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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 4, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today... the hpv vaccine is cutting cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. cancer research calls it a historic moment. back home safely. the australian toddler cleo smith has spent her first night with herfamily since her dramatic rescue. police have released audio of the moment she was found. what's your name, sweetheart? my name is cleo. are we about to see a rise in interest rates? prices going up mean that's likely to happen today.
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what does it mean for your pocket? the former england cricketer gary ballance say�*s he regrets using racist language against his yorkshire teammate azeem rafiq, as the row over rafiq's treatment at yorkshire county cricket club causes major sponsors to pull out. good morning. lots and i saw the northern lights last night. seems we have clear skies to start the day. a chilly start, frosty full sun. sunshine and showers on the coast. more details later in the programme. it's thursday, the 4th of november. the first major study looking at the effectiveness of the hpv vaccine has shown it's reducing cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. cancer research uk has described the findings as "historic," and it's hoped that vaccination could almost eliminate the disease in future. here's more from our health correspondent dominic hughes. almost all cases of cervical cancer are linked to the human papillomavirus.
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the hpv vaccine programme targeting the virus itself was introduced in the uk in 2008, when girls aged between 11 and 13 were first offered the jab. and since september 29th, boys of the same age —— and since september 2019, boys of the same age have also been eligible. now, the first real world study of the vaccine shows it's had a dramatic effect. cervical cancer rates were 87% lower in girls who were offered the vaccine when aged 12 and 13. it's estimated that by mid—2019, the hpvjab programme had prevented around a50 cervical cancers, and around 17,200 precancers, all of which would have needed some medical intervention. this study looked at people who both had the vaccine for hpv and were screened by cervical cancer. so cervical screening still remains important. as the vaccine gets taken up, more and more people are vaccinated, we might see changes to what the screening
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programme looks like. so that might be how often you go in, or what the test looks like. but for now, it's still really important that if you're invited to cervical screening to consider going. currently, cervical cancer claims the lives of around 850 women in the uk every year. but the researchers believe that in the future, a combination of the vaccine and screening could mean hardly anyone goes on to develop the disease. they say it's a testament to the power of science to protect the lives of thousands of women. dominic hughes, bbc news. a four—year—old girl, who was rescued 18 days after going missing from a campsite in western australia, has spent herfirst night at home with her parents. cleo smith was discovered in a locked house on tuesday. in the last few hours, police have released new audio of the moment she was found, as shaimaa khalil reports. i have got her. the moment clear
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smith was rescued and the moment she identified herself to the officers. the four—year—old was found in a room and police smashed into a locked house not farfrom her family's home in a western australian town. clear the vanished from herfamily�*s australian town. clear the vanished from her family's tent well camping at a popular tourist spot on the western australian coast. her story gripped australia and sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. a $1 million reward offered on her whereabouts. a man remains in police custody after twice being taken to hospitalfor south inflicted wounds. fix, twice being taken to hospital for south inflicted wounds.- twice being taken to hospital for south inflicted wounds. a man in custody may _ south inflicted wounds. a man in custody may well _ south inflicted wounds. a man in custody may well because - south inflicted wounds. a man in custody may well because very i custody may well because very
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shortly. we have seen their physical condition. she has been checked out at the hospital and physically she is ok. ~ ., at the hospital and physically she is ok. a, ., , ., at the hospital and physically she isok. ., ,., , ., is ok. more details are yet to emerue is ok. more details are yet to emerge about _ is ok. more details are yet to emerge about the _ is ok. more details are yet to emerge about the case - is ok. more details are yet to emerge about the case and l is ok. more details are yet to i emerge about the case and the is ok. more details are yet to - emerge about the case and the events leading to her rescue. authorities have said for the time being the investigation is ongoing and little cleo is doing well, enjoying her time back with herfamily, after more than two weeks of separation. let's get more now from shaimaa, who joins us from sydney. this story has put a smile on the faces of many people. there are a lot of questions remaining about the investigation and just what happened. fix, investigation and “ust what happened.h investigation and “ust what hauened. ., ., , ., , happened. a lot of questions remaining. — happened. a lot of questions remaining, charlie, - happened. a lot of questions remaining, charlie, but- happened. a lot of questions remaining, charlie, but a - happened. a lot of questions remaining, charlie, but a bigj happened. a lot of questions - remaining, charlie, but a big sense of relief within the whole country. of relief within the whole country. of course no one more than many who of course no one more than many who have had their daughter with them, spending the night and waking up in her house, in herfamily�*s home for
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the first time in more than two weeks. we had from the police today and the western australia premier, they met chloe and had a special delivery for her, two teddy bears. their names are cameron and don. these are the two officers who rescued her, two of the officers who rescued her, two of the officers who rescued her. they said he was behaving like a four—year—old shed, playing around, playing in the back yard and falling asleep in her mother's arms at some point. there are still so many details they are not sharing. it is quite telling they are sharing the audio and not they are sharing the audio and not the —— the video because they say it contains evidence linked to the investigation. the investigation is still ongoing. the 36—year—old man is still in custody but he is expected to be charged soon. thank ou ve expected to be charged soon. thank
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you very much- _ 18 countries have signed up to a plan to stop using coal—fired power plants in the latest major deal at cop26. it brings the total number of nations now backing the agreement to a0. let's get more from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, who's at the conference in glasgow. morning to you. how good a number is 40? ., ., morning to you. how good a number is 40? ., a, ., morning to you. how good a number is 40? ., ., ., ., , , 40? there are quite a lot of numbers floatin: 40? there are quite a lot of numbers floating around _ 40? there are quite a lot of numbers floating around around _ 40? there are quite a lot of numbers floating around around the _ 40? there are quite a lot of numbers floating around around the pledge. i floating around around the pledge. what it is is a coalition of countries, regions, cities and organisations like banks and financial services, institutions, who have pledged to phase out coal and stop building new coal powered stations and shut down existing ones. now the total number of people who have joined ones. now the total number of people who havejoined if utah up ones. now the total number of people who have joined if utah up all the pledges is 190. we have not got the full list yet. as we are getting used to this kind of change, reading the small print is very important.
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some of the smaller countries will only have to shut down their whole plants by 2040, 19 years away. like a lot of the initiatives announced here, it does not include china, which is a big user of coal powered stations. ,. , , ., , _, stations. the discussions continue, obviousl . stations. the discussions continue, obviously. back _ stations. the discussions continue, obviously. back in _ stations. the discussions continue, obviously. back in westminster, i stations. the discussions continue, | obviously. back in westminster, the fallout continues in the commons, after conservative mp 0wen paterson escaped a suspension despite being found to have breached lobbying rules. there is a lot of backlash about the changes in mps will be investigated. so much drama in westminster yesterday around this issue as it was being debated in parliament. what happened was 0wen paterson, the conservative mp, the house of commons standards committee and the independent standards adviser had said he was guilty of breaching the
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rules because he was working on being paid by some companies at the same time as being an mp. normally parliament would vote on a motion to approve that finding. yesterday instead mps voted to set up a new committee to look at changing the process by which mps are investigated and punished. it will look at introducing an appeals process. the government would say thatis process. the government would say that is making the hr process for mps more like hr processing and all company. laboursays, no way, it is actually corrupt and they will have nothing to do with the committee looking into changing the system. even there the government is saying this is an opportunity to look at the system rather than an individual case, the end result could be that 0wen paterson does not face any punishment at all, even though this committee on standards watchdog says he should be punished. thank committee on standards watchdog says he should be punished.— he should be punished. thank you for ex-alainin he should be punished. thank you for explaining that- _ he should be punished. thank you for explaining that. we _ he should be punished. thank you for explaining that. we will— he should be punished. thank you for explaining that. we will speak - he should be punished. thank you for explaining that. we will speak soon. |
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scientists are warning that carbon emissions are set to rebound this year to levels last seen before the pandemic. new research predicts that the amount of c02 released into the atmosphere will rise by almost the same amount that it decreased in 2020. experts say the report underlines the urgency of action needed at summits like cop26. the ongoing dispute over fishing rights will be discussed in fresh talks between the uk and france later. let's speak more about this with our correspondent jessica parker, who's in the port of honfleur in normandy this morning. jessica, it is rather beautiful scene where you are. this wrangle remains and has been pretty ugly. it is rather nice here early this morning. you are right. tensions had been rising. earlier this week, emmanuel macron delayed the threat of retaliatory measures over the
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post brexit fishing rights row. the french had suggested they could for example stop british boats of leading the catches on certain ports in northern france, looking at tighter border controls as well. the french president said he wanted to allow time for more talks to continue. the french want more licenses for the fishermen to fish across coastal waters and jazzy in the united kingdom. the uk says it is applying the post brexit trade agreement failing. —— fairly. the uk brexit minister will travel to paris and meet france's europe minister and meet france's europe minister and they will discuss these issues. my and they will discuss these issues. my understanding is the british side wants to broaden the discussion to other things like post brexit arrangements for northern ireland as well. they had quite a lot to talk about. it is not clear that today will be any breakthrough moment, but typically on the fishing row. i have
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been various tensions between united kingdom and france recently. whether it'll be a reset may make my expectations are being downplayed that we will have to wait and see. thank you very much. since the pandemic began we've spoken about many different hobbies that have surged in popularity as we all spend more time at home — but here's a new one for you: and i think you could contribute to this if it becomes a massive trend. it is making art from hair. here is that? can't you tell? this portrait of the prime minister was created by davinia fox. she's a hairdresserfrom somerset. it measures five feet by three feet. and davinia says she'd love mrjohnson to come and admire her handiwork. that is a lot of how used in the
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artwork! i'm not sure what to make of it. do you not like it? i am always in favour of art pushing the boundaries. i am glad it has happened. i don't know. can we see it again? i was trying to work out really. do you know what? it kinda bothers me a little bit how proud it is. it is quite high. as you look at it face on, it could be quite two—dimensional. see! look how much is on there. i wonder if it is all her or if it is put on something else. what does your expert eye tell us about it? i am with charlie. i did recognise it was the prime minister but i am a traditionalist, i think my like pictures like this.
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isn't it beautiful?! the northern lights were seen quite widely across the country yesterday. today is a cold start. cold across scotland's great western and central areas. some of thing some frost. today is likely to be the coldest day of the week. sunny spells are the order of the day with breezy conditions. that nagging northerly is bringing in showers in the especially close to the coast. some of them getting on land, also across parts of wales and devon and cornwall. later the next front coming in across the north west introducing cloud and light rain. some of the showers will be wintry on the mountains in the highlands and also in northern ireland. the temperatures today nine to about 11 degrees, tempered by the wind. it will feel cold if you are out and about. tonight the weather front continues to sink southwards,
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taking cloud and patchy rain with it. ahead of it we will have clear skies. in sheltered rural parts of the south temperatures could fall away as low as —2. after the frosty star will be sunshine. as the weather front continues sink southwards, the cloud will build the showers across the north and west. not as showery on the east coast and milder as well with the winds shift in direction to a westerly or north—westerly. interest rates have been at historic lows since the financial crisis back in 2009. lots of questions since then. when will they go up? every time the bank of england meets, lots of factors are taken into consideration. we have been asking will they go out for a long time? we
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have been asking will they go out for a long time?— have been asking will they go out for a long time? we have got used to them bein: for a long time? we have got used to them being really— for a long time? we have got used to them being really low— for a long time? we have got used to them being really low and _ for a long time? we have got used to them being really low and that - for a long time? we have got used to them being really low and that could | them being really low and that could be about to change. the bank of england meets regularly. what's so important about interest rates? well, they are used by banks and building societies to set the interest on our savings, and loans. they go up, we pay more on our debt. they go down, we have more to spend. so why might rates be going up ? it's because the cost of living has been rising. inflation — which tracks price increases — reached 3.1% in september. and is predicted to rise to 4% by the end of the year. that's much higher than the bank of england would like — here's why. the bank of england is worried about an inflationary spiral where costs io an inflationary spiral where costs 90 up. _ an inflationary spiral where costs go up, people demand a an inflationary spiral where costs 90 up. people demand a pay an inflationary spiral where costs go up, people demand a pay rise. pushes_ go up, people demand a pay rise. pushes company costs up and you get a vicious _ pushes company costs up and you get a vicious circle. what the bank tries— a vicious circle. what the bank tries to — a vicious circle. what the bank tries to do _ a vicious circle. what the bank tries to do about that is raise interest— tries to do about that is raise interest rates. suddenly it cost more _ interest rates. suddenly it cost more to— interest rates. suddenly it cost more to borrow money, it is better to put— more to borrow money, it is better to put money into a savings account, demand _
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to put money into a savings account, demand starts to flow and hopefully inflation _ demand starts to flow and hopefully inflation slows as well. we've sort of got used to low interest rates — but who remembers black wednesday when they reached 12%? before that they'd been bubbling around 10%. then in the �*90s they dropped to about 5% before the 2009 crisis slashed them right down to encourage spending. today — because of lockdown and again to encourage spending — at 0.1% rates are lower than they've ever been in the bank of england's 325—year history. we don't expect a rise anywhere near the �*80s or �*90s. but last week government advisers said rates could reach 0.75% by the end of 2023. interest rate rises are good for some and not others. for example those with mortgages may have to pay more. if you are on a fixed—rate deal, you will have to see what happens when you renew the deal. for those on variables, that could hurt.
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with a £200,000 mortgage over 20 years, with a variable interest rate ofjust under 4%, will pay around an additional £15 a month if the rate goes up by 0.15%, as it is forecast. monthly payments could go by £15. that is massive for those hoping to secure a mortgage. taste that is massive for those hoping to secure a mortgage.— that is massive for those hoping to secure a mortgage. we have sold our house that has _ secure a mortgage. we have sold our house that has been _ secure a mortgage. we have sold our house that has been a _ secure a mortgage. we have sold our house that has been a short - secure a mortgage. we have sold our house that has been a short delay - secure a mortgage. we have sold our house that has been a short delay in | house that has been a short delay in purchasing _ house that has been a short delay in purchasing a new one. interest rates in the _ purchasing a new one. interest rates in the uk _ purchasing a new one. interest rates in the uk are — purchasing a new one. interest rates in the uk are looking to rise. we received — in the uk are looking to rise. we received an— in the uk are looking to rise. we received an agreement in principle along _ received an agreement in principle along with — received an agreement in principle along with a couple of other mortgage office with fixed rates several — mortgage office with fixed rates several months ago and they have now expired _ several months ago and they have now expired we _ several months ago and they have now expired. we are anticipating we will look at _ expired. we are anticipating we will look at a _ expired. we are anticipating we will look at a higher rate of interest on the mortgage we will be taking next which _ the mortgage we will be taking next which will— the mortgage we will be taking next which will likely impact the amount we will— which will likely impact the amount we will pay on a monthly basis. with higher— we will pay on a monthly basis. with higher repayments, that may well in turn affect— higher repayments, that may well in turn affect the amount we can borrow — turn affect the amount we can borrow. ., turn affect the amount we can borrow. . ., ,, , turn affect the amount we can borrow. . . ,, , ., , turn affect the amount we can borrow. . .~ , ., , ., borrow. that makes it really hard to ian borrow. that makes it really hard to plan ahead. — borrow. that makes it really hard to plan ahead, doesn't _ borrow. that makes it really hard to plan ahead, doesn't it? _ borrow. that makes it really hard to plan ahead, doesn't it? what - borrow. that makes it really hard to plan ahead, doesn't it? what about| plan ahead, doesn't it? what about savings? you would think it would lead to an increase in interest on your savings but it takes longer for that element to filter through. even if we do see that rise today, it
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will remain pretty flat, even for those fortunate enough to have savings. it is not easy at the moment. thejob of savings. it is not easy at the moment. the job of the savings. it is not easy at the moment. thejob of the bank savings. it is not easy at the moment. the job of the bank of england will be to predict how we will behave and how much we feel willing to spend. it is unpredictable in the run—up to christmas because we are not out of the mess we have been in the last 18 months. �* ., , the mess we have been in the last 18 months. �* . , , months. and we are seeing rising rices as months. and we are seeing rising prices as well. _ months. and we are seeing rising prices as well. thank _ months. and we are seeing rising prices as well. thank you - months. and we are seeing rising prices as well. thank you very - months. and we are seeing rising i prices as well. thank you very much. let's take a look at today's papers. many of them lead with that vote by conservative mps to back a review of standards investigations — putting a former minister's suspension on hold. the daily mail doesn't mince its words. "shameless mps sink back into the sleaze" is the banner headline — above a comment piece which attacks what it calls a "venal" political class for "demeaning democracy" and heading towards moral
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bankruptcy. the times also leads on that story but its main picture comes from the climate conference in glasgow, where hollywood royalty leonardo dicaprio met actual royalty — prince charles. and here's a newspaper we don't usually feature: the west australian. its front page is dominated by that lovely image of cleo smith after she was rescued from 18 days in captivity. the headline is herfirst words to the police officers who found her: "hello, my name is cleo." i have international hamster news for you. i have international hamster news foryou. excellent. i have international hamster news for you. excellent. this is hamsters in vienna. sounds like a movie, doesn't it? judges in vienna had come to the rescue of hamsters in a
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big legal case. the european hamster, which is a particular breed of hamster, is found across quite large parts of europe. it is struggling a little bit. as pets? no, leading wild. they have had a loss of habitat and had moved into cities, including vienna. they have beenin cities, including vienna. they have been in the boroughs in and around vienna. there was a legal battle between developers who wanted to develop the land the hamsters were using. the hamsters have won. hamster power! they have won the right. in areas where developers wanted to develop. the court has ruled that hamster breeding sites must enjoy protection for as long as is necessary. it got to the point where a council, it seems a bit unfair, a city council employee was fined because he cleared the topsoil from a certain area of land
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unwittingly and he got fined, he got into trouble. it is international hamster news and you are up—to—date. i will take your hamsters and go to the other end of the scale and bring you wales. a little science lesson. i found this fascinating. this is you wales. a little science lesson. ifound this fascinating. this is in the times this morning. so, whales eat krill. in vast quantities! in vast quantities. it is very topical that we are talking about cop26 at the moment. when whales eat all the krill... i'm going to have to read this. when they eat all the krill, when they defecate they convert the protein into blubber and they defecate iron rich waste. the iron is a vital source for diatom is, microalgae. what they do by making the microalgae reproduce more, they
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remove loads of carbon from the air, carbon dioxide from the air through photosynthesis. and the whales, because they need to breathe air, they are often at the surface, this has taken a look at how whales contribute to the removal of carbon from the atmosphere. they are equivalent and on par with the whole forest ecosystem. c&a uc swathes of forest ecosystem. c&a uc swathes of forest on continence, entire continents, they are the equivalent of that. —— so you know uc swathes of that. —— so you know uc swathes of forest. all through what they eat. we want them to eat more to help the environment. we will be testing you on various bits of terminology and expertise we have just heard. 0k.
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we've heard a lot of words about climate change this week. in greece, people have experienced the terrible reality. wildfires raged there this summer, fanned by the country's worst heatwave in decades. temperatures are expected to rise in the coming years. there are concerns these fires could become worse. bethany bell reports. this summer, greece was on fire. the fire on the island of evia was the biggest in greece since records began. it was a mega fire, an intense blaze which burnt out of control for days. in some places, only the sea could stop it. many people were forced to flee their homes. wildfires in the mediterranean are common, but firefighters say
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this year's mega fires were unprecedented. lieutenant colonel stratos anastasopoulos, who's responsible for coordinating firefighting aircraft across greece, took us up to see the extent of the destruction. what made it so intense this year? because of the very, very dry... the brush and the grass and the trees. is this climate change? yes. the heat wave? yeah. it was very difficult for us. the first time that they came here in evia, i cried because it is all over fires, all over. here, there, there, there. up there in the other mountain. in the other mountain, oh, my god! the raging flames destroyed huge swathes of forest, a third of the island's territory.
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with the forest burned, there's a real danger of erosion and flooding when the winter rains come. these men are using the dead wood to make makeshift terraces to try to stop that happening. the effects of these fires will be felt here for years to come. hello. this man, who works for the world wildlife fund, says mega fires will happen again and again unless there's more focus on prevention. if you ask our colleagues in spain, portugal, italy, turkey, they're going to explain to you that the new trend in forest fires is mega fires. the mega fires are affected by climate change. these forests should eventually regenerate, but it'll take years
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for the trees to grow back. and with more heat waves forecast, their fears mega fires in the mediterranean could become the new normal. bethany bell, bbc news, greece. coming up in half an hour... we'll hear the story of london schoolgirl aleena, and yorkshire widow lesley. they became pen pals in lockdown, and after 18 months they've finally met in person. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. hertfordshire county council has written to parents and carers recommending children should wear face coverings at all times in secondary schools. that's not what official government guidance says, but the local authority says it's in response to the rising number of covid cases in the uk, particualry among young people. they're also asking all staff
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in early years, special, primary and secondary schools to wear them when in contact with other adults. london fire brigade has unveiled three new fire engines— each equipped with one of the tallest ladders in europe. the brigade has introduced new equipment and changed its response to the way it deals with fires in high rise buildings, following criticism over the grenfell tower disaster. these new ladders can reach the top of a 20—floor building in about a minute, and come with a lift to help rescue residents. so once at the top, three people can be taken into the lift and brought to safety down at ground level, and at the bottom they are met by the support crew who are shoot them to safety and the lift can be returned to the top of the ladder to assist more people at the top of the building. streatham hill theatre — a grand building which survived a direct bombing during the second world war— has been put on historic england's latest "at risk register". it's currently being used as a bingo hall ? and experts say it needs major repairs.
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however, historic england says 32 sites in london have been saved and are off its list, including battersea power station and the royal arsenal conservation area in woowich. let's see how the tube is running this morning. more problems with the metropolitan line this morning— severe delays between rickmansworth and amersham and chesham— minor delays on the piccadilly line too. and you can keep up to date with the travel news whereever time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling less chilly compared to yesterday and a bit more a breeze over night which prevented any frost from forming and reduce the risk of mist and fog and it's a largely cloudy start with maybe some showers moving south and feeding in on the northerly breeze and the breeze will feel quite chilly and fewer showers this afternoon and if you write spells potentially with temperatures between eight and 10 c but if you
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factor in the wind it will feel colder. 0vernight the wind will fall a bit lighter with clear skies, lighter winds and temperatures will drop again and it will be a chilly night with the minimum of low single figures if not zero, so again the chances are you might get some frost first thing on friday morning but it is a bright starting friday and some sunshine around but more cloud feeling south through the afternoon and the westerly breeze as the high—pressure slips and the westerly breeze will replace the cold air with something a little milder as we head through the weekend. of course it is bonfire night and tomorrow night it looks dry and cloudy in the wind reasonably night and saturday night if you're across the weekend celebrating his looking dry, largely cloudy but also a bit more of a breeze. i'm back in half an hour — do check out our website for much more. now it's back to charlie and naga, bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning.
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ahead of flying down under for the ashes, england star jimmy anderson tells us how he's preparing for cricket's greatest contest — and finds time to bowl some quick stuff at mike. 0ur bbc weather colleague 0wain is in serious training for his epic "drumathon" challenge for children in need. we'll catch up with him live behind the kit. and the singer tori amos will be on the sofa to tell us about writing a new album in lockdown, and falling in love with cornwall. you caught a glimpse of mike a second ago. trying to dodge and duck jimmy anderson's deliveries. was he giving them full pelt? he was warming upforthe
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giving them full pelt? he was warming up for the aussies. 90mph. that's what he said. i didn't see the ball. in a word, what is it like? terrifying, but what a thrill. you've got other things to talk about. a huge story at yorkshire county cricket club, the most successful county in the history of the domestic game and at the centre of the storm that is really intensifying with politicians getting involved over the treatment into the racist treatment of azeem rafiq, and if you want an idea of how he is feeling, he tweeted before midnight, a lot of people watched me cry every time i socialised and it's the lack of action that has caused such a storm as it deepens over the treatment of azeem rafiq. as the storm over the treatment of azeem rafiq, deepens, several sponsors have now ended their relationship, with yorkshire county cricket club, over its response to findings of rascism and bullying, while the former england international, gary ballance says he "regrets" using a racial slur against his former yorkshire teammate, rafiq. 0ur sports editor dan roan has more.
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it's the most successful club in the history of county cricket but yorkshire is now involved in a racism scandal centred on former player azeem rafiq. an independent panel found the spin bowler had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club. yorkshire apologised, but took no action against any member of staff and political pressure has been intensifying. what we've read is deeply shocking and one of the most disturbing events in modern cricket history, in my view. i can think of very few reasons why the board of yorkshire cricket club should remain in place. after a leak of the investigation's finding it emerge that a current yorkshire player repeatedly used a racially offensive term towards rafiq about his pakistani heritage but the panel regarded it as friendly banter, sparking an outcry. after mounting speculation, former england star gary ballance revealed he was the player concerned.
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in a statement, the yorkshire batsmen said. on a dramatic day, a host of yorkshire is a sponsors ended their partnership with the club as the fallout continued. emerald publishing, which has the naming rights to headingley, yorkshire tea, local brewer tetleys and leisure operator david lloyd all turning their back on the beleaguered county. it's over a year since rafiq alleged institutional racism. playing professional cricket for yorkshire the best time of your life. unfortunately for me, it wasn't. now with the ecb launching their own investigation, the crisis threatens to undermine the wider
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game's efforts to tackle discrimination in the sport. liverpool have booked their place in the knockout stages of the champions league after a comfortable 2—0 victory over atletico madrid at anfield diogojota put them ahead, early on, before sadio mane sealed the victory eight minutes later. liverpool's unbeaten run now extends all the way back to the start of april. integrate performance and an incredible performance in the group stage so far. nobody would have expected that seeing the draw, and doing that is pretty special, but for tonight, job done, but we all know, yet, we have two games to go and we will try everything to win the most well.
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manchester city took another big step towards the last 16 with a 4—1 win over club bruges. it was so one sided this, and city even gave the belgians, an own goal, before this move for city's 4th summed up the swagger, gabriel hesus finishing the night off in style. city need a point against paris saint—germain in their next game to advance to the knockout stage. it was really important because in the premier league game we have 28 games left, and here there are just six games left to play and qualify and just to now. it was so important today and that is why we won it and we are in a good position and we need three points to qualify and in february hopefully we can be in the last 16 with the best teams in europe. last 16 with the best teams in euroe. ., . h last 16 with the best teams in euroe. . �*, . , last 16 with the best teams in euroe. ., �*, ., ,. last 16 with the best teams in euroe. ., �*, ., europe. scotland's dreams are open in the t20 world _ europe. scotland's dreams are open in the t20 world cup _ europe. scotland's dreams are open in the t20 world cup after— europe. scotland's dreams are open in the t20 world cup after losing . europe. scotland's dreams are open in the t20 world cup after losing to | in the t20 world cup after losing to scott ? new zealand. scotland won the toss, and sent the kiwis in to bat, taking two quick wickets as captain kane williamson, was dismissed without scoring.
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scotland made a valliant effort to their reply, but in the end, they fell 16 runs short, which means they're out of the competition with 2 matches still to play. we've had a number of games against new zealand over the years and some have been close and some haven't and this is one where you are saying, 17 runs, which is a reasonable sizing t20 cricket we would look back and say where were those little moments in the game where we could have closed the gap and may be used that as an opportunity missed but that is where we have to keep raising the bar. meanwhile india thrashed afghanistan with a 66 run victory, rohit sharma and kl rahul, shared a commanding opening stand of 140 to finish, on 210 for 2. afghanistan never looked capable, of chasing that target. they remain though second in group 2. after weeks of uncertainty over this winter's ashes, england finally fly out
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to australia today. and at the age of 39, the evergreen record breaking bowler, jimmy anderson is getting ready for his ninth ashes series. and how did he warm up? and around the youngsters and we have an exclusive chat with him before he went into quarantine. more wickets than anyone else in test history, the burnley express, the king of swing, still unleashing his ferocity at the age of 39. and as excited to get stuck into his ninth passes series as he was in the first and the players were reassured they were allowed more freedom down under than in recent covid 19 bubbles even if it means anderson will be away from home and his family this winter. you will be away from home and his family this winter.— will be away from home and his family this winter. you know, when ou send family this winter. you know, when you spend a — family this winter. you know, when
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you spend a long — family this winter. you know, when you spend a long time _ family this winter. you know, when you spend a long time away - family this winter. you know, when you spend a long time away from . family this winter. you know, when i you spend a long time away from your family locked in a home ? hotel four weeks and time it takes its toll. we've done it for 18 months now, may be a bit longer and we've discussed it for quite a few weeks and it's something we have managed to get our heads around and i've done it before and been away from my family at christmas and new year. it's not easy, but for me it's probably my last chance to go to australia so i've got to do it. an amazing tour to go on and a great place to visit and to play in, so we were delighted when everything got sorted out and we got the green light.— when everything got sorted out and we got the green light. anderson was art of the we got the green light. anderson was part of the last _ we got the green light. anderson was part of the last england _ we got the green light. anderson was part of the last england team - we got the green light. anderson was part of the last england team to i we got the green light. anderson was part of the last england team to win i part of the last england team to win a series down under back in 2010 when he also took one of his all—time most memorable wickets. it's strange. i get the odd flashback of certain wickets at times. it's not always my most favourite wicket that pops in my head. in that particular series i remember mitchelljohnson and myself remember mitchell johnson and myself having remember mitchelljohnson and myself having a bit of it that'll sledge me
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and i got a wicket in the next ball and i got a wicket in the next ball and that never happens, so, the wickets are great and they do feel special, the milestones you take off for special but there's nothing better. we play this game as a team sport and we play it for those victories. i rememberthe sport and we play it for those victories. i remember the fifth test in the series where we won at sydney to make it 3— one and we sat in the outfield after the series was done and just had a beer together and reminisced over seven or eight weeks and what that meant to everyone. you know who has gone before you and the games that have been played on the series played, and it'sjust incredible. that is what makes it mean so much to us now. we are not just doing it for us as a team, we are doing it for everyone who has gone before us and everyone who will come after us. gone before us and everyone who will come after us— come after us. given the toll of fast bowling — come after us. given the toll of fast bowling takes _ come after us. given the toll of fast bowling takes on _ come after us. given the toll of fast bowling takes on your- come after us. given the toll of. fast bowling takes on your body, anderson is still defying age and science. ., , anderson is still defying age and science. . , ., , ., anderson is still defying age and science. . , ., ., , science. certainly as i got older my diet has got _
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science. certainly as i got older my diet has got a _ science. certainly as i got older my diet has got a lot _ science. certainly as i got older my diet has got a lot better. _ science. certainly as i got older my diet has got a lot better. i - science. certainly as i got older my diet has got a lot better. i love i diet has got a lot better. i love steak, that is my go to, some steak, but rather having ships i will be having solid with it instead. titer? having solid with it instead. very aood. he having solid with it instead. very good- he has — having solid with it instead. very good. he has broken _ having solid with it instead. very good. he has broken the mould in so many ways. it came from a state school that did not play cricket and like the youngsters he has been warming up with as part of the initiative to get more children playing. and he got up to speed, flexing his muscles against myself, showing us a glimpse of what the aussies can expect over the coming months. a few butterflies facing the highest wicket taker of all—time in the world, in the shoes of hundreds of test victims before me and my priority has to be not get hit and keep my eye on the ball coming at 90 an hour. at last. i think i actually hit that, jimmy. an hour. at last. ithinki actually hit that, jimmy-— an hour. at last. i think! actually hit that, jimmy. you did hint that, even with your _ hit that, jimmy. you did hint that, even with your eyes _ hit that, jimmy. you did hint that, even with your eyes shut. -
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hit that, jimmy. you did hint that, i even with your eyes shut. eventually there was a — even with your eyes shut. eventually there was a connection _ even with your eyes shut. eventually there was a connection between i even with your eyes shut. eventually there was a connection between bat| there was a connection between bat and ball. �* ., ., ., g; :: , and ball. i've gone down to 30mph there. and ball. i've gone down to 30mph there- you — and ball. i've gone down to 30mph there. you are _ and ball. i've gone down to 30mph there. you are joking? _ and ball. i've gone down to 30mph there. you are joking? dare i and ball. i've gone down to 30mph there. you are joking? dare to i there. you are 'oking? dare to challenge — there. you are joking? dare to challenge jimmy _ there. you are joking? dare to challenge jimmy anderson i there. you are joking? dare to challenge jimmy anderson at l there. you are joking? dare to i challenge jimmy anderson at your peril. to challenge jimmy anderson at your eril. ., , ., , �* challenge jimmy anderson at your eril. ., , �* ., ., ., peril. to be honest, i'm not far of our peril. to be honest, i'm not far of your standard _ peril. to be honest, i'm not far of your standard with _ peril. to be honest, i'm not far of your standard with the _ peril. to be honest, i'm not far of your standard with the bat. it's i your standard with the bat. it's tough and you almost have to do over train so you can be as quick as you possibly can and hopefully it feels slower when you are in the middle. it's pretty exciting, but it's also very— it's pretty exciting, but it's also very nerve—racking. with one of the best bowlers of all time, it's super scary _ best bowlers of all time, it's super scary |f— best bowlers of all time, it's super sca . , ., ,., ., best bowlers of all time, it's super sca . , ., ., _ scary. if you get bowled out by him, is a ten-year-old _ scary. if you get bowled out by him, is a ten-year-old girl, _ scary. if you get bowled out by him, is a ten-year-old girl, he's - scary. if you get bowled out by him, is a ten-year-old girl, he's bowled l is a ten—year—old girl, he's bowled out some — is a ten—year—old girl, he's bowled out some of— is a ten—year—old girl, he's bowled out some of the _ is a ten—year—old girl, he's bowled out some of the best _ is a ten—year—old girl, he's bowled out some of the best cricket - is a ten—year—old girl, he's bowled. out some of the best cricket players in the _ out some of the best cricket players in the world, — out some of the best cricket players in the world, so— out some of the best cricket players in the world, so it _ out some of the best cricket players in the world, so it wouldn't - out some of the best cricket players in the world, so it wouldn't feel- in the world, so it wouldn't feel very, _ in the world, so it wouldn't feel very, i— in the world, so it wouldn't feel very. i would _ in the world, so it wouldn't feel very, iwould honestly- in the world, so it wouldn't feel. very, i would honestly understand in the world, so it wouldn't feel- very, i would honestly understand if it happened — very, ! would honestly understand if it happened 1he— very, i would honestly understand if it happened-— it happened. the thing that got me as a kid was _ it happened. the thing that got me as a kid was the _ it happened. the thing that got me as a kid was the team _ it happened. the thing that got me as a kid was the team spirit - it happened. the thing that got me as a kid was the team spirit and i as a kid was the team spirit and making friends and different sorts of friends through sport. it isn't the most accessible game at times, so having these organisations going
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into school, especially schools, teaching people, kids cricket, giving them the opportunity to play it and show them what a great game it and show them what a great game it is is really important. it is hard to imagine _ it is is really important. it is hard to imagine an - it is is really important. it is hard to imagine an ashes series withoutjimmy anderson but eventually he has to step aside. and when he could be tempted to follow the line of other england stars who have bowled over the judges the line of other england stars who have bowled over thejudges on the line of other england stars who have bowled over the judges on the strictly dance floor instead. michael vaughan has done it, i am swann, mark ramprakash, we would love to see you on the dance floor. can you dance?— love to see you on the dance floor. can you dance? no. hopefully that is a lona wa can you dance? no. hopefully that is a long way off. _ can you dance? no. hopefully that is a long way off, thinking _ can you dance? no. hopefully that is a long way off, thinking about i can you dance? no. hopefully that is a long way off, thinking about stuff. a long way off, thinking about stuff like that. but i wouldn't rule it out. , ., like that. but i wouldn't rule it out. ,. like that. but i wouldn't rule it out. , ., no, out. do you get up at parties? no, absolutely — out. do you get up at parties? no, absolutely not. _ out. do you get up at parties? no, absolutely not. you _ out. do you get up at parties? no, absolutely not. you would - out. do you get up at parties? no, absolutely not. you would fit i out. do you get up at parties? no, absolutely not. you would fit in i absolutely not. you would fit in well. i absolutely not. you would fit in well- i will— absolutely not. you would fit in well. i will take _ absolutely not. you would fit in well. i will take that _ absolutely not. you would fit in well. i will take that as - absolutely not. you would fit in well. i will take that as a i absolutely not. you would fit in well. i will take that as a yes. | well. i will take that as a yes. that's a long _ well. i will take that as a yes. that's a long way _ well. i will take that as a yes. that's a long way off. - well. i will take that as a yes. that's a long way off. he i well. i will take that as a yes. that's a long way off. he was| well. i will take that as a yes. i that's a long way off. he was the most accessible bowl of the last time he went there even though they lost the series. i know you said it was terrifying being bowled out by
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jimmy anderson but what you should take away from that is that your batting level is the same asjimmy anderson stop its not far off and i can't take any credit because i didn't know anything about the ball hitting the bat. but you did manage to hit the ball.— to hit the ball. sometimes. it was more ? random. _ to hit the ball. sometimes. it was more ? random. i— to hit the ball. sometimes. it was more ? random. i did— to hit the ball. sometimes. it was more ? random. i did hit- to hit the ball. sometimes. it was more ? random. i did hit it- to hit the ball. sometimes. it was more ? random. i did hit it apart. more ? random. i did hit itapart from the one that went past him for four. ~ , , ., ., , four. we will see you later. they will fly out _ four. we will see you later. they will fly out today. _ four. we will see you later. they will fly out today. lots _ four. we will see you later. they will fly out today. lots of - four. we will see you later. they will fly out today. lots of warm i will fly out today. lots of warm matches first. slightly different weather there thanit slightly different weather there than it would be for us but carol can tell us with another lovely picture of the northern lights. yes, we saw a lot of the northern lights last night in some parts of the country and you do need clear skies for it and you can see we had them here with these beautiful colours and also the highlands, again, another stunning display of
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the northern lights and more to bring you as we go through the course of the morning. it is a chilly start for some of us and a touch of frost around and we still have a chilly, nagging and northerly breeze, especially along the east coast, but fewer showers than yesterday and more in the way of sunshine. you can see already we've had a lot of showers across the north and east and some of them making progress in land and also showers in the west and around the channel islands and the positioning of the showers will more or less be the same as we go through the course of the day. a cold start if you are waking up in western scotland, only 2 at eight o'clock in glasgow but a fair bit of sunshine around and for northern ireland you will see a few showers and sunshine and chilly for you as well and across parts of north—west england, wales and to the south—west we are also looking at a chilly start with a lot of sunshine. west wales and devon and cornwall prone to showers as his eastern england and into east anglia, to the midlands and also towards kent. through the course of the day the
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showers will head in the direction of the south east and we are looking at fewer than yesterday and gusty winds down the coastline, gusting as much as 40mph and that will accentuate the cold for in temperatures down compared to where we are yesterday and we are looking at roughly 7 and as we head for the evening and overnight, that will bring its reign slowly sinking southwards. hang on to clear skies in southern england, and a touch of frost, and sheltered rural areas could see temperatures dip as low as -2 could see temperatures dip as low as —2 but because we have the cloud and patchy rain and showers for north, temperatures will actually be higher than they were last night. so tomorrow we start with sunshine in the south that you can see already all of the cloud marching steadily southwards and there will be some breaks in north—east england and parts of scotland and another thing
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is, the wind is changing direction tomorrow for the west or north—west, so not a cold direction for us and temperatures will be up a notch or two anyway so we are looking at temperatures of between ten and 13 , so feeling a bit milder. as we head into saturday, we have all of the rain and a new weather front is coming our way rain and a new weather front is coming ourway and rain and a new weather front is coming our way and it will be sinking steadily southwards and it will be a windy day on saturday as well and you can see the cloud as it pushes south ahead of the band of rain and behind it, for scotland in particular, looking at sunshine but blustery showers and some of those could be heavy and thundery in the west and brightest rise across northern ireland but the wind will be a feature and we are looking at gusts of wind is around 50 or 60mph, so gales across the far west of scotland were generally windy and temperatures between ten and 13. if you have a fireworks display on saturday evening, keep in touch with the forecast because it could change but as we head through the overnight
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period, the wind will strengthen across the far north of scotland and the northern isles and we will have gas as much as 70mph. 0n the northern isles and we will have gas as much as 70mph. on sunday, very slowly, the wind will ease but you see we still have rain moving away into the north sea and then a lot of dry weather and there will be sunshine around as well and more settled, but by now temperatures slowly starting to slip, so we are looking at highs of between nine and 13 and as we head into the early part of next week, certainly on monday, things get more settled. i like it when it is settled. it makes me feel settled and you don't need any of the wardrobe kerfuffle. coat on, coat off, just keep it out. thank you. worth saying that those pictures you showed at the beginning, amazing images of the northern lights in scotland. stunning. i northern lights in scotland. stunning-— northern lights in scotland. stunnint. , ., stunning. i will whip through them and i will show _ stunning. i will whip through them and i will show you _ stunning. i will whip through them and i will show you some - stunning. i will whip through them and i will show you some more, i stunning. i will whip through them i and i will show you some more, the weather watchers were really doing
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their stuff last night. see that. quite far south as well and another one in the highlands. they are stunning when you see them. i've actually seen the northern lights myself and itjust looks like light cloud to start, just waving and you put your phone up to take a photo and then it pops. i put your phone up to take a photo and then it pops.— and then it pops. i want to sit on that little bench _ and then it pops. i want to sit on that little bench which _ and then it pops. i want to sit on that little bench which is - and then it pops. i want to sit on that little bench which is being i that little bench which is being covered up right now by the name there, but there was a bench there and it looks like the perfect place to sit to enjoy that view. see you later on. i've never seen them. have you?, no i haven't. all week we ve been hearing about the talks going on at cop26 in glasgow but outside those meetings, scotland is already struggling with climate change. the country's facing both water shortages linked to rising temperatures, and flooding caused by torrential rain. 0ur correspondent james cook has more.
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it's the element of life and legend. but water does notjust revive and inspire, as they know all too well here in the aberdeenshire town of stonehaven. lorraine watts and's chip shop has been badly flooded five times in ten years. this whole basement was _ five times in ten years. this whole basement was completely - five times in ten years. this whole basement was completely and i five times in ten years. this whole i basement was completely and utterly flooded. these freezers were floating, all this packaging and you just stand there and you just want to cry. just stand there and you “ust want to c . ~ ., just stand there and you “ust want to c . . . ., , just stand there and you “ust want toc .~ ., ., ,. ., to cry. what does climate change mean to you _ to cry. what does climate change mean to you in — to cry. what does climate change mean to you in stonehaven? i to cry. what does climate change mean to you in stonehaven? you j to cry. what does climate change i mean to you in stonehaven? you can watch all these _ mean to you in stonehaven? you can watch all these wildlife _ mean to you in stonehaven? you can watch all these wildlife programmes| watch all these wildlife programmes and juicy icebergs breaking away, and juicy icebergs breaking away, and do people take it seriously? probably not, but when you live in a community like this is where you have major affection, you have to look at that and say this is what is happening and we have to take action and everybody must take action.
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they're taking action here by building flood defences through the middle of the town. the project is expensive and late, but the chief engineer insists it's vital. there's been 1979, 1986. we've had a couple of big events in the 20005, so they are growing in intensity and frequency. will this protect stonehaven in the climate change era? we are protecting almost 400 homes, protecting a school, some residential homes. so these all have a cost. if they get flooded, they have a cost to society, but it won't solve every problem. and i think people need to be aware of that. this is not the silver bullet that will solve every problem. containing this river is only part of the solution for stonehaven. it's also been hit by torrential downpours, which have simply swamped the streets. plus, it's on the coast in an era of rising sea levels. and, of course, it's not the only place in scotland facing those challenges. further north, in the old herring port of wick, they know all about the peril of the sea.
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but this summer, the local distillery faced a different threat — drought. and you can't make whiskey without water. as you can see, we need a lot of cold water. the problem we were experiencing at the time was the whole ecosystem dried up. so we really had to manage that. we had to shut down. it wasn't a difficult decision to do. i mean, we want to protect the environment. we want to protect our source. if we don't have that, we can't make whiskey here. so the decision was an easy one to stop, let it recover, let it sustain itself. it's still a worry. even after recent rain, reservoirs in scotland are far from full. a glimpse, perhaps, of the country's future facing drought and flooding. james cook, bbc news, perthshire. such a beautiful place. sales of new cars across the uk last month dropped by around a quarter,
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compared to last year — with a shortage of parts thought to be one of the reasons for the downturn. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies is at the vauxhall plant in luton this morning, caroline, we're expecting to hear more from the industry later. i know we are expecting to hear more from the industry, but do we get a little tour of all of the stuff going on around you? i little tour of all of the stuff going on around you? i think so. i think we need _ going on around you? i think so. i think we need a _ going on around you? i think so. i think we need a little _ going on around you? i think so. i think we need a little bit - going on around you? i think so. i think we need a little bit of- going on around you? i think so. i think we need a little bit of a i think we need a little bit of a tour, so if you come over here, this is where they putting the wiring and the harnessing and where all of that is done and underneath the surface then they will put in the carpeting and that is all needed before they fit the dashboards, so if you come round this way you can see this as the dashboard they are putting together now and each person has about two and a half minutes on their slot putting in all the different elements they need before it moves on, so you can see how crucial it is to have all of the nuts and bolts exactly in place and ready when everyone needs them, otherwise the entire process will slow down and clog up and the big
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issue as you mentioned is the issue with semiconductors on the chips that keep the technology going and the fact that industries like this has reduced the numbers of ships from three to two meaning it can only produce up to 300 vehicles of the moment and it's not about the demand, it's about the fact that they don't have enough of these parts to keep the production line moving smoothly. i am joined by james who will be telling us a little more. what are the figures today and what they mean? goad today and what they mean? good mornint. today and what they mean? good morning- they — today and what they mean? good morning. they tell _ today and what they mean? good morning. they tell us _ today and what they mean? good morning. they tell us two - today and what they mean? good morning. they tell us two things. firstly, _ morning. they tell us two things. firstly, how— morning. they tell us two things. firstly, how manufacturers have really _ firstly, how manufacturers have really been working to make sure that vehicles are getting on the roads— that vehicles are getting on the roads and — that vehicles are getting on the roads and there's been a global semiconductor shortage and those are so important for the manufacture of vehicles _ so important for the manufacture of vehicles and also for all consumer electronics — vehicles and also for all consumer electronics and has been a challenge in terms _ electronics and has been a challenge in terms of— electronics and has been a challenge in terms of manufacturing vehicles and making sure they are available. those _ and making sure they are available. those vehicles are coming through so we are _ those vehicles are coming through so we are seeing registrations carry on but we _ we are seeing registrations carry on but we are — we are seeing registrations carry on but we are seeing a decline in 0ctoher— but we are seeing a decline in october compared to last year. the
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second _ october compared to last year. the second story has been the huge uptake — second story has been the huge uptake in— second story has been the huge uptake in electric vehicles, so battery— uptake in electric vehicles, so battery electrical and plug—in numbers— battery electrical and plug—in numbers have really rocketed in 2021 and by— numbers have really rocketed in 2021 and by the _ numbers have really rocketed in 2021 and by the end of the year we expect to register— and by the end of the year we expect to register more plug—in vehicles during _ to register more plug—in vehicles during this — to register more plug—in vehicles during this year alone than we did in the _ during this year alone than we did in the whole of the past decade. sc it's in the whole of the past decade. it's clear in the whole of the past decade. sr it's clear more people want to buy electric vehicles and cop26 is going on, but here we are standing on a plant that only makes diesel vans. what can be done to persuade people to move from petrol diesel to electric and what are the main things that hold people back from making that move? the things that hold people back from making that move?— things that hold people back from making that move? the first thing to reco . nise making that move? the first thing to recognise is — making that move? the first thing to recognise is that _ making that move? the first thing to recognise is that petrol _ making that move? the first thing to recognise is that petrol and - making that move? the first thing to recognise is that petrol and diesel i recognise is that petrol and diesel cars made — recognise is that petrol and diesel cars made today are the cleanest in history— cars made today are the cleanest in history and — cars made today are the cleanest in history and there is still a vital place — history and there is still a vital place in — history and there is still a vital place in the automotive market but we know _ place in the automotive market but we know there is an end of sale date in 2030, _ we know there is an end of sale date in 2030, so — we know there is an end of sale date in 2030, so it's important people move _ in 2030, so it's important people move to — in 2030, so it's important people move to electric vehicles as we progress — move to electric vehicles as we progress. as you say, there are barriers _ progress. as you say, there are barriers at — progress. as you say, there are barriers at the moment preventing everyone _ barriers at the moment preventing everyone from taking up those vehicles, — everyone from taking up those vehicles, sometimes the perception that they— vehicles, sometimes the perception that they are more expensive on the
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other— that they are more expensive on the other really— that they are more expensive on the other really important one is the lack of— other really important one is the lack of infrastructure. as i've said. — lack of infrastructure. as i've said, we've seen a huge surge in the number— said, we've seen a huge surge in the numberof— said, we've seen a huge surge in the number of electric vehicles bought this year— number of electric vehicles bought this year and we haven't seen the same _ this year and we haven't seen the same surge — this year and we haven't seen the same surge in charging infrastructure uptake and that is what _ infrastructure uptake and that is what people need to see if they want to be convinced to make the switch to be convinced to make the switch to electric — to be convinced to make the switch to electric vehicles.— to electric vehicles. thank you very much. to electric vehicles. thank you very much- we — to electric vehicles. thank you very much. we were _ to electric vehicles. thank you very much. we were talking _ to electric vehicles. thank you very much. we were talking about i much. we were talking about semiconductors and this is one of the crucial parts as it contains multiple semiconductors, so how many semiconductors do you think are in a normal vehicle, and i will not give you a chance to guess, it's between 1,000 503,000 of the chips and you can see how a shortage can clog them up can see how a shortage can clog them up ? 1,000 can see how a shortage can clog them up 71,000 503,000. i can see how a shortage can clog them up 21,000 503,000.— up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to sa “ust up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to sayjust four- — up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to sayjust four- a — up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to sayjust four. a little _ up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to say just four. a little bit _ up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to sayjust four. a little bit low. - up ? 1,000 503,000. i was going to sayjust four. a little bit low. how. sayjust four. a little bit low. how man ? sayjust four. a little bit low. how many? up — sayjust four. a little bit low. how many? up to _ sayjust four. a little bit low. how many? up to 3,0002 _ sayjust four. a little bit low. how many? up to 3,0002 yes - sayjust four. a little bit low. how many? up to 3,000? yes nearlyl
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sayjust four. a little bit low. how. many? up to 3,000? yes nearly up sayjust four. a little bit low. how- many? up to 3,000? yes nearly up to 3,000 semiconductor chips needed to havejust one vehicle. 3,000 semiconductor chips needed to have just one vehicle. it's always interesting. i always find it fascinating looking around the factories where you see stuff being made. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. hertfordshire county council has written to parents and carers recommending children should wear face coverings at all times in secondary schools. that's not what official government guidance says but the local authority says it's in response to the rising number of covid cases in the uk, particularly among young people. they're also asking all staff in early years, special, primary and secondary schools to wear them when in contact with other adults. london fire brigade has unveiled three new fire engines, each equipped with one of the tallest ladders in europe. the brigade has introduced new equipment —
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and changed its response — to the way it deals with fires in high rise buildings, following criticism over the grenfell tower disaster. these new ladders can reach the top of a 20—floor building in about a minute, and come with a lift, to help rescue residents. so once at the top, three people can be taken into the lift and brought to safety down at ground level, and at the bottom they are met by the support pump crew usher them to safety and the lift can be returned to the top of the ladder to assist more people at the top of the building. a grand theatre in south east london, which survived a direct bombing during the second world war, has been put on historic england's latest "at risk register." streatham hill theatre is currently used as a bingo hall. experts say it needs major repairs. but among the 32 sites, which are declared "saved," are battersea power station and the royal arsenal conservation area in woowich. let's see how the tube is running this morning.
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more problems with the metropolitan line this morning. minor delays between rickmansworth and amersham and chesham. not enough trains running again. and there are minor delays on the piccadilly line westbound between cockfosters and acton town after a signal failure. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling less chilly compared to yesterday and a bit more a breeze over night which prevented any frost from forming and reduce the risk of mist and fog. it's a largely cloudy start with maybe some showers moving south and feeding in on the northerly breeze and the breeze will feel quite chilly and fewer showers this afternoon and if you write spells potentially with temperatures between eight and 10 c but if you factor in the wind it will feel colder. overnight the wind will fall a bit lighter with clear skies, light winds and temperatures will drop again.
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it will be a chilly night with the minimum of low single figures if not zero, so again the chances are you might get some frost first thing on friday morning but it is a bright starting friday and some sunshine around but more cloud feeling south through the afternoon and the westerly breeze as the high—pressure slips and the westerly breeze will replace the cold air with something a little milder as we head through the weekend. of course it is bonfire night and tomorrow night it looks dry and cloudy in the wind reasonably night and saturday night if you're across the weekend celebrating it's looking dry, largely cloudy but also a bit more of a breeze. much more on our website— including on calls for escooters to be banned for public transport. many of you getting in touch with tuour thoughts on that. i'm back in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... the hpv vaccine is cutting cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. cancer research calls
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it a historic moment. back home safely. the australian toddler cleo smith has spent her first night with herfamily since her dramatic rescue. police have released audio of the moment she was found. the racism row around yorkshire county cricket club intensifies. now england international gary ballance say�*s he regrets using racist language, against his former yorkshire teammate azeem rafiq. there's just over a week to go until our very own 0wain takes on breakfast�*s 24—hour children in need drumathon. we'll see how he's preparing for the challenge. good morning. a lot of us had clear skies last night and many others saw the northern lights. it does mean there is a cold start to the day.
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some of the same frost. sunshine and showers will be the order of the day. not as many showers as yesterday. all the details later in the programme. it's thursday, the 4th of november. our main story. the first major study looking at the effectiveness of the hpv vaccine has shown its reducing cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. cancer research uk has described the findings as "historic." it's hoped that vaccination could almost eliminate the disease in future. here's more from our health correspondent dominic hughes. almost all cases of cervical cancer are linked to the human papillomavirus. the hpv vaccine programme targeting the virus itself was introduced in the uk in 2008, when girls aged between 11 and 13 were first offered the jab. and since september 2019, boys of the same age have also been eligible. now, the first real world study of the vaccine shows it's had a dramatic effect. cervical cancer rates were 87% lower
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in girls who were offered the vaccine when aged 12 and 13. it's estimated that by mid—2019, the hpvjab programme had prevented around 450 cervical cancers, and around 17,200 precancers, all of which would have needed some medical intervention. this study looked at people who both had the vaccine for hpv and were screened by cervical cancer. so cervical screening still remains important. as the vaccine gets taken up, more and more people are vaccinated, we might see changes to what the screening programme looks like. so that might be how often you go in, or what the test looks like. but for now, it's still really important that if you're invited to cervical screening to consider going. currently, cervical cancer claims the lives of around 850 women in the uk every year. but the researchers believe that in the future, a combination of the vaccine and screening could mean hardly anyone goes
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on to develop the disease. they say it's a testament to the power of science to protect the lives of thousands of women. dominic hughes, bbc news. a four—year—old girl who was rescued 18 days after going missing from a campsite in western australia has spent herfirst night at home with her parents. cleo smith was discovered in a locked house on tuesday. in the last few hours, police have released new audio of the moment she was found — as shaimaa khalil reports. i have got her. the moment cleo smith was rescued, and the moment she identified herself to the officers. the four—year—old was found in a room when police smashed into a locked house not farfrom her family's home in the western australian town of carnarvon.
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cleo vanished from her family's tent while camping at a popular tourist spot of quobba blowholes on the western australian coast. her story gripped australia and sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. a $1 million reward offered for information on her whereabouts. a 36—year—old man remains in police custody after twice being taken to hospital for self—inflicted wounds. a man in custody may well be before the court very shortly. we have seen the physical condition, we can say. she has been checked out at the hospital and physically she is ok. more details have yet to emerge about the case and the events leading to her rescue. but authorities have said for the time being the investigation is ongoing and little cleo is doing well, enjoying her time being back with herfamily, after more than two weeks of separation.
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let's get more now from shaimaa, who joins us from sydney. it does continue to dominate all the headlines in australia. in it does continue to dominate all the headlines in australia.— headlines in australia. in our paper review we even _ headlines in australia. in our paper review we even shed _ headlines in australia. in our paper review we even shed the _ headlines in australia. in our paper review we even shed the western i review we even shed the western australia. i imagine cleo's face is on all the front pages. latte on all the front pages. we understand _ on all the front pages. we understand an _ on all the front pages. - understand an arrest was made. an arrest was made. the 36—year—old man remains in custody. he was taken to hospital after harming himself in the police station. he is now back after being questioned. police wanted to make sure he was well enough to be interviewed. we are expecting charges to be laid soon. they were keeping their cards very close to their chest in terms of any details about what happens when details about what happens when details about what happens when details about the night they found
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her, what was around her, what the house was like. they released the dramatic audio but not video. they said it contained evidence linked to the investigation. interestingly, the investigation. interestingly, the police was calling out on the community where she was found, asking people to share cctv from the time she was missing. generally of course a sigh of relief. the community itself has been celebrating. they have been replacing missing person signs with balloons all over town. i think is a change they were delighted to make. we were talking yesterday about how great is to have a good news story like this. it has lifted the mood in australia as well.— australia as well. absolutely, it has full to _ australia as well. absolutely, it has full to it _ australia as well. absolutely, it has full to it has _ australia as well. absolutely, it has full to it has captured i australia as well. absolutely, it has full to it has captured the i has full to it has captured the nation's heart. we were hearing from the community. they say a huge sigh of relief. someone said they had been praying and this was our community's miracle.-
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been praying and this was our community's miracle. always good to talk to you- — community's miracle. always good to talk to you. thank _ community's miracle. always good to talk to you. thank you. _ 18 countries have signed up to a plan to stop using coal—fired power plants, in the latest major deal at cop26. it brings the total number of nations now backing the agreement to 40. let's get more from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, who's at the conference in glasgow. we watch with interest to see what moore comes out. what can you tell us about the latest deal? i moore comes out. what can you tell us about the latest deal?— us about the latest deal? i would reall like us about the latest deal? i would really like to _ us about the latest deal? i would really like to see _ us about the latest deal? i would really like to see the _ us about the latest deal? i would really like to see the small- us about the latest deal? i would really like to see the small print | really like to see the small print so we can work out which countries have joined so we can work out which countries havejoined mohammed he coalfired power stations they have got. as we are learning at this climate change conference in glasgow, which is on day five, you have got to read the small print. there is already a coalition of countries, regions, cities and organisations like banks, which had committed to phase out coal power stations. what has happened overnight is that some new members havejoined the happened overnight is that some new members have joined the coalition and it is a combination of
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countries, cities, regions and institutions. we need to see the actual list to work out what has gone on here. there are key bits of the small print already. china is not included in the senate is a massive user of coal power. also the smaller, less rich countries involved in this will not have to stop using coal power until 2040, which is 19 years away. while we are getting big announcements about particular things like energy, we also have negotiators from 176 countries getting on with the really detailed negotiations that stemmed from the paris climate change agreement signed a few years ago and those negotiations will continue until a week tomorrow. still quite a long way to go here in glasgow. you are a lont long way to go here in glasgow. you are a long way _ long way to go here in glasgow. you are a long way from westminster. is happening there yesterday resonated all over the place was that this is around conservative mp 0wen paterson, who had been deemed by the commons authorities to have broken
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the rules. yesterday, because of the vote, everything changed. queen vote, everything changed. owen paterson, vote, everything changed. owen paterson. the — vote, everything changed. owen paterson, the conservative i vote, everything changed. owen paterson, the conservative mp, | paterson, the conservative mp, worked the two companies and was paid by them, which is allowed to do within the parliamentary rules. but he was found by the independent parliamentary commissioner for standards and the committee. and it is, which is made up of mps, to have overstepped the mark when it came to those rules and they recommended he be suspended for 30 days. that had to be approved by vote in parliament. normally those votes go through. yesterday instead a group of conservative mps, backed by the government, used it as an opportunity to call for change to the whole system for how mps are disciplined. that vote went through. now there will be a new parliamentary committee which will investigate whether there should be a new appeals process added to the existing system for disciplining mps. now to labour and labour leader keir starmer writing an article in
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the guardian newspaper today. he says, that amounts to corruption, which is an upgrade to the language labour has been using to describe the whole process. that is what we are in now, a process. there will be this new committee to investigate whether there should be an appeal system. labourand whether there should be an appeal system. labour and the snp said it will boycott the process. the government says it is looking at whether the hr process and parliament for mps will be more like the hr process in a normal company. it has aroused lots of strong passions. it is quite controversial still has a long way to go. in passions. it is quite controversial still has a long way to go.- still has a long way to go. in the meantime _ still has a long way to go. in the meantime owen _ still has a long way to go. in the meantime owen paterson i still has a long way to go. in the meantime owen paterson will i still has a long way to go. in the i meantime owen paterson will remain undisciplined. thank you very much. scientists are warning that carbon emissions are set to rebound this year to levels last seen before the pandemic. new research predicts that the amount of co2 released into the atmosphere will rise by almost the same amount that it decreased in 2020. experts say the report underlines the urgency of action needed
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at summits like cop26. the ongoing dispute over fishing rights will be discussed in fresh talks between the uk and france later. let's speak more about this with our correspondent jessica parker, who's in the port of honfleur in normandy this morning. good to see you. it looks stunning behind you. tranquil and peaceful. i can see the sun glistening on the water. sharp contrast, i should say, perhaps to the tension building up over this. , ,., ., perhaps to the tension building up over this. , ., ., ., over this. yes. good morning from a very beautiful— over this. yes. good morning from a very beautiful town _ over this. yes. good morning from a very beautiful town in _ over this. yes. good morning from a very beautiful town in northern - very beautiful town in northern france. there has been a rise in tensions between france and the united kingdom over this issue. what is the issue? under post brexit arrangements, france feels not enough of its fishermen are being licensed to fish in the coastal waters of the united kingdom and the channel islands, particularly jersey. there has been an ongoing dispute around that. the united kingdom and jazzy saying it is applying the agreement fairly. it
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was back on monday night the french president emmanuel macron said the french would not impose retaliatory measures for now. those included stopping british boats from off—loading their patches here in northern france, tighter border measures as well. he said he wanted to allow negotiations to continue. they have been continuing. it leads up they have been continuing. it leads up to today when a brexit minister lord frost travels to paris to meet with france's europe minister. interestingly, britain wants to talk about broader issues as well. for example arrangements and northern ireland filled my understanding is that men are due to meet for a couple of hours. to what extent they go into the nitty—gritty details of this licensing is not particularly clear. this needs to be seen in the wider context of tensions between united kingdom and france. there have been other issues like the defence deal which angered france greatly as well. expectations being played out in terms of a
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breakthrough. whether this is a wider reset of french— anglo relations, we will have to wait and see. those relations have been somewhat at a low ebb.- see. those relations have been somewhat at a low ebb. thank you very much — somewhat at a low ebb. thank you very much for— somewhat at a low ebb. thank you very much for that. _ somewhat at a low ebb. thank you very much for that. can _ somewhat at a low ebb. thank you very much for that. can you - somewhat at a low ebb. thank you i very much for that. can you describe just how beautiful it is there? the weather looks stunning. we are going to power shortly. can you give us the update from normandy? this is absolutely beautiful. _ the update from normandy? this is absolutely beautiful. the _ the update from normandy? this is i absolutely beautiful. the cameraman will point over the level that there is a carousel over there. if you go down into the harbour, lots of beautiful fishing down into the harbour, lots of beautifulfishing boats. the weather looks quite beautiful although a moment ago it was tipping down with rain. it moment ago it was tipping down with rain. , , ., ., ., “ moment ago it was tipping down with rain. , , ., ., ., ~ ., rain. it is beautiful. look at the ower rain. it is beautiful. look at the power you _ rain. it is beautiful. look at the power you have _ rain. it is beautiful. look at the power you have to _ rain. it is beautiful. look at the power you have to fix _ rain. it is beautiful. look at the power you have to fix the - rain. it is beautiful. look at the i power you have to fix the weather just in time to bring it up—to—date on bbc breakfast. if only! someone else with the power, carol. i don't know. you have been standing us with the pictures of the northern lights. it will be pretty hard to beat that here this morning.
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depends where you are. we have some beautiful views around our own shores. the northern lights again, as far south as doncaster. probably as far south as doncaster. probably as far south as doncaster. probably as far south as wales may be over to the wash and parts north under clear skies last night. a good chance tonight under the clear skies we could see them as well. today we are looking at a chilly breeze with sunny spells and a few —— fewer showers than yesterday. the nagging and is accentuating the cold feel. also showers in wales, the south—west of england and later showers in north—west scotland and northern ireland will fade as a new system comes in, bringing in some rain. temperatures lower than yesterday. seven to 12 degrees but tempered by the wind vertically down the north sea coastline. tonight some clear skies to start. there is
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a weak weather front sinking south bringing patchy rain with it. there will be holes the cloud. there will be frost. temperatures could fall as low as —2. tomorrow we had the cloud continuing itsjourney low as —2. tomorrow we had the cloud continuing its journey moving southwards. for many of us tomorrow will be cloudier than today. there will be cloudier than today. there will be cloudier than today. there will be showers in the north and the west. it will not be as windy down the north sea coastline. though winter switching to more of the westerly to north—westerly and values will be much higher, we are looking at ten to 13. things change on saturday. we have a new weather front coming in from the north—west, introducing some rain and stronger winds. the wins will be particularly strong later in the day across the north and west. if you have any fireworks display is planned, to keepin fireworks display is planned, to keep in touch with the forecast. he had gorgeous views, we had gorgeous food. i think we tramp you just at the moment. i will explain
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more in a moment. would you mind reading? you have already had a go, haven't you? sweets, lights, fireworks and family — they're all on the agenda as millions of people across the world mark the start of the festival of diwali today. last year, celebrations had to be scaled back due to covid, and many people couldn't see their loved ones. let's speak to yogi shah, who's at a temple in west london, and manni dhokia, who's a volunteer at a temple in ashton—under—lyne. there we go. morning to you. morning. morning to everybody. lovely to see you here this morning. tell us a little bit about how you will be marking diwali? that tell us a little bit about how you will be marking diwali? that she was really special — will be marking diwali? that she was really special because _ will be marking diwali? that she was really special because we _ will be marking diwali? that she was really special because we will - will be marking diwali? that she was really special because we will be - really special because we will be able to celebrate it, not only at home, but also at the temple. last year with coronavirus, everything was at home during lockdown. we are always used to going to the temple to celebrate diwali. having looked damn is really difficult. then we
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had lots of online savings from the temple and diwali came into my house was really special. really ambivalent about it, it'll came into my house. the temple was just a screen away from me. it my house. the temple was 'ust a screen away from mefi my house. the temple was 'ust a screen away from me. it applies to diwali and other _ screen away from me. it applies to diwali and other things _ screen away from me. it applies to diwali and other things where - screen away from me. it applies to diwali and other things where the l diwali and other things where the restrictions that were in place, people worked around them. things were special regardless. i dare say there will be extra excitement because you were free to do what you might otherwise be doing. yes. because you were free to do what you might otherwise be doing.— might otherwise be doing. yes. this ear we might otherwise be doing. yes. this year we will — might otherwise be doing. yes. this year we will celebrate _ might otherwise be doing. yes. this year we will celebrate at _ might otherwise be doing. yes. this year we will celebrate at home - might otherwise be doing. yes. this| year we will celebrate at home again tonight this evening, with an online celebration in the temple. tomorrow is the hindu new year so we will be going to the temple. we will have a lot of visitors coming, all in a safe manner. we will be offering food to god. we literally do a mountain of feed to say thank you to god for his providence. and mountain of feed to say thank you to
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god for his providence. and welcome visitors for the _ god for his providence. and welcome visitors for the prayers. _ god for his providence. and welcome visitors for the prayers. since - god for his providence. and welcome visitors for the prayers. since you - visitors for the prayers. since you are talking about food, and you have very kindly brought salmon, what do we have? you say it is an offering. —— brought some in. we have? you say it is an offering. -- brought some in.— we have? you say it is an offering. -- brought some in. what do we have here? these — -- brought some in. what do we have here? these are _ -- brought some in. what do we have here? these are very _ -- brought some in. what do we have here? these are very traditional - here? these are very traditional items for diwali. this is savoury and in the middle it has chocolate on the top. the pastry is sweet inside. the offering will not only include indian sweets that will include indian sweets that will include other foods like pizza, pasta and the rest of it. we adapt to where we live.— to where we live. let's talk to yo . i. i to where we live. let's talk to yogi. i volunteer _ to where we live. let's talk to yogi. i volunteer at _ to where we live. let's talk to yogi. i volunteer at the - to where we live. let's talk to l yogi. i volunteer at the temple. to where we live. let's talk to - yogi. i volunteer at the temple. the colours are so vibrant. it is about celebration. with their sense of food,it celebration. with their sense of food, it is about people coming together and being thankful. yes. together and being thankful. yes, diwali is a time _
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together and being thankful. yes, diwali is a time for _ together and being thankful. yes, diwali is a time for everyone to come _ diwali is a time for everyone to come together. as it is a very festive — come together. as it is a very festive time, you seal the bright colours — festive time, you seal the bright colours. you can see behind me in the temple. — colours. you can see behind me in the temple, in the semple shrine... theyare— the temple, in the semple shrine... they are decorated really brightly. also you _ they are decorated really brightly. also you see the grand offering for the money— also you see the grand offering for the money you often talk about. that has been _ the money you often talk about. that has been set up in the offering started — has been set up in the offering started from this morning. it does look absolutely _ started from this morning. it does look absolutely spectacular. - started from this morning. it does look absolutely spectacular. many j look absolutely spectacular. many saying in a studio how well committees that issue you can be welcome for business. obviously last year it was very difficult for you, i am sure. year it was very difficult for you, i am sure-— year it was very difficult for you, i am sure. ., , . ., ., ., i am sure. last year we all had to do it from — i am sure. last year we all had to do it from home. _ i am sure. last year we all had to do it from home. in _ i am sure. last year we all had to do it from home. in the - i am sure. last year we all had to do it from home. in the 25, - i am sure. last year we all had to do it from home. in the 25, 26 i i am sure. last year we all had to i do it from home. in the 25, 26 years do it from home. in the 25,26 years at the _ do it from home. in the 25,26 years at the history— do it from home. in the 25,26 years at the history of this temple there has never— at the history of this temple there has never been a time where there is no people _ has never been a time where there is no people here at the temple celebrating diwali. last year, we know_ celebrating diwali. last year, we know what — celebrating diwali. last year, we know what it was, we had to have it at home, _ know what it was, we had to have it at home, brought to our homes by
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having _ at home, brought to our homes by having the — at home, brought to our homes by having the event online. i think you can see _ having the event online. i think you can see the — having the event online. i think you can see the cameras are already set ”p can see the cameras are already set up here _ can see the cameras are already set up here behind me, from where we do the online _ up here behind me, from where we do the online broadcast. however, this time round — the online broadcast. however, this time round we are really looking forward — time round we are really looking forward to — time round we are really looking forward to welcoming all the people here and _ forward to welcoming all the people here and that will bring back the whole _ here and that will bring back the whole vibrance of diwali. we should be clear, there _ whole vibrance of diwali. we should be clear, there will _ whole vibrance of diwali. we should be clear, there will still _ be clear, there will still be restrictions. coronavirus has not gone away. there will still be restrictions on safety measures, precautions. restrictions on safety measures, precautiona— restrictions on safety measures, recautions. ., ., , precautions. though are definitely safety measures _ precautions. though are definitely safety measures in _ precautions. though are definitely safety measures in place. - precautions. though are definitely safety measures in place. this - precautions. though are definitely. safety measures in place. this time and we _ safety measures in place. this time and we had — safety measures in place. this time and we had extended measures over four days _ and we had extended measures over four days. that allows people to spread — four days. that allows people to spread out in terms of they don't concentrate on one or two days where they can _ concentrate on one or two days where they can spread out over four days. we have _ they can spread out over four days. we have asked people to register online _ we have asked people to register online on— we have asked people to register online on the website. they will then— online on the website. they will then register and that time slots when _ then register and that time slots when they can can. that regulates
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the people. we have also asked for sociat— the people. we have also asked for social distancing and everyone to wear _ social distancing and everyone to wear a _ social distancing and everyone to wear a mask as well. the obvious one is if anyone _ wear a mask as well. the obvious one is if anyone has any symptoms, not to attend _ is if anyone has any symptoms, not to attend. also we have requested people _ to attend. also we have requested people to — to attend. also we have requested people to do in home tests as well before _ people to do in home tests as well before they attend.— people to do in home tests as well before they attend. thank you. they have ut before they attend. thank you. they have put his — before they attend. thank you. they have put his biscuit _ before they attend. thank you. they have put his biscuit slightly - before they attend. thank you. they have put his biscuit slightly out - before they attend. thank you. they have put his biscuit slightly out of i have put his biscuit slightly out of reach for me. i am going to do the everything and reach ever. remind me what these things _ everything and reach ever. remind me what these things are? _ everything and reach ever. remind me what these things are? this _ everything and reach ever. remind me what these things are? this is - everything and reach ever. remind me what these things are? this is a - what these things are? this is a savoury item- — what these things are? this is a savoury item. there _ what these things are? this is a savoury item. there is - what these things are? this is a savoury item. there is a - what these things are? this is a savoury item. there is a kick i what these things are? this is a savoury item. there is a kick to | what these things are? this is a i savoury item. there is a kick to it. nice. i savoury item. there is a kick to it. nice- i system _ savoury item. there is a kick to it. nice. i system may— savoury item. there is a kick to it. nice. i system may days - savoury item. there is a kick to it. nice. i system may days and - savoury item. there is a kick to it. nice. i system may days and they| nice. i system may days and they will be offered tomorrow to the gods. it will be offered tomorrow to the rods. . will be offered tomorrow to the rods. , , ., ., gods. it is the festival of light, lookin: gods. it is the festival of light, looking to _ gods. it is the festival of light, looking to the _ gods. it is the festival of light, looking to the goddess - gods. it is the festival of light, l looking to the goddess lakshmi. gods. it is the festival of light, - looking to the goddess lakshmi. the sto of looking to the goddess lakshmi. tue: story of diwali looking to the goddess lakshmi. t'te: story of diwali is looking to the goddess lakshmi. tt;a: story of diwali is ran looking to the goddess lakshmi. tte: story of diwali is ran was looking to the goddess lakshmi. tt;a: story of diwali is ran was exiled for iii years. when he came back, people let lamps in the doorways and
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the alleyways to bring god back into the alleyways to bring god back into the city. it is about welcoming lakshmi but also welcoming god. the symbolism of light over the coming darkness. tt symbolism of light over the coming darkness. . . . symbolism of light over the coming darkness. . , , ., , symbolism of light over the coming darkness. , ., , ~ darkness. it has been lovely. apart from anything _ darkness. it has been lovely. apart from anything else, _ darkness. it has been lovely. apart from anything else, you _ darkness. it has been lovely. apartj from anything else, you mentioned the colours this morning. you have lightened up our morning this morning. really nice to see you both. thank you for bringing that in. . ~' , ., , both. thank you for bringing that in. . ~ , ., , . both. thank you for bringing that it was the dramatic rescue that captivated australia and the world — the recovery of a four—year—old girl who was discovered in a locked house on tuesday and has now been reunited with her parents. let's speak to the deputy commissioner of western australia police, col blanch, who joins us from perth.
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deputy commissioner, thank you so much for your time. t deputy commissioner, thank you so much for your time.— deputy commissioner, thank you so much for your time. i know you had a ve bus much for your time. i know you had a very busy time- _ much for your time. i know you had a very busy time. we _ much for your time. i know you had a very busy time. we were _ much for your time. i know you had a very busy time. we were talking - much for your time. i know you had a very busy time. we were talking a i very busy time. we were talking a moment about some of the investigation itself. i wonder if you can talk to us a little bit about emotions around this. we heard from yourself and some of your fellow officers about that moment of discovery. what can you tell us about that from colleagues and your own perspectives? this about that from colleagues and your own perspectives?— own perspectives? this is after 18 da s of own perspectives? this is after 18 days of 24/7 _ own perspectives? this is after 18 days of 24/7 police _ own perspectives? this is after 18 days of 24/7 police work - own perspectives? this is after 18 days of 24/7 police work and - days of 24/7 police work and investigation to try to find little four—year—old, cleo smith. forthose 18 days, a 100 offers a task. in looking at her photo, trying desperately to find her. in the morning, police following intelligence they had sort of worked on for the 18 days made a decision to enter a house. four detectives went into the house. not only were
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they police officers, they were fathered by members of the community. they went in there and saw cleo sitting on a bed by herself. immediately you can see the relief on the case, their emotion. when they asked what her name was. she looked at the man said, my name is cleo. i have seen that the church. from the commission are down to the newest constable in the police, there was not a dry eye in the house. taste police, there was not a dry eye in the house-— police, there was not a dry eye in the house. we had heard an audio version of that. _ the house. we had heard an audio version of that. i _ the house. we had heard an audio version of that. i understand - the house. we had heard an audio version of that. i understand the l version of that. i understand the images of that particular moment are being held back for operational reasons to do with possibly court action and evidence. plot us through, if he were to happens next. the office has brought her out. having established here they were. —— the officers. then the moment of calling the parents and the family being back together again. so cleo was an physically _
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being back together again. so cleo was an physically good _ being back together again. so cleo was an physically good shape. - being back together again. so cleo was an physically good shape. the | was an physically good shape. the way the officers saw it at the time. the most important thing is to get her somewhere safe. they took her immediately to hospital. on the way to hospital, they rang ellie and jake, cleo's parents and said that we have someone who wants to talk to you. we did not tell them you are going into the has because we did not know what we would find. the minute that cleo started to talk to money, you can imagine inside the car, the emotion was extraordinary. when they met each other in hospital, hugs all around. when they met each other in hospital, hugs allaround. it when they met each other in hospital, hugs all around. it has been such an emotional 24—hour is for the community of australia, the police and certainly for the smith family he got to spend last night together. just an incredible moment in the history of australia. you will know _ in the history of australia. you will know there _ in the history of australia. you will know there are _ in the history of australia. you will know there are many questions people are interested in as to how it was that you came to be searching at that house and that point. there may well be many reasons why there is a limit to what you can tell us.
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we will have seen the images of your officers searching and what looks like outback areas, in areas of scrap, and yet you end up back in the town which is so familiar to the family. what kind of explanation can you give us has to how it was your officers ended up searching in that place? taste officers ended up searching in that lace? . ., , ., officers ended up searching in that lace? . , ., ., officers ended up searching in that lace? . ., ., ., place? we always had a large challenge _ place? we always had a large challenge ahead _ place? we always had a large challenge ahead of _ place? we always had a large challenge ahead of us. - place? we always had a large challenge ahead of us. for i place? we always had a large challenge ahead of us. for 18| place? we always had a large - challenge ahead of us. for 18 days, we decided from day one to collect everything we possibly could. we put a massive effort into doing that. 100 police officers. we put out a $1 million reward early leading to us finding cleo. what we did was collect cctv footage of almost 600 miles around where the camp ground was. this is a very remote area. we collected the rubbish, the trash along the entire highways. the two witness statements and had forensics teams calling over the area. we had mobile phone data, hundreds of lines
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of data. we were literally looking for a needle in a haystack. we were able to piece together a bit of a jigsaw, piece by piece, until we felt we had enough of a matching description of the circumstance of the working theory we were going with. the data overlay of all the pieces of information, that led us to a house we believed contained someone involved in the disappearance of cleo. taste someone involved in the disappearance of cleo. we know a 36-year-old _ disappearance of cleo. we know a 36-year-old man _ disappearance of cleo. we know a 36-year-old man was _ disappearance of cleo. we know a 36-year-old man was arrested. in 36—year—old man was arrested. in terms of what happens next procedure a, what are we to expect? there terms of what happens next procedure a, what are we to expect?— a, what are we to expect? there is a ve larae a, what are we to expect? there is a very large investigation _ a, what are we to expect? there is a very large investigation under- a, what are we to expect? there is a very large investigation under way i very large investigation under way at the moment. the first part of the investigation was to find cleo. and to understand what happened over the 18 days. and what offences occurred. kidnapping is one and child stealing will be one. it is to piece together
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the 18 days forensically. that will be talking to cleo and interviewing the 36—year—old man, which is currently being done at the moment and collecting all the information around the house where she was found. forensics have been in for the past two days and i would expect them to be there for a bit longer. we have asked people to bring forward cctv, their observations make neighbours. there is a lot more to do and we expect to be at this investigation.— to do and we expect to be at this investigation. time. thank you for our time investigation. time. thank you for your time this _ investigation. time. thank you for your time this morning. _ investigation. time. thank you for your time this morning. i - investigation. time. thank you for your time this morning. i know- investigation. time. thank you for your time this morning. i know it | your time this morning. i know it has been a moment of huge celebration after what looked like it would be a bleak situation. thank you for taking the time out for us this morning. you for taking the time out for us this morning-— coming up in half an hour... we'll catch up with our bbc weather colleague owain, who's in serious training for his epic bbc breakfast "drumathon" challenge for children in need. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning. i'm sonja jessup. hertfordshire county council has written to parents and carers recommending children should wear face coverings at all times in secondary schools. that's not what official government guidance says, but the local authority says it's in response to the rising number of covid cases in the uk, particularly among young people. they're also asking all staff in early years, special, primary and secondary schools to wear them when in contact with other adults. london fire brigade has unveiled three new fire engines, each equipped with one of the tallest ladders in europe. the brigade has introduced new equipment and changed its response to the way it deals with fires in high rise buildings, following criticism over the grenfell tower disaster. these new ladders can reach the top of a 20—floor building in about a minute, and come with a lift to help rescue residents. so once at the top, three people can be taken into the lift and brought to safety down at ground level,
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and at the bottom they are met by the support pump crew and they usher them to safety and the lift can be returned to the top of the ladder to assist more people at the top of the building. a grand theatre in south east london— which survived a direct bombing during the second world war— has been put on historic england's latest "at risk register". streatham hill theatre is currently used as a bingo hall? experts say it needs major repairs. but among the 32 sites which are declared "saved" are battersea power station and the royal arsenal conservation area in woowich. let's see how the tube is running this morning. there are minor delays still on the metropolitan between moor park and watford — not enough trains running again. and severe delays on the piccadilly line westbound between cockfosters and acton town after a signalfailure. and you can keep up to date with the travel news on your bbc local radio station. time for the weather
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with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling less chilly compared to yesterday and a bit more a breeze over night which prevented any frost from forming and reduced the risk of mist and fog. it's a largely cloudy start with maybe some showers moving south and feeding in on the northerly breeze and the breeze will feel quite chilly and fewer showers this afternoon and a few bright spells potentially with temperatures between eight and 10 c but if you factor in the wind it will feel colder. overnight the wind will fall a bit lighter with clear skies, light winds and temperatures will drop again. it will be a chilly night with the minimum of low single figures if not zero, so again the chances are you might get some frost first thing on friday morning but it is a bright start to friday and some sunshine around but more cloud feeling south through the afternoon and the westerly breeze as the high—pressure slips and the westerly breeze will replace the cold air with something a little milder as we head through the weekend. of course it is bonfire night and tomorrow
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night it looks dry and cloudy and the wind reasonably night and saturday night if you're across the weekend celebrating it's looking dry, largely cloudy but also a bit more of a breeze. i'm back in an hour, so do check out our website for much more. now it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the killing of sir david amess rocked mps across the political divide — it was a tragic reminder of the risks faced by those in public life. kim leadbeater, whose sisterjo cox was murdered in her constituency in 2016, is supporting a campaign to give young people a better understanding about how uk politics works. shejoins us now. good morning. how are you? okay.
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it's been a — good morning. how are you? okay. it's been a man _ good morning. how are you? okay. it's been a man few _ good morning. how are you? okay. it's been a man few months, - good morning. how are you? okay. it's been a man few months, but i good morning. how are you? okay. | it's been a man few months, but i'm glad to, and talk about political literacy day, and it's a difficult day on the back of what happened in parliament yesterday but it is being engage young people with politics and democracy. taste engage young people with politics and democracy.— engage young people with politics and democracy. engage young people with politics and democra . ~ _, . ~ ., and democracy. we will come back to what ou and democracy. we will come back to what you mentioned _ and democracy. we will come back to what you mentioned a _ and democracy. we will come back to what you mentioned a moment - and democracy. we will come back to what you mentioned a moment ago i and democracy. we will come back to what you mentioned a moment ago ifj what you mentioned a moment ago if you don't mind, but as soon as you start trying to say, and i don't know what the phrasing you are using, educating people about politics and make sure people know about politics and sometimes people step away from the phrase because that in itself likes politic ? politics is different from life. and to understand where you come from in politics, you are very much helping people to understand it is life and about what you do and your personal lives matter, and that is what politics is about.— lives matter, and that is what politics is about. exactly. politics is about people _ politics is about. exactly. politics is about people and _ politics is about. exactly. politics is about people and what - politics is about. exactly. politics is about people and what struckl politics is about. exactly. politics i is about people and what struck me during the by—election was we had a 47% turnout in the by—election and
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people thought it wasn't good. for me, i thought, people thought it wasn't good. for me, ithought, that's people thought it wasn't good. for me, i thought, that's 53% who did not vote and whoever you want to vote for and clearly i have my preference, go out and vote and you can't blame people for not voting because they don't feel they are engaged with the system and they don't feel the system does anything for them and it's really important that we help young people in particular. and what young people can mean for their lives but also politicians need to do the bestjob we can and showing how we can help people and this is what i said to people and this is what i said to people on the doorsteps and the mp is one of those people who should help you and we have some really good people in parliament and it's not the easiest day to say that, but we do and we have people, and it's how we connect and show people that politics matters. you how we connect and show people that politics matters-— politics matters. you know what this is like because _ politics matters. you know what this is like because when _ politics matters. you know what this is like because when your _ politics matters. you know what this is like because when your sister - politics matters. you know what this is like because when your sister was | is like because when your sister was an mp, you weren't interested. you
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know what i mean. you've always been interested in being in politics. tia. interested in being in politics. no, this is where _ interested in being in politics. no, this is where i _ interested in being in politics. tip, this is where i saw my career going and i've been on a horrificjourney to get where i am now. but i think people like the fact i'm not from a traditional political background and i are talking language i hope people understand and i don't want to get absorbed in the westminster bubble. i want to connect constituencies like mine and across the country with politics. like mine and across the country with politics-— like mine and across the country with politics. how do you make a difference if _ with politics. how do you make a difference if you _ with politics. how do you make a difference if you are _ with politics. how do you make a difference if you are not - with politics. how do you make a difference if you are not in - with politics. how do you make a difference if you are not in the i difference if you are not in the westminster bubble? how do you use your voice in the commons when votes are happening if you are more concerned, as you perhaps should be, with your constituents? you have to do both and that is the challenge and that is the journey i am on. do both and that is the challenge and that is thejourney i am on. how do you make sure you have a vocal presence in parliament, speaking to the rights of people you represent on the issues that they care about. so i try to spend a lot of time listening to people in the constituency and taking their views and opinions to parliament. so if
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ou want and opinions to parliament. so if you want people _ and opinions to parliament. so if you want people to _ and opinions to parliament. so if you want people to be _ and opinions to parliament. so if you want people to be politically engaged and with what is happening around them and what is happening in the world and how it affects them, how do you square that off, and you have alluded to this and we will talk about it, with what happened in parliament yesterday, the row over owen paterson and the change to the rules about how mps are investigated when people will look at parliament and say, this is completely different to my world and they are doing stuff that i don't understand. i think you are totally right and it's an important question and that's why the campaign is more important than ever because yesterday was a really embarrassing day for politics yesterday but a shameful day for the government and it's annoying that some of the media coverage today is about mps voting for this, coverage today is about mps voting forthis, know coverage today is about mps voting for this, know it was the government that voted in this shameful, embarrassing manner and all the labour mps voted against it but there is an important point on political education and there is a system in parliament called pairing, so if you are sick, you are paired with an mp from a different party so your votes cancel each other out so
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i saw there was a lot on social media say some mps from the labour party didn't vote. there is a system in place, so unless you understand the system, you don't really know what happened yesterday so there is a piece about political education but i think you are right, politicians need to be held to account and to behave appropriately and sadly what we have seen from this situation is not all mps do. you can't have a set of rules, you break the rules, and then try and change the rules and that's what happened yesterday. t change the rules and that's what happened yesterday.— change the rules and that's what happened yesterday. i fear we are in dancer of happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going _ happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going down _ happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going down a _ happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going down a bit _ happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going down a bit of- happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going down a bit of a - happened yesterday. i fear we are in danger of going down a bit of a sin: l danger of going down a bit of a sin: this one, but i think you just said that the government voted this down, and that is not strictly true because the vote was a free vote, it wasn't a whipped vote. the mps voted on the new motion to do with owen paterson, so it wasn't a government decision, it was a vote by mps. paterson, so it wasn't a government decision, it was a vote by mp5. the decision, it was a vote by mps. the other thing — decision, it was a vote by mps. the other thing on _ decision, it was a vote by mps. tte: other thing on voting in parliament is that you know about the whipping system and lots of people i know
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don't understand the whipping system and you are encouraged how to vote and you are encouraged how to vote and that can be done to a greater or lesser degree. 50. and that can be done to a greater or lesser degree-— lesser degree. so, did you witness conservative _ lesser degree. so, did you witness conservative mps _ lesser degree. so, did you witness conservative mps being _ lesser degree. so, did you witness conservative mps being whipped i lesser degree. so, did you witness l conservative mps being whipped and people will understand the phrase, they are being encouraged to vote on a certain way, so did you see it happening?— a certain way, so did you see it happening? there is tribalism in olitics happening? there is tribalism in politics and _ happening? there is tribalism in politics and you _ happening? there is tribalism in politics and you are _ happening? there is tribalism in politics and you are encouraged | happening? there is tribalism in l politics and you are encouraged to stick to your tribe and on some issues there are issues that transcend party politics and when it is an issue of morality you should vote with your conscience and i'm not sure that always happens and i am quite new to this but there are certain issues where we saw some conservative mps who voted against the motion yesterday and i think that's really important. but again we are getting slightly off the topic of political literacy and it's important for me that the more the people understand the system and are engaged with the system, the more likely they are to see yesterday as it was and hopefully notjudge all mps by the same sorry standards we
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saw yesterday. the mps by the same sorry standards we saw yesterday-— mps by the same sorry standards we saw yesterday. the way some people 'ud . e saw yesterday. the way some people 'udue mps saw yesterday. the way some people judge mps and _ saw yesterday. the way some people judge mps and how _ saw yesterday. the way some people judge mps and how they _ saw yesterday. the way some people judge mps and how they engage - saw yesterday. the way some people judge mps and how they engage in i judge mps and how they engage in what is going on in the world around them, for example, the row over the yorkshire cricket club and racism. and in the past you wouldn't have heard, and there were quite a few politicians coming out saying that this is not acceptable, whereas before it was almost easy to sit on the sidelines and let the rows play out. so how do you feel this is reflecting on yorkshire and cricket? both of those, separately, the game and the area have come under scrutiny. and the area have come under scrutin . . . and the area have come under scrutin . , , ., , scrutiny. yes, these are things i feel passionate _ scrutiny. yes, these are things i feel passionate about, - scrutiny. yes, these are things i feel passionate about, i - scrutiny. yes, these are things i feel passionate about, i am - scrutiny. yes, these are things i feel passionate about, i am a i scrutiny. yes, these are things i i feel passionate about, i am a proud yorkshire woman and my background is in sport and i think spot is powerful in bringing people together and uniting people and that is why we have to call out the behaviour when it is taking place and there is no place for racism in society and no place for racism in society and
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no place for racism in sport and this is what this is. and this thing about banter, it's used a lot. this is an banter. it's unacceptable behaviour and has to be called out wherever it exists. filth behaviour and has to be called out wherever it exists.— behaviour and has to be called out wherever it exists. on that theme of banter, wherever it exists. on that theme of banter. the — wherever it exists. on that theme of banter, the comments, _ wherever it exists. on that theme of banter, the comments, most - wherever it exists. on that theme ofj banter, the comments, most people don't watch prime ministers questions, that is the reality, bits of it get played out in the news later on, but what have you witnessed in terms of banter in the house of commons, not in that particular moment in time, but have you witness things that you think that this does not play or should not exist in the real world? we not exist in the real world? i've witnessed _ not exist in the real world? i've witnessed good _ not exist in the real world? te: witnessed good and not so good. what does not get talked about is the good stuff behind the scenes in the cross—party work that goes on. i've just joined cross—party work that goes on. i've justjoined some all—party parliamentary groups on things like political education, women in politics and rugby league amongst other things and that is where cross—party work takes place and that isn't really covered in the media perhaps because it's not as
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exciting as some of the other stuff that goes on in parliament but when all people see our parliament is the shouting that goes on in pmqs, and it is quite toxic in there. it's a bit like a bear pit, but that has to change for me and when there were these murders, we talk about treating each other with respect and it seems short lived and i feel strongly about lots of issues but you've got to be respectful and until politicians behave in a way that encourages that respect, engaging people with politics is an uphill battle. d0 engaging people with politics is an uphill battle-— uphill battle. do you think that the are uphill battle. do you think that they are going _ uphill battle. do you think that they are going forward - uphill battle. do you think that they are going forward or - uphill battle. do you think that - they are going forward or backwards? it sounds a bit like you are saying that at best it is the same or possibly worse? tt’s that at best it is the same or possibly worse?— that at best it is the same or possibly worse? it's really hard. i'm not sure _ possibly worse? it's really hard. i'm not sure things _ possibly worse? it's really hard. i'm not sure things are - possibly worse? it's really hard. i'm not sure things are any - possibly worse? it's really hard. | i'm not sure things are any better than when afterjo was killed and that's why put myself forward, to be a small part of that to show politicians are only human and we
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are not perfect in any way, shape or form but we also have to be responsible for our actions and sadly, some of the behaviour, particularly yesterday, you can't have a set of rules that you think don't apply to you and that is what we saw yesterday, sadly, in terms of this whole corruption issue. how can we engage people in politics people in parliament think they are better than anyone else when they are not? really interesting hearing your reflections. thank you very much on the campaign which i assume is cross—party, because you want more people to talk about politics generally. people to talk about politics generally-— people to talk about politics aenerall .~ . �*, ., , ., people to talk about politics renerall. ., , ., , generally. what's lovely today is i'm auoin generally. what's lovely today is i'm going to _ generally. what's lovely today is i'm going to a — generally. what's lovely today is i'm going to a primary _ generally. what's lovely today is i'm going to a primary school, i generally. what's lovely today is l i'm going to a primary school, one my dad went to in my constituency to talk to little ones about school counselling political education. you will aet counselling political education. you will get some _ counselling political education. you will get some challenging questions. i am more nervous about that than this. �* ,, , i am more nervous about that than this. �* , ., ~' we were talking about what has been going on at the yorkshire cricket club and that is what mike is picking up on this morning. this
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isn't going to go away? tlat picking up on this morning. this isn't going to go away?- picking up on this morning. this isn't going to go away? not at all because the _ isn't going to go away? not at all because the enquiry _ isn't going to go away? not at all because the enquiry continues i because the enquiry continues throughout november and it is leaked findings and it's the way it's been dealt with by yorkshire cricket club. as the fall out of this row, deepens, several sponsors have now ended their relationship, with yorkshire county cricket, club, over its response to findings of rascism and bullying of former player azeem rafiq, while the former england international, gary ballance says he "regrets" using a racial slur against, his former yorkshire teammate, rafiq. our sports editor dan roan has more. it's the most successful club in the history of county cricket but yorkshire is now involved in a racism scandal centred on former player azeem rafiq. an independent panel found the spin bowler had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club. yorkshire apologised, but took no action against any member of staff and political pressure has been intensifying. what we've read is deeply
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shocking and one of the most disturbing events in modern cricket history, in my view. i can think of very few reasons why the board of yorkshire cricket club should remain in place. after a leak of the investigation's findings, it emerged that a current yorkshire player repeatedly used a racially offensive term towards rafiq about his pakistani heritage but the panel regarded it as friendly banter, sparking an outcry. after mounting speculation, former england star gary ballance revealed he was the player concerned. in a statement, the yorkshire batsmen said.
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on a dramatic day, a host of yorkshire is a sponsors ended their partnership with the club as the fallout continued. emerald publishing, which has the naming rights to headingley, yorkshire tea, local brewer tetleys and leisure operator david lloyd all turning their back on the beleaguered county. it's over a year since rafiq alleged institutional racism. playing professional cricket for yorkshire should be the best time of your life. unfortunately for me, it wasn't. now with the ecb launching their own investigation, the crisis threatens to undermine the wider game's efforts to tackle discrimination in the sport. as suggested, plenty more on that to come in the coming weeks. let's move to the football. you have to go back to the start of april for the last time liverpool lost and their fine form has taken them into the knockout stages of the champions league. their latest victims were atletico madrid. diogojota put them ahead early
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on before sadio mane sealed the victory eight minutes later. it means liverpool win their group at a canter with two games to spare. a great performance and an incredible performance in the group stage so far. nobody would have expected that seeing the draw, and doing that is pretty special, but for tonight, job done, but we all know, yes, we have two games to go and we will try everything to win the most well. its looking good too for manchester city, who took another big step towards the last 16 with a 4—1 win over club brugge. it was so one sided this, and city even gave the belgians, an own goal, before this move for city's 4th undelined their dominance. gabriel jesus with the finish to match. city need a point
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against paris saint—germain in their next game to advance to the knockout stage. it was really important because in the premier league, we have 28 games left, 28, and here there are just six games left to play and qualify and just two now. it was so important today and that is why we won it and we are in a good position and we need three points to qualify and in february hopefully we can be in the last 16 with the best teams in europe. they may have won over new fans and made a name for themselves but scotland's t20 world cup journey is over after losing to new zealand. scotland won the toss and sent the kiwis in to bat, taking two quick wickets as captain kane williamson was dismissed without scoring. scotland made a valiant effort to their reply, but in the end, they fell 16 runs short, which means they're out of the competition with two matches still to play. we've had a number of games against new zealand over the years and some have been close and some haven't and
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this is one where you are saying, 17 runs, which is a reasonable size in t20 cricket but we would look back and say where were those little moments in the game where we could have closed the gap and may be used that as an opportunity missed but that is where we have to keep raising the bar. meanwhile india thrashed afghanistan with a 66 run victory, rohit sharma and kl rahul, shared a commanding opening stand of 140 to finish, on 210 for 2. afghanistan never looked capable, of chasing that target. they remain though second in group 2. a big sigh of relief for india, the pretournament favourites at one stage were in danger of going out, but they are through. it is coming up to ten to eight, so it is carol time. i'm coming to you with a beautiful picture, and look at this weather watchers picture.— picture, and look at this weather watchers picture. isn't it stunning? taken in penzance _ watchers picture. isn't it stunning? taken in penzance in _ watchers picture. isn't it stunning? taken in penzance in cornwall. - watchers picture. isn't it stunning? taken in penzance in cornwall. a l taken in penzance in cornwall. a cold start to the day and many of us had clear skies over night where the
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cloud has remained and the temperatures are not quite as low but in the southern uplands it is freezing and glasgow is 1 and freezing and glasgow is! and cardiff! and viewed in connolly is 2 and birmingham 4, and you will notice it if you are stepping out and today will be the coldest day of the week and we are looking at a lot of sunshine and fewer showers than yesterday but having said that if you are on the windward coast you are like to see some sun coming on land and you will see it across western scotland and northern ireland and a few more across parts of wales and south—west england as well as the channel islands. we still have the northerly breeze coming down the north sea, gusting at about 40mph and also a week where the front crossing us, so in the southeast a bit more cloud, but you can see a lot of clear skies and also by the time we get to the mid afternoon we will have the next weather system showing its hand and introducing more cloud and some
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spots of rain in the outer hebrides and some sunshine and showers for northern ireland and north—west england, wales and the south—west largely drove sunshine but you can see some coastal showers getting in through west wales and also devon and cornwall, and forget showers coming in from the east and again, that nagging wind which will make it feel cold, but temperatures are lower than yesterday and we are looking at seven up to 12 . lower than yesterday and we are looking at seven up to !2 . through the evening and overnight the week where the fun comes into the north—west by the end of the afternoon, slowly sinking southwards and it will fragment as it does so and it will fragment as it does so and there will be clear skies across eastern parts of scotland and parts of the north—east of england and the south of england as well. a good chance you might see the northern lights if you're an area with clear skies further north but in the south end of the clear skies, temperatures in sheltered areas will fall away as low as —2, so a frosty start and a colder start than this morning. this morning the week where the friend moves slowly southwards in cloud
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bills in the south as it arrives, but there will be a lot of cloud tomorrow there will be some brighter breaks but some showers coming in across the north west and one salient thing is the change in the wind direction and we will see more of a westerly or north—westerly are not nearly as windy on the east coast so it won't feel as cold and temperatures a little bit higher anyway. as we head into saturday, all change with heavy rain coming in across the north west and it will be windy and cloudy but the strongest winds will be later on across the far north and west and some of us will have some gales stop thank in just over a week, our weather presenter 0wain wyn evans will start his 24—hour, bbc breakfast drumathon for children in need. it's a man playing the drums for 24 hours. �* . it's a man playing the drums for 24 hours. �* , ., ., ., it's a man playing the drums for 24 hours. �*, ., ., ., �*, hours. it's more than that. it's hard work- _ hours. it's more than that. it's hard work. that's _ hours. it's more than that. it's hard work. that's what - hours. it's more than that. it's hard work. that's what i'm - hours. it's more than that. it's - hard work. that's what i'm saying. it's extraordinary. _ it's a gruelling challenge,
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so he's been training hard to make sure he's match fit. let's take a look... hello, good morning everyone. this is what your average day looks like for me at the moment in the run—up to the bbc breakfast breakfast drumathon. breakfast is a bit boring. peanut butter on toast. fanny�*s often here keeping me company. this is my training plan., so i'm going to take this now and go to the gym. workout number one for the day done. get changed. and then get on the drums. this, as you can see, is the actual drum kit that i will be using for the drumathon. it's an electric drum kit like mine, and interestingly this drum kit was used by duran duran. drumming. my hands are getting used to it. i've got these things forming now, these calluses. it's really hard putting all this stuff around a job, and also around the training. to be honest, i don't think i will ever be
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fully ready for the drumathon, so i need to be as ready as i possibly can, i suppose. i'm just looking at my weather stuff now for today, so just catching up on the briefing this morning and we also have weather warnings in force so i need to know what is going on there and i need to start working on my graphics for tonight's north west tonight. fanny is always keeping an eye on things making sure iam working. morning everyone, while some of us have seen some heavy and persistent spells of rain over the past !2 hours... this is a cure and when we get weather fronts they move quickly, but it's lethargic and not really going anywhere. i am home after doing the weather north west tonight and there is aaron, my wonderful husband. hello. aaron is basically doing everything at the moment, aren't you? all the cooking, cleaning, everything. i've just had my dinner and watched some tv, but i'm going to practise on the drums
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now, which is this, my practice pad. when i'm not playing songs, i will be doing 4—4, which is the kind of really basic drumbeat. i'm going back to work now because i'm presenting on radio 2 will this week. here we are, back at media dity in the rain. drums go in there, radio in here. hello, dan. dan is my fabulous producer. a bit of little mix playing now. !7 minutes plus to midnight now, feeling good. 0wainjoins us now. what time is it? about five to eight, and that is you and your normal outfits at home, just chilling out? like everyone else? absolutely. you know i like to dress for the occasion, sojust absolutely. you know i like to dress for the occasion, so just getting into my 3—piece suit like i'm at somebody�*s wedding. how are you doing? tlat somebody's wedding. how are you
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doin: ? ., somebody's wedding. how are you doin. ? ., ,., ., somebody's wedding. how are you doin:? ., ., ., somebody's wedding. how are you doin.? ., ., ., ,., somebody's wedding. how are you doin.? ., ., ., ., doing? not bad. how are you doing, more importantly? _ doing? not bad. how are you doing, more importantly? you _ doing? not bad. how are you doing, more importantly? you know- doing? not bad. how are you doing, more importantly? you know what, | more importantly? you know what, it's auoin more importantly? you know what, it's going all _ more importantly? you know what, it's going all right. _ more importantly? you know what, it's going all right. i _ more importantly? you know what, it's going all right. i feel— more importantly? you know what, it's going all right. i feel like - it's going all right. i feel like i'm playing the drum kit all the time pretty much and as i mentioned in the little video diary, the hands are getting used to it because when i was in with you to a couple of weeks ago and showing you my hands, i'm less of the blisters and they are hardening up which is what we want because find running for 24 hours we don't want my hands to be falling apart, darlings, but i'm pretty sure they will be. it's inevitable.— pretty sure they will be. it's inevitable. ., ., , inevitable. you have your playlist almost sorted _ inevitable. you have your playlist almost sorted out _ inevitable. you have your playlist almost sorted out for _ inevitable. you have your playlist almost sorted out for this - inevitable. you have your playlistl almost sorted out for this 24-hour almost sorted out for this 24—hour is. 400 songs? almost sorted out for this 24-hour is- 400 songs?— almost sorted out for this 24-hour is. 400 songs? yes, you know what, it was initially _ is. 400 songs? yes, you know what, it was initially really _ is. 400 songs? yes, you know what, it was initially really fun _ is. 400 songs? yes, you know what, it was initially really fun and - is. 400 songs? yes, you know what, it was initially really fun and 400 - it was initially really fun and 400 songs to play on the drums, it's great, but as time has gone on, i'm like, oh, my gosh, 24 hours a lot a long time so we have a list of about 400 songs and i won't play that many
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but i was finalising the playlist last night so i will be putting it on my social media at some stage in the next couple of days. it's a real mix. we go from rock, heavy metal, p0p, mix. we go from rock, heavy metal, pop, dance, loads of variety and hopefully that will make it more fun to deal with at three in the morning. to deal with at three in the morning-— to deal with at three in the mornin:. �* ~ , ., morning. are you keeping it a secret? are — morning. are you keeping it a secret? are you _ morning. are you keeping it a secret? are you allowed - morning. are you keeping it a secret? are you allowed to i morning. are you keeping it a | secret? are you allowed to say morning. are you keeping it a - secret? are you allowed to say what your opening number is? are you holding it back? i understand if you are in. t holding it back? i understand if you are in. ~ . holding it back? i understand if you are in. ~ , ., , are in. i will keep the opening number a _ are in. i will keep the opening number a secret _ are in. i will keep the opening number a secret but - are in. i will keep the opening number a secret but i - are in. i will keep the opening number a secret but i will- are in. i will keep the opening number a secret but i will do | are in. i will keep the opening i number a secret but i will do that in the studio, so this is where it will be happening and there is a real variety. we are going from britney spears to iron maiden, and thatis britney spears to iron maiden, and that is a handbrake turn, so there is also what's going on but over the next couple of days i will release some bits of information. owain, i know ou some bits of information. owain, i know you are _ some bits of information. owain, i know you are staying _ some bits of information. owain, i know you are staying at _ some bits of information. owain, i know you are staying at home - some bits of information. owain, i know you are staying at home to l some bits of information. owain, i - know you are staying at home to make sure you are as fit and healthy as
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possible ahead of the challenge, but do you have neighbours, and how do they feel? this is the electric drum kit so you don't hear it as much? that's right. this is the electric drum kit and that's right. this is the electric drum kitand it that's right. this is the electric drum kit and it still makes a bit of noise but not as loud as an acoustic kit. i am very lucky with my neighbours, very lucky, because this thing is really loud even though it's an electric it and i have headphones when i play it, but, yes, i try to stay home as much as possible and i have to come in and do some checks but i'm doing the drumming from here, the weather from here, so thank goodness that my neighbours are patient, that's all i can say. neighbours are patient, that's all i can sa . . . neighbours are patient, that's all i can sa . . , , ., neighbours are patient, that's all i cansa. . , ., can say. owain, we wish you all the best and we — can say. owain, we wish you all the best and we know _ can say. owain, we wish you all the best and we know you _ can say. owain, we wish you all the best and we know you are - can say. owain, we wish you all the best and we know you are on - can say. owain, we wish you all the best and we know you are on the i best and we know you are on the final stages of the training camp, so good luck. final stages of the training camp, so good luck-— final stages of the training camp, so good luck. thank you so much, both. so good luck. thank you so much, both- can't _ so good luck. thank you so much, both- can't get — so good luck. thank you so much, both. can't get rid _ so good luck. thank you so much, both. can't get rid of _ so good luck. thank you so much, both. can't get rid of him. - so good luck. thank you so much, both. can't get rid of him. we - both. can't get rid of him. we wouldn't want _ both. can't get rid of him. we wouldn't want to. _ both. can't get rid of him. we wouldn't want to. if _ both. can't get rid of him. we wouldn't want to. if you - both. can't get rid of him. we wouldn't want to. if you want | both. can't get rid of him. we l wouldn't want to. if you want to both. can't get rid of him. we - wouldn't want to. if you want to get involved, take a look at this. if you'd like to support 0wain's
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drumathon attempt and donate, here is what to do. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today... the hpv vaccine is cutting cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. cancer research calls it a historic moment. labour accuse the conservatives of "wallowing in sleaze", after borisjohnson backed a vote by mp's to block the suspension of former cabinet minister owen paterson. back home safely — the australian toddler cleo smith has spent her first night
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with herfamily since her dramatic rescue. police have released audio of the moment she was found. the racism row engulfing yorkshire county cricket club intensifies. as major sponsors pull out, former england international gary ballance says he regrets using racist language, against his former yorkshire teammate azeem rafiq. are we about to see a rise in interest rates? prices going up mean that's expected to happen today. what does it mean for your pocket? singer tori amos found spiritual healing in the cornish coastline during lockdown which inspired her new album. shejoins us later. good morning. the cold start to the
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day, particularly in central and western areas where there is some frost. for many others it will be dry this sunshine, still feeling cold. all the details later in the programme. it's thursday, the 4th of november. our main story. the first major study looking at the effectiveness of the hpv vaccine has shown it's reducing cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. cancer research uk has described the findings as "historic" — and it's hoped that vaccination could almost eliminate the disease in future. here's more from our health correspondent dominic hughes. almost all cases of cervical cancer are linked to the human papillomavirus. the hpv vaccine programme targeting the virus itself was introduced in the uk in 2008, when girls aged between !! and 13 were first offered the jab. and since september 2019, boys of the same age have also been eligible. now, the first real world study of the vaccine shows it's had a dramatic effect.
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cervical cancer rates were 87% lower in girls who were offered the vaccine when aged !2 and 13. it's estimated that by mid—2019, the hpvjab programme had prevented around 450 cervical cancers, and around 17,200 precancers, all of which would have needed some medical intervention. this study looked at people who both had the vaccine for hpv and were screened by cervical cancer. so cervical screening still remains important. as the vaccine gets taken up, more and more people are vaccinated, we might see changes to what the screening programme looks like. so that might be how often you go in, or what the test looks like. but for now, it's still really important that if you're invited to cervical screening to consider going. currently, cervical cancer claims the lives of around 850 women in the uk every year. but the researchers believe that in the future, a combination of the vaccine and screening
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could mean hardly anyone goes on to develop the disease. they say it's a testament to the power of science to protect the lives of thousands of women. dominic hughes, bbc news. labour has accused the conservative party of "wallowing in sleaze" after downing street pushed through a vote to hold a review of parliamentary standards investigations. it means the suspension of conservative mp owen paterson has been put on hold. our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, is in glasgow for cop26, but adam, that goings—on in the house of commons yesterday are important. we be need some explanation from you. one conservative mp was due to be censured and that has been delayed. it is quite complicated.—
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it is quite complicated. actually some in government _ it is quite complicated. actually some in government think - it is quite complicated. actually some in government think what happened yesterday distracts from what happens here in glasgow, which some think should be a bigger deal. owen paterson, conservative mp, former minister, was paid by tea companies to work for them, which he is allowed to do as an mp. the independent standards watchdog in parliament and parliament standards committee, made up of mps, found he broke the rules he overstepped the line with his lobbying and they recommended he be suspended from parliament for 30 days. normally that has to be approved by a vote in the house of commons. a group of conservative mps backed up eventually by the government instead voted that they should be an opportunity to change the system for how mps are disciplined. they will now be a new committee to look into that. it has proved to be very controversial and one of the by—products of it is the owen paterson case has been paused. rather than him being voted to be
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suspended for 30 days, it has been paused and there is an investigation into the entire system. taste paused and there is an investigation into the entire system.— into the entire system. we were s-ueakin into the entire system. we were speaking to _ into the entire system. we were speaking to labour— into the entire system. we were speaking to labour mp - into the entire system. we were speaking to labour mp kim - into the entire system. we were speaking to labour mp kim led l into the entire system. we were i speaking to labour mp kim led beta earlier on. it is my understanding that it was a free vote that there was actually a three line whip. t5 was actually a three line whip. t3 that the case? this is getting very technical and very parliamentary procedure. it was a three line whip which is when the government says to conservative mps, you had to vote for this. actually !3 conservative mps felt so strongly on the other direction they voted against the government. what will happen now is there will be a new parliamentary committee set up to investigate what the new system should look like in the new system should look like in the future. the government says there should be an extra layer in there, which would be an appeals process for mps and guilty of breaching the rules committee basically get another go. it is
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proving to be very controversial and labour and the snp say they will boycott this whole investigation into a new system. there is some quite strong language being used by the labour party. keir starmer calls all of this corruption and here is how one labour mp described it. politicians need to be held to account, _ politicians need to be held to account, we need to behave appropriately. what we have seen from _ appropriately. what we have seen from the — appropriately. what we have seen from the situation is not all mps do. from the situation is not all mps do you — from the situation is not all mps do. you cannot have a set of rules, you break— do. you cannot have a set of rules, you break them and then try to change — you break them and then try to change them. that is what try to happen— change them. that is what try to happen yesterday. this change them. that is what try to happen yesterday.— change them. that is what try to happen yesterday. this has provoked ve stron: happen yesterday. this has provoked very strong feelings _ happen yesterday. this has provoked very strong feelings in _ happen yesterday. this has provoked very strong feelings in parliament i very strong feelings in parliament and it will ramble on for a few months. we are now in a process of looking at changes to the rules for how mps are monitored. as always, a very good explanation of the complicated subject. thank you very much. a four—year—old girl who was rescued !8 days after going missing from a campsite in western australia has spent herfirst night
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at home with her parents. cleo smith was discovered in a locked house on tuesday. in the last few hours, police have released new audio of the moment she was found — as shaimaa khalil reports. the moment cleo smith was rescued, and the moment she identified herself to the officers. the four—year—old was found in a room when police smashed into a locked house not farfrom her family's home in the western australian town of carnarvon. cleo vanished from her family's tent while camping at the popular tourist spot of quobba blowholes on the western australian coast. her story gripped australia and sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. a $! million reward offered
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for information on her whereabouts. a 36—year—old man remains in police custody after twice being taken to hospital for self—inflicted wounds. a very large investigation under way at the moment. the first part was to find cleo but now it is to understand what happened in those !8 days, what offences occurred. obviously kidnapping was one child stealing will be one. it is to piece together the !8 days forensically and painstakingly going through that. that women talking to cleo herself, interviewing the 36—year—old man which is currently being done at the moment. collecting all the information around the house where she was found. more details have yet to emerge about the case and the events leading to her rescue. but authorities have said for the time being the investigation is ongoing and little
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cleo is doing well, enjoying her time being back with herfamily, after more than two weeks of separation. the ongoing dispute over fishing rights will be discussed in fresh talks between the uk and france later. earlier this week, france suspended its threat to target british trade — and yesterday a british trawler was released after a week's detention in le havre. the brexit minister lord frost is due in paris later to meet with french officials. carolyn is alongside some really amazing pictures from scotland. now they have changed. —— carol is alongside. i had taken new to the library. in the next half—an—hour i will show you lots of pictures from scotland and northern ireland. there is a chance tonight some of us could also see them. today we have a chilly breeze and also sunny spells.
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it will probably be the coldest day this week. more sunshine. drier than yesterday but still when wed case we are likely to see further showers. some of them blowing inland. you can see them in the south—east and also through west wales, south—west england and western wales and northern ireland. the black circles represent the strength of the wind gas. it will be windy, publicly on the north sea coastline. that will accentuate the cold feel of the day generally. temperatures lower than yesterday. we are looking at seven to 13 yesterday. we are looking at seven to !3 degrees. this evening and overnight a weather front coming in across the north west late afternoon, bringing patchy rain with it. that will slip southwards. there are some holes in the cloud. get outside and have a look if you are interested in the northern lights, you might be lucky. further south, we stay with the skies. it will hold. in some sheltered, will areas it could for 2—2. into tomorrow we
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start off on a sunny note in the south. the weather front will eventually make its way down towards the south with cloud and the odd spot of rain. nowhere near as windy on the north sea coastline. the wind changing direction stop it will become a milder direction. temperatures attach so not as cold as today. sorry, you can hear the chatter. we have an important and positive story to talk about this morning. let's return to our top story — the first major study looking at the effectiveness of the hpv vaccine shows it's reducing cases of cervical cancer by almost 90%. we'rejoined now by laura flaherty, who was diagnosed with the disease in 2016, and also kate sanger from jo's cervical cancer trust. very good morning to you. the reason we were talking just a moment ago as the cameras came to us, this
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matters, doesn't it? this is very personal to you. would you share your story a little bit? tett personal to you. would you share your story a little bit?— your story a little bit? tell us what happened. _ your story a little bit? tell us what happened. i _ your story a little bit? tell us what happened. i was - your story a little bit? tell us i what happened. i was diagnosed your story a little bit? tell us - what happened. i was diagnosed with cervical cancer at 29 after a routine smear test. it shows how important it is to keep up—to—date with your smears. i was told i had abnormal cells. i tested positive for hpv and there would need to be further investigation. the investigation revealed i had stage i cervical cancer which resulted in a hysterectomy at 29. {etc cervical cancer which resulted in a hysterectomy at 29.— hysterectomy at 29. ok. take us throu~h hysterectomy at 29. ok. take us through the _ hysterectomy at 29. ok. take us through the next _ hysterectomy at 29. ok. take us through the next part. _ hysterectomy at 29. ok. take us through the next part. sorry. it. hysterectomy at 29. ok. take us| through the next part. sorry. it is emotional— through the next part. sorry. it is emotional for _ through the next part. sorry. it is emotional for you. _ through the next part. sorry. it is emotional for you. take - through the next part. sorry. it is emotional for you. take us - through the next part. cr it is emotional for you. take us through what happened next. tt is emotional for you. take us through what happened next.— what happened next. it is the old clich . i what happened next. it is the old clich - l was _ what happened next. it is the old clich . i was sat _ what happened next. it is the old clich . i was sat in _ what happened next. it is the old clich . i was sat in a _ what happened next. it is the old clich . i was sat in a room - what happened next. it is the old clich . i was sat in a room and i i clich. i was sat in a room and i was told, i am really sorry, it is cancer. i had two small children a neighbour at the forefront of my
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mind. i said, neighbour at the forefront of my mind. isaid, i need you neighbour at the forefront of my mind. i said, i need you to save me, they are so young, they were not remember me if i die. he said to me, i'm going to look after you, don't worry. it came out of nowhere, i had no symptoms. it shows how important the screening is. i went on to have my hysterectomy and was told i was all clear, which is fantastic. hogs all clear, which is fantastic. how lona was all clear, which is fantastic. how long was the _ all clear, which is fantastic. how long was the whole _ all clear, which is fantastic. how long was the whole process? i i all clear, which is fantastic. how i long was the whole process? i went for a smear — long was the whole process? i went for a smear in _ long was the whole process? i went for a smear in february _ long was the whole process? i went for a smear in february and - long was the whole process? i went for a smear in february and was i for a smear in february and was given the all clear at the end of august. 50 given the all clear at the end of auust. ., given the all clear at the end of au~ust. ., ., , given the all clear at the end of au~ust. . ., , ~ august. so a few months. all quite recent, august. so a few months. all quite recent. isn't _ august. so a few months. all quite recent, isn't it? _ august. so a few months. all quite recent, isn't it? i— august. so a few months. all quite recent, isn't it? i don't— august. so a few months. all quite recent, isn't it? i don't think- august. so a few months. all quite recent, isn't it? i don't think i - recent, isn't it? i don't think! would be _ recent, isn't it? i don't think! would be human _ recent, isn't it? i don't think! would be human if— recent, isn't it? i don't think! would be human if i _ recent, isn't it? i don't think! would be human ifi didn't i recent, isn't it? i don't think i| would be human ifi didn't get would be human if i didn't get emotional about it now. itjust shows how important it is. i only have to speak about my children. i always feel so lucky to be here. even when they are driving me mad, i think i am so lucky. haifa even when they are driving me mad, i think i am so lucky.— think i am so lucky. how old are they now? _ think i am so lucky. how old are they now? 11— think i am so lucky. how old are they now? 11 and _ think i am so lucky. how old are they now? 11 and seven - think i am so lucky. how old are they now? 11 and seven going i think i am so lucky. how old are| they now? 11 and seven going on think i am so lucky. how old are i they now? 11 and seven going on 17. eve da they now? 11 and seven going on 17. everyday is — they now? 11 and seven going on 17.
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everyday is a _ they now? 11 and seven going on 17. everyday is a bonus _ they now? 11 and seven going on 17. everyday is a bonus day. _ they now? 11 and seven going on 17. everyday is a bonus day. it - they now? 11 and seven going on 17. everyday is a bonus day. it is - they now? 11 and seven going on 17. everyday is a bonus day. it is so - everyday is a bonus day. it is so important isn't it that stories like are told. where you offered the hpv vaccine? tt are told. where you offered the hpv vaccine? . �* , ., ., vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out when i was _ vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out when i was at _ vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out when i was at school. _ vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out when i was at school. so - vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out when i was at school. so now - vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out when i was at school. so now it i vaccine? it hadn't been rolled out i when i was at school. so now it has. the questions _ when i was at school. so now it has. the questions are, _ when i was at school. so now it has. the questions are, who _ when i was at school. so now it has. the questions are, who gets - the questions are, who gets offered it? when do you get offered and that no long? tt it? when do you get offered and that no lona ? . it? when do you get offered and that no lona ? , ., ' it? when do you get offered and that nolonu? , ,. , no long? it gets offered in schools, 11, 12 no long? it gets offered in schools, 11. 12 years — no long? it gets offered in schools, 11. 12 years of _ no long? it gets offered in schools, 11, 12 years of age. _ no long? it gets offered in schools, 11, 12 years of age. it _ no long? it gets offered in schools, 11, 12 years of age. it gets - no long? it gets offered in schools, 11, 12 years of age. it gets offered l 11, 12 years of age. it gets offered to girts _ 11, 12 years of age. it gets offered to girts as— 11, 12 years of age. it gets offered to girls as well as boys around age 11 to to girls as well as boys around age it to 12~ _ to girls as well as boys around age it to 12~ it— to girls as well as boys around age it to 12~ it is— to girls as well as boys around age 11 to 12. it is a two dose vaccination. if you are a girl who has not — vaccination. if you are a girl who has not had _ vaccination. if you are a girl who has not had a vaccination guy if you're — has not had a vaccination guy if you're under 25, you can still access— you're under 25, you can still access it _ you're under 25, you can still access it at _ you're under 25, you can still access it at your gp.- you're under 25, you can still access it at your gp. why can't a woman over _ access it at your gp. why can't a woman over the _ access it at your gp. why can't a woman over the age _ access it at your gp. why can't a woman over the age of - access it at your gp. why can't a woman over the age of 25 - access it at your gp. why can't a woman over the age of 25 in - access it at your gp. why can't a woman over the age of 25 in her| access it at your gp. why can't a - woman over the age of 25 in her 40s now go for the vaccine?— now go for the vaccine? evidence shows giving _ now go for the vaccine? evidence shows giving vaccination - now go for the vaccine? evidence shows giving vaccination around i now go for the vaccine? evidence | shows giving vaccination around 11 or 12 _ shows giving vaccination around 11 or 12 is _ shows giving vaccination around 11 or 12 is the — shows giving vaccination around 11 or 12 is the best time to ensure the maximum — or 12 is the best time to ensure the maximum protection. is many because at that— maximum protection. is many because at that age _ maximum protection. is many because at that age your chance to being exposed — at that age your chance to being exposed to h pb is extremely low. there _ exposed to h pb is extremely low. there is— exposed to h pb is extremely low. there is research looking at whether we could _ there is research looking at whether we could give it to women over 25
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but obviously we need to wait for the research to show what the evidences of that before it is offered _ evidences of that before it is offered on the nhs. just evidences of that before it is offered on the nhs. just talk us throu~h. offered on the nhs. just talk us through- i _ offered on the nhs. just talk us through. i mentioned _ offered on the nhs. just talk us through. i mentioned on - offered on the nhs. just talk us through. i mentioned on the i offered on the nhs. just talk us - through. i mentioned on the leading, an extraordinary percentage success rate. talk is three what that means in practice. rate. talk is three what that means in ractice. . rate. talk is three what that means in practice-— in practice. this study is amazing. -- talk us — in practice. this study is amazing. -- talk us through. _ in practice. this study is amazing. -- talk us through. it _ in practice. this study is amazing. -- talk us through. it is _ in practice. this study is amazing. -- talk us through. it is the - in practice. this study is amazing. -- talk us through. it is the first i —— talk us through. it is the first real— —— talk us through. it is the first real evidence will impact at the vaccine — real evidence will impact at the vaccine. we have never had that link realty _ vaccine. we have never had that link really demonstrated before. hopefully what it will show little teenagers, parents, people who are unsure _ teenagers, parents, people who are unsure about the vaccine will have questions — unsure about the vaccine will have questions that the vaccines really do work— questions that the vaccines really do work and the hpv vaccination can stop cervical — do work and the hpv vaccination can stop cervical cancer from developing in many— stop cervical cancer from developing in many cases and can save lives, that is— in many cases and can save lives, that is such — in many cases and can save lives, that is such an exciting thing. how does it know _ that is such an exciting thing. how does it know that _ that is such an exciting thing. firm-o" does it know that cervical cancer would have developed? taste does it know that cervical cancer would have developed? we don't know. i amt inc would have developed? we don't know. i am trying to — would have developed? we don't know. i am trying to figure _ would have developed? we don't know. i am trying to figure how— would have developed? we don't know. i am trying to figure how you _ would have developed? we don't know. i am trying to figure how you know- i am trying to figure how you know it would have prevented 90% of
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cases. tt it would have prevented 9096 of cases. . it would have prevented 9096 of cases. , ., it would have prevented 9096 of cases. . ., ., ~' cases. it is modelling work. the researchers _ cases. it is modelling work. the researchers have _ cases. it is modelling work. the researchers have looked - cases. it is modelling work. the researchers have looked at - cases. it is modelling work. the researchers have looked at the l researchers have looked at the cohort — researchers have looked at the cohort since the vaccination was introduced — cohort since the vaccination was introduced in 2008 and it has been a [on- introduced in 2008 and it has been a long study— introduced in 2008 and it has been a long study to make sure we can tell people _ long study to make sure we can tell people the — long study to make sure we can tell people the real solid evidence of the fact— people the real solid evidence of the fact it — people the real solid evidence of the fact it has prevented... it will have _ the fact it has prevented... it will have prevented these cases from presenting. have prevented these cases from presenting-— have prevented these cases from -~resentin. ., ., , ., presenting. you come at this from two oints presenting. you come at this from two points of— presenting. you come at this from two points of view. _ presenting. you come at this from two points of view. you _ presenting. you come at this from two points of view. you are - presenting. you come at this from two points of view. you are a - presenting. you come at this from i two points of view. you are a cancer survivor yourself to your children are coming up to the edge when they would be eligible for the vaccine. do you have those conversations with them? ~ , , , , ., , them? with my eldest, yes. he has 'ust them? with my eldest, yes. he has just started — them? with my eldest, yes. he has just started high — them? with my eldest, yes. he has just started high school. _ them? with my eldest, yes. he has just started high school. i _ them? with my eldest, yes. he has just started high school. i want - them? with my eldest, yes. he has just started high school. i want him| just started high school. i want him to be to what vaccine he is having, why he is having it. i have always been really open with them about my story. the word is slated around the house anyway. when i was diagnosed, i had never heard of hpv and what it
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was until i got that letter. he will be well educated on why he is having and what it is full.— and what it is full. people sometimes _ and what it is full. people sometimes are _ and what it is full. people sometimes are worried, i and what it is full. people i sometimes are worried, and and what it is full. people - sometimes are worried, and that is perfectly legitimate to ask those questions. what about take—up? is there a reluctance from people? the hpv vaccination uptake is relatively hi-h hpv vaccination uptake is relatively high in _ hpv vaccination uptake is relatively high in the — hpv vaccination uptake is relatively high in the uk, around 86% take at the vaccine — high in the uk, around 86% take at the vaccine. that does hide certain groups— the vaccine. that does hide certain groups with — the vaccine. that does hide certain groups with certain areas where it is tower~ — groups with certain areas where it is lower. we are living at a time when _ is lower. we are living at a time when vaccinations are very much in the public— when vaccinations are very much in the public eye. there is lots of hesitancy _ the public eye. there is lots of hesitancy and mistrust of vaccinations. he had to be really mindful— vaccinations. he had to be really mindful of— vaccinations. he had to be really mindful of the impact of the covid vaccination programme. we cannot take away the _ vaccination programme. we cannot take away the importance - vaccination programme. we cannot take away the importance of - vaccination programme. we cannot take away the importance of still i take away the importance of still having cervical smears. as he said, even though yours was delayed by three or four months, that wouldn't have made a difference. regular smear tests, have made a difference. regular smeartests, i have made a difference. regular smear tests, i assume you are having
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days. smear tests, i assume you are having da s. ., ., ., ., days. even though i have had a hysterectomy. _ days. even though i have had a hysterectomy. l— days. even though i have had a hysterectomy, i still— days. even though i have had a hysterectomy, i still go - days. even though i have had a hysterectomy, i still go for- days. even though i have had a i hysterectomy, i still go for regular smear_ hysterectomy, i still go for regular smear tests. hysterectomy, i still go for regular smeartests. it hysterectomy, i still go for regular smear tests. it doesn't get any easier. _ smear tests. it doesn't get any easier. i— smear tests. it doesn't get any easier. i don't feel any less embarrassed when i go but i know the importance _ embarrassed when i go but i know the importance of going now.— importance of going now. obviously in terms of medical— importance of going now. obviously in terms of medical health, - importance of going now. obviously in terms of medical health, they - in terms of medical health, they start busily later on in life but thatis start busily later on in life but that is still being pushed forward. evenif that is still being pushed forward. even if you have had the vaccination, no vaccine is 100% effective. it is still important to go for the screening, whether not you have had the vaccine.- go for the screening, whether not you have had the vaccine. thank you so much. you have had the vaccine. thank you so much- a — you have had the vaccine. thank you so much. a great _ you have had the vaccine. thank you so much. a great story. _ you have had the vaccine. thank you so much. a great story. the - you have had the vaccine. thank you so much. a great story. the children will be watching this morning. yes. will be watching this morning. yes, the well. will be watching this morning. yes, they well. embarrassed. _ will be watching this morning. yes, they well. embarrassed. what - will be watching this morning. yes, l they well. embarrassed. what should they well. embarrassed. what should the be they well. embarrassed. what should they be doing — they well. embarrassed. what should they be doing this _ they well. embarrassed. what should they be doing this morning? - they well. embarrassed. what should they be doing this morning? i'm - they be doing this morning? i'm hoinu they be doing this morning? i'm hoping they will all have left. , otherwise _ hoping they will all have left. , otherwise dad has done a bad job this morning. otherwise dad has done a bad 'ob this morningfi otherwise dad has done a bad 'ob this morninsfi otherwise dad has done a bad 'ob
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this morning. thank you so much. interest rates _ this morning. thank you so much. interest rates have _ this morning. thank you so much. interest rates have been - this morning. thank you so much. interest rates have been laid - this morning. thank you so much. interest rates have been laid for. this morning. thank you so much. interest rates have been laid for ai interest rates have been [aid for a very long time. if it changes it could cause people problems. it is something the bank of england notes on regularly. what's so important about interest rates? well, they are used by banks and building societies to set the interest on our savings, and loans. they go up; we pay more on our debt. they go down; we have more to spend.so why might rates be going up? it's because the cost of living has been rising. inflation — which tracks price increases — reached 3.1% in september. and is predicted to rise to li% by the end of the year. that's much higher than the bank of england would like. here's why. the bank of england is worried about an inflationary spiral where costs io an inflationary spiral where costs 90 up. _ an inflationary spiral where costs go up, people demand a an inflationary spiral where costs 90 up. people demand a pay an inflationary spiral where costs go up, people demand a pay rise. that pushes company costs up and you -et a that pushes company costs up and you get a vicious _ that pushes company costs up and you get a vicious circle. what the bank tries— get a vicious circle. what the bank tries to _ get a vicious circle. what the bank tries to do — get a vicious circle. what the bank
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tries to do about that is raise interest— tries to do about that is raise interest rates. suddenly it cost more _ interest rates. suddenly it cost more to— interest rates. suddenly it cost more to borrow money. better to put money _ more to borrow money. better to put money into _ more to borrow money. better to put money into a _ more to borrow money. better to put money into a savings account. demand starts _ money into a savings account. demand starts to _ money into a savings account. demand starts to slow and hopefully inflation slows as well. we've sort of got used to low interest rates — but who remembers black wednesday when they reached 12%? before that they'd been bubbling around 10%. then in the '90s, dropped to about 5% before the 2009 crisis slashed them right down to encourage spending. today, because of lockdown and again to encourage spending at 0.1% rates are lower than they've ever been in the bank of england's 325—year history. we don't expect a rise anywhere near the '80s or '90s. but last week, government advisors said rates could reach 0.75% by the end of 2023. interest rate rises are good for some and not others. for example, those with mortgages may have to pay more. those on fixed rate deals will have to see what happens when they renew their deal. but for those on variables —
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it could hurt. if you had a mortgage of £200,000 over 20 years, with a variable interest rate ofjust under li%, the small increase predicted today would see your monthly payments go up £15. it is huge for those about to take out a mortgage. irate it is huge for those about to take out a mortgage-— it is huge for those about to take out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ato out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ago and — out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ago and now— out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ago and now has _ out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ago and now has been - out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ago and now has been a - out a mortgage. we sold our house a while ago and now has been a short i while ago and now has been a short delay— while ago and now has been a short delay on— while ago and now has been a short delay on purchasing a new one. in the meantime interest rates are looking — the meantime interest rates are looking likely to arrive. we received _ looking likely to arrive. we received an agreement in principle along _ received an agreement in principle along with — received an agreement in principle along with a couple of mortgage offers _ along with a couple of mortgage offers with fixed rates of several months — offers with fixed rates of several months ago and those rates have now expired _ months ago and those rates have now expired we _ months ago and those rates have now expired. we are anticipating we'll look expired. we are anticipating we'll took at _ expired. we are anticipating we'll took at a — expired. we are anticipating we'll look at a high rate of interest on the mortgage we will be taking next which _ the mortgage we will be taking next which witt— the mortgage we will be taking next which will likely impact on the amount— which will likely impact on the amount we will have to pay on a monthly— amount we will have to pay on a monthly basis. with higher repayments but that may well in turn affect _ repayments but that may well in turn affect the _ repayments but that may well in turn affect the amount we can borrow. what _ affect the amount we can borrow. what about savings?
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well, you'd think it would lead to an increase in interest. but it takes longer for that to filter through. so even if we see that rise today it will remain a pretty flat time for those fortunate enough to have savings. so will it happen today? well, can you hear those bells jingling? the latestjohn lewis advert is out. this year it's a little boy befriending a space traveller and introducing them to christmas for the first time. that means the countdown has started and it does put pressure on the bank to raise those rates today in november, because waiting until december would be a bit bah—humbug. the expectation is labelled to it at noon. imagine being a bit bar humbug! noon. imagine being a bit bar humbut! noon. imagine being a bit bar humbug! filth! iwas noon. imagine being a bit bar humbug! filth! i was doing noon. imagine being a bit bar humbug! filth! iwas doing it noon. imagine being a bit bar humbug! filth! i was doing it business humbug! oh! i was doing it business item where we had to open christmas presents and you are not playing the
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game. i presents and you are not playing the tame. ., �* presents and you are not playing the tame, ., �* . ., presents and you are not playing the tame. ., �* . presents and you are not playing the tame. .,�* . . game. i don't recall that battle and i am actually _ game. i don't recall that battle and i am actually profoundly _ game. i don't recall that battle and i am actually profoundly hurt. - i am actually profoundly hurt. profoundly. i will do the betting and be0n charlie's side that i think he is far more about christmas than i am. . . he is far more about christmas than i am. . , ., . i am. that is not hard either. goodbye. — i am. that is not hard either. goodbye, nina. _ i am. that is not hard either. goodbye, nina. let's- i am. that is not hard either. goodbye, nina. let's see - i am. that is not hard either. i goodbye, nina. let's see what i am. that is not hard either. - goodbye, nina. let's see what is coming up. the singer tori amos willjoin us on the sofa to talk about writing a new album in lockdown and how she fell in love with cornwall. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning i'm sonja jessup. hertfordshire county council has written to parents and carers recommending children should wear face coverings at all times in secondary schools. that�*s not what official government guidance says— but the local authority says it's
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in response to the rising number of covid cases in the uk— particularly among young people. they're also asking all staff in early years, special, primary and secondary schools to wear them when in contact with other adults. london fire brigade has unveiled three new fire engines, each equipped with one of the tallest ladders in europe. the brigade has introduced new equipment and changed its response to the way it deals with fires in high rise buildings, following criticism over the grenfell tower disaster. these new ladders can reach the top of a 20—floor building in about a minute and come with a lift to help rescue residents. so once at the top, three people can be taken into the lift and brought to safety down at ground level, and at the bottom they are met by the support pump crew and they usher them to safety and the lift can be returned to the top of the ladder to assist more people at the top of the building. a grand theatre in south east london
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which survived a direct bombing during the second world war has been put on historic england's latest "at risk register". streatham hill theatre is currently used as a bingo hall? experts say it needs major repairs. but among the 32 sites which are declared "saved" are battersea power station and the royal arsenal conservation area in woowich. let's see how the tube is running this morning. thankfully we're hearing the problems on the metropolitan line have now cleared up, but we still have severe delays on the piccadilly line between acton town and heathrow airport and uxbridge and you can keep up to date with the travel news on your bbc local radio station. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling less chilly compared to yesterday and a bit more a breeze over night which prevented any frost from forming and reduced the risk of mist and fog. it's a largely cloudy start with maybe some showers moving south and feeding in on the northerly breeze and the breeze will feel quite chilly and fewer showers this afternoon and a few bright spells potentially with temperatures between eight and 10 c but if you
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factor in the wind it will feel colder. overnight the wind will fall a bit lighter with clear skies, light winds and temperatures will drop again. it will be a chilly night with the minimum of low single figures if not zero, so again the chances are you might get some frost first thing on friday morning but it is a bright start to friday and some sunshine around but more cloud feeling south through the afternoon and the westerly breeze as the high—pressure slips and the westerly breeze will replace the cold air with something a little milder as we head through the weekend. of course it is bonfire night and tomorrow night it looks dry and cloudy and the wind reasonably night and saturday night if you're across the weekend celebrating it's looking dry, largely cloudy but also a bit more of a breeze. i'm back in half an hour. do check out our website for much more (that's at the usual address)— now it's back to charlie and naga— bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. i'm just going to introduce our guest first. dominic walker is here and you are talking about a very special thing, an award that she received last night, but you just said, who are you? which i absolutely love. what she said was, i'm sorry, what's your name? i do watch, but what is your name. i loved the fact you did not ask what my name was. we will chat in a moment. get a cup of coffee or a drink of water. we will explain all. we don't know our own names. 'morning live' follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store with kimberley and rev. lam sure i am sure they are far more together. i am sure they are far more together-— i am sure they are far more totether. ., , ,, ., together. don't worry, i know your name.
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coming up on morning live, they've been dubbed the so called "menopause warriors" after davina mccall and penny lancaster joined campaigners outside parliament to demand better support for women going through the "change of life". today, we'll hearfrom presenter zoe hardman and her ex england rugby player husband paul, who had to make a life changing decision when she went through the menopause atjust 37. plus as 190 countries vow to phase out fuel. _ plus as 190 countries vow to phase out fuel. we — plus as 190 countries vow to phase out fuel, we are live in the conference in glasgow as geffen is riding _ conference in glasgow as geffen is riding the — conference in glasgow as geffen is riding the latest environmentally friendly— riding the latest environmentally friendly transport powerjust by hydrogen. and you might think your home's a safe space from pollution, but there can be dangerous toxins in the air produced by things like paint and even your sofa! thankfully, mark lane's here to tell us how plants can help. i will be here because they can purify— i will be here because they can purify the _ i will be here because they can purify the air— i will be here because they can purify the air in _ i will be here because they can purify the air in your— i will be here because they can purify the air in your home - i will be here because they can purify the air in your home and i will be here because they can - purify the air in your home and just by having _ purify the air in your home and just by having one _ purify the air in your home and just by having one of— purify the air in your home and just by having one of these _ purify the air in your home and just by having one of these beauties . purify the air in your home and just by having one of these beauties ini by having one of these beauties in your home — by having one of these beauties in your home they— by having one of these beauties in your home they can _ by having one of these beauties in your home they can improve - by having one of these beauties in your home they can improve the l by having one of these beauties in. your home they can improve the air quality— your home they can improve the air quality by— your home they can improve the air quality by 45%~ _ your home they can improve the air quality by 4596-— quality by 4596. that is so
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interesting. _ also coming up, diwali, the festival of light starts today and it's bonfire night tomorrow. so anna haugh's teaming up with chef maunika gowardhan to serve up traditional sweet treats that are easy to make if you're celebrating this weekend. plus, we'll be live on the road with matt baker as he teams up with another inspirational young person to ride the rickshaw for children in need. and if you're looking for a laugh. mock the week star hugh dennis, will be helping us see the funny side to this week's biggest headlines. we'll see you at 9:15. let's do the proper introductions. for the past 16 years, gee walker has devoted her life to promoting racial harmony in communities across the uk. it's all in the name of her teenage son, anthony, who was murdered in a violent racist attack in liverpool in 2005. she's now been recognised for her work — with a special award at this year's pride of britain ceremony. shejoins us now, along with her daughter, dominique. good morning to both of you. i feel
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we have broken the ice, this morning, which is always good. gee, congratulations on your award, first of all. how did it feel to be in that very public environment, because it is a huge event, pride of britain, and quite rightly a lot of respect for what you have done, so how did it feel?— how did it feel? scary, surreal and i thoutht how did it feel? scary, surreal and i thought my _ how did it feel? scary, surreal and i thought my kids _ how did it feel? scary, surreal and i thought my kids were _ how did it feel? scary, surreal and i thought my kids were cranking i how did it feel? scary, surreal and l i thought my kids were cranking me and as kyle might tell you later on, she had to phone me up to confirm that it wasn't a joke. but it is an honour to be recognised for the work we do, because it's not easy. it is continuous and it is sad. but we do what we have to do, so thank you for appreciating and recognising what we do, and i salute you, thank you. what you do, tell those who are
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watching, what are you doing in anthony's name?— watching, what are you doing in anthony's name? when anthony happened. _ anthony's name? when anthony happened. we — anthony's name? when anthony happened, we had _ anthony's name? when anthony happened, we had choices - anthony's name? when anthony happened, we had choices to - anthony's name? when anthony - happened, we had choices to make, how do we 7 either we carry on in the vein of hate or we carry on, and thank god for the people of liverpool who have been avid supporters and if it wasn't for them we would not be where we are today. the school supports us, the fundraisers, they take the lead and all of the others, too many to name and the local people, you name it, they come out in support of us to do what we do and the sad thing about it is that this is the 21st—century and we are still talking about racism. so that is the sad part about it and there is a need for us and you would be surprised to see
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how much, and i'm getting all emotional. she will explain. it’s emotional. she will explain. it's important- _ emotional. she will explain. it's important. we get emotional because it is important. you are absolutely right and i can see you are getting upset. in the 21st century, there is no way they should be a need to educate people or to change attitudes, and dominique, you must be so proud. i attitudes, and dominique, you must be so proud-— attitudes, and dominique, you must be so proud. i am. i am so proud. to be so proud. i am. i am so proud. to be honest. — be so proud. i am. i am so proud. to be honest. the _ be so proud. i am. i am so proud. to be honest, the team, _ be so proud. i am. i am so proud. to be honest, the team, carol, - be so proud. i am. i am so proud. to be honest, the team, carol, sarah, l be honest, the team, carol, sarah, alexi _ be honest, the team, carol, sarah, alexi the _ be honest, the team, carol, sarah, alex, the team who helped me orchestrate with my siblings this surprise — orchestrate with my siblings this sur-rise. . . orchestrate with my siblings this sur-rise. . , ., surprise. this is the pride of britain awards. _ surprise. this is the pride of britain awards. yes, - surprise. this is the pride of britain awards. yes, i - surprise. this is the pride of britain awards. yes, i spoke surprise. this is the pride of i britain awards. yes, i spoke to surprise. this is the pride of - britain awards. yes, i spoke to the team, britain awards. yes, i spoke to the team. nearly _ britain awards. yes, i spoke to the team, nearly every _ britain awards. yes, i spoke to the team, nearly every single - britain awards. yes, i spoke to the team, nearly every single day - britain awards. yes, i spoke to the team, nearly every single day over the last _ team, nearly every single day over the last month or so and i am so proud _ the last month or so and i am so proud of— the last month or so and i am so proud of her— the last month or so and i am so proud of her and i think she is more than deserving of this award. canl than deserving of this award. can i 'ust sa , than deserving of this award. can i just say. we _ than deserving of this award. can i just say. we will— than deserving of this award. can i just say, we will play _ than deserving of this award. can i just say, we will play you - than deserving of this award. can i just say, we will play you getting the award in a moment, but,
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dominique she wasn't too complimentary when she said she thought you were cranking her. is this what happens at home? she is nodding. theyjust wind you up? yes. nodding. they 'ust wind you up? yes, this is what nodding. theyjust wind you up? yes, this is what we _ nodding. theyjust wind you up? yes, this is what we do. _ nodding. theyjust wind you up? yes, this is what we do. let's _ nodding. theyjust wind you up? yes, this is what we do. let's see - nodding. theyjust wind you up? yes, this is what we do. let's see you - this is what we do. let's see you receive this _ this is what we do. let's see you receive this award. _ this is what we do. let's see you receive this award. your- this is what we do. let's see you j receive this award. your capacity this is what we do. let's see you i receive this award. your capacity to take tain receive this award. your capacity to take pain and _ receive this award. your capacity to take pain and turn _ receive this award. your capacity to take pain and turn pain _ receive this award. your capacity to take pain and turn pain into - receive this award. your capacity to take pain and turn pain into hope . take pain and turn pain into hope and action— take pain and turn pain into hope and action is— take pain and turn pain into hope and action is an _ take pain and turn pain into hope and action is an inspiration - take pain and turn pain into hope and action is an inspiration for. and action is an inspiration for every— and action is an inspiration for every single _ and action is an inspiration for every single one _ and action is an inspiration for every single one of _ and action is an inspiration for every single one of us, - and action is an inspiration for every single one of us, and i and action is an inspiration for every single one of us, and iti every single one of us, and it doesn't — every single one of us, and it doesn't matter— every single one of us, and it doesn't matter what- every single one of us, and it doesn't matter what colour, i every single one of us, and it- doesn't matter what colour, creed, gender— doesn't matter what colour, creed, gender we — doesn't matter what colour, creed, gender we are _ doesn't matter what colour, creed, gender we are. you _ doesn't matter what colour, creed, gender we are. you are _ doesn't matter what colour, creed, gender we are. you are an- gender we are. you are an inspiration _ gender we are. you are an inspiration. all— gender we are. you are an inspiration. all i _ gender we are. you are an inspiration. all i can- gender we are. you are an inspiration. all i can do. gender we are. you are an inspiration. all i can do isi gender we are. you are an- inspiration. all i can do is salute you _ inspiration. all i can do is salute ou. y ., inspiration. all i can do is salute ou. ~ ., , , you. do you know, gee, when i see that, you. do you know, gee, when i see that. those — you. do you know, gee, when i see that, those words _ you. do you know, gee, when i see that, those words are _ you. do you know, gee, when i see that, those words are so _ you. do you know, gee, when i see that, those words are so apt, - that, those words are so apt, because for a lot of people it is a fundamental thing you have done and most people think, would i have that in me, if something happened to me, that has happened to your family, would i have that ability to find
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something positive and not get lost in hate or regret or whatever it was, and it's a question a lot of us ask and probably we would come up short if you ask yourself that question. did you know you had that in you? where has it come from? it’s in you? where has it come from? it's no secret i — in you? where has it come from? it�*s no secret i am a christian and i love my children so much. they are my pride and myjoy and a lot of people don't know the journey and struggle i had to have that handed on to me because i had a series of miscarriages and then i thought my children were a gift from god and i embraced them with everything i had, all of the love i give it to them, and to have someone coming and take that away from you, that is huge, so i thank god and i give him thanks for his grace and strength to enable me to carry on. i am thankful that
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we did it early because we have no hating us. and i believe hate killed my son and there is no way i could the love i feel for my children and i am sharing it with others and i thought they would appreciate it. i have no space and i could not let that dominate the space. xyour have no space and i could not let that dominate the space. your mum is re that dominate the space. your mum is pretty remarkable. — that dominate the space. your mum is pretty remarkable, dominique? - that dominate the space. your mum is pretty remarkable, dominique? yes, i pretty remarkable, dominique? yes, she has been — pretty remarkable, dominique? yes, she has been a _ pretty remarkable, dominique? yes, she has been a beacon _ pretty remarkable, dominique? yes, she has been a beacon and is an ambassador for us and is our steward _ ambassador for us and is our steward. and as a proud black woman she has— steward. and as a proud black woman she has instilled that and instilled notions _ she has instilled that and instilled notions of— she has instilled that and instilled notions of love, antiracism and the
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fundamentals of christianity and i think— fundamentals of christianity and i think in— fundamentals of christianity and i think in antiracism in particular, the notion— think in antiracism in particular, the notion of love is something missind — the notion of love is something missing. if you have love for somebody and have love and respect for that _ somebody and have love and respect for that person, definitively you won't _ for that person, definitively you won't disrespect them and you won't use any— won't disrespect them and you won't use any harmful language and you won't _ use any harmful language and you won't cause them pain. and we have to get— won't cause them pain. and we have to get back— won't cause them pain. and we have to get back to love and in the situation _ to get back to love and in the situation with our family and if we can show— situation with our family and if we can show that capacity for our community and show it to everybody, i'm sure _ community and show it to everybody, i'm sure other people can have that capacity— i'm sure other people can have that capacity as — i'm sure other people can have that capacity as well, to love, to dare to love _ capacity as well, to love, to dare to love as — capacity as well, to love, to dare to love as well. because what i am parting _ to love as well. because what i am parting to— to love as well. because what i am parting to my children, i lead by ekampte. — parting to my children, i lead by ekampte. i_ parting to my children, i lead by example, i show them, i don't say do this, example, i show them, i don't say do this. i_ example, i show them, i don't say do this. i show— example, i show them, i don't say do this, i show them, so i'm hoping them _ this, i show them, so i'm hoping them that— this, i show them, so i'm hoping them that the community and others will follow— them that the community and others will follow the example. it is hard,
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peopie _ will follow the example. it is hard, peopie say. — will follow the example. it is hard, people say, but it's not hard, it's easy— people say, but it's not hard, it's easy to _ people say, but it's not hard, it's easy to love. it�*s people say, but it's not hard, it's easy to love-— easy to love. it's easy to hate, sor , easy to love. it's easy to hate, sorry. so _ easy to love. it's easy to hate, sorry. so why _ easy to love. it's easy to hate, sorry, so why not _ easy to love. it's easy to hate, sorry, so why not make - easy to love. it's easy to hate, sorry, so why not make it - easy to love. it's easy to hate, sorry, so why not make it easy easy to love. it's easy to hate, i sorry, so why not make it easy to love as well? it’s sorry, so why not make it easy to love as well?— love as well? it's interesting the work ou love as well? it's interesting the work you do. — love as well? it's interesting the work you do, dominique, - love as well? it's interesting the work you do, dominique, and i love as well? it's interesting the i work you do, dominique, and gee love as well? it's interesting the - work you do, dominique, and gee is fantastic, but i wonder how this has shaped you and your interaction, because you are a lecturer at liverpooljohn moores university in the school for justice and liverpooljohn moores university in the school forjustice and you teach policing studies and communities and used to be a police detective so you have seen this from all sides, so what do you see in terms of evolution and the way the conversation is heading? does it feel as much as a battle and a need to educate or is it nuances? i feel as much as a battle and a need to educate or is it nuances?- to educate or is it nuances? i think it is more nuances. _ to educate or is it nuances? i think it is more nuances. we _ to educate or is it nuances? i think it is more nuances. we cannot - to educate or is it nuances? i think. it is more nuances. we cannot argue there _ it is more nuances. we cannot argue there has— it is more nuances. we cannot argue there has been a transformation in there has been a transformation in the way— there has been a transformation in the way we — there has been a transformation in the way we deal with race relations and racism —
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the way we deal with race relations and racism in this country, we can't deny— and racism in this country, we can't deny that— and racism in this country, we can't deny that and it is to continue to educate — deny that and it is to continue to educate the younger people and educate — educate the younger people and educate communities and for resulted in better— educate communities and for resulted in better and educate communities and for resulted in betterand as educate communities and for resulted in better and as the chair of the anthony— in better and as the chair of the anthony walker foundation, which i've been— anthony walker foundation, which i've been for the last six months,, its to— i've been for the last six months,, its to champion that work and continue _ its to champion that work and continue to eradicate racism and continue — continue to eradicate racism and continue to— continue to eradicate racism and continue to work in communities who are involved — continue to work in communities who are involved. and in a lot of ways we have — are involved. and in a lot of ways we have evolved, but we've regressed and others _ we have evolved, but we've regressed and others and if you look at the news. _ and others and if you look at the news. if— and others and if you look at the news, if you look at the news, if you iook— news, if you look at the news, if you took at _ news, if you look at the news, if you look at cricket, stop and search. _ you look at cricket, stop and search. we _ you look at cricket, stop and search, we could go on in the relation — search, we could go on in the relation to— search, we could go on in the relation to the issues that are happening so there is still work to be done _ happening so there is still work to be done and that is why we need organisations like ourselves and campaigns, so people can report racist _ campaigns, so people can report racist incidents and get support and there _ racist incidents and get support and there are _
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racist incidents and get support and there are a — racist incidents and get support and there are a number of things people can do. _ there are a number of things people can do. so— there are a number of things people can do, so the work, ultimately starts _ can do, so the work, ultimately starts with— can do, so the work, ultimately starts with you. it starts with you. it's not _ starts with you. it starts with you. it's not only— starts with you. it starts with you. it's not only daring to love, it's also _ it's not only daring to love, it's also having _ it's not only daring to love, it's also having the capacity to educate others _ also having the capacity to educate others and — also having the capacity to educate others and having the capacity to be better— others and having the capacity to be better than do better. you others and having the capacity to be better than do better.— better than do better. you have got the award there, _ better than do better. you have got the award there, gee, _ better than do better. you have got the award there, gee, and - better than do better. you have got the award there, gee, and can - better than do better. you have got the award there, gee, and can we i better than do better. you have got l the award there, gee, and can we get the award there, gee, and can we get the shot of you holding your award and very proudly and i will share this with the audience because when you guys sat down, dominique said was, mum is not really a morning person, but i would say, and anyone listening to you, gee, a pin could have dropped while you were talking and for someone who is not a good morning person, ithink and for someone who is not a good morning person, i think you did pretty well. where is it going to go? it pretty well. where is it going to to? pretty well. where is it going to i o? ., ~' pretty well. where is it going to to? ., ~' , ., pretty well. where is it going to to? , ., , . go? it will take pride of place, and carol is a special— go? it will take pride of place, and carol is a special lady _ go? it will take pride of place, and carol is a special lady because - go? it will take pride of place, and carol is a special lady because we | carol is a special lady because we don't give her enough credit for
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doing what she does to highlight and magnify people like us, so i salute her and i thank her and i accepted on behalf of anthony, because if it was not for anthony, i would not be here in the name gee walker, so for my son, i accept it with pride and for the city of liverpool, i am taking pride back to them, and thank you for recognising the work we do. and of course you are talking about carol vorderman, who is the host of pride of britain. and that image there is lovely. because you have spoken with so much pride this morning about your son on the work you do and the importance of what you do and the importance of what you do and we have his picture the and then the award, so that is perfect. and then the award, so that is terfect. ,, ., perfect. see, without him, there would riot _ perfect. see, without him, there would riot be _ perfect. see, without him, there would not be this, _ perfect. see, without him, there would not be this, so, _ perfect. see, without him, there would not be this, so, for- perfect. see, without him, there would not be this, so, for my - perfect. see, without him, there i would not be this, so, for my son. anthony. i accepted.
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would not be this, so, for my son. anthony. iaccepted. foryou, boy. it's been an honour to have you this morning and it's lovely to see the dynamic between you and to see you having a smile. you can watch the daily mirror pride of britain awards on itv, tonight at 8pm. gee, dominique, thank you so much. thank you. let's get an update with the sport. mike, of course, some sporting stories we wish we did not have to report, but they are important. this follows the dramatic events of the last 2a hours, in which several sponsors have now ended their relationship, with yorkshire county cricket, club over its response
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to the findings of rascism and bullying of former player azeem rafiq, while the former england international gary ballance says he "regrets" using a racial slur against his former yorkshire teammate, rafiq. 0ur sports editor dan roan has more. it's the most successful club in the history of county cricket but yorkshire is now involved in a racism scandal centred on former player azeem rafiq. an independent panel found the spin bowler had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying while at the club. yorkshire apologised, but took no action against any member of staff and political pressure has been intensifying. what we've read is deeply shocking and one of the most disturbing events in modern cricket history, in my view. i can think of very few reasons why the board of yorkshire cricket club should remain in place. after a leak of the investigation's findings, it emerged that a current yorkshire player
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repeatedly used a racially offensive term towards rafiq about his pakistani heritage but the panel regarded it as friendly banter, sparking an outcry. after mounting speculation, former england star gary ballance revealed he was the player concerned. in a statement, the yorkshire batsmen said. on a dramatic day, a host of yorkshire is a sponsors ended their partnership with the club as the fallout continued. emerald publishing, which has the naming rights to headingley, yorkshire tea, local brewer tetleys and leisure operator david lloyd all turning their back on the beleaguered county.
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it's over a year since rafiq alleged institutional racism. playing professional cricket for yorkshire should be the best time of your life. unfortunately for me, it wasn't. now with the ecb launching their own investigation, the crisis threatens to undermine the wider game's efforts to tackle discrimination in the sport. you have to go back to the start of april, for the last time liverpool lost and their fine form has taken them into the knockout stages, of the champions league. their latest victims were atletico madrid. diogojota put them ahead, early on, before sadio mane sealed the victory eight minutes later. it means liverpool win their group at a canter with 2 games to spare. its looking good too for manchester city, who took another big step
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towards the last 16, with a 4—1win over club brugge. it was so one sided this, and city even gave the belgians, an own goal, before this move they may have won over new fans, and made a name for themselves, but scotland's, t—20 world cupjourney, is over, after losing to new zealand. scotland won the toss and sent the kiwis in to bat, taking two quick wickets as captain kane williamson, was dismissed without scoring. scotland made a valliant effort to their reply, but in the end, they fell 16 runs short, which means they're out of the competition with 2 matches still to play. they have done themselves proud, winning the qualifying group and putting up a good fist there against new zealand. and india also through, squeezing through after they thrashed afghanistan because there were doubts they would make it because they were the pretournament favourites, but they have made it. that was a good face. i was
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computing what you just said. it could have been staggering, but they are through. a sigh of relief for india. here's carol with a look at the weather. and carol tell us about that picture, imagine you sitting on that bench, seeing that view. it's stunning. and good morning. a lot of us or the northern lights last night in the northern half of the country in the skies were clear enough and this is charlie's favourite picture and i'm showing it again from the highlands but it wasn'tjust in the highlands that we saw the northern lights as other parts of the country did and look at this stunning one taken in fife and we have another one that was taken in ayrshire and we have another one in ayrshire and we have another one in scotland which was taken in dumbartonshire and then we move into the north of england, because here we also saw the northern lights on this one was taken in cumbria but look at how the colours change, the reds, yellows and purples and
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tonight if you have, there is a good chance you might see them, but we have a chilly start to the day especially in central areas and no fog this morning and it's too breezy and chilly breeze with the nagging northerly. more of us will see sunshine and there will be a few showers but there are some on windward coast is in the west and the east and some of them are making progress inland but also into the afternoon as well and some of them in the mountains and highlands of northern ireland will be wintry, so gusty winds down the east coast particularly the east coast of england and 14mph and by the end of the afternoon we have a new weather front coming in across the outer hebrides introducing thicker cloud and some rain. much of the rest of scotland is dry with bright and sunny skies. sunshine and showers for northern ireland and western parts of england and wales seeing
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sunshine but you can see sunshine coming in across west wales, parts of devon and cornwall and across eastern parts of england with some of them getting into east anglia, the east midlands and towards the south—east. the wind will make it feel colder than these temperatures suggest that the temperatures are lower than they were yesterday so it's likely to be the coldest day of the week today. through the evening and overnight the weather front comes into the north—west and sinks southwards bringing cloud and patchy rain and there will be some holes in that cloud, so do get outside if you're interested in the northern lights and in the south we have clear skies in some rural areas in the south temperatures could fall away as low as —2 so tomorrow morning there will be frost around. talking of tomorrow we will start with sunshine in the south and here is this week weather front continuing the journey and eventually bringing the cloud into southern areas but tomorrow it's cloudier than today and we will have some showers peppering the north and
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parts of the west. not nearly as windy down the east coast as it has been this week as today and the other thing is the wind is coming in from the west or north—west so temperatures higher a little today but it will feel milder because of the change in the wind direction. things change on saturday and a new weather front comes in things change on saturday and a new weatherfront comes in bringing this rain across scotland, northern ireland and into northern england and wales but the cloud is building ahead of it and behind it sunshine and blustery showers and some of those will be heavy with hail but the wind will be a feature for the weather in the north and west, particularly in the latter part of the day into the evening wear parts of northern scotland could have gales and that will continue overnight across the far north of scotland and there will be gusts of wind at 70mph and eventually the rain clears and sundays quieter and the wind slowly starts to ease and there will be a bit more sunshine around the temperatures by then we'lljust dip a little bit.
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carol, thank you very much. throughout her career the american singer—songwriter tori amos has become known for confronting often personal and emotive themes and the latest addition to her repertoire, is no different. written during lockdown from her home on the cornish coast, 'ocean to ocean' is described as the universal story of hitting rock bottom and renewing yourself all over again. we'll speak to tori in a moment but first, let's take a listen. # you knew me as fire. # you have always been metal, water, wood. # be like water # you tell me, "be like water."
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# pull that horizon down # pull that, pull that horizon down # line that horizon up # like the captain does with his instruments tori joins us now. we thought we would try to make you feel at home. it we thought we would try to make you feel at home-— feel at home. it does make me feel at home. feel at home. it does make me feel at home- tell— feel at home. it does make me feel at home. tell me, _ feel at home. it does make me feel at home. tell me, why _ feel at home. it does make me feel at home. tell me, why cornwall? . feel at home. it does make me feel. at home. tell me, why cornwall? what if ou do at home. tell me, why cornwall? what if you do for— at home. tell me, why cornwall? what if you do for you? _ at home. tell me, why cornwall? what if you do for you? you _ at home. tell me, why cornwall? what if you do for you? you mean, - at home. tell me, why cornwall? what if you do for you? you mean, during i if you do for you? you mean, during the lockdown? _ if you do for you? you mean, during the lockdown? i— if you do for you? you mean, during the lockdown? i think _ if you do for you? you mean, during the lockdown? i think it _ if you do for you? you mean, during the lockdown? i think it saved - the lockdown? i think it saved my life. a part of me had gone somewhere after my mother's death, and on the third lockdown i guess i was despondent and i missed her very much and i could not call her. she always knew what to say, so i turned to mother cornwall. i returned to earth mother cornwall. it’s to mother cornwall. i returned to earth mother cornwall.— to mother cornwall. i returned to earth mother cornwall. it's a very tersonal earth mother cornwall. it's a very personal thing — earth mother cornwall. it's a very personal thing you _ earth mother cornwall. it's a very personal thing you are _ earth mother cornwall. it's a very personal thing you are telling - earth mother cornwall. it's a very personal thing you are telling us. personal thing you are telling us and grief is a very personal thing
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and grief is a very personal thing and it's so different for different people and something can happen and i don't know the circumstances of your mother's death and you don't need to tell us but you never know how something will eat you and how and when. bud how something will eat you and how and when. �* . , how something will eat you and how and when. �* . . .. , and when. and when. that is the key. durint the and when. and when. that is the key. during the first _ and when. and when. that is the key. during the first lockdown, _ and when. and when. that is the key. during the first lockdown, our- during the first lockdown, our family, not to brag, but we did 0k. family, not to brag, but we did ok. we mucked in and our daughter's boyfriend and we thought we would be about two weeks and it was five months, but hey—ho, we cooked together and we were a family. but then on the third one, there were other circumstances, and not playing live music for the longest in my life, the music industry not being able to do what we do, which is play live for people, very different than studio work and i think i hit a wall and the grief overcame me. hope studio work and i think i hit a wall and the grief overcame me. how did ou
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and the grief overcame me. how did you know? — and the grief overcame me. how did you know? how _ and the grief overcame me. how did you know? how did _ and the grief overcame me. how did you know? how did you _ and the grief overcame me. how did you know? how did you know- and the grief overcame me. how did you know? how did you know you i you know? how did you know you either needed help or something to change? either needed help or something to chante? �* . either needed help or something to chante? �* , ., either needed help or something to chanue? �* , ., . change? because i sat on the couch in the living — change? because i sat on the couch in the living room, _ change? because i sat on the couch in the living room, no _ change? because i sat on the couch in the living room, no offence, - change? because i sat on the couch| in the living room, no offence, when i turned the volume down on the news, and everything else, and finally the muses came to me that i've been working with since i was two and a half, they are the spiritual creatures that help write the music and ijust said i am on my knees and i need help. and they said right from where you are. and i said i am in the muck, and they said, we need to hear what it is like in the muck, and they 7 then maybe you will find the trap door, it might be the sonic trap door, but you might find your way out. sonic trap door, but you might find your way out-— sonic trap door, but you might find your way out. when we listen to the
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album, is your way out. when we listen to the album. is it — your way out. when we listen to the album, is it the _ your way out. when we listen to the album, is it the fazes _ your way out. when we listen to the album, is it the fazes you _ your way out. when we listen to the album, is it the fazes you went - album, is it the fazes you went through or what emotions, what experience will the listener have. in the middle of the song there is 7 middle of the album there is a song called metal, water, wood and i thought i would need a fighter, and i thought of bruce lee and his mantra was, be like water, and there i am, surrounded mantra was, be like water, and there lam, surrounded by mantra was, be like water, and there i am, surrounded by it but i am sitting ina i am, surrounded by it but i am sitting in a chair because i cannot see, i can't see the water because of my tears. i couldn't see it. and there it was. and that is the thing you are saying. when grief hits and i thought i had it sorted out, i was kind of super mum in the first lockdown, and then no super mum, no
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super wide, lockdown, and then no super mum, no superwide, no lockdown, and then no super mum, no super wide, no super artist, just really missing my mother, so with that song it pulled me outside and then i got to the trees and i got to then i got to the trees and i got to the ocean on the cliffs, and it's a formidable beauty, cornwall. sometimes with the gales blowing, if it's not that sunny day, it can be a shock that the americans. it it's not that sunny day, it can be a shock that the americans.- shock that the americans. it can be brutal. i shock that the americans. it can be brutal- i am — shock that the americans. it can be brutal. i am looking _ shock that the americans. it can be brutal. i am looking at _ shock that the americans. it can be brutal. i am looking at this - shock that the americans. it can be brutal. i am looking at this picture| brutal. i am looking at this picture of you appear, and i know you don't look like kate bush, but i'm getting a kind of kate bush vibe. that look like kate bush, but i'm getting a kind of kate bush vibe.— a kind of kate bush vibe. that is the kindest _ a kind of kate bush vibe. that is the kindest thing. _ a kind of kate bush vibe. that is the kindest thing. that's - a kind of kate bush vibe. that is the kindest thing. that's the - the kindest thing. that's the kindest thing. _ the kindest thing. that's the kindest thing. that's - the kindest thing. that's the kindest thing. that's not - the kindest thing. that's the i kindest thing. that's not bad. the kindest thing. that's the - kindest thing. that's not bad. what is the field? the kindest thing. that's not bad. what is the field?— is the field? the feel is of the surroundings _ is the field? the feel is of the surroundings and _ is the field? the feel is of the surroundings and the - is the field? the feel is of the l surroundings and the mysticism is the field? the feel is of the - surroundings and the mysticism of the place. i am in a place called bossy ground, so i sound like your bossy ground, but it's not, but i'm
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looking towards the cliffs but i'm also looking out towards my other homeland which is the us. missing home. do homeland which is the us. missing home- do you _ homeland which is the us. missing home. do you call— homeland which is the us. missing home. do you call it _ homeland which is the us. missing home. do you call it home? - homeland which is the us. missing home. do you call it home? i - homeland which is the us. missing j home. do you call it home? i know you split your time. it is home. do you call it home? i know you split your time.— you split your time. it is my motherland, _ you split your time. it is my motherland, so _ you split your time. it is my motherland, so yes, - you split your time. it is my motherland, so yes, and i you split your time. it is my motherland, so yes, and a l you split your time. it is my l motherland, so yes, and a lot you split your time. it is my i motherland, so yes, and a lot of you split your time. it is my - motherland, so yes, and a lot of my family are there that part of my heart is here. here, in cornwall. you said you are missing live cornwall 7 live music. when you are getting back to it? the cornwall ? live music. when you are getting back to it?— getting back to it? the tour in february but _ getting back to it? the tour in february but we _ getting back to it? the tour in february but we are _ getting back to it? the tour in february but we are coming . getting back to it? the tour in | february but we are coming to getting back to it? the tour in i february but we are coming to great britain. i think the dates are march 11 and 12th at the palladium in lando and then glasgow on the 14th and 15th, manchester. 7 in london. you have the new album and you will be playing songs from that, but the fans will also want the old stuff. of course. fans will also want the old stuff. of course-— fans will also want the old stuff. of course-_ i i of course. what is the finale? i haven't written _
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of course. what is the finale? i haven't written the _ of course. what is the finale? i haven't written the set - of course. what is the finale? i haven't written the set lists i of course. what is the finale? i haven't written the set lists yet of course. what is the finale? i i haven't written the set lists yet so i'm getting the guys together and we start rehearsals injanuary but i have to start working up the rapid shop because it's been four 7 repertoire, because it has been four years, so i have to work up to it. will you be stage fit7 years, so i have to work up to it. will you be stage fit?— will you be stage fit? that's a really good — will you be stage fit? that's a really good question. - will you be stage fit? that's a really good question. i - will you be stage fit? that's a really good question. i am i will you be stage fit? that's a really good question. i am 58| will you be stage fit? that's a i really good question. i am 58 so i really good question. i am 58 sol have to pull it together and i need to get my hiking boots on and get back out there. the to get my hiking boots on and get back out there.— back out there. the perfect place for it. i back out there. the perfect place for it- i will— back out there. the perfect place for it. i will see _ back out there. the perfect place for it. i will see you _ back out there. the perfect place for it. i will see you out - back out there. the perfect place for it. i will see you out there, i for it. i will see you out there, cornish people. _ for it. i will see you out there, cornish people. you _ for it. i will see you out there, cornish people. you started i for it. i will see you out there, | cornish people. you started on for it. i will see you out there, i cornish people. you started on the ke boards cornish people. you started on the keyboards when _ cornish people. you started on the keyboards when you _ cornish people. you started on the keyboards when you were - cornish people. you started on the keyboards when you were 12. i cornish people. you started on the keyboards when you were 12. two | cornish people. you started on the i keyboards when you were 12. two and a half. it sounds _ keyboards when you were 12. two and a half. it sounds terrible _ keyboards when you were 12. two and a half. it sounds terrible but, - keyboards when you were 12. two and a half. it sounds terrible but, yes. i a half. it sounds terrible but, yes. so was that when you got a recording?— so was that when you got a recording? so was that when you got a recordint ? . , . recording? so, five i was at the conservatory — recording? so, five i was at the conservatory and _ recording? so, five i was at the conservatory and 11 _ recording? so, five i was at the conservatory and 11 i _ recording? so, five i was at the conservatory and 11 i was i recording? so, five i was at the | conservatory and 11 i was kicked recording? so, five i was at the i conservatory and 11 i was kicked out and then at the gay bars at 13 with my reverend, the father in his dog collar, sitting there and the gaze saying to me, is he in a costume? i
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love it. saying to me, is he in a costume? i love it- it — saying to me, is he in a costume? i love it. it comes _ saying to me, is he in a costume? i love it. it comes across _ saying to me, is he in a costume? i love it. it comes across in - love it. it comes across in everything _ love it. it comes across in everything you _ love it. it comes across in everything you say - love it. it comes across in everything you say and i love it. it comes across in everything you say and it | love it. it comes across in i everything you say and it is a love it. it comes across in - everything you say and it is a rich life, so great to see you back. goad life, so great to see you back. good to see you. — life, so great to see you back. good to see you, charlie. _ life, so great to see you back. good to see you, charlie. and _ life, so great to see you back. good to see you, charlie. and you - life, so great to see you back. good to see you, charlie. and you have brought a bit of corn rows it was. you are in a good place. that is good.
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this is bbc news, i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 9.00. new research says the hpv vaccine is cutting cases of cervical cancer by almost 90% — cancer research calls it a historic moment. labour has accused the government of "wallowing in sleaze" — after borisjohnson supported a vote that blocked the suspension of a conservative mp. scientists say global carbon emissions are returning to pre—pandemic levels more quickly than expected. police in australia charge a man over the abduction of cleo smith, as new audio is released of the dramatic moment she was found... and former england cricketer gary ballance says he regrets
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using racist language against his former yorkshire

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