Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 3, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: the eyes to the right to 50, the noes to the left 232. mp5 the ayes to the right to 50, the noes to the left 232.— the ayes to the right to 50, the noes to the left 232. mps back an amendment _ noes to the left 232. mps back an amendment to _ noes to the left 232. mps back an amendment to consider - noes to the left 232. mps back an | amendment to consider reforming noes to the left 232. mps back an - amendment to consider reforming the house of commons standards system, preventing the immediate suspension of the tory mp owen paterson. a new committee will be set up to review his case. labour's former shadow chancellor condemned the movah. i don't believe any honourable member is truly honourable if they serve on this new committee. therefore i want my constituents to know that no member of parliament serves on this corrupt committee in my name. the chancellor rishi sunak promises to "rewire" the entire global financial system — in order to cut carbon emissions.
5:01 pm
there are some hard months to come this winter — so says england's deputy chief medical officer, because of "very high" covid rates in the uk. the racism claims made by former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq — a leaked report suggests a senior player did use racially offensive language against him. and four—year—old cleo smith is found alive, more than two weeks after vanishing from a campsite in western australia. hello, good afternoon. mps have voted to block the suspension of a conservative mp who broke lobbying rules. an investigation found that the former cabinet minister, owen paterson, used his position to benefit two companies he worked for.
5:02 pm
mps voted by 250 to 232 not to support the recommendations of parliament's committee on standards over mr paterson's conduct. instead, a new committee will be set up to review his case and the wider process of investigating members of parliament. labour and the snp have both said they will boycott the new committee. here's how the vote went in the commons. order, order. the ayes to the right, 250. the order, order. the ayes to the right, 250- the nose _ order, order. the ayes to the right, 250. the nose neck _ order, order. the ayes to the right, 250. the nose neck to _ order, order. the ayes to the right, 250. the nose neck to the - order, order. the ayes to the right, 250. the nose neck to the left, - order, order. the ayes to the right, | 250. the nose neck to the left, 232. shameful! _ 250. the nose neck to the left, 232. shameful! ., .,
5:03 pm
shameful! order. order! iwant to read the result. _ the ayes to the right, 250. the noes to the left, 232. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. unlock. the question is that... order! the number needs tojust unlock. the question is that... order! the number needs to just calm a minute while i do next part of the scripture. you might find it shameful, but you might find i am in charge. shameful, but you might find i am in charae. . .,, shameful, but you might find i am in chare. . ., ,. charge. that was the scene earlier in the comments _ charge. that was the scene earlier in the comments this _ charge. that was the scene earlier in the comments this afternoon. l charge. that was the scene earlier i in the comments this afternoon. just in the comments this afternoon. just after 5:30pm, we will be speaking to the mp who played that a minute, andrea leadsom. but for the meantime, let's talk to helen catt. usually these sorts of votes go through, the committee produces its
5:04 pm
report, it gives it to mps, mps tend to vote or whatever it recommends, but this afternoon the investigation into owen paterson has sparked this whole other debate about the way the system for policing mps and their conduct works in westminster. and this vote was put forward to try and change that, to set up a new committee, to look at the way it works and to effectively put mr paterson's suspension on hold. the government had put forward its strongest with. .. government had put forward its strongest with... i am joined by one of the conservative you did not vote things in why not? —— vote for the amendment. i things in why not? -- vote for the amendment-— amendment. i did not think it was the riaht amendment. i did not think it was the right thing _ amendment. i did not think it was the right thing to _ amendment. i did not think it was the right thing to do. _ amendment. i did not think it was the right thing to do. i _ amendment. i did not think it was the right thing to do. i was - amendment. i did not think it was i the right thing to do. i was knocked him into_ the right thing to do. i was knocked him into the — the right thing to do. i was knocked him into the process was fair. to try and _ him into the process was fair. to try and create a review of the process — try and create a review of the process will we just announced a verdict. — process will we just announced a verdict. it— process will we just announced a verdict, it looks like you're trying to escape — verdict, it looks like you're trying to escape the verdict, that is wrong —
5:05 pm
to escape the verdict, that is wrong. and the committee they have chosen _ wrong. and the committee they have chosen is— wrong. and the committee they have chosen is unacceptable. the consultation was done at the last minute — consultation was done at the last minute it— consultation was done at the last minute. it is in the government's controt — minute. it is in the government's control. that is no way to having a partialm — control. that is no way to having a artial. .. ., control. that is no way to having a artial... ., .., ., , partial... some of the colleagues i've spoken _ partial... some of the colleagues i've spoken to — partial... some of the colleagues i've spoken to say _ partial... some of the colleagues i've spoken to say this _ partial... some of the colleagues i've spoken to say this is - partial... some of the colleagues i've spoken to say this is not - partial... some of the colleagues. i've spoken to say this is not about owen paterson, this is about nixing the defects on the system, and it should not have a impact on what happens to owen paterson at all. you don't buy that?— don't buy that? know, the main thing in the house — don't buy that? know, the main thing in the house it _ don't buy that? know, the main thing in the house it was _ don't buy that? know, the main thing in the house it was about _ don't buy that? know, the main thing in the house it was about owen - in the house it was about owen paterson — in the house it was about owen paterson i_ in the house it was about owen paterson. i accepted in the house it was about owen paterson. iaccepted has in the house it was about owen paterson. i accepted has not been completely abolished, it can come back any— completely abolished, it can come back any future point if this new committee recommends it, but he will problem _ committee recommends it, but he will problem is _ committee recommends it, but he will problem is is _ committee recommends it, but he will problem is is if the government believes— problem is is if the government believes the standards process needs reviewed, _ believes the standards process needs reviewed, they could've done that at any point _ reviewed, they could've done that at any point. they could have consulted, engaged with the other parties _ consulted, engaged with the other parties - _ consulted, engaged with the other parties — did not need to be done in a process— parties — did not need to be done in a process against one individual whose _ a process against one individual whose verdict they don't seem to like _ whose verdict they don't seem to like that — whose verdict they don't seem to like. that comes down to trusting the whole — like. that comes down to trusting
5:06 pm
the whole process. we need there to be the whole process. we need there to he trust _ the whole process. we need there to be trust that when mps transgress, there _ be trust that when mps transgress, there will_ be trust that when mps transgress, there will be sections about this. if the _ there will be sections about this. if the government like the person who has— if the government like the person who has transgressed, perhaps these sanctions _ who has transgressed, perhaps these sanctions don't have to apply, that's— sanctions don't have to apply, that's not— sanctions don't have to apply, that's not acceptable. | sanctions don't have to apply, that's not acceptable.- sanctions don't have to apply, that's not acceptable. i was what to ask ou that's not acceptable. i was what to ask you that- _ that's not acceptable. i was what to ask you that. how _ that's not acceptable. i was what to ask you that. how do _ that's not acceptable. i was what to ask you that. how do you _ that's not acceptable. i was what to ask you that. how do you think - ask you that. how do you think this is to be viewed by the public? i think it is a terrible position for parliament to be in. this is a system — parliament to be in. this is a system we _ parliament to be in. this is a system we police ourselves, and effective — system we police ourselves, and effective standards, he has seven labour— effective standards, he has seven labour members, seven mps, they did not need _ labour members, seven mps, they did not need to— labour members, seven mps, they did not need to overturn the verdict they— not need to overturn the verdict they came — not need to overturn the verdict they came to. it is hard to have confidence _ they came to. it is hard to have confidence in the system if we don't stick to— confidence in the system if we don't stick to the — confidence in the system if we don't stick to the decisions they he takes — stick to the decisions they he takes. what happens new, new process comes— takes. what happens new, new process comes out— takes. what happens new, new process comes out of— takes. what happens new, new process comes out of this, and there will be less mp _ comes out of this, and there will be less mp involvement full to end their— less mp involvement full to end their risk— less mp involvement full to end their risk with that. —— and there are risks — their risk with that. —— and there are risks with _ their risk with that. —— and there are risks with that. any sanctions kicking _ are risks with that. any sanctions kicking mps out of parliament must be seen _ kicking mps out of parliament must be seen to— kicking mps out of parliament must be seen to be impartial. how do you
5:07 pm
know— be seen to be impartial. how do you know does— be seen to be impartial. how do you know does not mps being kicked out the government don't like? it is dangerous for parliament and professional politics as a whole. it was a _ professional politics as a whole. it was a really foolish to do and i was very happy— was a really foolish to do and i was very happy to vote against it. do ou very happy to vote against it. you think very happy to vote against it. dr? you think this weakens the government? you were on a three line whip. that is the strongest in truck impossible to tell you how to vote, and you and number of your colleagues chose to vote against or abstain. does that weaken the government?— abstain. does that weaken the government? this is not a party olitical government? this is not a party political issue... _ government? this is not a party political issue... but _ government? this is not a party political issue... but this - government? this is not a party political issue... but this was i political issue... but this was whipped- _ political issue... but this was whipped- it _ political issue... but this was whipped. it was _ political issue... but this was whipped. it was a _ political issue... but this was whipped. it was a bad - political issue... but this wasl whipped. it was a bad mistake political issue... but this was - whipped. it was a bad mistake to whipped. it was a bad mistake to whi it. whipped. it was a bad mistake to whip it- that _ whipped. it was a bad mistake to whip it. that was _ whipped. it was a bad mistake to whip it. that was a _ whipped. it was a bad mistake to whip it. that was a foolish - whipped. it was a bad mistake to whip it. that was a foolish thing l whip it. that was a foolish thing for the — whip it. that was a foolish thing for the government to do. it has hurt _ for the government to do. it has hurt their— for the government to do. it has hurt their authority. to win by a small— hurt their authority. to win by a small amount, hurt their authority. to win by a smallamount, having put hurt their authority. to win by a small amount, having put the heavy whip in. _ small amount, having put the heavy whip in, shows concern across the house _ whip in, shows concern across the house i_ whip in, shows concern across the house. i think this is sadly the start— house. i think this is sadly the start of— house. i think this is sadly the start of a _ house. i think this is sadly the start of a process that will not be over— start of a process that will not be over quickly. start of a process that will not be over quickly-— start of a process that will not be over quickly. how much confidence do think there will _ over quickly. how much confidence do think there will be _ over quickly. how much confidence do think there will be in _ over quickly. how much confidence do think there will be in anything - over quickly. how much confidence do think there will be in anything that - think there will be in anything that this new comes up with? the think there will be in anything that this new comes up with?— think there will be in anything that this new comes up with? the snp have said they want — this new comes up with? the snp have said they want to _ this new comes up with? the snp have said they want to partake _ this new comes up with? the snp have said they want to partake in _ this new comes up with? the snp have said they want to partake in i _ this new comes up with? the snp have said they want to partake in i hear - said they want to partake in i hear
5:08 pm
labour— said they want to partake in i hear labour witt— said they want to partake in i hear labour will not, on the conservative exide _ labour will not, on the conservative exide there — labour will not, on the conservative exide, there will be no transparency side on _ exide, there will be no transparency side on how— exide, there will be no transparency side on how they will be chosen, i do not _ side on how they will be chosen, i do not think— side on how they will be chosen, i do not think they will be any confidence. i think that is sad, but without— confidence. i think that is sad, but without these processes being agreed on a cross— without these processes being agreed on a cross party basis, there is no hope _ on a cross party basis, there is no hope that— on a cross party basis, there is no hope that anything they come up with will he _ hope that anything they come up with will be accepted, and if you want an independent standards process april has confidence in, you need cross party, _ has confidence in, you need cross party, whole house support on these things _ party, whole house support on these things you — party, whole house support on these things. you cannot cobble together on the _ things. you cannot cobble together on the lesson before a vote and think— on the lesson before a vote and think you — on the lesson before a vote and think you will get support. some of our other think you will get support. some of your other colleagues _ think you will get support. some of your other colleagues have - think you will get support. some of your other colleagues have said - your other colleagues have said there was a sense on both sides, regard the sub which you took on it, that justice regard the sub which you took on it, thatjustice needed to be done. do you think it will be in this case? these sort of things... none of us, department— these sort of things... none of us, department to punish our colleagues. that is— department to punish our colleagues. that is why— department to punish our colleagues. that is why these things are normatty— that is why these things are normally accepted without a vote. —— none _ normally accepted without a vote. —— none of _ normally accepted without a vote. —— none of us _ normally accepted without a vote. —— none of us came to parliament.
5:09 pm
justice — none of us came to parliament. justice can— none of us came to parliament. justice can still be done, i hope this committee will do the right thing _ this committee will do the right thing and — this committee will do the right thing and refer the spec to the house — thing and refer the spec to the house to _ thing and refer the spec to the house, to take the decision... i think— house, to take the decision... i think that — house, to take the decision... i think that is _ house, to take the decision... i think that is the right thing to do. that can — think that is the right thing to do. that can still happen and i hope it can he _ that can still happen and i hope it can be done expeditiously. and you think and seven _ can be done expeditiously. and you think and seven mps _ can be done expeditiously. and you think and seven mps we _ can be done expeditiously. and you think and seven mps we making - can be done expeditiously. and you i think and seven mps we making their unhappiness no he on the way they voted today? i unhappiness no be on the way they voted today?— voted today? i think 17, 18 of us voted today? i think 17, 18 of us voted no. _ voted today? i think 17, 18 of us voted no, more _ voted today? i think 17, 18 of us voted no, more abstained. - voted today? i think 17, 18 of us voted no, more abstained. it. voted today? i think 17, 18 of us voted no, more abstained. it is| voted no, more abstained. it is difficult — voted no, more abstained. it is difficult i— voted no, more abstained. it is difficult. ithink voted no, more abstained. it is difficult. i think they have to reckon— difficult. i think they have to reckon as _ difficult. i think they have to reckon as they got this one very wrong _ reckon as they got this one very wrong today and have to learn from it and _ wrong today and have to learn from it and have — wrong today and have to learn from it and have to try and move this process— it and have to try and move this process forward, hopefully in a more constructive — process forward, hopefully in a more constructive and better thoughts for the last _ constructive and better thoughts for the last hours have given us. they can very much _ the last hours have given us. they can very much also _ the last hours have given us. they can very much also that _ the last hours have given us. they can very much also that of- the last hours have given us. he can very much also that of the outcome of the vote this afternoon. —— thank you very much. labour and the s&p already said they will not be involved in this, so that we are going to see a lot of discussion about this over the coming weeks and
5:10 pm
months —— the snp. and more of the programmes afternoon. for months -- the snp. and more of the programmes afternoon.— programmes afternoon. for the time being. helen — programmes afternoon. for the time being. helen catt — programmes afternoon. for the time being, helen catt and _ programmes afternoon. for the time being, helen catt and westminster. | large uk firms and financial institutions will be required to show how they intend to hit climate change targets, under new rules proposed by the treasury. on the fourth day of the cop26 conference in glasgow, it would come into effect for plans on the london stock in change by 2023. but the enforcements would not be enforced by law, leading to criticism which means the plans are doomed to fail. business is controlled by 40% of global assets have promised to help fund the global transition to green economies. the chancellor also told the conference the world's 20 biggest economies would aim to
5:11 pm
provide $100 billion of climate finance to developing countries by 2023, three years later than the target originally set in 2015. from glasgow, here's victoria gill. after a flurry of early deals on deforestation, methane emissions and cleaning up steel production, today at cop26 is all about the money. the chancellor rishi sunak said the global financial sector would be "rewired" to help meet our climate goals, and the uk would play a leading role. we are going to move towards making it mandatory for firms to publish a clear, deliverable plan setting out how they will decarbonise and transition to net zero, with an independent task force to define what's required. globally, a50 firms that collectively control about £95 trillion worth of assets have now pledged to clean up their investments.
5:12 pm
the aim is to channel as much money as possible towards the goal of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 celsius. make no mistake, the money is here if the world wants to use it. finance is no longer a mirror that reflects a world that's not doing enough — it's becoming a window through which ambitious climate action can deliver the sustainable future that people all over the world are demanding. it will help end of the tragedy on the horizon. amid all this talk today of trillions of pounds of investment, developing nations here at cop26 are still waiting for the delivery of a much more modest financial promise that was made to them more than a decade ago. the richest countries promised that, by 2020, they would provide $100 billion us every year to the poorest, most vulnerable countries — those that are suffering the most in the face of climate change. that financial promise will now not
5:13 pm
be fulfilled until 2023. that money is necessary to help developing countries adapt to the impact of climate change they are already experiencing daily, but also to transition to the greener path to the low—carbon economy so they don't repeat the high—carbon and high—emitting pathway that developed countries have followed. in what's been called the decisive decade for climate action, there's very little room to miss these deadlines. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. i'mjoined by karim haji, uk head of financial services at kpmg. good afternoon to you. how do you wreck to the announcement the uk is to be the first net zero financial sector? i to be the first net zero financial sector? ., , , to be the first net zero financial sector? ~ , , ., , sector? i think this is really excitin: sector? i think this is really exciting for _ sector? i think this is really exciting for the _ sector? i think this is really exciting for the uk - sector? i think this is really exciting for the uk and - sector? i think this is really exciting for the uk and i . sector? i think this is really| exciting for the uk and i am personally really welcoming it. it demonstrates the uk's leadership and innovation position in setting out
5:14 pm
these proposals, but it is also great for the financial services industry, showing them to be a real powerhouse in the uk. i think these gold standards measurement is really, really important because it means that all firms can be measured in the same way and treated to track against their progress, and finally i think this is notjust about showing your plans but also about actions, tangible actions, that people are taking to set out how they're gonna get net zero. indeed. in a they're gonna get net zero. indeed. in a practical— they're gonna get net zero. indeed. in a practical way. _ they're gonna get net zero. indeed. in a practical way, what _ they're gonna get net zero. indeed. in a practical way, what does - they're gonna get net zero. indeed. in a practical way, what does this i in a practical way, what does this mean for a company like kpmg? for kpmg, mean for a company like kpmg? fr?" kpmg, we are not called by these proposals directly, but voluntarily we have set out our plane six units are by 2030. that is notjust about our own omissions but our suppliers and also things like travel. but also we are helping all our clients making that transition into a net zero. �* , , ., . ,
5:15 pm
zero. and helping your clients in what way? _ zero. and helping your clients in what way? is — zero. and helping your clients in what way? is that _ zero. and helping your clients in what way? is that about - zero. and helping your clients in | what way? is that about choosing zero. and helping your clients in - what way? is that about choosing to invest in greener, cleaner technologies?— invest in greener, cleaner technologies? invest in greener, cleaner technolouies? , ., ., invest in greener, cleaner technolouies? ., ., technologies? yet, so it is a lot of different things. _ technologies? yet, so it is a lot of different things. firstly, _ technologies? yet, so it is a lot of different things. firstly, it - technologies? yet, so it is a lot of different things. firstly, it is - technologies? yet, so it is a lot of different things. firstly, it is run l different things. firstly, it is run how they transition to net zero, where they invest their money, what their strategy is, how they are dealing with their customers and suppliers. it is also a run how they report. the chancellor has announced about reporting their plans, helping prepare their plans and report, and finally we also provide assurance to the capital markets, to investors and wider society around these measures, so we welcome all of those aspects to help our clients.— aspects to help our clients. there are worries. _ aspects to help our clients. there are worries, aren't _ aspects to help our clients. there are worries, aren't there, - aspects to help our clients. there are worries, aren't there, about l aspects to help our clients. there l are worries, aren't there, about the enforcement of these plans? companies are being told they have got to have these plans, but there will not be any legal force behind them actually enforcing it. do you worry about that? what can be done about that? . , about that? once we set the standards — about that? once we set the standards about _ about that? once we set the standards about what - about that? once we set the standards about what is - about that? once we set the | standards about what is right about that? once we set the - standards about what is right and
5:16 pm
how you actually disclose this information, i think the markets and investors will provide that enforcement, and also there are rules for others to play, regulators, firms like our provider, so i'm not worried about that. i think this is a really important step forward. think this is a really important step forward-— think this is a really important ste forward. . , , , step forward. and i suppose i 'ust want to press fl step forward. and i suppose i 'ust want to press you i step forward. and i suppose i 'ust want to press you will i step forward. and i suppose i 'ust want to press you will limit h step forward. and i suppose ijust| want to press you will limit further on that, because if it is not mandatory, why is it in any big business orfinancial mandatory, why is it in any big business or financial institution's interest to go down this route? i think what will be mandatory is for people to disclose their plans and also the actions they are taking with those plans, so i think that is what is going to drive that adoption and that consistency, so i do think this is a defence to forward. also, hearing from clients everyday, their investors are asking about their plans, and that his rep acquitted by wider stickers they have — the
5:17 pm
government and society at large. i think those things will drive adoption, in addition to the fact that all you can company that are listed are going to have to disclose the information. —— all uk companies that are listed. the information. -- all uk companies that are listed.— that are listed. thank you for that. that is karim _ that are listed. thank you for that. that is karim haji, _ that are listed. thank you for that. that is karim haji, who _ that are listed. thank you for that. that is karim haji, who is- that are listed. thank you for that. that is karim haji, who is head - that are listed. thank you for that. that is karim haji, who is head ofl that is karim haji, who is head of financial services at kpmg. thank you. cop26 has attracted plenty of protests. the group extinction rebellion have been staging one in glasgow today, as james shaw reports. this is the corner of hope street and waterloo street in the centre of glasgow, just next her central station, and action by extinction rebellion happening here. they have attach themselves in some way to the entrance of this building, which belongs to the energy company sse, police have formed a cordon around those demonstrators just around the corner from where we are, to try and de—escalate this action, and meanwhile some of the protesters here have dressed up as cleaners, the point they are making is that or
5:18 pm
the point they are making is that or the allegation is that this company, amongst others, is responsible for what is known as greenwashing. in other words, appearing to be environment of the sound in their policies and behaviours but in reality behaving in a different way, net of the focus of the extension —— and that is the focus of the extinction rebellion protest today, this greenwashing. they visited and number of corporate buildings in glasgow, now they are locked onto this ssc building right next to central station in the centre of glasgow. it has been difficult for the police, i thing they have been chasing these protesters around the centre of glasgow, trying to catch up centre of glasgow, trying to catch up with them, trying to manage them. the situation does appear to have calmed down for the time being, but i think the difficulty for the police and try to manage the situation is what the protesters, the demonstrators, are doing is
5:19 pm
quite unpredictable and that mix tomori about what the impact will be on this city. our correspondentjim shall reporting there. a couple of bits of breaking is to bring you. you will remember the british fishing trawler impounded by the french authorities in the row over fishing rights after brexit, the director of that trawler has said this afternoon that the vessel had been allowed to leave and is going to set off for home later. apparently the court has not set any bonds for the release of the vessel and they are relieved that the crew, who remain in good spirits, are able to head home very shortly. that was the first bit of news i wanted to bring you. and then secondly, you will be aware we have been reporting all day but the allegations made by the former yorkshire county cricket,
5:20 pm
player azeem rafiq of racism and elites report that came out that suggested a senior player had made every sisler against him. in response to that, and other sponsors left the cricket club, yorkshire tea —— a racist slur against him. they say they wholeheartedly believe cricket should be a sport for everyone and his expenses and the way the panel report has been handled do not reflect that, so that statement there by yorkshire tea. straight back to westminster and to our political correspondent helen catt, who has got more on the boat this afternoon on standards. lots of reaction to that _ this afternoon on standards. lots of reaction to that vote _ this afternoon on standards. lots of reaction to that vote this _ reaction to that vote this afternoon, not to accept the wreck imitations of parliament's standards committee, which polices mps behaviour to suspend the tory mp
5:21 pm
owen paterson for 30 days after he was sent to have repeatedly broken lobbying rules. what happened was the vote was instead to set up a new committee to examine the whole process of discipline in parliament and that has the effect also putting his suspension on hold all that happens. the vote was very close in the end, a lot of mps, certainly in the end, a lot of mps, certainly in the opposition, who were very, did not think that it was quite the right way to do it, to put it mildly, and some tories as well, but with me as labour's emily thornberry. what do you make of the outcome this afternoon? let’s thornberry. what do you make of the outcome this afternoon?— outcome this afternoon? let's 'ust wheel beck — outcome this afternoon? let's 'ust wheel back of fl outcome this afternoon? let's 'ust wheel back of it. i outcome this afternoon? let's 'ust wheel back of it. the i outcome this afternoon? let's 'ust wheel back of it. the last i outcome this afternoon? let's 'ust wheel back of it. the last time]- outcome this afternoon? let'sjust wheel back of it. the last time the j wheel back of it. the last time the conservatives neck were in power for a long _ conservatives neck were in power for a long time — conservatives neck were in power for a long time, towards the end, conservative mac mps were collecting money _ conservative mac mps were collecting money and _ conservative mac mps were collecting money and brown envelopes and lobbying — money and brown envelopes and lobbying as a result of being paid for that, — lobbying as a result of being paid for that, and there is a committee set up. _ for that, and there is a committee set up. the — for that, and there is a committee set up, the majority, ithink for that, and there is a committee set up, the majority, i think it was alice _ set up, the majority, i think it was alice between numbers of the public and politicians, and they were to make _ and politicians, and they were to make decision on whether or not mps had behaved in the right way. we now have aitken— had behaved in the right way. we now have aitken centre neck party with
5:22 pm
majority _ have aitken centre neck party with majority of — have aitken centre neck party with majority of 80 that have been in power for — majority of 80 that have been in power for 12 years and we are way back— power for 12 years and we are way back into — power for 12 years and we are way back into sleeves again. we have an mp who _ back into sleeves again. we have an mp who received £82,000 to lobby 14 times on— mp who received £82,000 to lobby 14 times on behalf of his clients, not doing _ times on behalf of his clients, not doing his — times on behalf of his clients, not doing hisjob as... i do all my work free _ doing hisjob as... i do all my work free because _ doing hisjob as... i do all my work free, because i am a member of parliament, and what happened was his mates— parliament, and what happened was his mates did not like the fact that he was _ his mates did not like the fact that he was in — his mates did not like the fact that he was in trouble and they came along _ he was in trouble and they came along today, i can ever be how many of them _ along today, i can ever be how many of them there were, but 14 of them, who signed — of them there were, but 14 of them, who signed the amended, who had themselves been found guilty of doing _ themselves been found guilty of doing things wrong and held up before — doing things wrong and held up before the standards committee, they amend _ before the standards committee, they amend the _ before the standards committee, they amend the law so they change it, they get— amend the law so they change it, they get rid of the committee completely and introduce anyone work, _ completely and introduce anyone work, guess what, the majority of people _ work, guess what, the majority of people on— work, guess what, the majority of people on that committee not only are politicians that are considered neck— are politicians that are considered neck politicians. they can do whatever— neck politicians. they can do whatever they like and they are not a connal— whatever they like and they are not a connal to — whatever they like and they are not a connal to anyone —— conservative politicians — a connal to anyone —— conservative politicians. this is what happens when _ politicians. this is what happens when you — politicians. this is what happens when you have a majority of 80 and a government _ when you have a majority of 80 and a government with no shame. what do ou think,
5:23 pm
government with no shame. what do you think. they _ government with no shame. what do you think, they are _ government with no shame. what do you think, they are going _ government with no shame. what do you think, they are going to - government with no shame. what do you think, they are going to set - government with no shame. what do you think, they are going to set up . you think, they are going to set up this new committee, labour have said it is going to have no part of that? is that not of itself defeating? you will have no influence on what happens from here on in? thea;r will have no influence on what happens from here on in? they have set u- a happens from here on in? they have set up a committee _ happens from here on in? they have set up a committee where _ there will not be a balance of members, they're doing it because they are _ members, they're doing it because they are getting into trouble and they are getting into trouble and they don't like it and they are protecting themselves, and because they been_ protecting themselves, and because they been found out and because the rules are _ they been found out and because the rules are applied against them, they have decided to change the rules posted _ have decided to change the rules posted it — have decided to change the rules posted it is as corrupt as corrupt goes _ posted it is as corrupt as corrupt goes this — posted it is as corrupt as corrupt goes. this is what, if donald trump was able _ goes. this is what, if donald trump was able to— goes. this is what, if donald trump was able to blush, this would make donald _ was able to blush, this would make donald trump blush! this is not the way that— donald trump blush! this is not the way that you behave stop honestly, it is just _ way that you behave stop honestly, it is just extraordinary. way that you behave stop honestly, it isjust extraordinary. they think that rules — it isjust extraordinary. they think that rules are not applied to them, rules— that rules are not applied to them, rules apply— that rules are not applied to them, rules apply to everyone. no one is~~ _ rules apply to everyone. no one is... ~ , ., rules apply to everyone. no one is... we should say, jacob rees-mogg. _ is... we should say, jacob rees-mogg. a _ is. .. we should say, jacob rees-mogg, a number- is... we should say, jacob rees-mogg, a number of| is... we should say, jacob - rees-mogg, a number of mps, say is... we should say, jacob _ rees-mogg, a number of mps, say this rees—mogg, a number of mps, say this does not medially overturn the ruling against owen paterson, that
5:24 pm
still stands for stub they are going to look at —— that still stands. i5 to look at -- that still stands. is he to look at —— that still stands. is he going to be suspended? he is not. he could _ he going to be suspended? he is not. he could be — he going to be suspended? he is not. he could be. it could be a majority of tory— he could be. it could be a majority of tory mps, set up on this committee, in order to help out owen paterson, _ committee, in order to help out owen paterson, they might decide they're going _ paterson, they might decide they're going to _ paterson, they might decide they're going to suspend owen paterson, yes, that is— going to suspend owen paterson, yes, that is always possible. and i am nothing — that is always possible. and i am nothing we could not improve the rules, _ nothing we could not improve the rules, i_ nothing we could not improve the rules, i am — nothing we could not improve the rules, lam not nothing we could not improve the rules, i am not saying we should not continue _ rules, i am not saying we should not continue to— rules, i am not saying we should not continue to update them and make them _ continue to update them and make them more — continue to update them and make them more relevant, of course, but you cannot — them more relevant, of course, but you cannot do it on the back of a hearing or— you cannot do it on the back of a hearing or a _ you cannot do it on the back of a hearing ora finding you cannot do it on the back of a hearing or a finding that you do not like, _ hearing or a finding that you do not like you _ hearing or a finding that you do not like you do— hearing or a finding that you do not like, you do not decide that your mate _ like, you do not decide that your mate has— like, you do not decide that your mate has been found guilty of something you don't like, so you going _ something you don't like, so you going to — something you don't like, so you going to change the rules, and you take advantage of the fact the public— take advantage of the fact the public have given you an 80 seat majority — public have given you an 80 seat majority. they are here to serve the public, _ majority. they are here to serve the public, they— majority. they are here to serve the public, they are not here to serve themselves. public, they are not here to serve themselves-— themselves. would labour have brou . ht themselves. would labour have brought forward _ themselves. would labour have brought forward or _ themselves. would labour have brought forward or suggested . brought forward or suggested changes? the suggestion from jacob rees—mogg was this was the straw that broke the camel's back. this was the thing that push them to
5:25 pm
change the rules. with their been any push to change the procedure without this? —— were there have been? he without this? -- were there have been? , ., been? he said they were looking at chances been? he said they were looking at changes that _ been? he said they were looking at changes that could _ been? he said they were looking at changes that could be _ been? he said they were looking at changes that could be made - been? he said they were looking at changes that could be made an - changes that could be made an improvement they could be made, but you do— improvement they could be made, but you do it _ improvement they could be made, but you do it in _ improvement they could be made, but you do it in a _ improvement they could be made, but you do it in a calm way. you don't attach— you do it in a calm way. you don't attach it _ you do it in a calm way. you don't attach it to— you do it in a calm way. you don't attach it to an individual who was taken _ attach it to an individual who was taken £82,000 in order to not do his 'ob taken £82,000 in order to not do his job but— taken £82,000 in order to not do his job but instead to lobby on behalf of companies... | job but instead to lobby on behalf of companies... i do job but instead to lobby on behalf of companies. . ._ of companies... i do not think an bod of companies... i do not think anybody is — of companies... i do not think anybody is suggesting - of companies... i do not think anybody is suggesting yet - of companies... i do not think anybody is suggesting yet is l of companies... i do not think l anybody is suggesting yet is not done this job as an mp. it is anybody is suggesting yet is not done this job as an mp.- done this 'ob as an mp. it is not his 'ob done this 'ob as an mp. it is not hrsjeb to — done this job as an mp. it is not his job to take _ done this job as an mp. it is not his job to take £82,000 - done this job as an mp. it is not i his job to take £82,000 and lobby done this job as an mp. it is not - his job to take £82,000 and lobby 14 hisjob to take £82,000 and lobby 14 times— hisjob to take £82,000 and lobby 14 times on— hisjob to take £82,000 and lobby 14 times on behalf of those companies. he accepts _ times on behalf of those companies. he accepts that is what he did, he 'ust he accepts that is what he did, he just says — he accepts that is what he did, he just says there's nothing wrong with it either. _ just says there's nothing wrong with it either, and his friends say nothing _ it either, and his friends say nothing is _ it either, and his friends say nothing is wrong with it either, 14 of whom — nothing is wrong with it either, 14 of whom have also been found guilty by the _ of whom have also been found guilty by the standards committee of doing all sort _ by the standards committee of doing all sort of— by the standards committee of doing all sort of things. we have to have this committee because we have to hold people to account. yes, it is no problem — hold people to account. yes, it is no problem in us having a calm look at changes— no problem in us having a calm look at changes to the rules, but you do not do _ at changes to the rules, but you do not do it— at changes to the rules, but you do not do it like — at changes to the rules, but you do not do it like this, and i say say, ithink— not do it like this, and i say say, i think that — not do it like this, and i say say, i think that this is what comes when
5:26 pm
you have _ i think that this is what comes when you have a — i think that this is what comes when you have a conservative mac government with a large majority, 'ust government with a large majority, just like _ government with a large majority, just like we did in the 905, they lose their— just like we did in the 905, they lose their competence, they don't —— a conservative a —— majority. -- majority. emily thornberry, take -- ma'ority. emily thornberry, take ou -- majority. emily thornberry, take ou ve -- majority. emily thornberry, take you very much _ -- majority. emily thornberry, take you very much for _ -- majority. emily thornberry, take you very much for this _ -- majority. emily thornberry, take you very much for this new - -- majority. emily thornberry, take i you very much for this new committee will be set up. how much bible that have? as we heard there, labour are not code of anything to do with it, snp are narco to have anything to do with it. what happens after that? —— not going to have anything to do with it. ., ~ , ., ., ., with it. thank you for that. helen catt. england's deputy chief medical officer, professorjonathan van—tam, has warned there are likely to be "hard months to come" in the fight against the coronavirus. he told bbc news that infection rates in the uk are still "very high", and that people's behaviour in the coming weeks will be important in determining what happens with the pandemic in the "darkest months" of the winter. our health correspondent jim reed is here. strong notes of caution from jonathan van tam. 50 strong notes of caution from
5:27 pm
jonathan van tam.- strong notes of caution from jonathan van tam. so right. one of the most recognised _ jonathan van tam. so right. one of the most recognised will _ jonathan van tam. so right. one of the most recognised will faces - jonathan van tam. so right. one of the most recognised will faces in i the most recognised will faces in this pandemic, jvt, as he is called by the prime minister, a man who likes his turns of phrase, likes his metaphors. he was talking to bbc viewers and listeners of the five life. in the past, he has described the pandemic and compared to a football match, and he was compared to dick how he now ssseee, 18 months on, that for the going. —— to dick how he now ssseee, 18 months on, that forthe going. —— he to dick how he now ssseee, 18 months on, that for the going. —— he was asked today how he sees. i would say we're kind of in half time, extra time, and i think the final whistle in terms of, you know, i can't predict it, but my personal view is that we've got a few more months to run, and i think will be in a much calmer 5et of waters by...5pring, i think i'll say spring, yeah. but i think until then, caution, be very careful, this is not quite over, and vaccines, boosters — really important.
5:28 pm
a cautious tone there, but also a bit of optimism, looking forward to the spring. in the last 45 minutes, we have had the daily update of covid figures in the uk, and their two things going on at the moment. at the same time as you've got infections, positive cases, following — we're down to about 41,000 in the today, down on last week, a trend going on a week or so— at the same time, you've got hospitalisation and deaths still creeping up. we had another 217 people died within 20 days in a positive test reported today, and what professor van tam is warning against is people dropping their guard before christmas. he was asked about that today for this is what he had to say.
5:29 pm
i personally feel there are hardness to come _ i personally feel there are hardness to come in— i personally feel there are hardness to come in the winter and it is not over~ _ to come in the winter and it is not over~ i_ to come in the winter and it is not over~ ithink— to come in the winter and it is not over~ ithinka— to come in the winter and it is not over. i think a whole range of behaviours, including wearing face coverings. — behaviours, including wearing face coverings, but generally the caution people _ coverings, but generally the caution people take or don't take, terms of interacting — people take or don't take, terms of interacting with each other, that is going _ interacting with each other, that is going to _ interacting with each other, that is going to be a big determinant in what _ going to be a big determinant in what happens between now and the kind of— what happens between now and the kind of darkest months of the winter~ — you said,jim, just you said, jim, just before we heard from professor van tam there that the latest figures show that daily cases are going down, hospitalisations and deaths are going up. is that because there is a time lag? going up. is that because there is a time lac ? . , going up. is that because there is a time lac? . , going up. is that because there is a time lat? . , ., time lag? that is part of it. the other part _ time lag? that is part of it. the other part of — time lag? that is part of it. the other part of it _ time lag? that is part of it. the other part of it is _ time lag? that is part of it. the other part of it is we're - time lag? that is part of it. the other part of it is we're seeing l other part of it is we're seeing infections, deaths and hospitalisations in slightly different groups. we had a big increase and now a drop in school age children, secondary school aged children, particular in scotland, a bit earlier than in england for stub you're noticing the deaths and hospitalisations in slightly different groups, people tend to be
5:30 pm
still in their 705 and 805 cub and when you look at the numbers, they tend to people now who are double vaccinated, not because the vaccine is not working, it is very effectively, butjust because so many people have been vaccinated that you are still going to get some breakthrough infections, as they are called. people arejust breakthrough infections, as they are called. people are just gonna be lucky —— going to be unlucky. and that is what you heard from professor van tam, encouraging very strongly for people to come through for this third boosterjab in winter, protecting people heading into winter. , , ~., , winter. very interesting. many thanks, jim — winter. very interesting. many thanks, jim reed. _ joining me now is professor adam finn of bristol univeristy and a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. of thejoint committee good of the joint committee afternoon, professor. just y reaction good afternoon, professor. just your reaction to professor van time's comments. do you share his caution?
5:31 pm
hello, yes, jvt, as usual, is talking very good sense. he is right, we do need to be concerned about the months ahead. notjust with regard to covid—19 but the other wintertime viruses we can expect to come through this year in a way they did last year when we were all taking precautions and staying at home. he is right, we need to accelerate the vaccine programme but we also need to modify our behaviour and minimize transmission of both covid—19 and other viruses as much as we can. it is both, the vaccine, the boosters and behaviour? that message about behaviour is going to be difficult who have started to enjoy certain freedoms they didn't have, we didn't have for many months in lockdown? yes, i agree. have for many months in lockdown? yes, iagree. in a have for many months in lockdown? yes, i agree. in a way it is unfortunate the message has gone out that somehow this is all over and life has gone back to normal. it hasn't, we are still in the middle
5:32 pm
of it. jvt, likened it to a football match, you can liken it to the second world war. it is about 1942 at the moment, the tide might be about to tear but we have still got about to tear but we have still got a lot of fighting to do against this virus. ., ., , ., a lot of fighting to do against this virus. ., ., y., ., ,, ,, virus. how do you assess where we are with covid. _ virus. how do you assess where we are with covid, given _ virus. how do you assess where we are with covid, given the _ virus. how do you assess where we are with covid, given the figures. l are with covid, given the figures. there is a lot of ground. but 40,000 positive test is still a very large number and of course, very worrying to see that number of deaths. it is a lot of people dying who have been admitted and recently tested positive for covid. i am not —— not in any way an acceptable number of people being lost in that way, but also a massive pressure on the health service at a time when other pressures are going to go up. everything we can do to minimizing thatis everything we can do to minimizing that is going to make a difference. are there other measures people can
5:33 pm
take, continuing to test, for example?— take, continuing to test, for examle? , ., , , ., ., example? yes, absolutely. lateral flow tests are _ example? yes, absolutely. lateral flow tests are still _ example? yes, absolutely. lateral flow tests are still made _ example? yes, absolutely. lateral flow tests are still made available | flow tests are still made available free of charge. everyone in my group is being encouraged to do them twice a week and not to come to work if they test positive. particularly in they test positive. particularly in the adult population, those working and those socialising, i would strongly recommend them using those tests and using it as an early warning to avoid infecting other people. warning to avoid infecting other --eole. . ., warning to avoid infecting other --eole. . ~' , warning to avoid infecting other --eole. . ,, , . people. ok, thank you very much. good to talk— people. ok, thank you very much. good to talk to _ people. ok, thank you very much. good to talk to you _ people. ok, thank you very much. good to talk to you as _ people. ok, thank you very much. good to talk to you as always. - we have been reporting all afternoon about mps voting to change the system of policing mps about mps voting to change the system of policing mp5 of the standards of watchdog. this has been ever the case of the conservative mp owen paterson. he hasjust released a statement. he was found guilty,
5:34 pm
you will remember, of lobbying, which is against the rules. he says that after two years of hell, i now have the opportunity to clear my name. and this comes after the commons voted for a proposal that was supported by the government to overhaul their disciplinary process, rather than to suspend him immediately. we will get more on that during the course of this afternoon, but for the moment it is time for the sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport center, here is sarah. let's start with cricket because scotland has macro men's t20 cup is over after they were beaten by new zealand in dubai. the scots bowled first and made a really good start... with kiwi captain kane williamson out without scoring. new zealand were 53—3 at one point but a magnificent innings of 93 from martin guptill helped them to an imoressive172—5.
5:35 pm
scotland made a valliant effort to their reply... matthew cross at one stage hitting five consecutive fours. but scotland, in the end, fell 16 runs short, which means they are out of the competition with two matches still to play. the win means the black caps keep alive their bid for a place in the semi—finals. in the day's other game, india needed a win against afghanistan to avoid elimination. afghanistan won the toss and put india into bat — might have regretted it, as india were on fire with the bat, hitting a brilliant 210 runs from their 20 overs for the highest total we've seen at this world cup. a superb partnership between kl rahul and rohit sharma, who got 140 runs between them, helping them on the way to the total. afghanistan now batting and look unlikely to reach the target of 211 runs. bad news for england —
5:36 pm
fast bowler tymall mills will miss the rest of their world cup campaign. mills sustained a right thigh strain while bowling in the win over sri lanka on monday in sharjah, pulling up during a run up. a scan revealed the extent of the injury. travelling reserve reece topley willjoin the squad. a series of sponsors and partners have ended their ties with yorkshire county cricket club over the handling of allegations of racism made by azeem rafiq from his time at the club. yorkshire tea say they wholeheartedly believe that cricket should be a sport for everyone and the way the panel report has been handled doesn't reflect that. their current partnership was coming to an end, but they took the decision to end it with immediate effect. david lloyd clubs have also cut ties, saying the partnership was on a local level and was put on hold a few weeks ago. in light of recent reports,
5:37 pm
it will not be reinstated. and emerald group publishing said they have taken the decision to remove our brand association with yccc and headingley stadium. rafiq and members of yorkshire will give evidence in person to mp5 into a report which found he had been a victim of racial harrassment and bullying at the club. sprinters adam gemili and daryll neita have been ordered by uk athletics to "cease all association" with american coach rana reider after "multiple complaints of sexual misconduct" were made against him. uka has acted after receiving information from the us center for safesport about the conduct of reider, with an investigation is imminent. gemili and neita are currently coached by reider and both have been told that it is inappropriate for them to continue to be associated with him. the welsh rugby union is set to offer some of its female internationals their first
5:38 pm
professional contracts. up to 10 of their 15—a—side players will be awarded full—time deals, while there will be retainer contracts for 15 more individuals. the 12—month contracts are currently being drawn up with their value not yet known. there will also be match and training fees for the women. previously, the unions performance director nigel walker had admitted the governing body had not "covered itself in glory" in how it managed the women's game. british men's number one cameron norrie eased past the american reilly opelka to reach the final 16 of the paris open. the 6—3, 6—4 victory means norrie is still in with a chance of makintg the atp finals later this month. norrie will face taylor fritz in the last 16. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. more now on our main story and mp5 have voted narrowly to block the suspension of a conservative mp
5:39 pm
who broke lobbying rules. an investigation found that owen paterson used his position to benefit two companies he worked for. mps voted not to support the recommendations of parliament's committee on standards over mr paterson's conduct. in the past few minutes mr paterson has responded saying, after two years of hell, i have the opportunity to clear my name. we can speak now to the conservative mp whose amendment was successful, the former leader of the house, andrea leadsom, whojoins us now. good to have you on the programme. you will be pleased your amendment for selected and has been voted on. but as far as you are concerned, why did this change of rules have to be linked to owen paterson's fate? there isn't a change of rules, what my amendment was seeking to do was
5:40 pm
to establish a short, three—month only of the impartiality and the justice within the investigation system. as i said in the chamber, i deeply regret it was at a time when there was a live case before us, but nevertheless that review is long overdue. unfortunately, the system that looks at mps does not stand comparison with any of the laws of the land over workplace grievances elsewhere. and having a couple of years ago established an independent complaints and grievance key myself, i can tell you the scheme we put in place then was more fair and justifiable than the system under which mps are measured against expenses and so on. share which mps are measured against expenses and so on.— expenses and so on. are your concerns — expenses and so on. are your concerns about _ expenses and so on. are your concerns about owen - expenses and so on. are your. concerns about owen paterson, expenses and so on. are your- concerns about owen paterson, or are they about the system? they are about the system. in which case, how
5:41 pm
wise has it been to make this move at this time with owen paterson has macro fate in the spotlight? aren't you owing yourself open, rightly open to labour's accusations that you are simplyjust protecting your mate? you are simply 'ust protecting your mate? �* . . , you are simply 'ust protecting your mate? a ., , ., �* you are simply 'ust protecting your mate? �* . . , ., �* ~' you are simply 'ust protecting your mate? a ., , ,, ., mate? actually, i don't think that is the case- _ mate? actually, i don't think that is the case. what _ mate? actually, i don't think that is the case. what today's - mate? actually, i don't think that is the case. what today's notion l is the case. what today's notion decides is we will not be looking at the report of the committee on standards today. instead, that select committee, which will be politically balanced, so it's not a conservative thing, it is politically balanced, it will review the process of fairness and accountability over a short period, three months only. it may well represent the same committee standards report to the house in three months' time, or it may, should it decide the process has not been impartial and there haven't been impartial and there haven't been the natural laws ofjustice applied, it may look at the case
5:42 pm
again. it isn't a stitch up or letting anybody off, there is a three month delay. i regret bringing it forward on a day when there is a live case in front of us. but unfortunately these things need to be reviewed. this unfortunately these things need to be reviewed-— unfortunately these things need to be reviewed. , . ., ., be reviewed. this committee will not have any labour _ be reviewed. this committee will not have any labour or— be reviewed. this committee will not have any labour or snp _ be reviewed. this committee will not have any labour or snp members, i be reviewed. this committee will not l have any labour or snp members, how can it have any credibility? it is absolutely _ can it have any credibility? it 3 absolutely intended to be politically balanced. but absolutely intended to be politically balanced. but it is not auoin to politically balanced. but it is not going to be. _ politically balanced. but it is not going to be. is _ politically balanced. but it is not going to be, is it? _ politically balanced. but it is not going to be, is it? that - politically balanced. but it is not going to be, is it? that is - politically balanced. but it is not going to be, is it? that is what i going to be, is it? that is what opposition _ going to be, is it? that is what opposition members _ going to be, is it? that is what opposition members are - going to be, is it? that is what| opposition members are saying going to be, is it? that is what - opposition members are saying and i sincerely hope they change their minds. the amendment for three labour mps and one scottish nationalist entity. privately, a lot of opposition mps are gravely concerned about the system. in the chamber, things can get quite party political, labour members have not wanted to be open about their
5:43 pm
concerns. i understand that from a political point of view. but i hope as things calm down over the next few days labour whips and snp whips will be considered. this is an important part of our parliamentary scrutiny, is that the reviews of members of parliament need to be fair in the same way that we spend so much of our lives fighting for justice for our constituents. ok. justice for our constituents. ok, but there are _ justice for our constituents. ok, but there are people on your own backbenchers, we heard from nigel mills a while ago, who are deeply concerned this vote has gone through. you must fear the public is going to look at this and think, conservative mps don't like the verdict of the committee, so they have decided to try to dismantle the system? figs have decided to try to dismantle the s stem? �* , have decided to try to dismantle the s stem? r have decided to try to dismantle the s stem? a ., , ., ., system? as i say, that is not what this amendment _ system? as i say, that is not what this amendment is _ system? as i say, that is not what this amendment is about. - system? as i say, that is not what this amendment is about. this - this amendment is about. this amendment is a long, overdue and short review of the scrutiny system
5:44 pm
for members of parliament, long overdue. and it will provide some clarity in the system. it may not want to change anything in the report on owen paterson. but the point is, there hasn't been an opportunity to have such an amendment in recent months and so today was the opportunity and as a former leader of the commons, who has wanted to see this system overhauled for a long period of time, i took the chance and i'm very glad that it passed.— glad that it passed. there is a suspicion _ glad that it passed. there is a suspicion you _ glad that it passed. there is a suspicion you will _ glad that it passed. there is a suspicion you will be - glad that it passed. there is a suspicion you will be aware i glad that it passed. there is a | suspicion you will be aware of, glad that it passed. there is a - suspicion you will be aware of, this move has been carried out in order to avoid a by—election. if owen paterson had been suspended, it would have been possible, if voters got together, if 10% of voters triggered a by—election, that would have been possible? riff triggered a by-election, that would have been possible?— triggered a by-election, that would have been possible? of course, there will alwa s have been possible? of course, there will always be — have been possible? of course, there will always be accusations _ have been possible? of course, there will always be accusations of- have been possible? of course, there will always be accusations of that - will always be accusations of that sort. �* , ., ,
5:45 pm
will always be accusations of that sort. �* , . , sort. but is there any truth in it? no, there _ sort. but is there any truth in it? no, there isn't _ sort. but is there any truth in it? no, there isn't any _ sort. but is there any truth in it? no, there isn't any truth - sort. but is there any truth in it? no, there isn't any truth in - sort. but is there any truth in it? no, there isn't any truth in it. i no, there isn't any truth in it. having been leader of the commons for two years myself and having stood up for accountability, andi and i am seeking to ensure transparency and fairness in the system, which i have felt for a long time is not present in the elements of the scrutiny of mps. and time and again i have had colleagues on all sides of the house talking about the system and how they have felt they have not been able to defend themselves and bring forward evidence and have it properly had. they felt the system was stacked against them, no right to appeal and their careers and their lives have been damaged by an unfair system. this is the opportunity to put things right and so it was the right things right and so it was the right thing to do to take it. if
5:46 pm
things right and so it was the right thing to do to take it.— thing to do to take it. if you have this cross-party _ thing to do to take it. if you have this cross-party support, - thing to do to take it. if you have this cross-party support, why - thing to do to take it. if you have | this cross-party support, why not this cross—party support, why not get it openly before you actually try and change the system? to a certain extent you must be dismayed it has become this controversial? i am absolutely dismayed. opposition politicians have decided to take apart is in line because i was... you could have consulted them? i was very careful — you could have consulted them? i was very careful to — you could have consulted them? i was very careful to make _ you could have consulted them? i was very careful to make it _ you could have consulted them? i was very careful to make it clear _ you could have consulted them? i —" very careful to make it clear that this was not letting anybody off the hook. it is a short, time—limited until february the 3rd, a review of the oversight system, at the end of which this very same report may well come back to the house for a vote, or indeed if it is felt there is some elements of the process that has been missing, whether it an appeal, it may be implemented. it is
5:47 pm
not a stitch up whatsoever, it is not a stitch up whatsoever, it is not something i would get involved in. and yes, i am dismayed to the extent of which opposition mps have not appreciated and gone with what i think would be in many of their minds, which is the system isn't fair. . ., minds, which is the system isn't fair. ., ,, , ., minds, which is the system isn't fair. . ~' , ., , minds, which is the system isn't fair. ., ,, , ., , . minds, which is the system isn't fair. ., ,, , . ., fair. ok, thank you very much for our fair. ok, thank you very much for your time- _ large uk firms and financial institutions will have to publish plans for how they'll hit net—zero carbon emissions, under new plans from the treasury. the proposal would come into force for firms listed on the london stock exchange from 2023, which would be assessed by experts to ensure they are credible. joining me now from glasgow, kingsmill bond, who is the energy transition strategist at carbon tracker initiative. good afternoon, your reaction to what has been proposed? this good afternoon, your reaction to what has been proposed?- what has been proposed? this is treat. it what has been proposed? this is great- it is _ what has been proposed? this is great- it is part _ what has been proposed? this is great. it is part of _ what has been proposed? this is great. it is part of a _ what has been proposed? this is great. it is part of a wider - what has been proposed? this is i great. it is part of a wider package of measures. there is a lot of
5:48 pm
enthusiasm and excitement about what is going on. it is notjust this, the fact that 40% of financial assets are united behind the alignment of paris. we now have the money and the plan, it is great. hares money and the plan, it is great. how will this work— money and the plan, it is great. how will this work in _ money and the plan, it is great. how will this work in practice? what will this work in practice? what will you expect to see in companies' plans, how will they be monitored? again, as the statement makes clear, the details are yet to be worked out. in broad terms, listed companies, asset managers and asset owners will be obliged to explain why they haven't got an zero plan and strategy for their assets. they will be obliged to do that by 2023 and there will be a gold standard set, the process will be ratcheted
5:49 pm
with five year reviews. it is going to be quite important to force people to have clarity on what their plans are for a zero future. and in so doing, it will be very helpful, both for the to maintain its lead in finance generally, but also for companies to get ready for the world thatis companies to get ready for the world that is to come. figs companies to get ready for the world that is to come.— that is to come. as far as i understand _ that is to come. as far as i understand it, _ that is to come. as far as i understand it, while - that is to come. as far as i understand it, while it - that is to come. as far as i understand it, while it is. that is to come. as far as i - understand it, while it is mandatory for companies to publish these plans, it is not legally enforceable for them to carry it out? iloathed plans, it is not legally enforceable for them to carry it out?— for them to carry it out? what is likel to for them to carry it out? what is likely to happen _ for them to carry it out? what is likely to happen in _ for them to carry it out? what is likely to happen in practice, - likely to happen in practice, investors will use this information to separate the companies which are taking net zero seriously from those which just are not. taking net zero seriously from those whichjust are not. as taking net zero seriously from those which just are not. as we taking net zero seriously from those whichjust are not. as we have taking net zero seriously from those which just are not. as we have seen, we will be defunding those which are not taking the future seriously and reallocating capital to those which
5:50 pm
are. it will be a tool to allow the capital to flow more effectively. 0k, capital to flow more effectively. ok, thank you so much for that. novels set in sri lanka and south africa, cardiff bay and the outer cosmos are among those to have been nominated for this year's booker prize. the winner will be announced at a ceremony tonight, which you'll be able to watch live here on the bbc news channel from around 7.15pm. the shortlist for the 2021 prize includes three american writers and, for the second year in a row, only one british author. our arts correspondent rebecca jonesjoins me now. you have read those coveted cover? i have. strictly alphabetical order, so let's start with the sri lankan author, his second author, a very young author. it is an interesting book because long sentences, long
5:51 pm
paragraphs, very little dialogue. it is more a meditation on the trauma caused by the civil war in sri lanka. it caused by the civil war in sri lanka. ., �* , ., ,., lanka. it won't be for everyone, i actually really — lanka. it won't be for everyone, i actually really like _ lanka. it won't be for everyone, i actually really like to. _ lanka. it won't be for everyone, i actually really like to. the - lanka. it won't be for everyone, i i actually really like to. the promise b a south actually really like to. the promise by a south african _ actually really like to. the promise by a south african writer. - actually really like to. the promise by a south african writer. it - actually really like to. the promise by a south african writer. it is - actually really like to. the promise by a south african writer. it is a . by a south african writer. it is a family saga set over four decades but it looks at the unfulfilled promises of south africa post apartheid. it promises of south africa post apartheid-— promises of south africa post aartheid. ., ., , apartheid. it works on different levels. apartheid. it works on different levels- this _ apartheid. it works on different levels. this one, _ apartheid. it works on different levels. this one, very - apartheid. it works on different i levels. this one, very interesting. no one is talking about this, patricia lockwood. she is a poet, herfirst patricia lockwood. she is a poet, her first novel. patricia lockwood. she is a poet, herfirst novel. it patricia lockwood. she is a poet, her first novel. it is about a woman who becomes a star on social media and it is written in fragmented toes. then it turns into a completely different book, very interesting. the fortune men, the only british writer on the shortlist. british somali writer.
5:52 pm
this is a historical novel and it is set in tiger bay in cardiff in the 1950s. it is set in tiger bay in cardiff in the 19505. it is based on a true story. it is a fictionalised account of a somali sailor who was wrongly convicted of murder. very powerful. bewilderment, richard towers, american author, he won the pulitzer prize and has been shortlisted for this price before. it is about an astra biologist whose son has special needs and he turns to unconventional methods to try to help him. so a book of ideas, that one. and alas, maggie shipp stead, another american, one. and alas, maggie shipp stead, anotheramerican, herthird book. it is about a post—war female pilot and a 2ist—century actress who is playing the pilot. it is a bit baggy, but brilliant book, great fun, full of six, drugs and rock and
5:53 pm
roll as well. fun, full of six, drugs and rock and roll as well-— roll as well. rebecca, you are not on the panel— roll as well. rebecca, you are not on the panel of— roll as well. rebecca, you are not on the panel ofjudges, _ roll as well. rebecca, you are not on the panel ofjudges, if- roll as well. rebecca, you are not on the panel ofjudges, if you i roll as well. rebecca, you are not i on the panel ofjudges, if you were, he would be your winner? i on the panel ofjudges, if you were, he would be your winner?— he would be your winner? i would choose the _ he would be your winner? i would choose the promise. _ he would be your winner? i would choose the promise. i— he would be your winner? i would choose the promise. i read - he would be your winner? i would choose the promise. i read it - he would be your winner? i would choose the promise. i read it on i choose the promise. i read it on holiday in august. the first one i read, i put it down and i said to my husband, i think this should win. it is exceptional. whether the judges agree, i do not know. brute is exceptional. whether the “udges agree, i do not knowi is exceptional. whether the “udges agree, i do not know. we haven't got [one to agree, i do not know. we haven't got long to wait- — agree, i do not know. we haven't got long to wait- a _ agree, i do not know. we haven't got long to wait. a reminder— agree, i do not know. we haven't got long to wait. a reminder again - agree, i do not know. we haven't got long to wait. a reminder again the i long to wait. a reminder again the winner will be announced at a ceremony tonight, which you can watch live on the bbc news channel from around 7.15. a four—year—old girl has been found alive and well more than two weeks after she went missing in australia. cleo smith disappeared from a tent she was sleeping in with her family, on a remote campsite. police found her, locked in a house in her home town in western australia. a 36—year—old man is in custody and being questioned by detectives. our sydney correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. hiya, my name's cameron — how are you? are you doing ok? we're going to take you to see
5:54 pm
your mummy and daddy, ok? this is the moment cleo smith was rescued, found in one of the rooms in a locked house, not far from her family home in the western australian town of carnarvon. alive and well — the news her parents have waited more than two weeks for, and feared they wouldn't hear. one of the officers described the moment they found her as one of shock and elation. i wanted to be absolutely sure it was her, so i said, "what's your name? " and she didn't answer, and i said, "what's your name?" she didn't answer again, so i asked her a third time, and then she looked at me and she said, "my name's cleo." the four—year—old vanished from her family's tent while camping on the western australian coast. it sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area, with extensive air, land, and sea searches. a million—dollar reward was offered for information on her whereabouts. cleo's disappearance gripped australia. from day one, this story captured the nation's heart.
5:55 pm
now that she's been rescued, so many people took to social media to express theirjoy and relief — including, of course, cleo's mother, ellie smith. she said, "ourfamily is whole again." australia's prime minister scott morrison said this was wonderful, relieving news. this is every parent's worst nightmare, and the fact that that nightmare has come to an end and our worst fears were not realised i5ju5t a huge relief, and a moment for greatjoy. a 36—year—old man is in custody and is being questioned by detectives. more details have yet to emerge about how little cleo disappeared and the events that led to her rescue. but, for now, a family's ordeal is over, and a country's prayers have been answered. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney.
5:56 pm
changes are fat out there, even as we speak, we are pulling in cold air from the north and it will work its way increasingly southwards right the way across england and wales. we have seen some showers today, draping themselves across the north of the uk and down western and eastern coasts. tomorrow we will have a similar pattern to the showers. many will see some sunny spells. the biggest change is that it will feel colder. here is the cold air, working its way down the matter on a northerly wind, sweeping right the way into the south for thursday. still showers to come this evening across eastern most counties of the uk. towards the west of pembrokeshire and cornwall, this line of showersjust pembrokeshire and cornwall, this line of showers just keeps feeding in. elsewhere, a dry picture, clearing skies and we could see a
5:57 pm
frost anywhere from central scotland into parts of the midlands, perhaps the welsh marches. further east, mcleod and the breeze with the showers. lessen the way of showers across the eastern side of the uk through thursday, but some will clip into the coast every now and then and it will feel chilly along the length of the north sea coast with the win. same for pembrokeshire and cornwall, persistent showers elsewhere, a lot of sunshine and in the afternoon temperatures will be similar to today but it will feel cooler because of the northerly wind. that little line is a warm front and that will tip its way across the uk on friday. warm, so we will see milder air getting in to the north of the uk through friday and some patchy rain as well with increasing cloud across scotland and northern ireland. further south, temperatures a little higher than thursday, klau but it should stay dry. friday evening, some clearer spells if you are heading out but to
5:58 pm
the north of the uk, the cloud will continue to build as we make way for our next weather system to come in from the north—west. as it comes in, it comes in with a westerly wind. so it comes in with a westerly wind. so it becomes milder. saturday, quite wet for scotland and northern ireland, brighter perhaps later in the day. england and wales, quite a lot of fine weather but there will be wet weather for northern england and wales late in the day. sunday is the driest and brightest day of the weekend. we should see quite a bit of sunshine on sunday and wet weather will be limited to the far north—eastern regions of scotland. temperatures, 12 or 13 degrees.
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
at six... mps have voted to prevent the immediate suspension of a conservative mp accused of breaking lobbying rules. to cries of "shame", they narrowly voted through measures to shake up the rules on mps' behaviour. an investigation found owen paterson used his position to benefit two companies he worked for — labour called today's vote a return to tory sleaze. when they break the rules, mr speaker, theyjust remake the rules. i think that she needs to consider the procedures of this house in a spirit of fairness. tonight owen paterson said after two years of hell he now had the chance to clear his name. also on the programme: tackling global warming — the chancellor says he wants the uk to show the world how finance
6:01 pm
and business can play their part

14 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on