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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 3, 2021 9:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm christian fraser. joe biden and his party are reeling from a set of bitterly disappointing election results. in virginia — the governors house goes to a republican for the first time in more than a decade while in newjersey — the race is still too tight to call. tackling global warming — the chancellor says he wants the uk to show the world how finance and business can play their part in reducing emissions. mps in the uk vote to prevent the suspension of a conservative mp who broke lobbying rules — much to the chagrin of oppositon benches. plus — how the four astronauts travelling back from the international space station will have to do — without a loo.
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the republican glenn youngkin became the newly elected governor of virginia last night, flipping political control of a state thatjoe biden won by ten points just twelve months ago. youngkin s opponent was terry mcauliffe, a democrat with deep ties to the national party establishment. in august he was a shoe in. had virginia been the only shock of the night, that might have been the headline. but a second governors race, in newjersey, followed a similar pattern, suggesting the democrats have deep problems. youngkin won virginina with 50.7 percent of the vote, in a record turnout. and in newjersey the incumbent phil murphy, who won the 2017 election by fourteen points, was in deep deep trouble. however through the day it has
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turned around for the democrat — but still closer than he orjoe biden would have liked. in this last hour the president has spoken, he says they need to do better at selling their agenda. spoken, he says they need to do i'm spoken, he says they need to do convinced that if) everything i'm convinced that if you look at everything from my view on criminal justice system to my view on equal opportunity to my view on economic issues and all the things that happen while of impression that legislation, each of the elements are overwhelmingly popular. we have to speak to them and explain. ijust think people are at a point and it's understandable where there's a whole lot of confusion. according to the exit poll data — one of the biggest shifts in virginia was among white women voters. take a look at how white women split in the 2020 presidential election in virginia. and yet this year — it goest in favour of the republican glen youngkin.
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that's a fifteen percentage point swing from democrat to republican in that group alone — and in the space of twelve months. i'm joined now by mary—ann marsh. good to see you. why did white suburban women who voted forjoe biden12 months ago turn on terry mcauliffe? biden 12 months ago turn on terry mcauliffe? �* , , , mcauliffe? because they believed ounu mcauliffe? because they believed young kinsale _ mcauliffe? because they believed young kinsale job _ mcauliffe? because they believed young kinsale job about _ mcauliffe? because they believed l young kinsale job about education. and yesterday was really the perfect storm of everything that's wrong about politics in the united states today. republicans defined that race, pushing propaganda about education fuelled by race and yet to win the governors race and they did. voters willingly accepted a lie as the truth and voted for the republican. and then the democrats there, tell him limit terry mcauliffe never took that seriously. allow the republicans to define that race was up at the time they took it seriously it was too little too late, they never had an answer for it and that's why they lost. but
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when you _ it and that's why they lost. but when you look _ it and that's why they lost. but when you look at the record turnout last night in virginia and there were some on the moderate side of your party who say the progressives bring out the republican vote much like donald trump brought out the democrat vote. there is some evidence for that. i democrat vote. there is some evidence for that.— evidence for that. i do think there's an _ evidence for that. i do think there's an element - evidence for that. i do think there's an element of - evidence for that. i do think there's an element of truth | evidence for that. i do think l there's an element of truth to evidence for that. i do think - there's an element of truth to that. i don't think there's anyone thing here. but i do think the comparison between driving republicans out when they are pushed by progressives, the corollary to that is on the democratic side, democrats think they did theyjob by voting trump out of the white house. they think they were all set, that's not true. the fact is, every election now is to say the two two democracy of the united states. and yesterday democrats do not take this race seriously enough to do that. you have to work every signal day for every election and i willjust point to newjersey for a moment where government murphy looks like he's going to squeak out a win. he did take his opponent seriously either. they made a cheeky ad about the fact that his republican opponent wanted
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to ban profanity. well, who's laughing now? ithink to ban profanity. well, who's laughing now? i think every election has to be taken seriously and that did not happen yesterday. from what ou're did not happen yesterday. from what you're saying. _ did not happen yesterday. from what you're saying. the — did not happen yesterday. from what you're saying, the democrats - did not happen yesterday. from what you're saying, the democrats need i did not happen yesterday. from whatj you're saying, the democrats need to learn that it's not enough to just be the party that is opposed to doctrine, they have to govern. of course in washington they have it covered very well because the two bills which probably will go through at some point are still sitting there on the table. i wonder who you think comes out of this stronger when you look at the congressional make—up of the party. is it senator joe mansion the moderates or progressives? it’s joe mansion the moderates or progressives?— joe mansion the moderates or progressives? joe mansion the moderates or roaressives? �*, ., q ,, progressives? it's nancy pelosi. she finally started _ progressives? it's nancy pelosi. she finally started to _ progressives? it's nancy pelosi. she finally started to take _ progressives? it's nancy pelosi. she finally started to take over, - progressives? it's nancy pelosi. she finally started to take over, take - finally started to take over, take chuck schumerjob over, the white housejob over and she's chuck schumerjob over, the white house job over and she's going to make this happen. and she understands that white women in particular, without are central to democrats being able to win. that's why she put paid to care back and yesterday that's like she's talking about it today. women care a lot about it today. women care a lot about education because they believe for the kids and their grandkids education is the way up it out.
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unfortunately they bought a lie about it. you're going to see nancy pelosi get those bills through the house and make sure they get through the senate too. i house and make sure they get through the senate too.— the senate too. i wonder if there is another element _ the senate too. i wonder if there is another element to _ the senate too. i wonder if there is another element to what _ the senate too. i wonder if there isj another element to what happened last night. when you look at eric adams, the new mayor of new york city, former police officer, ran on crime being tough on crime, he won easily last night as we know he would. but he won a primary quite easily as well. and then when you look at minneapolis where they put forward a motion to defend the police, which was defeated, maybe that defunct the police message does work too well across the country for that may be progressives needs to ditch that. it that may be progressives needs to ditch that. ~ ., ~ ditch that. it never did. we talked about it last _ ditch that. it never did. we talked about it last year _ ditch that. it never did. we talked about it last year on _ ditch that. it never did. we talked about it last year on the _ ditch that. it never did. we talked about it last year on the show. . about it last year on the show. myself and others believe brief form the police, absolutely. look at all the police, absolutely. look at all the stories was all seen in all the tragedies that have happened, most if not all avoidable regarding police conduct and other matters. reform is needed. but i think people
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don't understand that many in the black community in particular don't want to get rid of the police. even though often they are the ones who suffered the most under bad police conduct. so there is no left or right in these things. i think there are some basic things that everybody can agree on. what you're going to see isjoe mansion making that argument, i don't like it's a coincidence that he did his press conference on monday talking about the fact that this is too big, these packages are too big, too much, too fast, too soon. and i tweeted this point too if terry mcauliffe lost yesterday, that was proof of it. there may be a little bit of truth to that but the question is now is someone likejoe mansion going to try to keep stalling this passage of these bills and they said it until january and then sound like mitch mcconnell and say, "well it's an election year and will let the voters speak on this passage of these bills in the senate until january and then sound like mitch mcconnell and say, "well it's an election year and will let the voters become his"?. some hard thinking some hard thinking for
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democrats. thinking some hard thinking for democrats-_ to see you. the british chancellor says he wants the city of london to set an example to the world in how finance and business can play their part in tackling global warming. at the climate change summit in glasgow —rishi sunak said major british companies will have until 2023 to set out, how they intend to hit climate change targets — though they would not be legally required to hit those targets. our economics editor faisal islam reports. follow the money to net zero — that was the plan revealed at the ongoing climate change talks in glasgow, with time ticking for the world's finance ministers and bankers gathered in the audience. good morning, and welcome to cop26 finance day. the main result, the world banks, pension funds and insurers promising to invest and lend in a way consistent with net zero by 2050. that's £95 trillion of funds, or two fifths of the whole of globalfinance. so those in suits are today's ecowarriors, says the president of the summit.
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today, the swampys of the world are all around us — in boardrooms, in government departments, in multilateral development banks and trading floors all around the world. you, my friends, are the new swampys, so be proud. can it really be the case that these guys, the bankers and financiers, can save the world from climate change? that's the hope underlying these incredible numbers, that lending decisions to businesses large and small will transform entire sectors, from energy to transport, from food to retail. and for politicians, this is a lot more palatable than telling consumers — voters — that their behaviour has to change. one british bank chief from the institution that funded north sea oil and gas told the bbc tough conversations in the sectors where carbon emissions were difficult to limit were already happening. we're very clear that we are ending funding of harmful activity
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and we will only work with people with a credible transition plan aligned with paris, because, actually, if all that happens, is the hard—to—abate sectors get financed in the private sector without transparency, you haven't met the goal of taking the carbon out of the economy. the announcements made this morning will discourage finance going to new coal mines or oilfields, for example, but they won't absolutely prevent such flows. rich nations have also delayed long—promised funds for poorer countries to help with climate change. the international energy agency has come out and said, to get to 1.5, we need to cease all new fossil fuel financing. these commitments today don't add up to that, so we need to see further ambition on moving our investments away from brown into green. green campaigners were crying foul directly to the chancellor on the site of the negotiations. he acclaimed the uk at the center of a tidal wave of global green banking, the hope that the carrot
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of cheap finance rather than the stick of tough regulations is the answer for the world. faisal islam, bbc news. is faisal right? i've been speaking to our environment a nalysts a na lysts o n analysts on how significant he thinks today's announcement is. well, scientists have been saying for a long time that if we don't put the climate and the environment at the climate and the environment at the centre of every decision we might have a planet worth living on. so the initiative announced by the new two uk chancellor rishi sunak was for companies you have to draw up was for companies you have to draw up a plan showing how they could get to near zero emissions. there was some confusion about whether this was going to be mandatory or not. but the treasury has made it plain that this will not be mandatory and critics say what's the point of it if it's not mandatory because countries believe that companies can draw plans anyways? is this can make
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much of difference? the truth is it similar to last time. when you get the sort of pressure coming from hsr, when he talks about possibly making it mandatory in future than people do start to move. it's another one of those signs that the world is slowly, turning around. the prime minister set the bar very high at this conference was up at pm cues today he was asked a question by the mp in central london, when he was going to sign off on runway 38 two at heathrow for the a lot of her constituents would like it to be ditched of course because the planes will fly over the top of the houses. this was borisjohnson�*s reply. harare this was boris johnson's reply. have a listen. this was boris johnson's reply. have a listen- what— this was boris johnson's reply. have a listen. what we _ this was boris johnson's reply. have a listen. what we are _ this was borisjohnson's reply. the: a listen. what we are going to this was borisjohnson's reply. the a listen. what we are going to do is get to net zero aviation, mister speaker, that's the future for this country, clean, green aviation! and by the way i think that we have every chance of arriving a lot
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earlier than a third runway at heathrow. earlier than a third runway at heathrow— earlier than a third runway at heathrow. ~ ., heathrow. was at boris johnson -auttin heathrow. was at boris johnson putting another— heathrow. was at boris johnson putting another nail— heathrow. was at boris johnson putting another nail in - heathrow. was at boris johnson putting another nail in the - heathrow. was at boris johnson | putting another nail in the coffin of runway three, roger? i putting another nail in the coffin of runway three, roger?- putting another nail in the coffin of runway three, roger? i think it ma be of runway three, roger? i think it may be reading — of runway three, roger? i think it may be reading too _ of runway three, roger? i think it may be reading too much - of runway three, roger? i think it may be reading too much into - may be reading too much into that. actually, boris has forgotten one of his own favourite phrases, he christened his aviation industry would not initiative jet zero, not net zero butjet would not initiative jet zero, not net zero but jet zero. would not initiative jet zero, not net zero butjet zero. i think he must�*ve forgotten his own line. the truth is jet zero, must�*ve forgotten his own line. the truth isjet zero, zero must�*ve forgotten his own line. the truth is jet zero, zero carbon aviation is a long way off there their passenger planes now that can carry it may be six or eight people using batteries. until we get to the stage where we can go a long haul on clean fuels and cleave aviation is a bit of a pipe dream. especially as we have to make all our cuts on major cuts before 2030. there is really a huge mismatch between what
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the government is doing at the moment on the international stage, which i have to say is a veteran of many cops is very impressive and is moving things along. there's a difference between that and what they're actually doing on their home turf. , :, they're actually doing on their home turf. , ., ., they're actually doing on their home turf. , :, ., :, ., , they're actually doing on their home turf. ,:, ., :, ., turf. yes, a veteran of many cops. someone — turf. yes, a veteran of many cops. someone whispered _ turf. yes, a veteran of many cops. someone whispered in _ turf. yes, a veteran of many cops. someone whispered in my - turf. yes, a veteran of many cops. someone whispered in my ear - turf. yes, a veteran of many cops. i someone whispered in my ear today that you've been to every un climate meeting sense 1992. what surprised meeting sense 1992. what surprised me because that would make you nearly 50. me because that would make you nearl 50. :, �* , me because that would make you nearl 50. :, �*, ., , ., nearly 50. that's actually not true. i haven't been _ nearly 50. that's actually not true. i haven't been to _ nearly 50. that's actually not true. i haven't been to all _ nearly 50. that's actually not true. i haven't been to all of _ nearly 50. that's actually not true. i haven't been to all of them. i'vel i haven't been to all of them. i've missed a lot. i started going in 1992 at the rio summit and i've been to cops along the way. [30 1992 at the rio summit and i've been to cops along the way.— to cops along the way. do they each have their own _ to cops along the way. do they each have their own personality? - to cops along the way. do they each have their own personality? yeah, l have their own personality? yeah, the do have their own personality? yeah, they do have _ have their own personality? yeah, they do have their— have their own personality? yeah, they do have their personality. - have their own personality? yeah, | they do have their personality. but there tends to be a familiar pattern of, a great hubbub at the beginning and then a great hubbub at the end and then a great hubbub at the end and in between lots of hours of tedious negotiation in rooms where you can find out what's going on.
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but as i mentioned earlier, there's been quite a lot of praise for the brits for the way this one is been organised. and they have been some pretty serious announcements made. what's happening now is the nature of these conferences is changing. in the old days everything is to happen in the conference rooms and had to be carried by consensus. so laggard nations that would typically be, say the salaries for instance would be able to hold things up right the way through the night. ? saltys. what's happening now is a different model in decisions that are taken and decisions that are launched outside the conference, the kind of bolted onto it. i think this is the way were going to see things in the future with coalitions of the willing, with governments willing to move further and faster, putting themselves on the line and just inviting on others to follow. tomorrow it is energy.
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tomorrow stay with us on bbc news, still to come — british mps vote to overhaul the rules on their own misconduct — as the government backs a former minister. we'll discuss, next. england's deputy chief medical officer england's deputy chief medical 0fficerjonathan ben tam has warned are likely to be had months to come in the fight against the coronavirus. he told bbc news that peoples behaviour in the coming weeks will be important in determining what happens next with the pandemic. too many people believe that this _ with the pandemic. too many people believe that this pandemic _ with the pandemic. too many people believe that this pandemic is - with the pandemic. too many people believe that this pandemic is now - believe that this pandemic is now over. i personally feel there are some hard months to come in the winter and it is not over. i think a whole range of behaviours including the use of face covering but generally the caution that people take or don't take in terms of interacting with each other, that is good to be a big determinant in what happens between now and the kind of
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darkest months of the winter. so thatis darkest months of the winter. so that is going to be very important. the other things that are going to be really important are how people respond if they are in need of a booster, if they are in need of flu vaccine, if they are partially vaccinated or indeed if they are unvaccinated. that will be another really important factor in terms of what happens over the next few months. christmas and indeed all of the darker winter months are potentially going to be problematic. and i think the things that are really going to determine us are first of all, human behaviours and caution over the winter months. but particularly in the next couple of months if you're talking about christmas. it's how cautious we are. the next one is how well the vaccination programmes go in terms of and i don't rhyme repeating it,
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the boosters, partially met vaccinated coming for the second dose and unvaccinated people coming to be vaccinated. this is evergreen, it's open all the time. flu vaccines and they are all really key things that will put us in the best place for winter. the conservative mp 0wen paterson has today avoided a thirty—day suspension from the house after intervention from the government. instead of upholding the punishment, conservative mps voted to shake—up the rules that are meant to govern standards in public life for mps. the move comes a week after the house of commons' standards committee ruled that mr paterson's lobbying efforts amounted to �*an egregious case of paid advocacy�*. the committee had found the ex minister had been paid to lobby on behalf of two companies and had misused his position as an mp. not once but 1a times and that
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mr paterson's remuneration from the firms was worth almost three—times his annual salary as an mp. mr paterson denies he did anything wrong, insisting his approaches had been within the rules because he was seeking to alert ministers to defects in safety procedures. he also says he was found guilty without being spoken to and with no proper investigation being undertaken. the recommendation that the mp be suspended for thirty days, will now be set aside. the conservative mp who tabled the amendment — andrea leadsom — regretted its timing but defended the need for reform. what my amendment was simply seeking to do is to establish a short, three—month only review of the and the justice within the investigation system. as i said in the chamber i deeply regret that it was at a time when there was a live case before us but nevertheless, that review is long overdue. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticusjoins me
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now from westminster. i think at the start of the week that this would be a relatively inconsequential vote. but now to become really important because this is how we police and scrutinise the people we elect. is how we police and scrutinise the people we elect-— people we elect. yes, absolutely riuht. people we elect. yes, absolutely right- even _ people we elect. yes, absolutely right. even yesterday _ people we elect. yes, absolutely right. even yesterday this - people we elect. yes, absolutely right. even yesterday this didn'tl right. even yesterday this didn't look like it was good to be a big thing. but last night this all blew up. and today we have this almighty route now going on. notjust because it's about how mps are members of parliament are police but because it's totally split the parties, the government and the opposition parties rather than there being a consensus around how to do this. and because we have a situation where this mp, a two—year investigation into first of all in independent commissioner, then there is a committee of half mps, have non—mps of independent people on that
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committee looked at this, they recommended the sanction, they found that they believed he had broken the rules they say egregiously. the chair said in parliament today that this was a clear case, he said of a corrupt practice which was taking this money from companies who were paying this mp to be an adviser and then going to lobby ministers was to be said lobbying ministers on behalf of someone you're paid is an express breach. the government stepped in at the last minute, the ordered mps to back this amendment saying he had been unfairly treated, that was backed by entirely government mps apart from to. many government mps it has to be said chose not to stay away but that's past. set up the whole process has been put to onside. and there is a committee that's going to look at redrafting rules should this whole process change for the up the opposition is very angry about this. but
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change for the up the opposition is very angry about this.— very angry about this. but labour, the opposition _ very angry about this. but labour, the opposition and _ very angry about this. but labour, the opposition and scotish - very angry about this. but labour, l the opposition and scotish national party said tonight that they are not going to involve themselves in any conversation about a change in parliamentary rules so what happens next? :, �* , :, parliamentary rules so what happens next? ., �*, ., , parliamentary rules so what happens next? :, �*, :, , parliamentary rules so what happens next? :, �*, ., , , ., next? that's a very good question because this _ next? that's a very good question because this vote _ next? that's a very good question because this vote today, - next? that's a very good question because this vote today, it - next? that's a very good question because this vote today, it was i next? that's a very good question because this vote today, it was to j because this vote today, it was to set up a committee to look at changes. as you point out, those two main opposition party saying they are not going to touch this. so they are not going to touch this. so they are trying to highlight what they say is damage that the government is doing to the standing of mps, the people up tonight as i will look at this as the mps being protected from proper scrutiny. the government says in the mps you heard from there who's pushing that says no, this is a system that needs reforming. but it's hard to see now how they are good progress on that if they can't get consensus across the house. they could for something through but that will be very difficult to see how that could have legitimacy. this is now going to be i think, stuck in a
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even bigger argument for some time while this mp case is part and we wait to see what the outcome is there for the ball of this ends up in a very messy situation. let s get some of the day s other news. two more bodies have been pulled from the debris of a collapsed high—rise building in lagos in nigeria. it brings the number killed to 22. the 21—storey building was still under construction when it crumbled on monday in the upscale ikoyi neighbourhood of the country's commercial capital. chinese tennis star peng shuai has publicly accused a retired communist official of sexual assault. in a post on chinese social media site weibo, ms peng said former vice premier, zhang gaoli, had "forced" her to have sexual relations with him. it is the first time such an allegation has been made against one of china's senior political leaders. mr zhang has not responded to her claims. germany's health minister has warned, the country is experiencing — a pandemic of the unvaccinated. infection rates have soared in recent weeks, as the country grapples with a fourth wave —
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and doctors say, hospitals are coming under increasing pressure. 66% of germans are fully vaccinated — and some regions have started to impose restrictions on unvaccinated people, in an effort to push more to getjabbed. now we all know that being caught short, a long way from a loo is no fun, and i speakfrom experience having just spent two days at a live position in glasgow. but imagine being one of four astronauts travelling back from the international space station. i would certainly need a loo on thatjourney home. but apparently the space x craft which is bringing them back to earth is not working properly. and so they have all been fitted with special—issue undergarments. maybe we need those at the bbc. anyway spacex discovered an issue with the spacecraft toilet during a routine inspection of the return capsule. the company found that a tube used to funnel urine into a storage tank had become unglued, and was causing a leaky mess beneath the capsule's floor. and then i suppose once you are zero gravity.
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it doesn't stay on the floor. hence the special garments. safer all round. hello. after what was a mild october, the first few days of november has certainly brought a cool—down. we've been in the grip of northerly winds during wednesday, feeding cold air southwards across the uk. many of us have had some spells of sunshine but the northerly winds have also brought showers. the shower cloud as he could see on the satellite picture have been focused around coastal areas. this line of shower cloud plaguing parts of temperature and cornwall will continue to be a feature during thursday, showers continuing here. some showers for a time across eastern england. some of the showers in northern scotland wintry over high ground. but as we go through the day the showers will become fewer and further between. they'll be more dry weather, some good spells of sunshine for most of us but it won't help the temperatures much,
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values at best between 7—11 degrees. and late in the day we see thicker cloud ringing rain into the far northwest of scotland. and that is the first sign of a change. as we move out of thursday into friday around this area of high pressure we are going to draw a lot of cloud in from the west. that's quite key, this westerly wind direction is going to bring a much milder feel to the weather so temperatures by friday afternoon back up into double digits for most of us. best of any sunshine across the east, thickness of the cloud in the west bringing the odd spot of rain. certainly much, much milder conditions through friday evening if you are having any bonfire night celebrations. now, into saturday we keep this speed of cloud from the west. quite a strong westerly wind at this stage. frontal systems pushing close to the north bringing some outbreaks of rain and confirmation of that milder air working its way in. so quite a mild start to saturday with a lot of cloud for many for the best chance of any sunshine
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across eastern england. as for scotland, northern ireland and eventually northwest england and wales we will see some outbreaks of rain, it will be quite windy, particularly up towards the north. but temperatures up to 13—14 degrees. frontal system weakens as it pushes southward was up quite a lot of white lines you'll notice on the charts, quite a lot of isobars. it is going to be a windy day on sunday the north where they will be one or two showers. elsewhere are some areas of cloud but i think a decent chance of seeing some spells of sunshine and any sunny skies down towards the south we could see 14—15 degrees. and we take a lot of dry weather with us into the start of the new working week. this area of high pressure trying to reassert itself so monday is looking like a predominantly friday. is looking like a predominantly dry day. again i think the best of any sunshine will be across eastern areas, more cloud feeding and further west. as frontal systems approach we may see some rain late in the day and parts of northern ireland
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and western scotland. again it is mild, 12, 13 or 1a degrees. as we look further ahead, high pressure will try to hold on close to the south of the uk. frontal systems up towards the northwest that will make a little progress southwards and eastwards but i think the wettest weather will always be up towards the north and west with southern areas being protected by areas of higher pressure. but with the winds remaining mainly west or south—westerly we are going to stick with some milder air. certainly milder than it has been of the last couple of days. so to sum things up — for next week it will mostly feel mild. the wettest of the weather close to low pressure in the north and the west. it will always say drier further south and east where high pressure holds on. that's all for me, bye for now.
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mps vote to overhaul the rules on their own misconduct, as the government backs a former minister. the suspension of conservative mp 0wen paterson, ordered by a cross—party watchdog, is now on hold, sparking accusations of sleaze. when they break the rules, mr speaker, theyjust remake the rules. i think that she needs to consider the procedures of the house in a spirit of fairness. as opposition parties say they won't cooperate on drawing up a new system, we'll be live in westminster. also tonight: as the climate talks continue, businesses are told they'll have to start publishing their carbon—cutting plans. the row over azeem rafiq's treatment at yorkshire county cricket club —
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as sponsors pull out, his former teammate admits using a racial slur.

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