million and is paying about £500 per course. the uk government is in talks with the nhs to see how quickly they can roll it out to patients and this will be done through a national study as soon as possible. we have not been given exact details
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of the timescale yet and there are still some questions about the logistics of how it will be made accessible. it is worth pointing out this is not an alternative to vaccination. people are still urged to get their vaccines, their boosters, their flu jabs, but this is hugely important because no vaccine is 100% effective and some people can't have vaccines or don't respond well to them, so this is another weapon in the fight against covid and is helping reduce those most at risk from serious illness, reducing hospital admissions and therefore ultimately pressure on the nhs. a 63—year—old man has been found responsible for killing a fellow resident in her 90s, at a care home in south—east london. alexander rawson beat eileen dean, who was 93, with a metal walking stick. it was decided that because of his mental health condition, he couldn't enter a plea or stand trial at the old bailey. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. eileen dean moved into
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a care home last year. she was 93 and had dementia. because of covid, her family couldn't see her over her first christmas there. a few days into the new year, eileen was subjected to a brutal attack in her room. at night, as she lay in bed, she was set upon by another resident, alexander rawson. he was in the room next door at fieldside care home in catford in south—east london. rawson, who was 62, beat eileen with a walking stick, which broke during the attack. she appeared to mouth the word "help" to the member of staff who found her. the doctor came and a nurse and they started detailing all her injuries. i didn't recognise her. she was beaten really badly, but then i saw her feet and i realised it was my mum and ijust told her to let go
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and said goodbye and said i loved her and not to worry about me. eileen dean's family have been at the old bailey to hear evidence against alexander rawson. because of his mental health condition he wasn't in court. he was declared unfit to stand trial or enter a plea. instead, a jury had to listen to the evidence and they have now ruled he was responsible for the killing. before being moved to the care home, alexander rawson was an in—patient at two south london hospitals. he had twin conditions linked to chronic alcohol abuse and he was sectioned under the mental health act because of his aggressive behaviour. during his time in hospital, he threatened staff with a knife and scissors, spoke of getting a machine gun to kill people who he had fantasised had attacked him, and he is also said to have assaulted a doctor during an earlier hospital stay.
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alexander rawson was a patient at the ladywell mental health unit based at lewisham hospital. this unit is run by the south london and maudsley nhs trust, which was responsible for housing him. we've been told that a team of professionals held a meeting and they agreed he should be moved into fieldside care home. a risk assessment was done. eileen dean's family have questions for all those who dealt with alexander rawson. i'm very angry. why would you put someone with that level of violence into an old people... it's like putting a fox in a chicken coop. just to run. if he's got that, why would you put vulnerable people, why would you put them at risk? eileen dean lived a long, full, happy life. herfamily placed her in a care home because they wanted her to be safe in herfinal years. the investigations have begun into why she wasn't. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey.
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you are watching bbc news. 3:18pm. the bbc has asked the south london and maudsley nhs trust, and fieldside care home for a response. as yet, there's been no comment. scientists are warning that carbon emissions are set to rebound this year to levels last seen before the pandemic. new research predicts that the amount of co2 released into the atmosphere will rise by almost the same amount that it decreased in 2020. experts say the report underlines the urgency of action needed at summits like cop26. meanwhile, at the climate change conference in glasgow, a further 18 countries have agreed to a plan to stop using coal power plants. it brings the total number of countries backing the plan to a0. but some of the world's largest coal users, including china and the us, have not signed up. coal is the single biggest contributor to climate change.
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i'm joined by dale vince, the owner of green energy company ecotricity. hejoins us from he joins us from glasgow. without china, without the us, is this really going to make much difference? i really going to make much difference?— really going to make much difference? ., �* ~ ., difference? i don't think that it will actually. _ difference? i don't think that it will actually. and _ difference? i don't think that it will actually. and the - difference? i don't think that it will actually. and the target i will actually. and the target itself, they have set themselves to do this sometime in 201320a0, which is too late anyway and back here in britain we are just about to allow a coal mine to open, first won in 30 years, so even though britain is signed up to this, you have got to ask are we really serious? what signed up to this, you have got to ask are we really serious? what can be done, though, _ ask are we really serious? what can be done, though, bearing _ ask are we really serious? what can be done, though, bearing in - ask are we really serious? what can be done, though, bearing in mind i be done, though, bearing in mind at the moment renewables won't bridge the moment renewables won't bridge the gap? the moment renewables won't bridge the aa-? ~ the moment renewables won't bridge the .a'). . ., , , the moment renewables won't bridge then-a? , the gap? well, renewables can bridge the gap? well, renewables can bridge the aa- the gap? well, renewables can bridge the gap because _ the gap? well, renewables can bridge the gap because they _ the gap? well, renewables can bridge the gap because they are _ the gap? well, renewables can bridge the gap because they are already - the gap because they are already cheaper than any other form of new energy we have available to us. we have poured more money into... but what about supply? we _ have poured more money into... but what about supply? we just - have poured more money into... but what about supply? we just have - have poured more money into... but what about supply? we just have to. what about supply? we 'ust have to build more. — what about supply? we 'ust have to build more, we have _ what about supply? we just have to build more, we have put— what about supply? we just have to build more, we have put more - build more, we have put more subsidies into fossil fuels
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build more, we have put more subsidies into fossilfuels now build more, we have put more subsidies into fossil fuels now but we do as a world and a country than we do as a world and a country than we do as a world and a country than we do renewable energy. we have got to change our economic system and stop supporting fossil fuels. flan stop supporting fossil fuels. can those renewables be built quickly enough? i'mjust thinking back those renewables be built quickly enough? i'm just thinking back to last november, when the national grid warned, not of an imminent blackout, but that they could potentially be blackouts because there just was not enough supply. brute there 'ust was not enough supply. we can there just was not enough supply. - can build renewable energy isjust can build renewable energy is just not the cheapest and the cleaners, it is the fastest form a new energy we can build. by contrast, the government last week said they knew want to build new nuclear power stations. they take ten years to plan, ten years to build and another ten years before they break even from a carbon point of view. we don't have ten years and we can build renewable energy much faster. but we don't have enough wind sometimes or enough sunlight, and the storage issue is a problem. yes. the storage issue is a problem. yes, no, it is the storage issue is a problem. yes, no. it is an — the storage issue is a problem. yes, no, it is an issue, _ the storage issue is a problem. yes, no, it is an issue, but— the storage issue is a problem. yes, no, it is an issue, but what - the storage issue is a problem. ies no, it is an issue, but what we need to be doing is exploring otherforms of renewable energy that can solve the intermittency issue, like offshore tidal lagoons. the tides
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are predictable 100 years in advance, so we can use offshore lagoons like big batteries, full storage, and there is geothermal, which isjust beginning in common, drilling deep underground for 20 a7 renewable electricity. that solved the problem, but the government puts nothing into those two technologies. i am only putting different questions too obviously because people will say this is a bit pie in the sky. when you are looking at hydro energy for, for example, that is not going to take a few months to build, that is going to take years. i am not advocating hydro, i am saying wind and solar, geothermal and offshore tidal lagoons, very fast, much faster than nuclear, which is the government's current plan to bridge the energy gap, which is a foolish plan. the plan to bridge the energy gap, which is a foolish plan.— is a foolish plan. the ligaments as this is the beginning _ is a foolish plan. the ligaments as this is the beginning of _ is a foolish plan. the ligaments as this is the beginning of the - is a foolish plan. the ligaments as this is the beginning of the end i is a foolish plan. the ligaments as this is the beginning of the end of| this is the beginning of the end of coal. what do you want to see happen with the local planning arrangements for that new coal mine in the uk? it has to be cancelled, doesn't it? because we have no credibility if we go ahead with a new coal mine, the
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first in 30 years, and at the same time as we sign up to a new accord to end the use of coal. how can it make sense? how can we encourage the us and china to get on board and we won't even do it ourselves? bill won't even do it ourselves? all riuht. won't even do it ourselves? all right. dale vince up at cop26 in glasgow. thank you much indeed. let's just take you back to that other bringing story we had in the last have a narrow so, our home affairs correspondent was talking in the studio about a man who pleaded guilty at maidstone crown court. this was to the murders of two women backin this was to the murders of two women back in 1987, david fully admitted killing wendy knell and caroline pierce, —— david fuller, and saying that he was affected by mental condition. we have been speaking to tom symons, who was outlining some of the sexual abuse that he has admitted to at the difficultjob detectors are having our home are having to tell relatives of those deceased who had been abused by david
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fuller, who was an electrician at two hospitals. fuller, who was an electrician at two hospitals-— fuller, who was an electrician at two hospitals.- after i fuller, who was an electrician atj two hospitals.- after 33 two hospitals. morning. after 33 ears, he two hospitals. morning. after 33 years, he almost _ two hospitals. morning. after 33 years, he almost seemed - two hospitals. morning. after 33 years, he almost seemed to - two hospitals. morning. after 33 years, he almost seemed to be. years, he almost seemed to be expecting it. bill years, he almost seemed to be expecting it-— years, he almost seemed to be exectin: it. �* ., expecting it. all right, david. you are under arrest _ expecting it. all right, david. you are under arrest on _ expecting it. all right, david. you are under arrest on the _ expecting it. all right, david. you are under arrest on the suspicion| expecting it. all right, david. you i are under arrest on the suspicion of the murders of wendy knell and caroline pierce in 1987. o0 the murders of wendy knell and caroline pierce in 1987.- caroline pierce in 1987. do you understand? — caroline pierce in 1987. do you understand? david _ caroline pierce in 1987. do you understand? david fuller, - caroline pierce in 1987. do you understand? david fuller, mr. caroline pierce in 1987. do you - understand? david fuller, mr normal, at least on the outside. wendy knell and caroline pierce. independent young women in a quiet town in the 19805. ., ., �* , . ., 19805. you don't expect it in a small town — 19805. you don't expect it in a small town like _ 19805. you don't expect it in a small town like tunbridge - 19805. you don't expect it in a i small town like tunbridge wells. 19805. you don't expect it in a - small town like tunbridge wells. you don't expect it to be too young women — don't expect it to be too young womenjust getting on don't expect it to be too young women just getting on with their own business. _ women just getting on with their own business, working. like myself. we were _ business, working. like myself. we were all— business, working. like myself. we were alliust — business, working. like myself. we were alljust working locally. it could _ were alljust working locally. it could have happened to any of us. julie was— could have happened to any of us. julie was a — could have happened to any of us. julie was a friend of wendy and worked with her in a caf. julie was a friend of wendy and worked with her in a caf . she alwa s worked with her in a caf . she always wanted _ worked with her in a caf . she always wanted to _ worked with her in a caf. she always wanted to get married and have children and be a homemaker.
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that is— have children and be a homemaker. that is what— have children and be a homemaker. that is what she wanted to do. but when the's — that is what she wanted to do. ifizi,ii when the's home, her tiny bedsit, was where she was murdered. caroline pierce was attacked on her doorstep and taken away. three weeks later, a farm worker looked down from his tractor into a drainage ditch and spotted a body. like wendy, caroline had been beaten, strangled and sexually assaulted. police were pretty sure of the same man had killed both of them, but back then there is there a little cctv, especially around here, no phones to track and dna techniques were rudimentary. but that has changed. david fuller was tracked down and using modern dna techniques which can identify a criminal who his family members. when this dna swab was taken, it matched samples from the murder scenes, carefully stored for decades. david fuller's house provided more evidence. this
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picture. see the shoes he is wearing? they matched this footprint, in blood, from one department bedsit. it footprint, in blood, from one department bedsit.— footprint, in blood, from one department bedsit. footprint, in blood, from one deartment bedsit. . , ., , department bedsit. it has got number 52. date of death. _ department bedsit. it has got number 52. date of death. he _ department bedsit. it has got number 52. date of death. he has _ department bedsit. it has got number 52. date of death. he has identified i 52. date of death. he has identified the victims- — 52. date of death. he has identified the victims. and _ 52. date of death. he has identified the victims. and it _ 52. date of death. he has identified the victims. and it slowly _ 52. date of death. he has identified the victims. and it slowly police - the victims. and it slowly police started to _ the victims. and it slowly police started to make _ the victims. and it slowly police started to make discoveries, i the victims. and it slowly police i started to make discoveries, which revealed what david fuller was all about. he revealed what david fuller was all about. ., , ~ revealed what david fuller was all about. . , ~ ., about. he has killed them and evidence indicating _ about. he has killed them and evidence indicating that - about. he has killed them and evidence indicating that he - about. he has killed them and | evidence indicating that he has killed them to then sexually abuse them. after death. and that is the evidence that has been presented in court. and so, horrific murders. these young ladies, 25 and 20, utilised for his sexual satisfaction.- utilised for his sexual satisfaction. , ., . satisfaction. the search continued. it looks satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like _ satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like he _ satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like he has— satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like he has got _ satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like he has got some - satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like he has got some hard | it looks like he has got some hard drives— it looks like he has got some hard drives in— it looks like he has got some hard drives in there, i would say. but they— drives in there, i would say. but they are — drives in there, i would say. but they are stuck to be back. and these hidden hard — they are stuck to be back. and these hidden hard drives _ they are stuck to be back. and these hidden hard drives contained - hidden hard drives contained devastating evidence. david fuller, a hospital maintenance man into
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hospital mortuaries, carrying out sexual acts with dead bodies. he had set up a camcorder and video it himself. his swipe card gave him access to all areas. we can now report for the first time that at the kent and sussex hospital and its successor, the tunbridge wells hospital, at least 100 dead women were abused. they include children and the elderly. david fuller recorded some of their names in a little black book. but said practically nothing to police. is anything you would like to add or clarify— anything you would like to add or clarify at— anything you would like to add or clarify at this point, david? no. leavin: clarify at this point, david? no. leaving them — clarify at this point, david? no. leaving them to _ clarify at this point, david? thu leaving them to identify more than 78 victims from details in his videos. 78 and counting. their families have been traced and visited. ., ., ., ., visited. you have got to tell them. we must tell— visited. you have got to tell them. we must tell them. _ visited. you have got to tell them. we must tell them. and _ visited. you have got to tell them. we must tell them. and there - visited. you have got to tell them. we must tell them. and there are| we must tell them. and there are some _ we must tell them. and there are some that — we must tell them. and there are some that have said, we wish you hadn't _ some that have said, we wish you hadn't told — some that have said, we wish you hadn't told us. i don't know how i
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would _ hadn't told us. i don't know how i would react— hadn't told us. i don't know how i would react if it happened to one of my close _ would react if it happened to one of my close loved ones, whether i would want to _ my close loved ones, whether i would want to know about it. i think we have _ want to know about it. i think we have to _ want to know about it. i think we have to tell— want to know about it. i think we have to tell them.— have to tell them. david fuller's claimed that _ have to tell them. david fuller's claimed that he _ have to tell them. david fuller's claimed that he was _ have to tell them. david fuller's claimed that he was mentally i have to tell them. david fuller's claimed that he was mentally ill| have to tell them. david fuller's - claimed that he was mentally ill was torn apart in court. psychiatrist doctor richard badcock has advised the police on cases, including that of harold shipman. the psychopathology - of harold shipman. tie: psychopathology work here is very definitely one of sadomasochism. which, in essence, is not being able to deal with your own issues, except by manipulated behaviour of other people. although you are doing extreme things, you don't feel alive most of the time to stop you know, you might only feel alive in the moment of the... of the offence. david fuller will become notorious for crimes which will revolt the nation. his victims, so many women and girls, wendy and caroline, were
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not even safe after their deaths. tom symons, bbc news, maidstone crown court. you are watching bbc news. it is coming up to 3:30pm. time for some weather and nick will have the details. hello, it may be chilly, but there is plenty of fine weather out there this afternoon before increasing cloud over the next few days and increasing rain and temperatures edge up a bit. some showers this afternoon along the coasts and parts of east anglia and south—east england, brushing pembrokeshire, cornwall, one or two for northern ireland, outbreaks of rain pushing into north—west scotland. a chilly day, yes, but hopefully some sunshine away from showers as well compensate. tonight spilling in across scotland and northern ireland and northern england with some patchy rain and heavy bursts in north—west scotland, with some cloud, temperatures are edging upwards tonight, still some frost across parts of wales and the southern of england and some sunshine tomorrow in south—east england before it clouds over.
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overall, tomorrow is a cloudy day, turning a bit breezy as well. cloud across western parts and a bit of light rain and drizzle, especially across hills, and more persistent rain across north—west scotland. it is a touch milder. hello, this is bbc news. it is just it isjust coming up it is just coming up to it isjust coming up to 3:30pm. the headlines... in the last few minutes, owen paterson has resigned as a conservative mp following a backlash over the government decision to overhaul the policing of mps' conduct. he'd been found to have broken lobbying rules. a man has pleaded guilty to murdering wendy knell and caroline pierce more than 30 years ago. david fuller killed the two women in kent in 1987. he also pleaded guilty to abusing female bodies in hospital mortuaries. the uk has become the first country in the world to approve the use of an anti—viral pill to treat covid—19.
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new research says the hpv vaccine is cutting cases of cervical cancer by almost 90% — cancer research calls it a historic moment. dozens of countries commit to ending their dependence on coal at the glasgow climate talks, but big producers like china refuse to sign up. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. england manager, gareth southgate has recalled marcus rashford, trent alexander arnold and jude bellingham to the england squad for the world cup qualifiers against albania and san marino. but there's no place forjadon sancho, kieren trippier orjesse lingard who've been left out.
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southgate said they weren't playing regularly for their respective clubs. he made his squad announcement just a short time ago, saying there was a lot of competition for places. a strength and depth to his squad and that he had seen over the last 12 months how rapidly young players can come through. there is competition and i think we are at that stage this season where we are picking our third squad but we are picking our third squad but we are picking our third squad but we are only ten league matches in. when we pick our next one we will be 25, 30 league matches and, in much better sample size to be assessed on, especially some of the younger players, to see whether they've just had a good start the season or whether they can maintain that. northern ireland have also named their squad today for next week's final world cup qualifying matches at home to lithuania and italy. manager ian baraclough has given seventeen—year—old nottingham forest striker dale taylor his first call—up. tottenham begin a new era tonight with newly appointed manager antonio conte in the dugout to lead them in their europa conference league match against vitesse.
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the former chelsea manager joined spurs on tuesday, just a day after the sacking of nuno espirito santo, who had been in thejob forjust four months. captain hugo lloris says conte has raised expectations at the club already. obviously, there is a lot of excitement, not only from the players but from all the club, from all the fans. as i said before, you know, his cv talks by itself. he has a great personality, he has great ideas of football, and, you know, he is going to bring his passion, his energy, and his knowledge of football. british number one cameron norrie has lost in straight sets to the american taylor fritz in the paris masters. he had been hoping to get through the third round, and qualify for the atp finals in turin, but 2a—year—old fritz was too strong. taking him 6—3 in the first set and then 7—6 in the second. so it's the american who advances to the quarter finals and will face
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the favorite novak djokovic. at the t20 mens world cup, australia are up to second in group 1 after a comfortable victory over bangladesh this morning. looking to bounce back after their defeat to england at the weekend, aaron finch's side gave bangladesh no chance at all, bowling them out for just 73. adam zampa getting five wickets. finch then starred with the bat, top scoring with a0 offjust 20 balls to help them reach the target in just over six overs. they now go above south africa in the table and play the west indies next. manu tuilagi will make his first england appearance since march 2020 against tonga at twickenham on saturday, for england's autumn series opener. centre tuilagi was called into the england camp over the summer, but had to withdraw because of a hamstring issue.
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he's spent long periods on the sidelines with injuries, including eight months out with a torn achilles, repeated groin injuries and knee ligament damage. captain owen farrell will start at fly—half. the team announcement was delayed because a member of support staff had tested positive for covid—19. wales have also named their team for the match against south africa. ellisjenkins will make his first appearance in three years on saturday at the principality stadium. the cardiff flanker is one of six changes from last weekend's 5a—16 defeat against new zealand. details of both squads are on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. jane, thank you very much. see you later on. the bank of england has left interest rates unchanged at 0.1%. there was speculation they might rise, head off surging inflation. our economics correspondent, andy verity, says todays' news from the bank of england has confounded all the commentators... yeah, that's right and, you know, there've been 13a meetings
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of the bank of england's monetary policy committee since they cut rates to emergency lows way back in march 2009. of those 13a meetings, they've only actually moved rates five times. and they went down first of all, then they went back up to 0.75%, then the pandemic came along, they went down to 0.1% so the obvious question that the bank of england's being asked, the decision—makers there in the press conference earlier, the governor was asked, well, you know,if you're going to have the highest inflation next year that you've had for ten years, 5%, why aren't you doing anything about it? why aren't you raising interest rates? the answer is they don't yet to know how much of that rise in the cost in the cost of living is global and how much is domestic. you've had wholesale energy prices around the world surging as demand comes back, as global economies reopen, but supply can't rise to meet it.
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there's not enough petrol, for example, to meet all the demand, that's why you got a record price of petrol. and that's a passing phenomenon, the bank of england hopes, and they hope that that will rebalance itself so that will rebalance itself so that prices, energy prices start to come down again in the back half of next year. what they don't yet know is about domestic price pressures. so, for example, there are about1 million people on furlough at the end of september, when the scheme wound up. they don't yet know how many of these people are going to end up on the dole queue, and therefore how many people will be available to employers. and, of course, that determines how much pressure there is on employers to raise wages, and then, perhaps, to have to raise prices to cover the extra costs. so, they're waiting to get more data before they raise rates, but they are warning that they will have to in the next year, and that the official rate may rise from its all—time low now of 0.1% to a whole one percentage point by the end of next year. scientists researching the effectiveness of the hpv vaccine have produced the first major study which they say shows that it's
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reducing rates of cervical cancer by almost 90% in some age groups. one of the lead researchers has described the impact of the uk vaccination programme as 'huge'. the charity, cancer research uk, says the findings are 'historic�*. here's more from our health correspondent dominic hughes. almost all cases of cervical cancer are linked to the human papillomavirus. the hpv vaccine programme, targeting the virus itself, was introduced in the uk in 2008, when girls aged between 11 and 13 were first offered the jab. and, since september 2019, boys of the same age have also been eligible. now, the first real—world study of the vaccine shows its had a dramatic effect. cervical cancer rates were 87% lower in girls who were offered the vaccine when aged 12 and 13. it's estimated that by mid—2019, the hpvjab programme had prevented around a50 cervical cancers, and around 17,200 precancers, all of which would have needed some medical intervention.
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this study looked at people who'd both had the vaccine for hpv and were screened by cervical cancer. so cervical screening still remains important. as the vaccine gets taken up, more and more people are vaccinated, we might see changes to what the screening programme looks like, so that might be how often you go in, or what the test looks like. but, for now, it's still really important that if you're invited to cervical screening to consider going. currently, cervical cancer claims the lives of around 850 women in the uk every year. but the researchers believe that in the future, a combination of the vaccine and screening could mean hardly anyone goes on to develop the disease. they say it's a testament to the power of science to protect the lives of thousands of women. dominic hughes, bbc news. the study�*s lead author — professor peter sasieni explained that with rising levels of hpv vaccination amongst younger women, the hope is that protection from cervical cancer
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will last for many years. the vaccine works for at least ten, 15 years. there is no indication of it waning in its efficacy and it presents the infections and those infections might cause cancer ten, 20, 30 years later, so by preventing the infections up to the age of 30, we'll be preventing cancers up to the age of 60, and we hope that, actually, it will continue to work well beyond. i would encourage schoolgirls and their parents and schoolboys to get the vaccine if it is offered to them. it was greatly disrupted last year because of coronavirus and social distancing and school closures.
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i think the likelihood is that people will want to know whether or not women were vaccinated when they were girls and have a different screening recommendation for those who were vaccinated than those who we don't know. there is some benefit if we vaccinate enough people, particularly right now, with vaccinating boys, but even those people who are not vaccinated will benefit because the virus becomes far less common. joining me now is kate sanger, head of communications and public affairs atjo's cervical cancer trust. could you even have dreamt of results like this? we could you even have dreamt of results like this?— could you even have dreamt of results like this? we knew that this should be happening _ results like this? we knew that this should be happening but— results like this? we knew that this should be happening but after- results like this? we knew that this should be happening but after the l should be happening but after the real proof there is absolutely fantastic and certainly more so i know when we have a lot of vaccine hesitancy and conversations about vaccines going on it is amazing that this really solid proof that says, look, this is what the vaccine does, why it is important and why we encourage you to take if you are eligible.
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encourage you to take if you are eliaible. �* encourage you to take if you are eliaible. . ,., ., , ., eligible. and, potentially, would this make cervical— eligible. and, potentially, would this make cervical cancer- eligible. and, potentially, would this make cervical cancer are - eligible. and, potentially, would| this make cervical cancer are rare cancer, perhaps, the doctor than ten or 15 years' time, or even sooner? it is getting us on that path but we have still got a long way to go. as peter said in this previous clip we are very much living in the time of covid—19 vaccine disruption we don't know what that it is looking like now. we have also got lots of generations who haven't been able to be vaccinated because it was only introduced in 2008 so there's over 30 have got cervical screening is a really good tool for preventing cervical cancer but we're not going to stay slim and heated from those ages that we have got a long way to go but we're getting there. —— we are not going to see it eliminated from those ages. o0 are not going to see it eliminated from those ages.— are not going to see it eliminated from those ages. do you have any ruestion from those ages. do you have any question marks — from those ages. do you have any question marks over— from those ages. do you have any question marks over the - from those ages. do you have any question marks over the study - from those ages. do you have any i question marks over the study itself because of the women themselves were 20 years old is pretty there, isn't it, the cervical cancer at that age? you don't even start getting smears known for the age of 25. that age? you don't even start getting smears
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known for the age 25. the baptism issue? ., ., ,., known for the age 25. the baptism issue? ., ., . issue? no. the reason cervical cancer is _ issue? no. the reason cervical cancer is rewing _ issue? no. the reason cervical cancer is rewing under - issue? no. the reason cervical cancer is rewing under 25 - issue? no. the reason cervical cancer is rewing under 25 is i issue? no. the reason cervical cancer is rewing under 25 is is| cancer is revving under 25 is is because the vaccine, because we have got an amazing vaccination that is wiping out this kissing young women. that is not to say they are fully gone because no vaccine is 100% effective that it is what is helping us to do that. the study is a very robust study published in an academic esteemed journal and it is compared cohorts who have been vaccinated with cohorts who haven't so i think we can take what it said as read that the vaccine really does work. , ., ., . work. does it mean for cervical smears for— work. does it mean for cervical smears for women _ work. does it mean for cervical smears for women who - work. does it mean for cervical smears for women who are - work. does it mean for cervical. smears for women who are having those everything— five years now and having this as the cops effective way for the nhs to identify cancer. do you think those cervical smears should be maintained for quite a bit of time going forward? absolutely, especially for those who don't have the vaccination and don't have that protection against cervical cancer for the generations and women it is
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the best protection against getting cervical cancer because they can identify any infection that might be treating monitoring before it has a chance to develop. but, again, feeling of age groups who have had the vaccination again it still remains important and that is the message that we really want to get it across because lots of people at the charity who have had the vaccination and think they are fully protected said that as a done deal and that is not the case you take such a high protection and this just shows that the levels of protection a nation the vaccine gives might be higher than officially appreciated but it still shows the importance of getting and speaking.— but it still shows the importance of getting and speaking. thank you much for 'oinin: getting and speaking. thank you much forjoining us— getting and speaking. thank you much forjoining us here _ getting and speaking. thank you much forjoining us here on _ getting and speaking. thank you much forjoining us here on bbc— getting and speaking. thank you much forjoining us here on bbc news. -
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azeem rafiq has said that the racism scandal he's involved in is "not really about the words of individuals", but about institutional racism. rafiq's former team—mate gary ballance has admitted that he used racist language towards rafiq during their time together at yorkshire. ballance says he deeply regrets it, but insists it was friendly in nature. rafiq and senior officials from yorkshire will appear before mps later this month. i'm joined by mihir bose — writer, broadcaster and former editor of bbc sport people in yorkshire have been in denialfor a long time. cricket was a game that was supposed to have sorted it all out and it had got a problem but only football had a problem but only football had a problem will knew about funds behaviour but what this is revealed is that cricket has been denial
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about it failed to become diverse and, in fact, about it failed to become diverse and, infact, diversity about it failed to become diverse and, in fact, diversity and inclusion it has gone backwards since the 80s and therefore it has created a climate where the england team, unlike the football team, as we saw the need arose, is not as representative of the country is used to be on the way yorkshire stumbled overall this since rafiq made the allegation and the may direct way yorkshire given that the investigation talk to a lot of damage to people.- investigation talk to a lot of damage to people. investigation talk to a lot of damaaeto --eole. ., damage to people. there was a report carried out by — damage to people. there was a report carried out by yorkshire _ carried out by yorkshire cricket club that upheld some of rafiq's claims but has published that. the defence by many people in yorkshire is that this was banter, that these two men were best friends. does that cut any slack of anyice friends. does that cut any slack of any ice in this debate?— any ice in this debate? well, the roblem any ice in this debate? well, the problem with — any ice in this debate? well, the problem with that _ any ice in this debate? well, the problem with that is _
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any ice in this debate? well, the problem with that is that - any ice in this debate? well, the problem with that is that what i any ice in this debate? well, the l problem with that is that what one person thinks his banter is offensive to the other person. for instance, i offensive to the other person. for instance, lam researching offensive to the other person. for instance, i am researching a book called the impossible dream, can we get a nonracial sports worlds, and i spoke to rafiq during the course of the end he told me he was called rafa the kafir and that word is a muslim is a very dangerous world which means when unbeliever weather is actually the cricketers and the people in yorkshire cricket using that term mentor in the sense that the white south africans used to use it in the days of apartheid. brute the white south africans used to use it in the days of apartheid.— it in the days of apartheid. we 'ust -ause it in the days of apartheid. we 'ust ause for it in the days of apartheid. we 'ust pause fora — it in the days of apartheid. we 'ust pause for a moment i it in the days of apartheid. we 'ust pause for a moment because ii it in the days of apartheid. we just pause for a moment because ijust want to bring in some breaking news that an mp, claudia webb, the 56—year—old leicester east mp. now, she had been facing charges of harassment at westminster magistrates�* court and we have just heard that she has been handed a suspended ten week sentence and 200
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hours community services at westminster magistrates�* court of being convicted of harassment. we will be going to our correspond it at westminster magistrates�* court on at westminster magistrates�* court on a couple of minutes�* time but bad news just in from there, so convicted of harassment and it could lead to a recall if there were enough signatures and hearst constituency to ask her to be another vote for her seat there. she had been told she was facing a sentence can study all centres just a week ago. we have talked about football and problems are spot more wildly yorkshire is a specific case in terms of a number of minority players perhaps representing yorkshire and really predominantly all—white team for many many decades until the last 20 years ago. haifa until the last 20 years ago. how unusual was _ until the last 20 years ago. how unusual was that? _ until the last 20 years ago. how unusual was that? it _ until the last 20 years ago. how unusual was that? it was - until the last 20 years ago. hon-n unusual was that? it was very unusual. i mean, first of all,
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yorkshire has this policy that it would not play anybody who was not born within yorkshire, there were in the past they did play the odd player. but, basically, if you look at the situation since the 50s, immigrants of colour, black and brown, migrated to yorkshire, made it their home, people from asia, from the indian subcontinent and the caribbean, they played cricket, and when in the 70s and 80s i used to go to yorkshire to look at this issue reporting for the sunday time i often find that the agents would say they are not given the opportunity in the white would say that there is no racism, you are not playing for the right clubs that provide cricketers for yorkshire. and the result was that the agents from their own league and unknown tournament called... tournament named after the founder of pakistan, muhammad ali�*s dinner. that is still going on and now we find that those same stories have reappeared and that the asian cricketers say they
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are not being given the opportunity is white cricketers are denied. what has happened is if you think about it these communities have been living here since the 19505 —— the muhammad alijinnah living here since the 19505 —— the muhammad ali jinnah tournament. very fond of cricket and at the recreational level there are a very, very big number of agents who play cricket and they should produce and cricketers that made the team in the first non—white to play to yorkshire was not even yorkshire born, he was the indian cricketer who only came in because at the last minute the white australian player that yorkshire had side couldn�*t play because of injury so the whole process in yorkshire has been we�*ve got to do it finally, we�*ll do it, they are very reluctant, and this is where the azeem rafiq story comes in because in this story is well yorkshire seem to be in a state of denial, nothing wrong, we are right, gods own country, we can�*t possibly have done anything like this. iltrui’eilii.
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have done anything like this. well, thins have done anything like this. well, things might _ have done anything like this. well, things might change _ have done anything like this. well, things might change actually savour some of the responses drawn by the opposition. thanks very much indeed. more than forty countries have promised to phase out coal power in an agreement made at the cop26 climate conference. many — such as poland, vietnam and chile — have made the pledge for the first time. but environmentalists say big polluters like china, the usa, india and australia have not signed up. our correspondent sarah dickins is in treorchy in wales not coal mine, i can see! no, not at all. i not coal mine, i can see! no, not at all. lam not coal mine, i can see! no, not at all. i am actually at wales and england�*s largest onshore wind farm and it isjust england�*s largest onshore wind farm and it is just at the top of where four valleys including the rondo come together where they used to be famous worldwide for making coal, now they are famous for this wind energy and these turbines, the 76 of them, 100 metres high, hard to
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imagine but basically enormous, and it is a £a00 million project. but alongside this and other wind farms across wales and england there is, of course, also community energy projects and community energy wind as well. well, joining us now is dan mcclellan who runs one of those community wind projects. dan, what is the advantage, in your eyes, a community owned wind? i think it provides an asset base for communities. we have been able to develop the loss of other projects with income from our community wind farm. i think, with income from our community wind farm. ithink, most with income from our community wind farm. i think, most importantly, with income from our community wind farm. ithink, most importantly, it just engages ordinary people in climate change. you know, people can look up at our turbines, schools can visit them and feel that they own them and that they have helped achieve those turbines and we just need to find ways of engaging people in as many ways as possible in climate change action in order to tackle it. it can�*tjust be
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something that is, sort of, done to communities by large companies. we�*ve all got to, sort of, take part in dealing with these issues. we've all got to, sort of, take part in dealing with these issues.- in dealing with these issues. now, the end generated _ in dealing with these issues. now, the end generated here _ in dealing with these issues. now, the end generated here is - in dealing with these issues. now, the end generated here is the - in dealing with these issues. now, the end generated here is the amount used by 200,000 homes. it goes into the grid. what happens to the electricity from your two turbines? i mean, we operate within the uk energy market, so we produce enough to supply about 2500 homes, and £8 million project. it is not on the same scale as others. that is not to say that community energy couldn�*t deliver at that kind of scale as well, in my opinion. but within europe community energy projects are able to sell directly to households. the energy market is a lot less regulated than in the uk where it is
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largely controlled by large companies if we are going to tackle climate change we�*re going to have to enable community projects like like our own to solder it to households and businesses in the way that they do in germany, belgium and france and alsojust look that they do in germany, belgium and france and also just look at control of the grid as well. in berlin, community energy came together and actually bought the grid. in the uk, it is controlled by very large corporations, usually foreign owned and we need to find ways of tackling that. �* . . , ., that. and the electricity generated b our that. and the electricity generated by your turbines, _ that. and the electricity generated by your turbines, is _ that. and the electricity generated by your turbines, is it _ that. and the electricity generated by your turbines, is it cheaper - that. and the electricity generated by your turbines, is it cheaper or i by your turbines, is it cheaper or more expensive than, let�*s say, the electricity here, want to end up in household? it electricity here, want to end up in household?— electricity here, want to end up in household? , , , household? it is basically the same, fed into the — household? it is basically the same, fed into the uk — household? it is basically the same, fed into the uk energy _ household? it is basically the same, fed into the uk energy market. - fed into the uk energy market. people can resell our power to orcs of this energy who are a mid—scale energy company so it is largely within the mainstream market. i think the important thing for our project is that all the revenue goes back into local regeneration so we have bought the former school in the village and we are developing that
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of a low carbon arts centre and community centre. you know, school groups, school groups come and visit our turbine. we have a not—for—profit entity in those values, kind of, in view everything that we do and on the back of the wave fan we have developed a lot of rooftop solar power which is actually the largest corp in the uk, now, rooftop solar and installing solar and school so that is a lot the community energy can do to take forward other initiatives to tackle climate change.— forward other initiatives to tackle climate change. also 'oining us from 'ust down climate change. also 'oining us from n“ down the _ climate change. also 'oining us from just down the vanda _ climate change. also joining us from just down the vanda valley - climate change. also joining us from just down the vanda valley is - just down the vanda valley is professor calvin jones from cardiff university. —— rhondda valley. doesn�*t matter who owns the renewable energy? doesn't matter who owns the renewable energy?— doesn't matter who owns the renewable energy? well, i think it does for many _ renewable energy? well, i think it does for many of _ renewable energy? well, i think it does for many of the _ renewable energy? well, i think it does for many of the reasons - renewable energy? well, i think it does for many of the reasons dan | renewable energy? well, i think it. does for many of the reasons dan has a very— does for many of the reasons dan has a very talked — does for many of the reasons dan has a very talked about. you know, we have _ a very talked about. you know, we have particularly in the community and sitting — have particularly in the community and sitting in now a situation where for hundreds of years people have had local— for hundreds of years people have had local resources, local well taken — had local resources, local well taken out _ had local resources, local well taken out from under their feet and what they— taken out from under their feet and what they don't want is to see the
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same _ what they don't want is to see the same resources, the energy resources, taken them out of their head _ resources, taken them out of their head so— resources, taken them out of their head so i_ resources, taken them out of their head so i think having your share is very important important in the narrative — very important important in the narrative around renewable energy and climate change and people are prepared _ and climate change and people are prepared to put up with the disruption of changing to renewable energy— disruption of changing to renewable energy if_ disruption of changing to renewable energy if they have a real stake. when _ energy if they have a real stake. when people see the power being exported — when people see the power being exported from their valleys and they see very— exported from their valleys and they see very little coming back in terms of control— see very little coming back in terms of control that is when you have a problem — of control that is when you have a roblem. 1, ., ~' of control that is when you have a roblem. �* ~ , of control that is when you have a roblem. m 'j~ of control that is when you have a roblem. ~ , ' j~ ., ., problem. book adc £1.8 million a ear problem. book adc £1.8 million a year come — problem. book adc £1.8 million a year come from _ problem. book adc £1.8 million a year come from this _ problem. book adc £1.8 million a year come from this wind - problem. book adc £1.8 million a year come from this wind farm i problem. book adc £1.8 million a . year come from this wind farm into communities like the one in... and as we have heard earlier on that has helped all sorts of projects and businesses and will do so for many years. businesses and will do so for many ears. ., , , ., , ., businesses and will do so for many ears. ., , ,., , ., ., years. oh, absolutely, and from there there _ years. oh, absolutely, and from there there are _ years. oh, absolutely, and from there there are a _ years. oh, absolutely, and from there there are a lot _ years. oh, absolutely, and from there there are a lot of - years. oh, absolutely, and from there there are a lot of stops i years. oh, absolutely, and from| there there are a lot of stops and years. oh, absolutely, and from i there there are a lot of stops and i think— there there are a lot of stops and i think there — there there are a lot of stops and i think there is a big difference between _ think there is a big difference between money that you earn from your resources, own assets or otherwise — your resources, own assets or otherwise and own labour, and money 'ust otherwise and own labour, and money just given _ otherwise and own labour, and money just given to _ otherwise and own labour, and money just given to you by somebody else. there _ just given to you by somebody else. there is— just given to you by somebody else. there is something different about how that _ there is something different about how that feels and when you look at the ways _ how that feels and when you look at the ways in— how that feels and when you look at the ways in which some of these
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communities around where i live have suffered _ communities around where i live have suffered from a lack of agency, you know _ suffered from a lack of agency, you know. a _ suffered from a lack of agency, you know. a lack— suffered from a lack of agency, you know, a lack of control over resources _ know, a lack of control over resources and their economic choices, _ resources and their economic choices, and given money is really important — choices, and given money is really important and that is valuable that they have — important and that is valuable that they have been given that money. it is not _ they have been given that money. it is not the _ they have been given that money. it is not the same as other resources and i_ is not the same as other resources and i think— is not the same as other resources and i think that is a qualitative difference, really.— and i think that is a qualitative difference, really. survive actually sa in: difference, really. survive actually saying that _ difference, really. survive actually saying that in _ difference, really. survive actually saying that in your— difference, really. survive actually saying that in your case _ difference, really. survive actually saying that in your case people i difference, really. survive actually saying that in your case people of| saying that in your case people of wales should be earning wind farms like this and other renewable projects in the future? i like this and other renewable projects in the future? pro'ects in the future? i think it is projects in the future? i think it is fair to say — projects in the future? i think it is fair to say that _ projects in the future? i think it is fair to say that in _ projects in the future? i think it is fair to say that in the - projects in the future? i think it is fair to say that in the uk - projects in the future? i think it is fair to say that in the uk in i is fair to say that in the uk in general— is fair to say that in the uk in generalwe is fair to say that in the uk in general we missed is fair to say that in the uk in generalwe missed a is fair to say that in the uk in general we missed a huge trick by not finding the mechanism to engage communities more than ownership and equity— communities more than ownership and equity and _ communities more than ownership and equity and i_ communities more than ownership and equity and i think the welsh government has struggled to find a way to— government has struggled to find a way to do— government has struggled to find a way to do this for a number of years. — way to do this for a number of years. with _ way to do this for a number of years, with the best of intentions, and _ years, with the best of intentions, and, fortunately, we have a situation _ and, fortunately, we have a situation in the uk that, as dan has said, _ situation in the uk that, as dan has said. in— situation in the uk that, as dan has said. in the — situation in the uk that, as dan has said, in the commercial side, large companies — said, in the commercial side, large companies that the best grid locations are managed to capture that part —
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locations are managed to capture that part of a grid supply and then, of course, — that part of a grid supply and then, of course, on the private side what you find _ of course, on the private side what you find is— of course, on the private side what you find is that nice middle—class people _ you find is that nice middle—class people with spare resources are the ones who— people with spare resources are the ones who are able to put solar pv and the _ ones who are able to put solar pv and the houses early on, swallow up all that— and the houses early on, swallow up all that subsidy which then causes subsidy— all that subsidy which then causes subsidy to — all that subsidy which then causes subsidy to be taken away when it is oversubscribed. the communities that took longer— oversubscribed. the communities that took longer to organise, with one or two exceptions, not really in a position— two exceptions, not really in a position to get in on that market and start— position to get in on that market and start the supplies of electricity.— and start the supplies of electrici . ., , ,., and start the supplies of electrici . ., , electricity. professor kelvin jones, demo can. — electricity. professor kelvin jones, demo can, thank _ electricity. professor kelvin jones, demo can, thank you _ electricity. professor kelvin jones, demo can, thank you very - electricity. professor kelvin jones, demo can, thank you very much i electricity. professor kelvin jones, i demo can, thank you very much and electricity. professor kelvin jones, - demo can, thank you very much and we will bejoined by demo can, thank you very much and we will be joined by the welsh government�*s to climate change minister later on and we will bring some of those points to her. back to you. beautiful afternoon where you are. thanks very much. some showers to be had today along
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north sea coast, pushing pembrokeshire cornwall will once of northern ireland, a sven pushing into north—west scotland. it is a chilly feeling day, yes, but hopefully some sunshine away from the shows will compensate. tonight, clouds filling in a chilly feeling day, yes, but hopefully some sunshine away from the shows will compensate. tonight, clouds billing and across scotland, northern ireland, northern england with some right patchy rain and some heavy bursts temperature is edging upwards of the night goes on, still foster across parts of wales in sun trying to start with tomorrow in east anglia and some heavy bursts in upper scotland. with the clyde moving on, change of wind direction. temperature is edging upwards of the night goes on, still foster across parts of wales in the southern parts of england some sun trying to start with tomorrow in east anglia in touch milder.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at four... owen paterson has resigned as a conservative mp following a backlash over the government decision to overhaul the policing of mps�* conduct.
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he�*d been found to have broken lobbying rules. the mp claudia webbe has been given a suspended 10—weekjail sentence and 200 hours community service after being convicted of harassment. a man has pleaded guilty to murdering wendy knell and caroline pierce more than 30 years ago. david fuller killed the two women in kent in 1987. he also admitted abusing female bodies in hospital mortuaries. four teenagers are found guilty of murdering 1a—year—old schoolboy keon lincoln in birmingham. a jury is still considering a murder charge against a fifth teenager, who�*s accused of supplying the weapon. the uk has become the first country in the world to approve the use of an anti—viral pill to treat covid—19. as energy consumption dominates discussions at the climate summit in glasgow. we�*re at one of the biggest onshore wind farms in wales as we look at the alternatives to using fosil fuels.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. and we start with the breaking news that owen paterson has resigned as an mp after a row over his conduct led to a government u—turn. the conservative member of parliament for north shropshire was found to have broken lobbying rules and was facing suspension — until tory mps blocked it by calling for an overhaul of the mp5�* standards watchdog instead. they initially had the backing of number 10, but downing street reversed its decision after a furious backlash from opposition parties and some conservative mps. in a statement, mr paterson said...
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let�*s talk to our political correspondent chris mason. the correspondent chris mason. man has gone but the remains, the man has gone but the problem remains, chris? the the man has gone but the problem remains, chris?— the man has gone but the problem remains, chris? the problem really does remain _ remains, chris? the problem really does remain after— remains, chris? the problem really does remain after an _ remains, chris? the problem really does remain after an extraordinary| does remain after an extraordinary 2a hours, really. you know, yesterday morning we were looking a
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situation where owen paterson, having been found by an independent watchdog to have broken parliament�*s rules, was facing the prospect of a suspension, a 30 day suspension, and with it the prospect of a by—election in his north shropshire seat, that is what a chunk of the lake is a to a situation where through the eyes of many government cooked up a mechanism via which it could if not get him off the hook then certainly postpone that potential punishment while also looking at all of the rules. then there was this extraordinary backlash to that from the opposition parties, from the newspapers, including those usually sympathetic to the government and plenty of conservative mps, even those who had told the government line yesterday invited to this postponement of mr paterson�*s suspension which is thought, do you know what? thisjust looks grubby. how on earth to be defenders to our constituents? the government had hoped that it could put together a new committee, made up
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put together a new committee, made up of loads of mps put together a new committee, made up of loads of mp5 from across the house to dream of the new rule book of at least add to the existing rule book and bolt an appeals mechanism for situations like this. the other party said absolutely no way. we are not doing that, we are not going anywhere near it. so the government had reversed itself into a cul—de—sac out of which there weren�*t many options in terms of getting out because how could you possibly change the rules that are meant to govern how all mp5 behave on a committee made upjust purely of the governing party? p as you turn this morning from jacob rees—mogg, the leader of the common saying, look, we will look at the rules but we will detach mr paterson�*s case from it. the added twist is that one of my colleagues here rang owen paterson afterjacob rees—mogg had said this in the house of commons to find out what he made of commons to find out what he made of it and he was wandering round the supermarket and the first he knew was that he was back on the hook and did face the prospect of a vote that could seem suspended was when we
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rang him up to tell him in the government hadn�*t got round to letting him know. they did see these two things are set for all along but why did they seek to separate were mr paterson was like to face a vote regarding his suspension. so it was a very, very awkward and personally very difficult situation for owen paterson suddenly got a lot worse in this decision was eight and he�*s going to walk away from politics. you say that he also maintained his innocence and talked about his integrity and last night he was going to fight and he thought great, this is an opportunity to clear my name so was he pushed, do you think? you think the government said to him, look, it is better if you do resign now because we have in this pickle? i think it does help the government that he has resigned and i don�*t know what came about what conversation necessarily went on for his decision. i conversation necessarily went on for his decision-— his decision. i think the key thing we shouldn't _ his decision. i think the key thing we shouldn't underestimate - his decision. i think the key thing we shouldn't underestimate is i his decision. i think the key thing i we shouldn't underestimate is that we shouldn�*t underestimate is that he has gone through this horrendous personal time with the loss of his wife rose to suicide. he very pointedly said that the whole business around these investigations
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into him had contributed towards her state of mind prior to her taking her life. we had seen in the last week or so his daughter going public in making the case defending her dad so i think he obviously felt very keenly that the personal situation that he finds himself in, detach from the investigation that has been ongoing, he does tie those two things together, but detach from that, clearly, he had been giving some serious thought to how much anguish his time in politics was causing him. his critics say, look, he brought this upon himself because there is a clear set of rules about what you can and cannot do as an mp as fathers paid outside work is concerned. you can do paid outside work, you have to register it, but what you cannot do is be a paid advocate. in other words, whilst being an mp, start lobbying ministers, trying to persuade ministers, trying to persuade ministers to change government policy or whatever on behalf of your paid employee. now, his argument was
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what he was doing was in the national interest around questions of food safety for the companies that he was working for and that he said look, there is an exemption for that. the investigator said there is but it doesn�*t qualify, given what we have found to be an egregious breach of the rules. . mr paterson has had a rough old times at the announcement of the investigation. he said he hasn�*t received adequate justice. he said after what looked like this in 2a hours at the chance that this case we examined under a new set of rules only for the government to pull the rug from under him by changing their mind on where they were less than 2a hours previously. where they were less than 24 hours reviousl . ., where they were less than 24 hours reviousl . . ,., where they were less than 24 hours reviousl . . . kevin barrow is a former labour mp for rother valley and a former chair of the commons standards
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and privilege committee.
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in terms of reputation and everything else, doesn�*t she or he have the right to appeal basic right to appeal within the system. i have to appeal within the system. i have to say that. there is a right of appeal within the system. in all the years i was chair of the committee, when we did, and we do on an annual basis, we do review the code of conduct and how it sits and quite frankly this argument about having a right of appeal, i had never heard of it before. i went to meetings when andrea led some, who put the amendment down yesterday, the leader of the house, we had discussed
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issues which we thought... and quite frankly, the issue of the appeal was not mentioned before. that is my view of a red herring. i think what the object of the exercise yesterday was to try to stop that report being put in front of the house and for a parliament to take a decision on it. yes, owen paterson said the commissioner refused to take evidence from 17 witnesses who he thought would have helped defend his case. ~ , ., , thought would have helped defend his case. ~ y., , ., , case. well, you must ask chris b ant, case. well, you must ask chris bryant. who — case. well, you must ask chris bryant. who is _ case. well, you must ask chris bryant, who is the _ case. well, you must ask chris bryant, who is the chair - case. well, you must ask chris bryant, who is the chair of - case. well, you must ask chris bryant, who is the chair of thisj bryant, who is the chair of this committee, but let me just say what i picked up in the last 2a hours. though 17 witnesses that wrote in evidence, was read and published and i think i heard it said yesterday that none of them asked government to give evidence in front of the committee. and we see owen has had the opportunity to do that. right. but this the opportunity to do that. right. lhut this was _ the opportunity to do that. right. but this was set _ the opportunity to do that. right. but this was set up _ the opportunity to do that. right. but this was set up in _ the opportunity to do that. right. but this was set up in 1995, - the opportunity to do that. right. but this was set up in 1995, this i but this was set up in 1995, this committee, because of the cash for questions, for example. yes. but do you think it needs to be looked at
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again? othertweaks you think it needs to be looked at again? other tweaks that perhaps could be made? it again? other tweaks that perhaps could be made?— again? other tweaks that perhaps could be made? it gets looked at in every parliament. _ could be made? it gets looked at in every parliament. it _ could be made? it gets looked at in every parliament. it didn't - could be made? it gets looked at in every parliament. it didn't because| every parliament. it didn�*t because of the last couple of years because of the last couple of years because of the last couple of years because of the very short parliaments we have had. i was involved in looking at it once again in 2015, we did make changes. i think on every occasion, every parliament, some changes have been made. they have been done on the basis of consensus. all decisions i have been involved in, whether it has been individual reports against mps in, whether it has been individual reports against mp5 or in the change in conduct, all of them have been non—consensus. i have never known any vote having been whipped in a way that was yesterday and i am afraid i think owen paterson probably thinks they tried it yesterday and they have hung him out to dry today. ok. yesterday and they have hung him out to dry today-— to dry today. ok. thank you very much indeed. _ let�*s speak to sir ed davey, leader of the liberal democrats.
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do you think it is right that the commissioner should have declared that owen paterson was guilty before she even had the evidence from him? i think this process is gone through in the normal way. you heard that it has been the way that it has been in for a while. my concern is actually about the prime minister. boris johnson thought he could rewrite the rules yesterday to defend himself and his tory mates from charges of sleaze and corruption. he thought no one would notice, but i think she underestimated the british people and how badly this would go down, including amongst lifelong conservative voters and some conservative voters and some conservative mps. this government just can�*t keep taking people for granted. i think people want decency, they want honesty from the government, and they�*re not getting that from boris johnson. government, and they�*re not getting that from borisjohnson. oid government, and they're not getting that from boris johnson.— that from boris johnson. did any of owen paterson's _ that from boris johnson. did any of owen paterson's four _ that from boris johnson. did any of owen paterson's four playas - that from boris johnson. did any of owen paterson's four playas wash . that from boris johnson. did any of. owen paterson's four playas wash as owen paterson�*s four playas wash as far as you are concerned? he was doing it in the role of a whistle—blower, for example, the standards in foods, though i think
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there was only one small payment from lynn�*s county foods, his main money came from randox, the big farming company. we money came from randox, the big farming company-— money came from randox, the big farming company. we have laypeople in the process — farming company. we have laypeople in the process you _ farming company. we have laypeople in the process you makes _ in the process you makes recommendations to parliament and look at that and then we vote and as colin barringer said it is extraordinarily unusual for this to be whipped vote on a mission for this committee and i think that shows the government in a very bad light. the conservative government who whipped to vote without any precedent and i think it is the process the public should look at any individual case of owen paterson by itself but for a government to try and undermine an independent process that had gone through in the normal way that was trying to
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maintain standards in public life i think people should be really worried about the way this government is behaving. if it was just this example by itself, may be some people would say well, it is just one example. unfortunately for borisjohnson, there are a whole series of examples of where he is undermining the independence of those institutions that are there in our country, part of this british tradition from the british way of life, and he is undermining them for his own purposes, his own power. he has had an attack on the independence of the judiciary, he has had an attack on the electoral commission. when his own independent adviser on ministerial standards alex allan recommended that priti patel the home secretary should be sanctioned for bullying her staff, the prime minister refused those recommendations and alex allen the independent adviser resigned. so there is a whole history of boris johnson behaving in, frankly, an autocratic way and people will look
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at borisjohnson. one rule for boris johnson�*s friend, one rule for the rest of us i think people wouldn�*t like that. i will say again people want decency and honesty for the government and they are not getting that from boris johnson. talks government and they are not getting that from boris johnson.— that from boris johnson. talks about the rocess that from boris johnson. talks about the process and _ that from boris johnson. talks about the process and is _ that from boris johnson. talks about the process and is it _ that from boris johnson. talks about the process and is it right _ that from boris johnson. talks about the process and is it right and - that from boris johnson. talks about the process and is it right and fair. the process and is it right and fair for the people to wait two years for the results of that investigation which he claims contributed to the fact that his wife took her own life because the pressure that two—year investigation. i because the pressure that two-year investigation-— investigation. i think we have all not hue investigation. i think we have all got huge compassion _ investigation. i think we have all got huge compassion for- investigation. i think we have all got huge compassion for anyone investigation. i think we have all- got huge compassion for anyone who has a tragedy and their family lives and i think all our hearts go out to the whole family for that. the delay in the republication of the report i cannot really comment on. i think maybe it was because they were trying to hear the different
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submissions coming from the owen paterson side. you heard from kevin barron that apparently the 17 witnesses that mr paterson wanted to call did publish, did have the evidence published and was taken into account, so i can�*t actually comment on things i haven�*t been involved in. the reality was they recommendations were there, made by a committee that had more tory mps and opposition mps and i think the idea that borisjohnson and his government should, when they don�*t like the result of a process, try to turnit like the result of a process, try to turn it over, i think that is just simply wrong. we are seeing it far too much from this government. i think they are abusing their power, i think it is against the traditions of our country and i think if they keep undermining the rule of law, undermining the independence of institutions from the judiciary, the
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parliamentary commission on standards, and such like, i do hope people will be pretty angry about that. they should be because boris johnson is playing fast and loose with our democracy. it is a must like it is being run by the mafia in the way they are behaving. it is not acceptable. people want proper process, they want decency and democracy and they are not getting it from borisjohnson. ok. democracy and they are not getting it from boris johnson.— democracy and they are not getting it from boris johnson. ok, thank you very much- — it from boris johnson. ok, thank you very much- let's _ it from boris johnson. ok, thank you very much. let's turn _ it from boris johnson. ok, thank you very much. let's turn to _ it from boris johnson. ok, thank you very much. let's turn to another- it from boris johnson. ok, thank you j very much. let's turn to another mp. an mp who made threatening phone calls to a woman because she was jealous of her relationship with her partner has been given a suspended sentence. claudia webbe, a former labour mp for leicester east who is now independent, made several calls over two years and threatened the woman with acid. let�*s get more on this from our correspondent helena wilkinson who�*s at westminster magistrates�* court... helena? yes, we are expecting claudia webbe _ helena? yes, we are expecting claudia webbe to _
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helena? yes, we are expecting claudia webbe to leave - helena? yes, we are expecting - claudia webbe to leave westminster magistrates�* court at any moment now, but she has been sentenced by the chief magistrate, paul coldspring, in the last minutes or so, to ten weeks in custody. but that has been suspended for two years and she has also been told by the chief magistrate that she has to carry out 200 hours of unpaid community service and also she has to pay compensation to the victim in the case, michelle maritz, of £1000. the trial had heard that claudia webbe had made a number of unwanted phone calls to michelle. michelle was friends with claudia webbe�*s partner. and a number of those phone calls were threatening. in one of them, she had threatened michelle with acid. she had also threatened to send intimate photographs of michelle merritt to members of her family. the chief magistrate, paul, had said today during his sentencing remarks that the threats of acid and
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the threats of photographs were designed to cause significant stress and she said in particular the fret about acid, paul goldspring said, they that threat in his view was a very serious violence. he did say that because of her previous character and he said in court that this was out of character by claudia webbe, it was something that would not be repeated, it would not be an immediate custodial sentence, so he has sentenced her to ten weeks in custody. that has been suspended for two years and he told her that means basically that she has to stay out of trouble for that amount of time, but we heard also in court from michelle merritt, who gave a very emotional victim impact statement behind a curtain, so she couldn�*t be seen by claudia webbe and she said in court that she felt fearful, anxious and vulnerable after the months of harassment carried out by claudia webbe. ok.
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months of harassment carried out by claudia webbe.— claudia webbe. ok, helena with the latest from westminster _ claudia webbe. ok, helena with the. latest from westminster magistrates' latest from westminster magistrates�* court, thank you very much. a man has pleaded guilty at maidstone crown court to the murders of two women in 1987. david fuller had admitted killing wendy knell and caroline pierce, but had previously denied murder, saying he was affecting by a mental condition. he�*s also admitted sexually abusing the bodies of dead women in two hospital mortuaries. here�*s our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. a warning — you may find some of the details in this report disturbing. morning. hello. after 33 years, he almost seemed to be expecting it. all right, david. you are under arrest on the suspicion of the murders of wendy knell and caroline pierce in 1987. do you understand ? david fuller, mr normal — at least, on the outside. wendy knell and caroline pierce. independent young women in a quiet town in the 19805. you don't expect it in a small town
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like tunbridge wells. you don't expect it to be two young women just getting on with their own business, working... ..like myself. we were alljust working locally. it could have happened to any of us. julie was a friend of wendy and worked with her in a caf. she always wanted to get married and have children and be a homemaker. that is what she wanted to do. but wendy�*s home, her tiny bedsit, was where she was murdered. caroline was attacked on her doorstep and taken away. three weeks later, a farm worker looked down from his tractor into a drainage ditch and spotted a body. like wendy, caroline had been beaten, strangled and sexually assaulted. police were pretty sure the same man had killed both of them, but back then there was very little cctv, especially around here, no phones to track and dna techniques were rudimentary.
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but that has changed. fuller was tracked down using modern dna techniques, which can identify a criminal through his family members. when this dna swab was taken, it matched samples from the murder scenes, carefully stored for decades. fuller�*s house provided more evidence. this picture. see the shoes he is wearing? they matched this footprint, in blood, from wendy�*s bedsit. and then it has got number 52. date of death. he has identified the victims. and slowly police started to make discoveries, which revealed what david fuller was all about. he�*s killed them and evidence is indicating that he has killed them to then sexually abuse them. after death? after death. and that is the evidence that has been presented in court. and so... horrific murders.
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these young ladies, 25 and 20, brutalised for his sexual satisfaction. the search continued. it looks like he has got some hard drives in there, i would say. but they are stuck to the back. and these hidden hard drives contain devastating evidence. fuller, a hospital maintenance man in two hospital mortuaries, carrying out sexual acts with dead bodies. he had set up a camcorder and videoed himself. his swipe card gave him access to all areas. we can now report for the first time that at the kent and sussex hospital and its successor, the tunbridge wells hospital, at least 100 dead women were abused. they include children and the elderly. fuller recorded some of their names in a little black book. but said practically
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nothing to police. is there anything you would like to add or clarify at this point, david? no. leaving them to identify more than 78 victims from details in his videos. 78 and counting. theirfamilies have been traced and visited. we have got to tell them. we must tell them. and there are some that have said, "we wish you "hadn�*t told us." i don�*t know how i would react if it happened to one of my close loved ones, whether i would want to know about it. i think we have to tell them. fuller�*s claim that he was mentally ill was torn apart in court. psychiatrist doctor richard badcock has advised the police on cases, including that of harold shipman. the psychopathology work here is very definitely one of sadomasochism. which, in essence, is...not being able to deal with your own issues, except by manipulated behaviour of other people.
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although you are doing extreme things... ..you don�*t feel alive most of the time. you know, you might only feel alive in the moment of the... of the offence. david fuller will become notorious for crimes which will revolt the nation. his victims — so many women and girls, wendy and caroline — were not even safe after their deaths. tom symonds, bbc news, maidstone crown court. in the last few minutes, the family of one of the vitims, wendy knell, have given this statement. more on that, of course, on the web
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search. let�*sjust bring more on that, of course, on the web search. let�*s just bring you some other developing news and that is concerning the racism row at yorkshire county cricket club, those allegations of racism using the p word against azeem rafiq. now another sponsor has decided to withdraw its support. nikkei will no longer be the kit supplier for yorkshire. we stand firmly against discrimination, it says, of any kind. one other development as well thatis kind. one other development as well that is that harrogate spring water has taken the decision to end its sponsorship agreement with the club as well, with immediate effect. we will be making no further comment on this matter. it concerns, as i say, the allegations of against azeem rafiq. so that is sponsors nike and harrogate spring water gone. four teenagers have been convicted of murdering the schoolboy keon lincoln outside his home in birmingham injanuary.
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they�*ll be sentenced later this month. a jury is still considering a murder charge against a fifth teenager. keon lincoln, aged 15, was shot in the stomach while on the ground, despite making attempts to escape the attack, but was later pronounced dead. the first pill designed to treat covid has been approved by the uk medicines regulator. the tablet will be given twice a day to vulnerable patients recently diagnosed with the disease. our health correspondent, katharine da costa, has more. this is really good news, particularly for vulnerable groups, so the elderly and people with a weakened immune system who may not respond well to covid vaccines. before we had treatments that were given in hospitals to patients that were seriously ill. this is the first drug that can be given as a pill at home in the early stages of an infection. clinical trials found that the tablet, molnupiravir, halved the risk of hospitalisation and death in at—risk patients. patients will be given a tablet twice a day and the treatment works by stopping the virus making copies of itself, so it reduces the levels of virus in the body...
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yes, they described it as mutating itself to death, which i thought was a good description. so today the uk regulator, the mhra, approved it, said it was effective and said it should be given as soon as possible after getting a positive covid test or within five days of symptoms starting and it will be given to people with mild—to—moderate covid with at least one risk factor, so that could be obesity, heart disease, diabetes, old age. so when will they be dispensed? i think we have ordered, what, half a million or more? yes, so the us drug company behind this thinks they can produce about 10 million courses by the end of the year. the uk government has pre—ordered nearly half a million courses. we don�*t know how much it is paying for that. the us has ordered about 1.7 million and is paying about £500 per course. the uk government is in talks with the nhs to see how quickly they can roll it out to patients and this will be done through a national study as soon as possible.
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we have not been given exact details of the timescale yet and there are still some questions about the logistics of how it will be made accessible. it is worth pointing out this is not an alternative to vaccination. people are still urged to get their vaccines, their boosters, their flu jabs, but this is hugely important because no vaccine is 100% effective and some people can�*t have vaccines or don�*t respond well to them, so this is another weapon in the fight against covid and is helping reduce those most at risk from serious illness, reducing hospital admissions and therefore ultimately pressure on the nhs. katharine da costa speaking to me a little earlier. let�*s get the latest covid figures. 21a deaths in the uk within 28 days of a positive test. that is down from 217 on wednesday. that is from
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the latest government data. 37,269 people tested positive in the last 2a hours. as i say, 21a deaths within 28 days of the positive test. in terms of vaccinations, 81% of people aged 12 or over have received a first dose. just under 76% of people are fully vaccinated. just under 9 million people have received their booster vaccine as well. in time for the chilly weather, winter honours. nick miller has the details. it certainly feels that way today, temperature is below average for the time of year, many of us in single figures, some sunshine, though, in cumbria. after all the rain this week, some blue sky and that in many places some sunshine around, that chilly breeze especially on the north sea coast with sunshine here, showers running across the western fringes of wales, especially down to cornwall, one or two down into northern ireland as well as overnight we get cloud
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increasing over the northern half of the uk with some outbreaks of rain, temperatures,... across the midlands and south—east of england on friday begins. cloud increasing here as well and overall tomorrow is a cloudy day. from the cloud we could see an increase in rain and drizzle, the most persistent of rain across north scotland and the most persistent and northerly winds will be turning towards a more westerly now and with cloud cover that means temperatures will not be as low tomorrow. in fact, temperatures will not be as low tomorrow. infact, closerto temperatures will not be as low tomorrow. in fact, closer to average again and that is where they will stay over the weekend. a windy weekend and some rain and at times as well, especially in scotland and northern ireland. for details about the weather to come, just before 5pm. hello this is bbc news with tim wilcox. the headlines... owen paterson has resigned as a conservative mp following a backlash over
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the government decision to overhaul the policing of mps�* conduct. he�*d been found to have broken lobbying rules. the mp claudia webbe has been given a suspended 10 weekjail sentence and 200 hours community service after being convicted of harassment. a man has pleaded guilty to murdering wendy knell and caroline pierce more than 30 years ago. david fuller killed the two women in kent in 1987. he also pleaded guilty to abusing female bodies in hospital mortuaries dozens of countries commit to ending their dependence on coal at the glasgow climate talks, but big producers like china,refuse to sign up.
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and former england cricketer gary ballance says he regrets using racist language against his former yorkshire team—mate azeem rafiq. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. england manager, gareth southgate has recalled marcus rashford, trent alexander arnold and jude bellingham to the england squad for the world cup qualifiers against albania and san marino. arnold assisted both of liverpool�*s goals in their champions league win over atletico madrid last night. kieren trippier also played for the spanish champions at anfield, but he�*s been left out along with jadon sancho and jesse lingard. southgate said there�*s a lot of competition for places. a strength and depth to his squad and that he had seen over the last 12 months how rapidly young players can come through. northern ireland have also named their squad today for next week�*s final world cup qualifying matches at home to lithuania and italy. manager ian baraclough has given seventeen—year—old nottingham forest striker dale taylor his first call—up. it is to see how he deals with it. he did very well for the under 21 is in the summer. i was thinking about
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bringing him in september but he got an injury. he is now back from that injury and it is a chance to bring him in and have a look look at him in and around the squad and see how he deals with it. tottenham have confirmed that new coach antonio conte and his coaching staff have their work permits, so will be in the dugout to take charge of their europa conference league match against vitesse. the club has also announced that former player, ryan mason will take up the role of first team coach. former chelsea manager conte joined spurs on tuesday, just a day after the sacking of nuno espirito santo, who had been in thejob forjust four months. captain hugo lloris says conte has raised expectations at the club already. obviously, there is a lot of excitement, but not only from the players — from all the club, from all the fans. as i said before, you know, his cv talks by itself. he has a great personality, he has great ideas of football, and, you know, he is going to bring his passion, his energy, and his knowledge of football.
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british number one cameron norrie has lost in straight sets to the american taylor fritz in the paris masters. he had been hoping to get through the third round, and qualify for the atp finals in turin — which is still mathematically possible — but 2a—year—old fritz was too strong for him. taking norrie 6—3 in the first set and then 7—6 in the second. so it�*s the american who advances to the quarter finals and will face the favorite novak djokovic. at the t20 mens world cup, australia are up to second in group 1 after a comfortable victory over bangladesh this morning. looking to bounce back after their defeat to england at the weekend, aaron finch�*s side gave bangladesh no chance at all, bowling them out for just 73.
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adam zampa getting five wickets. finch then starred with the bat, top scoring with a0 offjust 20 balls to help them reach the target in just over six overs. they now go above south africa in the table and play the west indies next. eddiejones has named his squad for england�*s autumn series opener against tonga and centre manu tuilagi will make his first international appearance since march 2020 at twickenham on saturday. tuilagi has spent long periods on the sidelines with injuries, including eight months out with a torn achilles, repeated groin injuries and knee ligament damage. jones confirmed that captain owen farrell will start at fly—half. the team announcement was delayed because a member of support staff had tested positive for covid—19. wales have also named their team for the match against south africa. ellisjenkins will make his first appearance in three years on saturday at the principality stadium. the cardiff flanker is one of six changes from last weekend�*s 5a—16 defeat against new zealand. details of both squads are on the bbc sport website.
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in the last hour two more sponsors of yorkshire county cricket club has ceased their association with them. harrogate spring water will no longer sponsor them and nike will no longer be their kit supplier saying "stand firmly against racism and discrimination of any kind." you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. of course, this is related to the row over former player azeem rafiq�*s racism allegations. moral voice toys on the bbc sport website. that�*s it for now. —— more on all of those stories on the bbc sports website. we�*ll go to glasgow in a moment. let�*sjust read you a tweet from greta thunberg. she said that this cop26 was the most excluding cop of all time, a global north green wash festival, a two—week celebration of business as usual and blah blah
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blah, the praise that the prime minister borisjohnson of got picked up minister borisjohnson of got picked up when he does cop but was hoping it wouldn�*t be seen as a green wash festival of global north. well, the government says the end of site. the government says the "end of coal is in sight," after more than a0 countries, promised to phase out the fossil fuel in the coming decades. it is the single biggest contributor to climate change. poland, vietnam and chile are among the fast—growing economies, that now say they�*ll reduce their coal use. but other nations such as australia, india, china and america haven�*t i can speak now to professor karen turner, director of energy policy at the university of strathclyde. i want to talk about renewables in a moment. what you make about that at aboufs moment. what you make about that at about�*s tweet about it is more blah blah blah, most excluding cop ever, global of the most festival. o0 blah blah, most excluding cop ever, global of the most festival.- global of the most festival. do you a . ree? global of the most festival. do you agree? well. _ global of the most festival. do you agree? well. i— global of the most festival. do you agree? well, i hope _ global of the most festival. do you agree? well, i hope we _ global of the most festival. do you agree? well, i hope we won't - global of the most festival. do you . agree? well, i hope we won't agree agree? well, i hope we won�*t agree by the end of cop26. i think clearly going through this there is
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high—level discussion between countries going on in a real need to get the global north to do what they are going to do and so we had finance day yesterday was about shifting minor, markets green finance in one of the key elements is going to be whether or not we actually deliver on paris 2315 commitment of finance for the global south so i think there is a lot of lining up the global north. —— paris 2015. we have to sympathise a bit with the greta�*s point because the voices come out of cop26 in the media a bit skewed at the moment. the biggest thing are some of the biggest emitters china and russia and there, it doesn�*t really show a holistic approach to this, it? i think it is concerning. i think we have to be very aware that all of this is going on in the covid—19 environment some of these leaders haven�*t travelled as their country to 20 months or so and the key thing really is... to 20 months or so and the key thing reall is... ., ~ ., , really is... you think that is the reason why _ really is... you think that is the reason why china _
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really is... you think that is the reason why china and _ really is... you think that is the reason why china and russia i really is... you think that is the | reason why china and russia are really is... you think that is the - reason why china and russia are now? what i think definitely in those two cases those two leaders haven�*t travelled outside of their countries in the last 20 months. i think there are lots of reasons we will go on whether or not a leader will come to a cup summit are not and i think a key thing is who they send. back in brazil in 1992 with all ambassadors who did the work so i think there is a real... that is concerning because for such a major summit, you know, it would have been good to have a presence of all the major leaders. but the key thing is what comes out of this. ~ ., but the key thing is what comes out of this. ~ . ., ., ., , of this. what we need to do as the uk, then. _ of this. what we need to do as the uk. then. for— of this. what we need to do as the uk, then, for renewables - of this. what we need to do as the uk, then, for renewables because| of this. what we need to do as the i uk, then, for renewables because at the moment i think the target is 30-a5% of the moment i think the target is 30—a5% of renewables by 2030. we are nowhere near that, weyou yes, we saw quite some way off with a lot of work to be done by thing on the positive side there�*s been a great build—up of renewables in the cost of generating sooner than new boss has fallen steeply given that the site was heavily subsidised. brute has fallen steeply given that the site was heavily subsidised. we have movin:
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site was heavily subsidised. we have moving towards _ site was heavily subsidised. we have moving towards apparently - site was heavily subsidised. we have moving towards apparently no - moving towards apparently no subsidies for renewables, certainly less than the sun of the types of energy so i think we have got the momentum and we are on the right road but, you know, the challenge really is, how does everything come together in delivering the type of energy system that we need? yes, it needs to be low carbon but it also needs to be low carbon but it also needs to be reliable and secure for the people who want to use it who have been using it in different ways particularly as it than electricity we use of the heating and transport on things and then the big challenge of keeping it affordable for the people who live in the uk and the businesses who operate because if it becomes unaffordable we worsen our energy poverty vices and then, obviously, the effective this will ripple through all the prices we pgy- “ ripple through all the prices we pay. —— energy poverty prices. stand pay. -- energy poverty prices. and the underlying _ pay. —— energy poverty prices. and the underlying reliability of this in terms of his and enough wind at certain times a year to provide the energy we need?— certain times a year to provide the energy we need? ending in scotland we have got — energy we need? ending in scotland we have got the _ energy we need? ending in scotland we have got the challenge _ energy we need? ending in scotland we have got the challenge of - energy we need? ending in scotland we have got the challenge of we - energy we need? ending in scotland. we have got the challenge of we have got so much win but we don�*t
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necessarily... has got so much win but we don't necessarily. . .— got so much win but we don't necessarily... got so much win but we don't necessaril . , ,., necessarily... as i say, where you are it is not _ necessarily... as i say, where you are it is not a _ necessarily... as i say, where you are it is not a problem. _ necessarily... as i say, where you. are it is not a problem. sometimes our windows _ are it is not a problem. sometimes our windows drop, _ are it is not a problem. sometimes our windows drop, though, - are it is not a problem. sometimes our windows drop, though, and - are it is not a problem. sometimes i our windows drop, though, and even we in scotland are having our wind turbines not turn at the time we wanting to and that is why it is really crucial that we have a mix. you know, we still have other technologies, we�*re still looking at nuclear, some thermal power generation, for example, up in the north—east of scotland where the police to have carbon capture and storage and gas thermal power generation see really do need a mix and camino, i am an economist and i want to know what this means for people so the end of the date is what is delivered at the system that is the crucial thing. you will need a mix of different technologies and it is decarbonising all of them are notjust having renewables. my professor, good to speak to you. they have a much forjoining us on bbc news.
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today�*s talks at cop26 are all about clean energy. we canjoin bbc wales economics correspondent sarah dickins, who is at one of the uk�*s biggest onshore wind farms welsh valleys still a beautiful evening where you are. yes, this is actually part of the old coalfield and 76 of these huge turbines that are 100 metres high but, actually, this is an area that was known around the world for producing coal a few decades ago. and it is wherefore of those industrial put coal cavalli come together through a real shame already happened —— a real change because of to happen, change of wind predicting we are going to see much more relevantjournals now is a welsh government minister that climate change julie welsh government minister that climate changejuliejames. welsh government minister that climate change julie james. that afternoon. you have recently released your plan for net zero as has the uk government what you yourselves admit that 60% of what yourselves admit that 60% of what you say needs to happen in wales and
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the say—so of the uk government. is that frustrating to you? it is the say-so of the uk government. is that frustrating to you?— that frustrating to you? it is up to us, isn't that frustrating to you? it is up to us. isn't it. _ that frustrating to you? it is up to us. isn't it. to _ that frustrating to you? it is up to us, isn't it, to make _ that frustrating to you? it is up to us, isn't it, to make sure - that frustrating to you? it is up to us, isn't it, to make sure we're i us, isn�*t it, to make sure we�*re putting up enough pressure on the uk government to make the step up to their responsibilities. one of the reasons we here at cop26 had to make sure we are making the lines of small nations promises around the world to push our you�*re in level states into doing the right thing. how ambitious can you be, though, if you are so dependent on the larger neighbour saying yes to things? we can neighbour saying yes to things? - can be very ambitious, can we? we can be very ambitious, can we? we can do all the things in our power and at the same time we can be pressurising them into doing the right thing for the bits that they are in charge of and, actually, pushing them into playing the right to roll on the global stage for the uk as well. to roll on the global stage for the uk as well-— to roll on the global stage for the uk as well. . ,., ., , .,, uk as well. and so how will people in wales notice _ uk as well. and so how will people in wales notice the _ uk as well. and so how will people in wales notice the difference - uk as well. and so how will people in wales notice the difference that| in wales notice the difference that you are making, the difference that comes in practical terms your strategy? 50 comes in practical terms your strategy?— comes in practical terms your strate: ? ., ., ., , , strategy? so one of the examples we alwa s rive strategy? so one of the examples we always give as _ strategy? so one of the examples we always give as you are _ strategy? so one of the examples we always give as you are there - strategy? so one of the examples we always give as you are there ever - strategy? so one of the examples we always give as you are there ever a i always give as you are there ever a
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wind farm in wales and we want to make sure that the communities that host the wind farms get the benefit of the wind farms, so the direct clean energy from wind farms, so we want to make sure, for example, that between now and 2050 we get our people off great oil and under the clean renewables that their communities hosting services about different economic models as well as a different way producing energy. talking of economic models, it is ironic, is it not that this went wind farm, you know, the biggest in wales, is actually owned by the swedish company which is state owned so the profits end up in the public purse of sweden, not in yours or number 11 downing st?— purse of sweden, not in yours or number 11 downing st? number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is— number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is we _ number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is we want _ number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is we want to _ number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is we want to do - number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is we want to do is - number11 downing st? exactly, and one thing is we want to do is work i one thing is we want to do is work with those countries, companies make sure relation with the community benefit stay in wales, energy stays in wales as well and also we work with them to make sure we have community buy in community ownership across wales so i am looking forward to talks later on today with marine energy companies and that as well so
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this is about all kinds of renewables, notjust onshore wind. and the future generations commission for wales says this is an opportunity to make wales and the uk more equal. you agree with that, but how can you do that? 50. more equal. you agree with that, but how can you do that?— how can you do that? so, one of the thins we how can you do that? so, one of the things we want to _ how can you do that? so, one of the things we want to see _ how can you do that? so, one of the things we want to see is _ how can you do that? so, one of the things we want to see is a _ things we want to see is a just transition is we want to make absolutely certain that people who already explains the most economic disruption are not the ones that bear the burden of the same for us this is all about making sure that our fuel poverty strategies, our optimised... programmes and so on make sure that people at the bottom are not the ones bearing the brunt so, for example, we cannotjust swap houses to air source heat pumps because that will be much more expensive the people living in them, especially at the house is not in good condition, so there silver bonnet and that is why we are running things like the optimised structures programme which will allow us to see what is suitable for each has —— there isn�*t a silver bullet. it will allow to make sure
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people living and that house and experiencing fuel poverty. i have experienced many places where those people actually aren�*t negative energy... and selling energy to the grid as a result of what the house is producing to the lots of things going on in wales that will make sure we not only get the transition but we get a just transition for all our people. but we get a 'ust transition for all people.— but we get a 'ust transition for all our --eole., , . . ~' ,. our people. julie james, thank you ve much our people. julie james, thank you very much commitments _ our people. julie james, thank you very much commitments of - very much commitments of climate change at the most common. actually in the studio. —— back to you in the studio. the bank of england has left interest rates unchanged at 0.1%. there was speculation they might rise, to head off surging inflation. the governor of the bank of england andrew bailey explained why the decision was made to hold interest rates as they are for the time being this was a very close call. you know we have got, obviously, much higher inflation than we would want to see. we want inflation to be on target. the closes of it, quite a few of them are global. but if you of them
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to do with bottlenecks in the world economy effecting is which, actually, rising interest rates will not directly sold. i mean, that is the question. but the reason i made the question. but the reason i made the statement i did a few weeks ago was because we have to keep a very close watch, obviously, on can be the consequences of these price pressures in what could cause this inflation to become well sustained and much more difficult. for the foreseeable future, we are in a world of low interest rates. that doesn�*t mean of course that they don�*t rise and fall within that band but i want to be clear that we are not signalling that there is going to be some very sharp, you know, return to the world that we can just about remember before the financial crisis if we are of a certain age. andrew bailey, governor of the bank of england. a 63—year—old man has been found responsible for killing a fellow resident in her 90s, at a care home in south east london. alexander rawson beat eileen dean, who was 93, with a metal walking stick. it was decided that because of his mental health condition, he couldn�*t enter a plea or stand
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trial at the old bailey. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. eileen dean moved into a care home last year. she was 93 and had dementia. because of covid, her family couldn�*t see her over her first christmas there. a few days into the new year, eileen was subjected to a brutal attack in her room. at night, as she lay in bed, she was set upon by another resident, alexander rawson. he was in the room next door at fieldside care home in catford in south—east london. rawson, who was 62, beat eileen with a walking stick, which broke during the attack. she appeared to mouth the word "help" to the member of staff who found her. the doctor came and a nurse and they started detailing all her injuries. i didn�*t recognise her. she was beaten really badly,
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but then i saw her feet and i realised it was my mum and ijust told her to let go and said goodbye and said i loved her and not to worry about me. eileen dean�*s family have been at the old bailey to hear evidence against alexander rawson. because of his mental health condition he wasn�*t in court. he was declared unfit to stand trial or enter a plea. instead, a jury had to listen to the evidence and they have now ruled he was responsible for the killing. before being moved to the care home, alexander rawson was an in—patient at two south london hospitals. he had twin conditions linked to chronic alcohol abuse and he was sectioned under the mental health act because of his aggressive behaviour. during his time in hospital, he threatened staff with a knife and scissors, spoke of getting a machine gun to kill people who he had fantasised had attacked him, and he is also said to have assaulted a doctor during an earlier hospital stay.
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alexander rawson was a patient at the ladywell mental health unit based at lewisham hospital. this unit is run by the south london and maudsley nhs trust, which was responsible for housing him. we�*ve been told that a team of professionals held a meeting and they agreed he should be moved into fieldside care home. a risk assessment was done. eileen dean�*s family have questions for all those who dealt with alexander rawson. i�*m very angry. why would you put someone with that level of violence into an old people... it�*s like putting a fox in a chicken coop. just to run. if he�*s got that, why would you put vulnerable people, why would you put them at risk? eileen dean lived a long, full, happy life. herfamily placed her in a care home because they wanted her to be safe in herfinal years. the investigations have begun into why she wasn�*t. june kelly, bbc news,
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at the old bailey. the bbc has asked the south london and maudsley nhs trust, and fieldside care home for a response. as yet, there�*s been no comment. the periods of lockdown for those who were shielding and unable to leave their homes, meant months of loneliness for many people across the country. but one widower says she kept going, becauise of her �*wonderful�* four—year—old pen pal. after 18 months of exchanging letters, the two have finally met in person. our reporter luxmy gopal was there to hear their story. lesley is travelling to see someone she�*s never met before. i�*m feeling really excited and a bit nervous, i think, as well, but ijust can�*t believe the day has come. she is finally meeting a pen pal she started writing to a year—and—a—half ago in lockdown, aleena from london, who was just four years old back then. through letter—writing they became
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so close she started calling lesley "granny". i wish i could see grenny lesley seen. i was in the house. most of the time i got out for a breath of fresh air in the garden, but being able to write the letters to her and then receive them, it was wonderful. this was a painting that she did and i really like this one — she put "granny lesley" on. just thinking that when you are shielding, this kind of contact must have made a huge difference. oh, it kept me going. it was lovely to think i would eventually be meeting aleena. yes, i wonder if she�*ll be excited. well, let�*s catch up to find out. i'm looking forward to meeting her because she is always kind and she writes and she replies
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a letter back to me! after 18 months, the moment of meeting for these pandemic penpals has finally arrived. hello! how are you? i'm really good. oh, don�*t you look well. i�*ve brought you a little present. thank you! i like your wellies. it�*s amazing. it�*s wonderful. i thought we never meet up, it�*s been so long. was it a bit emotional? i was nearly in tears walking along the path. i was having to hold it in! it's really good seeing granny lesley. and their correspondence doesn�*t end here. i wouldn�*t stop now. no, never. i shall keep writing. i'm going to stay in touch with granny lesley and make every letter for her.
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is that for me? yes. thank you! from the dark times of the pandemic has emerged an unlikely friendship and a lasting bond. luxmy gopal, bbc news. what a lovely story. since the pandemic began we�*ve spoken about many different hobbies that have surged in popularity as we all spend more time at home — but here�*s a new one for you — making art from hair. this portrait of the prime minister was created by davinia fox. she�*s a hairdresserfrom somerset. it measures five feet by three feet — and davinia says she�*d love mrjohnson to come and admire her handiwork. maybe he could bring some of his hair with him because he has a good conscience apply it seems. hairas paint. nick, do hair as paint. nick, do you
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defensive portrait done that as you? it seems there are some things you just can�*t un—say! i want to just go straight to something nicer which is the sunshine we have seen today and that has been across many parts of the uk today. however, things are changing and turning claudia in the forecast. let�*s take a look at where we have seen a bit of rain today and a few showers across the north sea coast running into east anglia, south—east england, western most parts of wales and cornwall. look at the rain, though, pushing at the far north—west of scotland, into the western isles, there is a sign of things to come. patchy rain, increasing cloud across scotland by the northern ireland and northern england as the night goes on. if you�*re looking for northern lights go early before the crowd increases but there are opportunities and still one or two breaks around in temperatures on the whole heading up as the night goes on across northern areas but there are opportunities and still one or two breaks around in temperatures on the whole heading up in temperatures on the whole heading up as the night goes on across northern areas before night. bit of a weather front moving its way south was tomorrow which is the night. bit of a weather front moving its way
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south was tomorrow which is their view of and is the leading edge of some less cold air coming our way so after the coldest day of the week temperatures are going to be edging up. edison sign in east anglia and the south—east which is not going to last. overall it is a cloudy day tomorrow from the quiet little bit patchy rain and result not slanting to much. by two breaks still across eastern parts of the uk, physician rains north—west of scotland and thatis rains north—west of scotland and that is for the temperatures, yes, more places will be into double figures so just more places will be into double figures sojust edging more places will be into double figures so just edging back closer to the seasonal average. and bonfire night, most places looking dry, still some rain the north scotland and the is a more substantial rain coming in along with stronger winds as well from low pressure here is here is that is going to turn things much better across scotland and northern ireland, then, into saturday and we will see some outbreaks of rain just pushing further south into parts of wales and england, even ahead of the main rain band we will see some light rain band we will see some light rain and drizzle through wales and west are battling on. it is a cloudy picture, it is a breezy picture in those parts of scotland mayjust brighten up later in the day and temperatures into double figures. if you wendy, late saturday, on
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saturday night into sunday. in northern scotland strong winds, 60-70 northern scotland strong winds, 60—70 miles an hour in places combined with high tides and dangerous waves aren�*t in the case here. it will be windy across the uk on sunday and then other wins will be windy across the uk on sunday and another went all silly still be seen but it is certainly going to be scotland, loss of dry weather elsewhere and there will be a few sunny spots to be had here and there are never on. it is a cloudy picture, it is a breezy picture in those parts of scotland mayjust brighten up later in the day and temperatures into double figures. if you wendy, late saturday, on saturday night into sunday. in northern scotland strong winds, 60-70 northern scotland strong winds, 60—70 miles an hour in places combined with high tides and dangerous waves aren�*t in the case here. it will be windy across the uk on sunday and then other wins will still be seen but it is certainly going to be a blustery day. plenty of shells running through scotland, loss of dry weather elsewhere and there will be a few sunny spots to be had here and there and again
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broken lobbying rules and was facing this is bbc news. i�*m clive myrie. i�*m clive myrie. the headlines — the headlines — owen paterson has resigned owen paterson has resigned as a conservative mp after a backlash over the as a conservative mp after a backlash over the government�*s decision to overhaul government�*s decision to overhaul the policing of mps�* conduct. the policing of mps�* conduct.
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mr paterson been found to have mr paterson been found to have broken lobbying rules and was facing a man has pleaded guilty to murdering the women wendy knell and caroline pierce more than 30 years ago. david fuller killed them in kent in 1987. he also admitted abusing female bodies in hospital mortuaries.

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