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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 3, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the british chancellor, rishi sunak, promises to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. he's been outlining a plan at the cop26 summit in glasgow to stop firms investing in fossil fuels and push money into green energy and technologies instead. in australia, a four—year—old girl — missing for 18 days — cleo smith, has been found alive and well in a locked house. i said, "what's your name?" and she didn't answer. "what's your name? " she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time and she looked at me and she said, "my name is cleo." the board of yorkshire county cricket club faces heavy criticism over its handling of allegations of racism by a former player. scientists in the united states have
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given the go—ahead for children aged between five and 11 to receive a pfizer coronavirus vaccine. and — as world leaders try to agree on how to fight climate change, we have a special report from madagascar, which is on the brink of what the un is calling the world s first climate—induced famine . hello and welcome or around the world. the uk's chancellor, rishi sunak, is promising to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. in a speech at the cop26 summit in glasgow, he said the uk will become the first "net zero aligned" financial centre.
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he said a50 firms controlling 40% of global financial assets — equivalent to $130 trillion — have now aligned themselves to limit global warming to 1.5c. and he outlined his plan to force british businesses to explain how they intend to deliver on climate targets. the chancellor said the finance to fight climate change had to come from a mix of public and private money. public investment alone isn't enough. our second action is to mobilise private finance. let me pay an enormous tribute to mark carney for his leadership — leadership that is delivering results. the glasgow financial alliance for net zero has now brought together financial organisations with assets worth over $130 trillion of capital to be deployed.
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this is a historic wall of capital for the net zero transition around the world. what matters now is action — to invest that capital in our low carbon future. to do that, investors need to have as much clarity and confidence in the climate impact of their investments as they do in the traditional financial metrics of profit and loss. so our third action is to rewire the entire global financial system for net zero, better and more consistent climate data. sovereign green bonds, mandatory sustainability disclosures, proper climate risk surveillance, stronger global reporting standards. all things we need to deliver and i am proud that the uk is playing its part. we've already made it mandatory for businesses to disclose climate—related financial
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information, with 35 other countries signing up to do the same. today, i'm announcing that the uk will go further and become the first ever net zero aligned financial centre. this means we are going to move towards making it mandatory for firms to publish a clear deliverable plan, setting out how they will decarbonise and transition to net zero with an independent task force to define what's required. so, a renewed pledge to $100 billion a year of public funding. over $130 trillion of private capital waiting to be deployed and a greener financial system under way. six years ago, paris set the ambition. today, in glasgow, we're providing the investment we need to deliver that ambition.
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rishi sunak there. jeannie boyle is a director at e0 investors, a financial adviser which describes itself as a sustainable investment specialist. she works with organisations and individuals. thank you very much for being with us. rishi sunak they're talking about the uk becoming the first net zero aligned financial centre. what exactly does that mean? is that real genuine action or is that blah, blah, blah?— genuine action or is that blah, blah, blah? . , , ., ., blah, blah? that depends on how we achieve that — blah, blah? that depends on how we achieve that. it _ blah, blah? that depends on how we achieve that. it is _ blah, blah? that depends on how we achieve that. it is great _ blah, blah? that depends on how we achieve that. it is great the - achieve that. it is great the financial sector recognises they have to make changes. he has asked all companies to publish their plans to reach neck zero and it will place a task force to make sure we implement gold standard so hopefully
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we can see those actions are robust and measurable. the issue may be if we go about reaching net zero simply by trying to offset all of our carbon emissions. that isn't the way that we are going to make a change. we need to actually be reducing carbon emissions and what we would like to hear the chancellor go on and talk about is how we can get some of our larger financial institutions to stop investing in new fossil fuel capability. the international agency... energy agency recently reported that we can't fund these expansions and reach our 1.5 degrees targets. some of the institutions involved are not yet taking steps to stop this investment. 50 yet taking steps to stop this investment.— yet taking steps to stop this investment. , ., , ., investment. so firms are being told this is what — investment. so firms are being told this is what they _ investment. so firms are being told this is what they need _ investment. so firms are being told this is what they need to _ investment. so firms are being told this is what they need to do - investment. so firms are being told this is what they need to do but - investment. so firms are being told this is what they need to do but if. this is what they need to do but if they don't, who is really going to police that and who will punishment and what would be the punishment if they don't? that is a very good question and not something that was covered in this announcement. hopefully, the task
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force that has been put in place will have the capability to sanction companies if they are not treating this seriously enough. the important thing is about getting information to investors so they can see not only that a company has plans in place but to assess the quality of those plans, so capital can be diverted to companies who are genuinely making change towards net zero. do you think it's in the interests of companies to make these changes, and they are pretty dramatic changes, let's face it, because of their investors, because of their shareholders and because of good public relations they need to do it, they need to be seen to be doing it? i think there's been quite a few companies who have been doing it or seem to be doing it. if you are a shareholder in a business, then surely one that business to be operating profitably over the next century. this is about sustainability of the businesses and lifestyles we have as well as sustainability of the planet. but is being sustainable the same as being profitable? in other words, can... are you likely to make more
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money if you don't make these changes, that is the worry, i suppose? i think it's possible you might make more money over the short term but if you look at the long term, if investors are interested in the long term, those profits could be quite short lived. like many b corporations we are committed to being a profitable business but also acting sustainability and more and more businesses are getting on board with the idea we can be responsible in the way we go about doing our business without sacrificing profit. jeannie boyle, thank you very much indeed, directorat jeannie boyle, thank you very much indeed, director at e0 investors, thank you. a four—year—old girl who went missing from a remote australian campsite nearly three weeks ago has been found alive and well following a huge search operation. cleo smith was discovered by police in a locked house and has now been reunited with her parents. a 36—year—old man is being questioned by police. 0ur australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports.
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alive and well — the news cleo smith's parents have been waiting more than two weeks for. a police team broke their way into a locked house in carnarvon at about 1am. they found little cleo in one of those rooms. one of the officers picked her up into his arms and asked her, "what's your name? " she said, "my name is cleo." cleo was reunited with her parents a short time later. this is the outcome we all hoped and prayed for. for now, welcome home, cleo. the four—year—old had vanished from her family's tent while camping on the western australian coast. it sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area, with extensive air, land and sea searches. her disappearance gripped australia and a reward of $1 million was offered for information leading to her location. cleo's mother, ellie smith,
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expressed her relief on social media, saying, "our family is whole again." a man is in custody and being questioned by detectives. australia's prime minister, scott morrison, said this was "wonderful, relieving news". this is every parent's worst nightmare and the fact that that nightmare has come to an end and our worst fears were not realised isjust a huge relief and a moment for greatjoy. more details have yet to emerge about how little cleo disappeared and how she was found. but for now, a family's nightmare is over and a country's prayers have been answered. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. one of the police officers who found cleo has been speaking about that magical moment she was rescued. i asked her what her name was. one of the guysjumped in in front of me and picked her up and, you know, ijust wanted to be
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absolutely sure that... you know, it certainly looked like cleo. i wanted to be absolutely sure it was her, so i said, "what's your name? " and she didn't answer and i said, "what's your name?" she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time and then she looked at me and she said, "my name's cleo." narelle towie is a journalist who's been covering the story for the guardian and says the news has been welcomed right across australia. yes, it's been a massive story here, that started quite early in the morning for us, 4.1 5am. police issued a statement saying that cleo had been found, that she had said, herfur sort of thing had been found, that she had said, her fur sort of thing she said to the police officers was, "my name is cleo" and it's just been going since then. it's been a very exciting day. you could really see the elation in the police officers' faces when they were making their announcements and
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giving press conferences. it was just a day of celebration. henge giving press conferences. it was just a day of celebration. have you had any indications _ just a day of celebration. have you had any indications about - just a day of celebration. have you had any indications about what - just a day of celebration. have you | had any indications about what took the police to that particular location, how they narrowed down their search and how they eventually found her? , , ., ., ., found her? they put it down to hard olice found her? they put it down to hard police work- — found her? they put it down to hard police work- so _ found her? they put it down to hard police work. so a _ found her? they put it down to hard police work. so a huge _ found her? they put it down to hard police work. so a huge amount - found her? they put it down to hard police work. so a huge amount of i police work. so a huge amount of analysis, forensic. they went exactly what it is. there were reports about a week after she went missing that a car was spotted turning off the main road to the campsite onto the highway towards carnarvon, where cleo's family is from where she was eventually found. that was sort of the main clue that the police had and were asking for people to come forward and speak about. but when questioned today, they didn't say it was only one thing, they said it was just a really effective hard work and
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enormous work that went into the investigation. find enormous work that went into the investigation-— investigation. and this was huge man ower investigation. and this was huge manpower devoted _ investigation. and this was huge manpower devoted to _ investigation. and this was huge manpower devoted to this - investigation. and this was huge i manpower devoted to this search, wasn't it? we could see the emotion on the faces and in the voices of the police that found her, that may be against their expectation is that they had found her alive and well? yes, it was a massive, one of the biggest and most complicated search and police investigations in wa's history. so the task force were 100 officers, a $1 million reward and it was gruelling as well. so the location where cleo went missing was a very remote, very isolated, no electricity at that campsite, no running water. they campsite, the beachin running water. they campsite, the beach in front of it is quite nice but either side of that is rugged terrain with open ocean. big tides.
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so picturesque spot but very brutal and the landscape that they were searching through as well was dense shrub, beach shrub. so they knew to use police horses to search. 0fficers use police horses to search. officers were working around the clock, almost from the moment she went missing. the searches of the family home where they were looking forensically for evidence went well into the night quite a view times. it was huge. the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor, rishi sunak, is promising to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. as to cut carbon emissions. you have just been hearin in australia, a four—year—old girl, missing for 18 days, has been found alive and well in a locked house. the board of yorkshire county cricket club faces heavy criticism over its handling of allegations of racism by a former player. "a turning point in our
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battle against covid—19", that's how us presidentjoe biden described the decision to approve vaccines for all children over the age of five in the united states. the jabs are expected to be rolled out from today. 0ur north america correspondent, nada tawfik, has been to florida to gauge how communities there feel about the decision. the simple joy of passing time together. it's something the simons value now more than ever. after the whole family came down with covid, nine—year—old mckenna suffered complications that sent her away to the hospital for a week. it was our worst nightmare coming true. everybody had said that, you know, kids recover really easily, it's not that big of a deal. both of us were vaccinated, my parents were vaccinated. my 14—year—old, of course, is vaccinated. so, like, you know, we felt like we minimised our risks. sick with pneumonia, and anaemia, mckenna was hooked up to oxygen and given antibiotics. it wasn't until she had
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a blood transfusion that she finally improved. across the united states, households now have the option to vaccinate their young ones. those who get covid in this age group largely have mild symptoms or none at all but they aren't completely immune. this is a place i hope most parents never get to see. dr kenneth alexander specialises in infectious diseases and was a consultant for moderna. he's concerned that vaccine hesitancy could slow efforts to end this pandemic. these vaccines are new, so i can't look you in the eye and say... i don't know what's going to happen 20 years from now. that being said, can we come up with any examples of vaccines that have long—term effects? not that i can think of. this is an adult vaccine thatjust came out of the freezer. now, the one for younger children will be a third of the dose. it will still be two shots
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given three weeks apart. now, clinics all across the country are going to rush to administer these before they expire. so convincing parents will be key. how many of you would feel uncomfortable getting your young children a covid vaccine? the group moms for liberty was a vocal opponent of mask mandates. it's quickly grown in influence to 50,000 members nationwide. we used to take care of our children in this country, put them first, women and children. and now all of a sudden, our children are meant to be vaccinated to protect other people? when there is risk for them? we don't know what the long—term effects will be? many more parents are still on the fence if vaccine rates for teenagers are any indication. months after the cdc approved the shot for that age group, less than 50% got the jab. even with all the unknowns and the rare risks, the simons believe one thing for certain. that the covid vaccine could have kept their daughter
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out of the hospital. nada tawfik, bbc news, florida. i'm nowjoined by drjim versalovic, who is one of the leaders of the covid command at texas children's hospital. thank you very much indeed for being with us. do you understand why some parents might be a bit nervous about vaccinating their children? inaudible inaudible i think you might be on mute. i don't know if you can hear me, are you on mute? i’m don't know if you can hear me, are you on mute?— don't know if you can hear me, are| you on mute?_ there you on mute? i'm very sorry. there we to, you on mute? i'm very sorry. there we go, lovely- — you on mute? i'm very sorry. there we go, lovely. let's— you on mute? i'm very sorry. there we go, lovely. let's start _ you on mute? i'm very sorry. there we go, lovely. let's start again. - you on mute? i'm very sorry. there we go, lovely. let's start again. i l we go, lovely. let's start again. i was asking you whether you understand why some parents might be a little nervous about vaccinating their kids? , . ., , their kids? yes, we certainly understand _ their kids? yes, we certainly understand the _ their kids? yes, we certainly| understand the apprehension their kids? yes, we certainly - understand the apprehension here across this country among adults and parents are certainly... can be apprehensive, of course. we
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understand the reluctance but the reality is we have a highly safer and effective vaccine. we have worked with centres and children's hospitals across the country, tailoring this vaccine to children. it is one third of the adult dose and over the past several months, with more than 4000 children in these trials, we have had remarkable success. during the delta surge. i think that is the reassuring point, that we have proven this vaccine has endured the ultimate test, frankly, with the delta surge in the united states, the pfizer vaccine which was recently authorised here in the united states is ready for prime time for delivery today. parents need to be reassured that this vaccine is both highly safe and highly effective. and why is it necessary? make that case to any parents who might be confused about this because young children usually get pretty mild
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symptoms, so what would you say about why they need to be vaccinated? it's very important to be vaccinated. we know the importance of childhood vaccines for respiratory viruses such as influenza to prevent disease. it is hard to predict. some children have a well—known risk factors for severe covid and we have seen many cases at this hospital alone. we have had approximately 1500 children hospitalised with covid, a cute covid infection, pneumonia. they have been in the hospitalfour days. we have seen children with no identifiable risk factors. it's very difficult to predict and keep in mind, children may be out of school for days, even with an acute infection which may not require hospitalisation. we do know also children may be at risk for more long—term complications, m isc has afflicted more than 250 children in this hospital and it's important to note that two thirds of those children have required critical
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paediatric care. we had 30% of children requiring care and ventilation and hundreds of children die from covid across this country and across the world, many more. the reality is children can die from covid, they can suffer severe complications and roughly 10% of children may have long covid, symptoms which may last for weeks or months, compromising their physical activities and growth and develop meant. we want children to be healthy. this is a vaccine preventable disease of the children as well as adults now, and so we i stand on the caspian of the prevention of covid in children, as well as adolescents and adults with highly safe and effective vaccines. but is this vaccine, this drive to vaccinate young children also about trying to reduce transmission of covid? ~ , ,., , trying to reduce transmission of covid? ~ , , ., trying to reduce transmission of covid? �* , , . trying to reduce transmission of covid? ~ , ., ., covid? absolutely, i am so glad you hiuuhlihted covid? absolutely, i am so glad you highlighted that _ covid? absolutely, i am so glad you highlighted that point. _ covid? absolutely, i am so glad you highlighted that point. at _
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covid? absolutely, i am so glad you highlighted that point. at texas - highlighted that point. at texas children's and other centres across the country, we have been working diligently on these vaccine trials that juveniles and diligently on these vaccine trials thatjuveniles and children knowing we had data in adults showing reduction of transmission. we know that will be the case here with children as well. based on the information we had to date and what we have gained throughout the pandemic with the vaccines during 2021. the reality is we are keeping individuals safe, including children now, school—aged children, 5—11 years of age safe from covid with these new vaccines. we are also stopping the spread, reducing transmission. the only way we're going to get this pandemic is... and to do it safely and saving lives is by... through effective diagnosis, testing, treatment and prevention. those are the three pillars in managing any new outbreak and new epidemic or pandemic in this world. the reality is vaccines are the
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cornerstone of disease prevention and have been for decades. so we stand ready as a specialty in medicine, paediatrics, tojoin the adults now that have been vaccinated. so it is very important to highlight disease prevention, along with diagnosis and treatment, will be essential in navigating our way through this pandemic. very good to talk to you. thank you so much and good luck with all of your work at the texas children's hospital. drjim versalovic, thank you. allies of the conservative former minister 0wen paterson will today try to stop him being suspended from parliament. mr paterson — who was paid more than £100,000 a year as a consultant to two companies — was found by the parliamentary watchdog to have repeatedly broken lobbying rules. the cross—party standards committee has recommended a 30—day suspension. but mps will table amendments in the commons — calling for his case to be reviewed. joining me now is our politicial correspodent helen catt.
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this is a fascinating case, isn't it? normally the suspension is kind of go through but this one is very much in the balance.— of go through but this one is very much in the balance. their son has caused a real— much in the balance. their son has caused a real sort _ much in the balance. their son has caused a real sort of— much in the balance. their son has caused a real sort of stir. - much in the balance. their son has caused a real sort of stir. i - much in the balance. their son has caused a real sort of stir. i will - caused a real sort of stir. i will take you back through how we got to this point because it's quite complicated how the enforcement system works. you have 0wen paterson come he is the mp for north shropshire. he was investigated by the mps apostrophe watchdog, the commissioner for parliamentary standards, over approaches he the food standards agency and the department for international development relating to two companies he works for as a consultant outside parliament. the commissionerfound consultant outside parliament. the commissioner found that by approaching them, these departments in this way, it could have incurred significant benefits on those companies in the long term and in the short term they couldn't have at those meetings without mr paterson getting bell. the commissioner decided that was a breach of
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parliament's lobbying rules. so there is a committee of mps called there is a committee of mps called the parliamentary standards committee which decides what the appropriate punishment should be. they recommended he is suspended from the commons for 30 days. to enforce that, that has to go to a full vote of all mps and that is what is happening later today and thatis what is happening later today and that is where mps are going to try to, we think, change that. there is quite a lot of sympathy for mr paterson among conservative mps. he has always said he is innocent of this, that he was raising legitimate food safety concerns was that he says he takes issue with the way the investigation was run by the commissioner. that it did not speak to witnesses who would have spoken up to witnesses who would have spoken up in his defence. he had no right of appeal and more than that, mr pattison�*s wife sadly took her own life glacier and he suggested the way this process was run was a major contributing factor. so there is a feeling of compassion for mr patterson among other conservative
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mps. �* ., patterson among other conservative mps. �* . , ., mps. and a quick question, whether the government _ mps. and a quick question, whether the government might _ mps. and a quick question, whether the government might support - mps. and a quick question, whether the government might support his l the government might support his friends and allies?— the government might support his friends and allies? noises from some ministers because — friends and allies? noises from some ministers because one _ friends and allies? noises from some ministers because one of _ friends and allies? noises from some ministers because one of the - friends and allies? noises from some ministers because one of the mps - ministers because one of the mps want to change this, one of the amendments put forward would create amendments put forward would create a new committee to consider changes to the process for the way mps were investigated. the transport secretary this morning said that the current system of standards of scrutiny for mps was damaging public confidence. he said that is because there is a single commissioner that comes to conclusions without speaking to and interviewing witnesses and there are no rights of appeal is that there is a feeling the government might be moving on this one. ., ~ i. the government might be moving on this one. ., ~' ,, ~ the government might be moving on this one. ., ~ i. . the government might be moving on this one. ., ~ . ., ~ this one. thank you. we can talk more on this _ this one. thank you. we can talk more on this now. _ the labour mp thangam debbonaire is the shadow leader of the house of commons. thank you for being with us. what do you make at this? we head to the government might support this attempt by mr paterson's friends on the backbenches to save him from suspension but also to overhaul the
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whole standard system. it is suspension but also to overhaul the whole standard system.— whole standard system. it is quite extraordinary _ whole standard system. it is quite extraordinary in _ whole standard system. it is quite extraordinary in the _ whole standard system. it is quite extraordinary in the first - whole standard system. it is quite extraordinary in the first place - extraordinary in the first place that any mp is seeking to change the system midway through the process of a live case. this standards commissioner properly and independently reviewed the evidence and found egregious breaches of the code of conduct for mps. the public has a right to know that we not only are held to high standards but are properly scrutinised. that evidence was then reviewed by the standards committee and they upheld the commissioner's findings and recommended 30 days. so for any mp front or back bench to interfere in this process at this stage is quite extraordinary. if the overnight press briefings are true that the government, including possibly be prime minister, are going to back this change of an entire system whilst we are still in the middle of a case is quite extraordinary and blows a coach and horses through any sense of scrutiny of mps. we should want to be held to very high account and scrutiny for stock that is the right thing to do. the public needs to know we are not accepting money to know we are not accepting money to lobby on behalf of a firm. there
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were any number of options this member had, that 0wen paterson had, if he wanted to raise a question of serious harm, he could have returned the money, asked a collie, there were other options available to them. it's extraordinary that this afternoon in a 90 minute debate that we are going to end up having a debate about the very system itself which is designed to scrutinise mps. it's absolutely outrageous. bernard jenkin a senior conservative mp says we are not letting 0wen paterson off, not condoning him, we will put his case in front of a proper judicial star panel where there can be a proper hearing. 0wen paterson himself denied the allegations against him very strongly and said the whole investigation into him was unfairly conducted. even said the manner of the investigation played a part in the decision of his wife to take her own life.— part in the decision of his wife to take her own life. bernard jenkin is on the standards _ take her own life. bernard jenkin is on the standards committee - take her own life. bernard jenkin is on the standards committee and i take her own life. bernard jenkin is on the standards committee and if| take her own life. bernard jenkin is i on the standards committee and if he felt the system is wrong he has had any number of opportunities to
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reform it. he is the chair of an influential liaison committee and he could have brought it up there or in standards. there has been any number of opportunities. the review of standards was published on monday and it says standards of anything are strengthened. this is weakening them. my interpretation of the amendment is not the same as sir bernard's, which this is exonerating 0wen paterson. it's not ok to decide midway through the process that the process is no longerfit midway through the process that the process is no longer fit for purpose when they have had any number of opportunities to do something about that. yes, let's debate standards but now is not the time to do that in a 90 minute debate on a live case, when a commissioner who is independent from members has quite correctly ruled then be reviewed, there has been a review process of there has been a review process of the evidence, that was done by the standards committee, of which bernard jenkin is a member. there seems to be _ bernard jenkin is a member. there seems to be a _ bernard jenkin is a member. there seems to be a feeling _ bernard jenkin is a member. there seems to be a feeling among - bernard jenkin is a member. there seems to be a feeling among some conservative mps that the standards watchdog is biased, actually, against conservatives and
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particularly brexiteers conservatives. it particularly brexiteers conservatives.- particularly brexiteers conservatives. , , conservatives. it was properly recruited and _ conservatives. it was properly recruited and had _ conservatives. it was properly recruited and had very - conservatives. it was properly recruited and had very high i recruited and had very high qualities and qualifications for the role and again, i repeat, there is a review process. it is a standards committee in which some tory mps sit. it is a cross—party committee and includes tory mps including bernard jenkin and lay members who have valued contributions. there is lots of clear evidence, i have read the report and i urge anybody and everybody to read the report carefully because my understanding is actually mr 0wen paterson isn't denying he did those things, he is denying he did those things, he is denying they were improper. that is not the commissioner's interpretation of the rules but as a check and balance, review, the committee also reviewed it and they're finding found what the commissioner found.- they're finding found what the commissioner found. ,, ., ., ., ., commissioner found. shadow leader of the house of — commissioner found. shadow leader of the house of commons. _ commissioner found. shadow leader of the house of commons. thank- commissioner found. shadow leader of the house of commons. thank you - commissioner found. shadow leader ofj the house of commons. thank you very much indeed. the headlines on bbc news... the british chancellor rishi sunak promises to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. he'll outline a plan at the cop—26 summit in glasgow to stop firms
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investing in fossil fuels and push money into green energy and technologies instead. in australia, a four—year—old girl cleo smith, missing for 18 days, has been found alive and well in a locked house. i said, "what's your name?" and she didn't answer. "what's your name? " she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time and she looked at me and she said, "my name is cleo." scientists in the united states have given the go—ahead for children aged between five and 11, to receive a pfizer coronavirus vaccine. and as world leaders try to agree on how to fight climate change, we have a special report from madagascar, which is on the brink of what the un is calling the world s first climate—induced famine . let's return to the cop26. the amount of money rich countries give to the developing world to help it cope with climate change will be one of the big battles
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of the summit. let's talk about realistic pledges and targets. dr alina averchenkova is a distinguished policy fellow at the grantham research institute on climate change and the environment, at the london school of economics and political science. a long title, but let's ask you whether you think cop26 is going to deliver in the way that many environmental campaigners around the world are hoping and praying that it well. ~ ., , ., well. cop26 has to deliver. the romise well. cop26 has to deliver. the promise to _ well. cop26 has to deliver. the promise to mobilise _ well. cop26 has to deliver. the promise to mobilise $100 - well. cop26 has to deliver. the| promise to mobilise $100 billion well. cop26 has to deliver. the - promise to mobilise $100 billion and finance to assist developing countries was made in 2009. the data clearly shows that at the end of 2020, which is when the pledge had been made, we are about 20 billion short in climate finance. the data is still coming, but the assessment
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done by the 0ecd shows that the pledge will not have been made by 2020. meeting that pledge is essential because that money is necessary to help developing countries adapt to the impact of climate change they are already experiencing daily and to transition to the green part of the local economy so that they do not repeat the high carbon and high emitting pathway that developed countries have followed. so cop26 has to deliver, has to come up with new commitments, and has to build confidence in the multilateral process and to show developing countries that developed countries are serious about helping them to address the problem of climate change. address the problem of climate chance. �* ., ., , , change. and that money is specifically _ change. and that money is specifically to _ change. and that money is specifically to be _ change. and that money is specifically to be spent - change. and that money is specifically to be spent on | change. and that money is - specifically to be spent on warts by developing nations? give us an idea of exactly what that money would go on, what sort of projects. the on, what sort of pro'ects. the hundred billion _ on, what sort of projects. tue: hundred billion dollars on, what sort of projects. tta: hundred billion dollars as on, what sort of projects. "tta: hundred billion dollars as public finance and mobilise private finance
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that could go into for example financing renewable energy projects and developing countries such as solar panels, wind farms, they would also go on to help developing countries adapt to the impact of climate change for example, drought resilience crops, building coastal defence, also touristic planning, helping developing countries develop their strategies on adapting to climate change and assessing their vulnerability to the problem still to come in the future. we vulnerability to the problem still to come in the future.— to come in the future. we were heafina to come in the future. we were hearing from — to come in the future. we were hearing from cop26, _ to come in the future. we were hearing from cop26, the - to come in the future. we were - hearing from cop26, the chancellor rishi sunak is calling for financial firms to play a huge role and the former bank of england governor as well trying to get hundreds of the worlds biggest finance companies to sign up to a climate coalition. how important it is all of that in fighting climate change around the world? ~ ., , ,
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fighting climate change around the world? , , ., , world? mobilising private finance is critical. if world? mobilising private finance is critical- if we _ world? mobilising private finance is critical. if we look, _ world? mobilising private finance is critical. if we look, the _ world? mobilising private finance is| critical. if we look, the commitment to mobilise finance from developed countries is 100 billion annually but to address climate change we need trillions of dollars in investment and that investment, that private sector controls, so the announcement this morning by the uk government about various initiatives to help shift, the mentioned 130 trillion us dollars in private investment, this is welcome, a welcome initiative and i hope other industrialised countries will follow. , ., ~ industrialised countries will follow. ~ , follow. do you think those big companies — follow. do you think those big companies are _ follow. do you think those big companies are serious - follow. do you think those big companies are serious about | follow. do you think those big - companies are serious about their own green initiatives aren't about, you know, coming up with that kind of money? the you know, coming up with that kind ofmone ? , ., ., you know, coming up with that kind ofmone? , ., of money? the companies have to be serious because _ of money? the companies have to be serious because it _ of money? the companies have to be serious because it is _ of money? the companies have to be serious because it is not _ of money? the companies have to be serious because it is not about - serious because it is not about environmental objectives that are abstract anymore, it is about very strong from the government that the
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world economy has to shift to low carbon, the low emission pathway, if companies want to operate and stay relevant in the market, they have to take into account their performance in terms of emissions but also in of investing into investments that will be resilient on the impact of climate change.— be resilient on the impact of climate change. be resilient on the impact of climate chance. ., ~ , ., , . climate change. thank you very much. from the grantham _ climate change. thank you very much. from the grantham research - climate change. thank you very much. from the grantham research institute| from the grantham research institute on climate change and the environment. as world leaders continue to hammer out an agreement on climate change, the issue is already having a devastating effect on millions of people across the globe. madagascar, an island nation off the coast of east africa, is on the brink of what the un is calling the world s first climate—induced famine. here's our climate editor, justin rowlatt. a warning: you might find some of the images in his report distressing. almost1 million people
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are suffering severe food shortages in madagascar, the un says. many are on the verge of starvation. marari gathers her family around her. they have lived their entire life in this village. they used to grow maize, rice and potatoes. but now the ground is bone dry. translation: there hasn't been any rain, not a single _ drop has hit the soil. all the crops we planted failed. everything failed. it is agony for marari's daughter to see her children go without food. translation: my son doesn't keep quiet when he's hungry. _ he pulls on my shoulder and climbs on my lap, crying for food, saying," i'm hungry. i'm hungry." but where can i find food to give him? he does not understand that there is no food.
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he thinks there is food but we hide it from him. the world food programme is currently providing emergency money and food to people here, but it says the situation is desperate. the first time i saw, ijust cried. i was really, really shocked about the situation of the children. you can see in their face that the child is very sick and almost to die. insects are part of the diet in madagascar, but for some children, they are now the only food available, the un says. historians will look back at madagascar as probably the first time a country was brought to the brink of famine just by climate factors. no war in madagascar and no conflict. but if you ask me, do i think this will be the last time this happens? no way, i have no doubts that there will be more cases like this. don't imagine the climate crisis is some vague future
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threat, warns the un. for marari, she's worried it is already too late for her family. translation: i have no hope that i will stay alive. _ i will die. and when i think of my family, i realised that we will all die because we have nothing to eat to survive. justin rowlatt reporting there. yorkshire county cricket club is facing increasing criticism of its handling of allegations of racism by a former player, azeem rafiq. the british cabinet minister, sajid javid, has said heads should roll" at the club after it was reported it had decided to take no disciplinary action, despite a report concluding that rafiq was a victim of racial harrassment and bullying. so how has it got to this point? for a while, azeem rafiq seem to be striking through the ranks
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at yorkshire county cricket club, a trailblazer for the game he loved. he was yorkshire's golden boy, adored by fans of the game and a beacon of inspiration for young south asian boys and girls across yorkshire. but, in september last year, that bubble burst as azeem detailed the racial abuse he had encountered at the club. playing professional cricket for yorkshire should be the best time of your life. unfortunately for me, it wasn't. now the racist comments reportedly dismissed as friendly banter will be investigated by mps. in a statement, the dcms says," we are extremely concerned about recent reports about the lack of action against individuals following the findings. it is clear that yorkshire county cricket club has questions to answer. we want to see much greater transparency from yorkshire county cricket club. it is time for them to answer their critics.. taj butt was an employee
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of the yorkshire cricket foundation, the official charity and community arm of the yorkshire county cricket club. there will be a lot of communities living in yorkshire watching this play out. what do you think will be the effect and the consequences on those communities following what has happened? it seems as if we are actually taking a backward step. and i think what is now likely to happen, there's a lot of young asians who won't feel comfortable in the sort of experience that azeem rafiq has had, and then that will probably force a lot of these people back into their own communities. what do you think yorkshire county cricket club need to do to repair trust between themselves and the minority communities living in yorkshire? as long as those people are allowed to get away with what they did to azeem rafiq, the asian community will never be able to trust the club or the organisation to allow their own sons and daughters to go and become part of that organisation. the yorkshire county cricket club have said in a statement following their own internal investigation," there is no conduct or action taken by any of our current employees, players or executives that warrants
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disciplinary action. they do, however, acknowledge that they must work hard to restore trust from those who feel let down. but halee mccann who promotes inclusivity in sport says the only way to restore trust is by holding people to account. i think this is the situation that clearly has not been dealt with as best as it should have, to not have any follow—up action or disciplinary action towards those that may be accountable for this, it's not painting a good picture for the club, picture for the sport in itself. i think it has given a green light to racism. with politicians, sponsoring bodies and public figures calling on yorkshire county cricket club to take action, this issue will not be going away anytime soon. a trial in germany is shining a light on a multi—million pound london property bought by a notorious cryptocurrency scammer.
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dr ruja ignatova made billions of pounds selling a fake cryptocurrency called 0necoin before disappearing in 2017. none of her victims — located all around the world — have received any of their money back. the story has been the subject of a bbc podcast, called the missing cryptoqueen and its creatorjamie bartlett joins me now. can you tell us more about it? in can you tell us more about it? t�*t 2014 this mysterious but brilliant business woman, turned up out of nowhere and set i have got the world's next cryptocurrency that is going to explode in value and meet you all rich. very quickly, as many as1 million people invested in theirs. it turned out to be a very
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clever pyramid scheme, there was no cryptocurrency behind it at all and as you said, 2017, she disappears, takes a ryanairflight as you said, 2017, she disappears, takes a ryanair flight from sofia as you said, 2017, she disappears, takes a ryanairflight from sofia in bulgaria to athens and has not been seen since. she bulgaria to athens and has not been seen since. , . bulgaria to athens and has not been seen since. ,, ., , seen since. she had this huge ro -e seen since. she had this huge property in — seen since. she had this huge property in london _ seen since. she had this huge property in london worth - seen since. she had this huge - property in london worth millions. so in 2016, we discovered that she bought a £13.5 million kensington penthouse with beautiful artwork and a swimming pool, a glorious place to live, but it was a secret until a couple of trials recently including the one in germany revealed a bit of light and we started to dig deeper to find out who helped to conceal the true ownership and how long she held out for and so on. many people would be surprised that this woman had this very, very impressive piece of property rights in the heart of london. , ., , of property rights in the heart of london. , .,, , ' . of property rights in the heart of london. , ., , , . ., london. this has been difficult for
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the authorities _ london. this has been difficult for the authorities to _ london. this has been difficult for the authorities to track _ london. this has been difficult for the authorities to track down - london. this has been difficult for the authorities to track down her. the authorities to track down her movements and exactly what she owned. tts movements and exactly what she owned. , ., movements and exactly what she owned. , . , ., , ., ., owned. its a wider story. you have seen it with _ owned. its a wider story. you have seen it with the _ owned. its a wider story. you have seen it with the pandora _ owned. its a wider story. you have seen it with the pandora leaks, - owned. its a wider story. you have seen it with the pandora leaks, a l seen it with the pandora leaks, a lot of very wealthy people, some for good reason and some for bad, use companies and obscure ownership structures to essentially keep the true ownership of their property head on. in this case, she a guernsey offshore company which was owned by another offshore company, which meant her name appeared nowhere on the records of ownership. that is what made it really difficult for the authorities and makes it difficult for authorities all over the world to work out who owns what in these kinds of cases. lets talk about the victims of this scam. do we know how much they have lost and what they can do about it? can they get anything back? t lost and what they can do about it? can they get anything back? i should add that the companies _
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can they get anything back? i should add that the companies involved - can they get anything back? i should add that the companies involved in l add that the companies involved in this deny wrongdoing, they were following their compliance checks and so on which is another reason this is difficult to get to the bottom. we think about 1 this is difficult to get to the bottom. we think about1 million people have lost out words of 4 billion euros in the scam. a colossal amount of money. it's very frustrating to hear that there are these beautiful properties dotted all over the world which seemed to be there, owned by that we now know by this woman but no one can do anything about it because of the complicated ownership systems. the victims are still waiting to see if some of the money they've lost can be reclaimed, maybe this article can help in a very small way, but the lesson as we need to get to grips with these ownership records. really important and the government has pledged to do this by 2023, some wanted sooner, we need to start naming the ultimate owners of properties, you can'tjust own
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companies in the uk through offshore companies, own property through offshore companies, you need to know who the real person is behind it, that would help back for the victims, it is going to be a long road before they see any of their money back. tt road before they see any of their money back-— money back. it is a fascinating sto , in money back. it is a fascinating story. in your— money back. it is a fascinating story, in your podcast, - money back. it is a fascinating story, in your podcast, which l money back. it is a fascinating i story, in your podcast, which has money back. it is a fascinating - story, in your podcast, which has a great title, the missing crypto queen, what is next for the series? she called herself the crypto queen and she is missing so it makes sense. we have been going on the story for three years, it is a lot harder to find someone that you would think. you would imagine with digital technology people are easily found, they are really not, we are still on the case and on the hunt, there will be a couple of new episodes that hopefully bring the story together coming out in the next three or four months. tt story together coming out in the next three or four months. if anyone finds her, you _ next three or four months. if anyone finds her, you would _ next three or four months. if anyone finds her, you would like _ next three or four months. if anyone finds her, you would like to -
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next three or four months. if anyone finds her, you would like to talk- next three or four months. if anyone finds her, you would like to talk to i finds her, you would like to talk to her. ., , that finds her, you would like to talk to her.- that would _ finds her, you would like to talk to her.- that would be - finds her, you would like to talk to her.- that would be a - finds her, you would like to talk to her.- that would be a good j her. please! that would be a good eisode. her. please! that would be a good episode. thank _ her. please! that would be a good episode. thank you _ her. please! that would be a good episode. thank you for _ her. please! that would be a good episode. thank you for talking - her. please! that would be a good episode. thank you for talking to i episode. thank you for talking to us. glenn youngkin is a wealthy financier and newcomer showing his win a defining moment showing he narrowly beats the democratic party incumbent. he was endorsed by donald trump but sought to distance himself from the former president who lost virginia in 2020. celebrating victory, he set out his agenda. fin victory, he set out his agenda. on da one, victory, he set out his agenda. on day one, we are going to work, victory, he set out his agenda. q�*t day one, we are going to work, we are going to restore excellence in our schools. we will invest the largest education budget in the history of the commonwealth. we are
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going to invest in teachers, new facilities, special education. we are going to introduce choice within our public school system. let's go back to one of our top stories... a man's been arrested after police found a four year old girl, who'd been missing in western australia for eighteen days, in a locked house. cleo smith is said to be in good spirits. beau pearson is a reporterfor 10 news first perth and is in carnarvon in western australia. done, what is the latest on this extraordinary story? to done, what is the latest on this extraordinary story?— extraordinary story? to this is an amazin: extraordinary story? to this is an amazing story — extraordinary story? to this is an amazing story in _ extraordinary story? to this is an amazing story in western - extraordinary story? to this is an i amazing story in western australia. little cleo smith was found safe and well, 18 days messing since she was abducted from her parents taint in the campsite not too far away along the campsite not too far away along the coastline. she was fine this morning safe and well, the police
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force, an extensive task force of officers raided a local house after some information they receive, found the little girl alive, healthy, locked inside a bedroom of a local man here. she was rescued by the officers. they asked her what is her name, she said my name is cleo, the officer we spoke to today were close to breaking down. they said it has been an emotional date. she is back in the arms of her family, as for the man that has been arrested, he is being questioned by detectives all day today. so far, no charges have been laid. we know he is a 36—year—old local man, we are told he was acting alone and there no link between him or cleo smith. the police say it was most likely an opportunistic crime that was committed. no charges have yet been laid, cleo smith safely back in the arms of herfamily laid, cleo smith safely back in the arms of her family tonight and it
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has been 18 nights, 18 long nights for herfamily without has been 18 nights, 18 long nights for her family without their little girl. she is back safely in their arms and as you can see behind me, everyone in the town is ecstatic and breathing an enormous sigh of relief, thankfully little cleo smith is back home with herfamily. wonderful news. thank you for bringing us the latest. yahoo has become the latest us tech company to end its presence in mainland china. it follows linkedin's decision to stop operating there. both companies blamed their decisions on tougher regulations. chinese tech giants have also been under a lot of pressure from beijing. 0n on monday, yahoo stopped functioning in china saying insights are no
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longer available. they have said there is a regulatory environment. it is the latest tech firm to abandon operations in china. a law that came into effect this week about how data can be collected and stored as part of the problem. the rules are not dissimilar to other countries like europe, but the political environment is significantly different in china with some strict censorship requirements. last month the professional networking site linkedin said it would cease in china later this year. other social media sites like twitter and facebook have been blocked for years. google abandoned its operations in china more than a decade ago. the leading scientists advising politicians on the coronavirus said he resigned last month to focus on his work as a
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director of a medical charity but he also warned that covid—19 rates in the uk are concerning and are a long way from over. a new recruitment campaign to fill more than one—hundred thousand vacancies in the social care sector has been launched it comes as providers warn of an increasing staffing crisis fuelled by compulsory covid vaccinations for workers, and rising wages in other areas of the economy. we need an enormous investment. the money that has been released so far are just the tip of the iceberg. we need to really get to grips with the underfunding of social care. we need to do that straightaway because we can recruit people but we are going to have to keep them, and to keep them we have to pay them and compete with other industry.
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in the gambia, financial constraints are threatening to derail its pledge on the government wants to drill for oil. the gambia has reliable sunlight for solar energy and that is what some rely on to get... we use social power washing machines to provide laundry services. machines to provide laundry services-— machines to provide laundry services. ., . ., ., services. the importance of solar in our lives cannot _ services. the importance of solar in our lives cannot be _ services. the importance of solar in our lives cannot be over _ services. the importance of solar in i our lives cannot be over emphasised. you can use it at any time to look do our work, with the great we are interrupted by power outages. the centre is training more women to run services for renewable energy. it
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also produces solar energy, but the problem as it cannot sail it. the government says there is no policy to regulate chariots. authorities in the gambia said they want to make renewable a significant part of the countries energy mix but little has been achieved so far. that is because they rely heavily on fossil fuels to generate power. now the government targets near zero emissions by 2015 which means a transition to renewable energy. but of the coast, it also plans to drill for oil. ., ,., ., ., for oil. need to export oil to develop ourselves. - for oil. need to export oil to develop ourselves. this - for oil. need to export oil to develop ourselves. this is i for oil. need to export oil to l develop ourselves. this is the fastest we can to get their written sources we have on renewables and opportunities. if oil is implemented, it will offset this. meanwhile climate change impacts continue to bite. these farmers say
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reduced rainfall is affecting them. there's farmland is about five hectares, now only one hectare is used for peanuts which used to be their main cash crop. they are turning to alternatives. 0n the site of the field, they are planting sesame and mailings which require less rainfall. let's have a look at the weather. it is going to bea to be a cold day where ever you are. the forecast is one of sunshine and showers. we will not all see these shares but some will be driven in on brisk winds on coasts. weak weather france are sinking south which are enhancing the showers. we will see some showers in mind as well as along the coast. there will be some
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sunshine, north wales northwards to the mountains, the showers will be wintry and brisk winds, stronger winds than yesterday. these are the gusts in the black circle, gusty across the north and the west and especially down the north sea coastline which will accentuate the cold feel of the day. temperatures, it degrees in the north, 13 degrees in the south. this evening and overnight, we start off with showers, they will fade, anywhere from north wales northwards on the mountains, we will see some snow and the winds will continue. central and western areas, a touch of frost, elsewhere too much wind and showers. as we head towards the end of the week, this is thursday, an area of high pressure building on from the atlantic, a weak weather france coming and across the north west bringing rain. when's changing
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direction, not as cold as represented by the yellow chasing away the blue. as we head through the course of thursday, there will not be so many showers, more dry conditions, a fair bit of sunshine, gusty winds down the north sea coastline, mph, accentuating the chilliness. temperatures 11 degrees. thursday the coldest day of the week. heading through thursday and into friday and the weekend, an area of high pressure going southwards, opening the doors to a new area coming in from the atlantic bringing a weather front, strong winds and heavy rain. 0n a weather front, strong winds and heavy rain. on friday, the wind changes to westerly, cloud and patchy rain rain and drizzle in the race, saturday, milder but windy in the north and west.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... the british chancellor rishi sunak promises to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. he'll outline a plan at the cop—26 summit in glasgow to stop firms investing in fossil fuels, and push money into green energy and technologies instead. in australia, a four—year—old girl cleo smith, missing for 18 days, has been found alive and well — in a locked house. i said, "what's your name?" and she didn't answer. "what's your name? " she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time and she looked at me and she said, "my name is cleo." the board of yorkshire county cricket club faces heavy criticism over its handling of allegations of racism by a former player.
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scientists in the united states have given the go—ahead for children aged between five and 11, to receive a pfizer coronavirus vaccine. and — as world leaders try to agree on how to fight climate change, we have a special report from madagascar, which is on the brink of what the un is calling the world s first climate—induced famine . the uk's chancellor, rishi sunak, is promising to "rewire the entire global financial system" , to cut carbon emissions. in a speech at the cop26 summit in glasgow, he said the uk will become the first "net—zero aligned" financial centre. he said 450 firms controlling 40% of global financial assets — equivalent to $130 trillion dollars — have now aligned themselves to limit global warming to 1.5c.
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and he outlined his plan to force british businesses to explain how they intend to deliver on climate targets. the chancellor said the finance to fight climate change had to come from a mix of public and private money. public investment alone isn't enough. our second action is to mobilise private finance. let me pay an enormous tribute to mark carney for his leadership — leadership that is delivering results. the glasgow financial alliance for net zero has now brought together financial organisations with assets worth over $130 trillion of capital to be deployed. this is a historic wall of capital for the net zero transition around the world. what matters now is action — to invest that capital
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in our low carbon future. to do that, investors need to have as much clarity and confidence in the climate impact of their investments as they do in the traditional financial metrics of profit and loss. so our third action is to rewire the entire global financial system for net zero, better and more consistent climate data. sovereign green bonds, mandatory sustainability disclosures, proper climate risk surveillance, stronger global reporting standards. all things we need to deliver and i'm proud that the uk is playing its part. we've already made it mandatory for businesses to disclose climate—related financial information, with 35 other countries signing up to do the same. today, i'm announcing that the uk
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will go further and become the first ever net zero aligned financial centre. this means we are going to move towards making it mandatory for firms to publish a clear deliverable plan, setting out how they will decarbonise and transition to net zero with an independent task force to define what's required. so, a renewed pledge to $100 billion a year of public funding. over $130 trillion of private capital waiting to be deployed and a greener financial system under way. six years ago, paris set the ambition. today, in glasgow, we're providing the investment we need to deliver that ambition. mr sunak outlined the initiative this morning alongside the former bank of england governor, mark carney. he says participating firms will have to be completely
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transparent about how they're improving their environmental credentials. mr carney�*s been speaking to my colleague christian fraser. we are increasingly going to see, though, as government policy toughens up, is clever, fills in, different words for the same thing about what is needed to get us to 1.5 degrees this company is going to have to notjust saying theoretically this is what is going to happen but actually i do have to write off some of those. we saw a tiny bit of that earlier last year, about a year ago, with some of the major oil companies who wrote off some of those excess reserves that just don't make sense in a 1.5 degrees world but it's a drop in the bucket thus far. tithe degrees world but it's a drop in the bucket thus far.— degrees world but it's a drop in the bucket thus far. one of the problems at the moment _ bucket thus far. one of the problems at the moment is _ bucket thus far. one of the problems at the moment is what _ bucket thus far. one of the problems at the moment is what we _ bucket thus far. one of the problems at the moment is what we call - bucket thus far. one of the problems | at the moment is what we call carbon leakage. so you get a territory like the eu that puts up the price of carbon, carbon taxes, it gets more expensive companies and then companies relocate to another part of the world whether it is cheaper.
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do you think there needs to be thought about the global carbon price? t thought about the global carbon rice? ., ~' �* , price? i do think... i'm in, first best question _ price? i do think... i'm in, first best question as _ price? i do think... i'm in, first best question as we _ price? i do think... i'm in, first best question as we would i price? i do think... i'm in, first| best question as we would have global carbon price. it wouldn't exactly match, you know, the level of the price would be higher may be in the uk than is in some sub—saharan developing african or small island state, given the relative resources, but everyone should try to have a price on carbon. i am should try to have a price on carbon. iam not should try to have a price on carbon. i am not na ve about it, though. i don't think it is going to happen overnight. 0ne though. i don't think it is going to happen overnight. one of the objectives that presidents underline and prime minister trudeau and the prime minister of sweden in the head of the world trade organisation and myself talked about yesterday was to get the coverage of carbon price up to about two thirds of global emissions by the end of this decade. we will have more on cop26 later including the vice president of the
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asian development bank of i will be talking to about what his bank is doing in terms of investment in a sustainable future. a four—year—old girl who went missing from a remote australian campsite nearly three weeks ago, has been found alive and well — following a huge search operation. cleo smith was discovered by police in a locked house — and has now been reunited with her parents. a 36—year—old man is being questioned by police. 0ur australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. alive and well. the news cleo smith's parents have been waiting more than two weeks for. a police team broke their way into a locked house in carnarvon about 1am. they found little cleo in one of those rooms. one of the officers picked her up into his arms and asked, "what's your name? " she said, "my name is cleo." cleo was reunited with her parents a short time later. this is the outcome we all hoped and prayed for. for now, welcome home, cleo. the four—year—old had vanished from her family's tent while camping on the western australian coast.
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it sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. her disappearance gripped australia and a reward of $1 million was offered for information leading to her location. cleo's mother ellie smith expressed her relief on social media, saying "our family is whole again." a man is in custody and being questioned by detectives. australia's prime minister scott morrison, who is currently said this was "wonderful, relieving news". this is every parent's worse nightmare than the fact that the nightmare than the fact that the nightmare has come to an end in our worst fears were not realised is just a huge relief in the moment for greatjoy. more details have yet to emerge about how little cleo disappeared
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and how she was found, but, for now, a family's nightmare is over and a country's prayers have been answered. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. one of the police officers who found cleo has been speaking about the moment she was rescued i asked her what her name was. one of the guysjumped in in front of me and picked her up and, you know, ijust wanted to be absolutely sure that... you know, it certainly looked like cleo. i wanted to be absolutely sure it was her, so i said, "what's your name? " and she didn't answer and i said, "what's your name?" she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time and then she looked at me and she said, "my name's cleo." 0ur australia correspondent shaimaa khalil told me more about the investigation and the emotion of the police officers who found cleo. and you could actually hear the emotion and the voice breaking one of the officers who smashed his way into that locked out with others and
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rescued little cleo smith. he described the moment when he saw have been one of those rooms and he said first it was shot and then it was elation and he did ask her her name to confirm that this was clear and then when she said my name was clear we turned around, left the house and we headed to the hospital but he did say i had the bestjob in the world calling clio's parents and saying someone here wants to talk to you and of course it was cleo. he also described the moment they reunited in the hospital and he said theirfirst reunited in the hospital and he said their first words were money. he said there were kisses and hugs but there were a lot of tears, as you can imagine. this is an outcome that many had feared would not happen. as the days went by, there were grave concerns the player's well—being and this is not news any parent wants to hear but now that cleo will be spending the night for the first time in 18 days with her parents, notjust time in 18 days with her parents, not just the family or the police that a happy but the whole nation,
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really, is rejoicing with this. it has been a huge search. they have been rummaging through so many bits of information and evidence. they receive thousands and thousands of messages from the community giving them close. they were quite reluctant to give media any details because they said even though cleo is now safe with her family the investigation is ongoing but we do know that a 36—year—old man is in custody. she do know that she was found that locked house. we were asked, for example, about whether this was a to pile and if reports from some of the neighbours that they saw someone buy nappies with and there were all these reports coming in that they wouldn't confirm anything what they wanted to say today was that this is an outcome they were hoping for. they didn't quite expect and that this is an outcome and the result that this family has been painfulfor a long
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time and, like i said, the rest of australia because really this is a story that has captured the whole of australia. you know, from day one when she was announced missing when she disappeared from the family's tent on that campsite and all those days where there were concerns about her well—being, days where there were concerns about herwell—being, people days where there were concerns about her well—being, people feared the worst, but i think now everybody has express theirjoy on social media and relief that she is back and healthy and happy and back with mum and dad, of course. reporting on that great development that cleo has been found safe and well. a leading scientist advising the government on its response to the coronavirus pandemic, has stepped down from his role. in a statement, sirjeremy farrar said he resigned from sage at the end of last month to focus on his work as the director of a medical charity. but he also warned that the covid rates in the uk were "concerning", saying the situation was "a long
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way from over". a new recruitment campaign to fill more than 100,000 vacancies in the social care sector has been launched in england. it comes as providers warn of an increasing staffing crisis fuelled by compulsory covid vaccinations for workers, and rising wages in other areas of the economy. we need an enormous investment. the monies that have been released thus far are just the tip of the iceberg. we need to really get to grips with the underfunding of social care. and we need to do that straightaway because we can recruit people but we're going to have to keep them and to keep them we have to be able to pay them and compete with other industries. coming up on the bbc news channel we will have more from the un climate conference cop26 in glasgow under the action was happening there, which is all about the financial
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aspect of how to fund the green future. also coming up at midday payments as questions will have coverage on the bbc news channel to do sales, but the stuff about this if you're watching on bbc two it is time to say goodbye. i hope you have a deafening and thanks your company. —— have a good afternoon. they've gone! allies of a conservative mp found to have breached commons lobbying rules will try to stop him being suspended from parliament today.the mps' watchdog has recommended that 0wen paterson be suspended for 30 days for using his position to benefit two companies that paid him as a consultant. mr paterson rejected the findings and said the inquiry had not been fair — and today his supporters will try to vote down his suspension. i think where people do things wrong of course there should be sanctions and that is very important for
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public confidence. i think that what is damaging public confidence is the idea that a single standards commissioner comes to conclusions, acts without speaking to and interviewing those who might be witnesses, and there are no rights of appeal or normal legal processes in place, which is a rather odd situation and it is that that may require fixing but, as i say, i haven't even seen if this is coming to the house today and i suspect the speaker may have muse himself. —— news on it himself. 0ur politicial correspodent helen catt explained what's been happening... he is being investigated over some approaches in eight of the food standards agency and department print national development relating to two companies he works for outside parliament. the commission found that by approaching these development departments in this way
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that it could have conferred significant benefits in those two companies in the long term and in the short term they couldn't have had those meetings that they had without this device is in getting involved so the commission decided that was a breach of parliament's love ingles so there is then a committee of mps called the parliamentary standards committee which decides what the appropriate punishment should be. they recommended that he is suspended from the commons for 30 days. now, to enforce that, though, that has to go to a full vote of all mps and thatis go to a full vote of all mps and that is what is happening later today and that is where mps are going to try to, we think, change that, and there is quite a lot of sympathy for mr paterson among conservative mps. now he has a wee said he is innocent of this, that he was raising legitimate food safety concerns. he says he takes issue with the way the investigation was won by the missioner, that didn't speak to witnesses that would have spoken up in his defence. he had no right of appeal and, more than that, mr patterson's wife very sadly took of her life last year and he has
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suggested that the way this process was one was a major contributing factor so there is a lot of feeling of comparison for mr patterson among his mps, other conservative mps. the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor rishi sunak is promising to "rewire the entire global financial system" , to cut carbon emissions. in australia — a four—year—old girl missing for 18 days , has been found alive and well — in a locked house the board of yorkshire county cricket club faces heavy criticism over its handling of allegations of racism by a former player let's get more now on the cop26 summit in glasgow. the chancellor, rishi sunak, is promising to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. ahmed saeed is the vice—president of operations, asian development bank. it's launching an initiative at the summit to speed the closure of coal—fired power plants in asia.
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welcome and thank you very much for joining us. tells more about the initiative? ., ~ , ., ., ., initiative? thank you for having me. there are few _ initiative? thank you for having me. there are few problems _ initiative? thank you for having me. there are few problems in - initiative? thank you for having me. there are few problems in the - initiative? thank you for having me. j there are few problems in the world bigger than the problem of coal—fired power and it is a particularly difficult problem in asia and in emerging markets and so today the asian development bank in partnership with the governments of the philippines and indonesia launched an innovative scheme to accelerate that transition out of coal to take existing coal plants and to shut them down early, leveraging both the power of financial engineering and support from a very broad array of actors, including governments, development banks, developed countries and global philanthropy and business. i smack how much work is there to be done on this? can you give us a sense of the scale? yes, absolutely. as i said, the problem of coal—fired power particularly in asian and emerging markets could very well be
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the biggest problem on the planet and so the scale is absolutely enormous. the many other countries that we are talking about, call still represent the majority of the mix. —— coal. just our pilot project alone could generate 200 million tonnes of c02 reduction. this would be the largest reduction of carbon emissions in the world, the equivalent of 61 million cars, so we're talking about a project that evenin we're talking about a project that even in its early phases is lighter than anything that was done today. mike maxso what is the scale of financial investment needed, then, to see other areas developed to take away from the coal—fired power? well, i would say two things. the first is that there is capital required at the beginning, sojust our pilot facility, which will target indonesia, vietnam and the philippines will need 2.5 to $3.5 billion. of that, in much smaller
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piece will be concessionary capital. that should come from the market and so should be mobilise a bill. now, developed countries are promised $100 billion from developing countries —— developed countries have promised $100 billion to developing countries to support this transition and we hope $100 million that should find its way to cold transition schemes like the only supporting this at the same time an equally important point to make is that if we do this right at the end of the day we will be in a better and cheaper world. so, solar power is already cheaper than coal, and so will we are transitioning to is a world that is better and less expensive and so we need to think about this transition cost is an investment into a better future rather than a price to be shared or a burden to be born. th rather than a price to be shared or a burden to be born.— rather than a price to be shared or a burden to be born. in terms of how much money — a burden to be born. in terms of how much money is _ a burden to be born. in terms of how much money is actually _ a burden to be born. in terms of how much money is actually going - a burden to be born. in terms of how much money is actually going into i much money is actually going into fossilfuel much money is actually going into fossil fuel companies much money is actually going into fossilfuel companies in much money is actually going into fossil fuel companies in financing, ifound one fossil fuel companies in financing, i found one statistic that said the world's bigger 60 banks are provided
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$3.8 billion in financing for fossil fuel companies since the public climate deal in 2015 and, basically, the funding has continued to increase rather than decline —— since the paris climate deal. why is that when banks keep saying that they are going to be turning away in financing sustainable energy? weill. financing sustainable energy? well, i auess financing sustainable energy? well, i cues in financing sustainable energy? well, i guess in the _ financing sustainable energy? well, i guess in the first _ financing sustainable energy? well, i guess in the first instance - financing sustainable energy? well, i guess in the first instance i - i guess in the first instance i would say that that question is best directed at those providing that financing. directed at those providing that financina. , i. directed at those providing that financina. ~ , ., financing. does your bank provide any financing _ financing. does your bank provide any financing for _ financing. does your bank provide any financing for fossil _ financing. does your bank provide any financing for fossil fuel - any financing for fossil fuel companies?— any financing for fossil fuel comanies? , ., ., ., any financing for fossil fuel comanies? , ., ., . ~ �* companies? yes, going forward, abb's new ener: companies? yes, going forward, abb's new energy policy. _ companies? yes, going forward, abb's new energy policy. we _ companies? yes, going forward, abb's new energy policy, we will _ companies? yes, going forward, abb's new energy policy, we will not - companies? yes, going forward, abb's new energy policy, we will not be - new energy policy, we will not be financing coal and what we will be doing in certain limited instances is financing a transition away from fossil fuels and so sometimes, as with this proposal, you do need to engage existing assets in order to get them shut down and so we are focused on mechanisms that allow us
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to transition in a smooth and orderly way to a better world. band orderly way to a better world. and so what the _ orderly way to a better world. and so what the timeframe? what with the timeframe be and what is the level of investment currently? 50 of investment currently? so currently, — of investment currently? so currently, if _ of investment currently? sr currently, if you of investment currently? 5r currently, if you look at the countries that we are engaged with, let's take indonesia for example, indonesia's current target is to be phasing out coal by 2060. that is a very, very long time from now but the covenant is working with us in partnership with us on the scheme which could take a coal—fired power plant that might last 30 or 40 years and potentially shut it down in 15 years or even sooner than that. what i would also say to you as you need a little bit of time to plan for the transition to renewables anyways, so that i'm vain that we are talking about icon the sort of, the best reasonable, practical timeframe is that we can achieve this on. now, and your question about how much money would take, it would actually take, you know, a meaningful large quantity of money in our target
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countries to do this, ten, 20, $30 billion perhaps in the aggregate, and that money would be used to transition away and to replace the coal with renewables, with wind, with solar, with batteries, with other emerging technologies like hydrogen. there isjust a host of different ways to provide power in a green and sustainable way that are emerging, as you know.— green and sustainable way that are emerging, as you know. when rishi sunak, the british _ emerging, as you know. when rishi sunak, the british chancellor - emerging, as you know. when rishi sunak, the british chancellor has i sunak, the british chancellor has said that the entire global financial system is being rewired to cut carbon emissions i mean, that is quite a statement, isn't it? how do you see that? t quite a statement, isn't it? how do you see that?— you see that? i would say it is both uuite a you see that? i would say it is both quite a statement _ you see that? i would say it is both quite a statement but, _ you see that? i would say it is both quite a statement but, believe i you see that? i would say it is both quite a statement but, believe it i you see that? i would say it is both| quite a statement but, believe it or not, it is an understatement. the reality is that we have to tilt the entire planet on its axis in a matter of a decade old too and the financial system isjust matter of a decade old too and the financial system is just a matter of a decade old too and the financial system isjust a part matter of a decade old too and the financial system is just a part of it. we have to change the energy system, our industrial processes, absolutely everything we do. the
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power of finance, of course, is that it is the nervous system of the economy and so if we are able to pivot the nervous system of the economy and finance which the chancellor has laid out as an objective, i think likely slow, and that an accelerator of the other processes that need to happen. band processes that need to happen. and in terms of — processes that need to happen. and in terms of your own company's mission statement and targets on the net zero, where do you stand? weill. net zero, where do you stand? well, ou net zero, where do you stand? well, you know, — net zero, where do you stand? well, you know, we _ net zero, where do you stand? well, you know, we are — net zero, where do you stand? well, you know, we are not _ net zero, where do you stand? well, you know, we are not a _ net zero, where do you stand? well, you know, we are not a company, i net zero, where do you stand? -tt you know, we are not a company, we are a multilateral development institution owned by government and so our role is to support governments as they make these net zero commitments, as they announce their national development contributions, their commitments to reduce emissions under the paris accords. 0ur role is to support them and to assist them in that process. now, an element of that is to give them good policy advice, an element of that is a given funding, but the most powerful element of that is going to be create high—impact public—private partnerships because
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if there's one message coming out of cop it is that we have a loss of lined actors in the world together and there is a real risk that the whole is less than the sum of its parts so i would say the most important thing we are doing and i think the energy transition mechanism focused on coal is a great example, the most important thing we are doing is an institution is to sit in the middle of these various actors, leveraging our unique role in the ecosystem to try and create vehicles and platforms that letters will accomplish our mutually shared and announced objectives. does will accomplish our mutually shared and announced objectives. and announced ob'ectives. does the absence of china i and announced objectives. does the absence of china and _ and announced objectives. does the absence of china and russia - and announced objectives. does the absence of china and russia at i absence of china and russia at cop26, what does their absence mean? well, i can't speak to the cop26 process but one thing i can tell you that makes our institution quite unique is that our three largest shareholders are the united states, japan and china and so when the bbb does do something then these three important asian and global powers are represented. and so i think that thatis are represented. and so i think that that is a good question for the
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cop26 organisers. it is not necessarily an issue that affects our institution. —— adb. necessarily an issue that affects our institution. -- adb.- necessarily an issue that affects our institution. -- adb. thank you very much — our institution. -- adb. thank you very much for— our institution. -- adb. thank you very much forjoining _ our institution. -- adb. thank you very much forjoining us, - our institution. -- adb. thank you very much forjoining us, vice i very much forjoining us, vice president of the asian development bank. thank you. facebook will delete more than a billion faceprints of its users — because of "ongoing uncertainty" about the place of the technology in society. until now, users could choose to opt into the facial recognition feature which would notify them if someone had posted a picture of them. the social media website says it's responding to a lack of guidance from regulators. joining me now is dr stephanie hare who is a researcher in technology, politics and history and has a book due to be published on technology ethics. thank you a much forjoining us. why is facebook doing this? tt is thank you a much forjoining us. why is facebook doing this?— is facebook doing this? it is such a treat is facebook doing this? it is such a great question- — is facebook doing this? it is such a great question. on _ is facebook doing this? it is such a great question. on the _ is facebook doing this? it is such a great question. on the one - is facebook doing this? it is such a great question. on the one hand, l great question. 0n the one hand, it sounds really significant to say that they are going to delete the face cleanser over a billion users but they have also kept the model that they built off of those face
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guns, all those billions of people. they've kept that and they've also said that they might still use facial recognition in future products and services that they build, so they give with one hand and take away with the other, so i think we have to really ask ourselves what has really changed here other than a very interesting headline. �* , ., ., ,~' here other than a very interesting headline. �* i. ., i. , headline. and when you ask yourself the question. _ headline. and when you ask yourself the question, what _ headline. and when you ask yourself the question, what sort _ headline. and when you ask yourself the question, what sort of— headline. and when you ask yourself the question, what sort of answers l the question, what sort of answers are you up with? t the question, what sort of answers are you up with?— the question, what sort of answers are you up with? i think what we're auoin to are you up with? i think what we're going to have _ are you up with? i think what we're going to have to — are you up with? i think what we're going to have to learn _ are you up with? i think what we're going to have to learn as _ are you up with? i think what we're going to have to learn as a - going to have to learn as a society is how important our body data and our face is is how important our body data and ourface is probably the biggest one and may be our voice and fingerprints as well. facebook has been using this technology for 11 years. it doesn't need, necessarily, the1 billion or years. it doesn't need, necessarily, the 1 billion or more face scans that it already has because it hasn't been far more powerful, which is the algorithm called deep face that it built. it can now book use that it built. it can now book use that in any way that it once including those featured products that it including those featured products thatitis including those featured products that it is hinted that he is facial
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recognition honours anyways. that is powerful. 50 recognition honours anyways. that is owerful. �* ., , recognition honours anyways. that is owerful. �* . , ., powerful. so i didn't realise that this technology _ powerful. so i didn't realise that this technology had _ powerful. so i didn't realise that this technology had been - powerful. so i didn't realise that this technology had been there l powerful. so i didn't realise that i this technology had been there for so long and so many people were using it. what are they, kind of, questions around privacy and protection of your own data? t questions around privacy and protection of your own data? i think the big question _ protection of your own data? i think the big question that _ protection of your own data? i think the big question that we _ protection of your own data? i think the big question that we really i protection of your own data? i think the big question that we really have is where do we draw the line. there are very useful use cases for facial recognition technology. you could use it as facebook did, for instance, to spot duplicate or fraudulent accounts. you can also use it to help visually impaired users so they can get captions generated of who is in photos that they want to use the site, so there are always, with any technology, some potentially positive uses and then some potentially negative uses. the problem is that facebook, because it is so big and it has so many people's data, it is really, sort of, skip the bounds of any regulation or any lawmakers and what is really interesting in their
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announcement is that they said we are stopping this because we recognise it is so problematic and they really aren't adequate rules so they really aren't adequate rules so they punted this back to the lawmakers around the world saying you can keep complaining about it all crafts and laws and then actually enforce regulation. 50 all crafts and laws and then actually enforce regulation. so was it likely that _ actually enforce regulation. so was it likely that lawmakers _ actually enforce regulation. so was it likely that lawmakers will - actually enforce regulation. so was it likely that lawmakers will step i it likely that lawmakers will step in and change the law?— it likely that lawmakers will step in and change the law? well, it is interesting- _ in and change the law? well, it is interesting. even _ in and change the law? well, it is interesting. even the _ in and change the law? well, it is interesting. even the united i in and change the law? well, it is i interesting. even the united kingdom we have got to debate in the house of lords tomorrow on the use of facial recognition on children in schools to pay for lunch. now, that is nothing to do with facebook but it does show that this is a technology that can be used in so many different ways. potentially we might decide that we want to draw the line on children, potentially we might want to draw the line and saying it is ok or not ok to use it with the police and law enforcement, so that is really the big question, it is all up for grabs and every country is going to take a different position on it. t country is going to take a different position on it— position on it. i mean, the fact that they _ position on it. i mean, the fact that they are — position on it. i mean, the fact that they are doing _ position on it. i mean, the fact
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that they are doing it, - position on it. i mean, the fact| that they are doing it, whatever position on it. i mean, the fact i that they are doing it, whatever the reasons for that, is definitely putting it out there, isn't it, something that has been discussed because those sorts of questions that you're talking aboutjust haven't been debated and we are where we are with facebook having a billion face prints on its database. yes, and we actually saw this last year after the black light mass movement came to such global attention. amazon and ibm and google and microsoft all came out and said they were no longer going to recognition technology to law enforcement. —— black lives matter. that was really significant in the united states because the united states has been actually banning this technology unless action has been taken around the world but what happens in the united states where companies like facebook and amazon etc based ripples out, so now we're seeing lawmakers and regulators in the public starting to, sort of come again a consciousness about this technology, realising quite how powerful it is an suddenly becoming aware that we have no laws to
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protect us from this, not really. really interesting. thank you very much explain myself. thank you. hello again. once again today, the forecast is one of sunshine and showers. a lot of the showers coming in in the brisk winds, windward coasts but some of them are making it inland. across england, there will be a bit more cloud around than there was yesterday. but there'll still be some sunshine, gusty winds, 40—50 mph gusts along the north sea coast, accentuating the cold feel. temperatures 8—13 north to south. through this evening and overnight, many of the showers will fade but anywhere from north wales northwards, the showers on the mountain tops are likely to be wintry. still gusty winds as well and in some sheltered central and western areas, temperatures will fall away low enough for a touch of frost. so we start the day tomorrow with a chilly note. we're also looking at a fair bit of sunshine, a lot of dry weather, fewer showers than we're looking at today. still gusty winds down this north sea coastline and it's likely
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to be the chilliest day of this week, with temperatures between 9—11. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the british chancellor rishi sunak promises to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. in australia — a four—year—old girl cleo smith missing for 18 days has been found alive and well — in a locked house. the board of yorkshire county cricket club faces heavy criticism over its handling of allegations of racism by a former player. and — as world leaders try to agree on how to fight climate change, we have a special report from madagascar, which is on the brink of what the un is calling the world s first climate—induced famine . sport and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, .s. there you can follow that you can follow that life. the player at the centre of an investigation into allegations of racism at yorkshire
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county cricket club is set to give evidence in person to the digital culture and media sport select committee on his experiences. it will appear on november 16 along with leading yorkshire officials. it follows calls for answers from a number of politicians after a leaked report emerged apparently containing details of the investigation into the treatment of the player. story published by espn said the story had concluded that a racially offensive term used was regarded as banter. the investigation found that he was the victim of racial harassment and bullying however yorkshire has said no disciplinary action would be taken. ~ ., ., , no disciplinary action would be taken. ~ . . , ., , no disciplinary action would be taken. . . , ., , , no disciplinary action would be taken. . ., , , ., taken. what really remains is that the government _ taken. what really remains is that the government and _ taken. what really remains is that the government and even - taken. what really remains is that l the government and even sponsors taken. what really remains is that i the government and even sponsors are actually, you know, really unclear about where do yorkshire lie about this? did they have a firm understanding of the discomfort that they caused to him and, if so, why
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are they not, people who have been accused to actually come up and talk about this and tell us who they are. they obviously kept the report quite secret and they've given it over for investigation and they will give them action because they want to be, you know, they feel that yorkshire brought the game into disrepute. manchester united were rescued by ronaldo in the champions league once again. his 91st minute equaliser earned them a two all draw but has his moment of brilliance once again papered over the cracks? we have the action. there was a time for manchester united to relax. welcome is it ever? in the 12 minute shot at the goalkeeper and in. and here we go again. an injury soon. the magenta reorganisation. mostly get it to rinaldo. that is an equaliser.
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this is the replay that was studied for two minutes before, yeah, they decided it was on side and the goal stood. how could united recover? not how, it is who. injury time, the repair man. rinaldo. 2—2. the last gasp era for all time. remember 1979? here they do. european cup finalists then. success takes money but pride is still priceless. the swedish defence helped chelsea out for 55 minutes. no star strikers for chelsea. it needed this kind of thing. 1—0 was enough. joe wilson, bbc news. the former arsenal manager were turned down the chance to become the new newcastle head coach according to spanish football experts. he had confirmed yesterday that he had been approached by newcastle who want him to replace steve bruce and have him in place by
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the weekend but there is advising were left feeling uncertain about the club's strategy. that is the sport for an hourjust before we go new zealand are 163—5 in the 19th over. scott than to get to bat. game for scotland at the men's t20 world cup. the judge who acted as coroner in the fishmongers' hall inquests has said it was "very unsatisfactory" that the panel responsible for managing the attacker usman khan weren't told of intelligence suggesting that he intended to carry out an attack. khan was out on licence from prison when he killed two people and injured three others in the attack in london in november 2019. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is with me. just remind us about what happened and where we are now with this? jack merritt was a — and where we are now with this? t:c< merritt was a young person involved with the prison education programme
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and was stabbed to death at this eventin and was stabbed to death at this event in november 2019 which was attended by the attacker, the man who had been released from prison about a year earlier on licence from about a year earlier on licence from a terrorist offence. and just before he was released from prison that had been intelligence that he might be intending to carry out an attack after his release but somehow not enough people in the chain were aware of that and although his licence conditions were quite strict, he was basically have to board a train on his own to london and they carried out the attack. tell us more, then, but what the judge has said? tie tell us more, then, but what the judge has said?— judge has said? he has made 22 recommendations _ judge has said? he has made 22 recommendations to _ judge has said? he has made 22 recommendations to prevent i judge has said? he has made 22 i recommendations to prevent future deaths, which is a huge number. but i some of the key ones are around this intelligence. he said it was very, very unsatisfactory that this intelligence that he might be intending to carry out an attack was not made available to the protection panel responsible for monitoring him
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after his release and he said, we need to find a way where, if there is intelligence known only to the security service m15 counterterrorism police of making sure that is made available to the panel in a formal way so that everybody knows that it has been said. and where it can't be shared with the panel then may be the chair at the panel needs to have high enough security clearance that he at least can be told, he or she at least can be told, he or she at least can be told, he or she at least can be told and then decision can be made about letting other people know. i think some of the other recommendations are around varying of licence conditions because he was not to a train station and yet his licence conditions were very to allow them to travel on his own on a train to london. the sens was from what the jury said and what the coroner said that not enough consideration had been given of the risk of that so perhaps that is to be more formally done risk assessments when you are
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in very licence conditions. he has made other recommendations about prisoners generally. perhaps should be allowed to stop and search them at some time and perhaps there should be drug testing. both of which you might think are already in place but actually are not. these are some of the key recommendations to try to prevent deaths in the future from like this.- to try to prevent deaths in the future from like this. what will ha en future from like this. what will happen now — future from like this. what will happen now with _ future from like this. what will happen now with those - happen now with those recommendations. ., recommendations. some of them, their recommendations _ recommendations. some of them, their recommendations to _ recommendations. some of them, their recommendations to various _ recommendations. some of them, their recommendations to various police i recommendations to various police forces and the home office. some of them are already trying to put in place changes that reflect those recommendations but certainly this is from such a seniorjudge that after such a devastating set of events and such a long—running inquest that i think they will all be taken very seriously and although some of the more difficult one surrounding intelligence sharing and surrounding intelligence sharing and surrounding what you do with prisoners on licence in terms of
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stop and search the government will have to say why it isn't adopting any of these recommendations. ithihat any of these recommendations. what are those difficulties _ any of these recommendations. what are those difficulties around intelligence sharing because it seems fundamental that the panel responsible for managing someone about whom there is intelligent as there was in this case should know about it. , , , ., , there was in this case should know about it. , , , . , ., about it. dishes that came up at the in . uest about it. dishes that came up at the inquest were _ about it. dishes that came up at the inquest were bound, _ about it. dishes that came up at the inquest were bound, well, - about it. dishes that came up at the inquest were bound, well, if- about it. dishes that came up at the inquest were bound, well, if you i inquest were bound, well, if you have got stuff that has come from a very, very sensitive source, may be from human sores or some other very sensitive means of gathering intelligence, the service m15 and counterterrorism police were sought their representatives on earth, are sometimes very, very wary of letting that be shared more widely for risk of compromising the source and that is usually what it is all about. it is usually what it is all about. it is about how can you make sure that enough of that information is allowed to get to the people responsible for protection? because it turns out, in this case, nobody
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was particularly unhappy with this intelligence being just was not shared. intelligence being 'ust was not shared. ., ~ , ., let's return to the cop26 climate summit — which is turning its attention to global finance, with firms who control trillions of dollars in funds promising to help achieve carbon neutrality by twenty— fifty. hundreds of the world's biggest finance companies have signed up to a climate coalition led by the former bank of england governor, mark carney. he's been speaking to my colleague christian fraser. there's been so many that have been pursued since paris that make no sense. and those of the stranded assets. and it should help. i was going to ask you, the word has too much proven reserves of oil, coal and gas. the stranded assets that you talk about, where does it appear now in the balance sheets? {etc you talk about, where does it appear now in the balance sheets? ok. well, at this stage, — now in the balance sheets? ok. well, at this stage. in _ now in the balance sheets? ok. well, at this stage, in most _ now in the balance sheets? ok. well,
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at this stage, in most cases, - now in the balance sheets? ok. well, at this stage, in most cases, it - at this stage, in most cases, it does not. that climate disclosure we talked about earlier, one of the requirements is to do a scenario thatis requirements is to do a scenario that is a to agree world and then it crystallises, if you will, the scale of the stranded assets so that will start to be disclosed and of course what we are asking the auditors as well is to think about again in one and have to agree world is that calculation right. so that is what starts to show up. i think we are increasingly going to see, though, as government policy toughened up, about what is needed, companies are going to have to say theoretically this is what is going to happen but actually i do have to write off some of those. this tiny bit of that earlier about a year ago with some of the major oil companies who wrote off some of those excess reserves thatjust off some of those excess reserves that just don't off some of those excess reserves thatjust don't make sense in a one in have to agree world but it is a
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drop in the back at this far. t in have to agree world but it is a drop in the back at this far. i know ou are a drop in the back at this far. i know you are a supporter _ drop in the back at this far. i know you are a supporter of _ drop in the back at this far. i know you are a supporter of the - drop in the back at this far. i know you are a supporter of the carbonl you are a supporter of the carbon market and a way of generating finance and getting finance to those parts of world that need it, one of the problems at the moment is what we call carbon leakage. so, you get a territory like the eu which puts up a territory like the eu which puts up the price of carbon, carbon taxes, it becomes more expensive companies and then companies relocate to another part of the world where it is cheaper. do you think there needs to be thought about a global carbon price? t do about a global carbon price? i do think. we would _ about a global carbon price? t if think. we would have a global carbon price that at the level would be higher may be in the uk than it is in some sub—saharan developing african or small island states given the relative resources but everyone should try to have a price on carbon. i'm not na ve about it and i don't think it is going to happen overnight on one of the objectives
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that various leaders talked about yesterday was to get the coverage of the carbon price up to about two thirds of global emissions by the end of this decade. and that will help reduce carbon leakage and of course, as you know, another issue in the absence of that is they could be trade barriers put in place because of to prevent that carbon leakage. and notjust the carbon leakage. and notjust the carbon leakage but the impact. to export back to that _ leakage but the impact. to export back to that territory _ leakage but the impact. to export back to that territory you'd - leakage but the impact. to export back to that territory you'd face i back to that territory you'd face the cost. 50 back to that territory you'd face the cost. , , ., , , back to that territory you'd face the cost. , , ., ', ., back to that territory you'd face the cost. , , ., , the cost. so put big tariffs on my steel industry — the cost. so put big tariffs on my steel industry carbon _ the cost. so put big tariffs on my steel industry carbon price i the cost. so put big tariffs on my steel industry carbon price steel| steel industry carbon price steel industry to try to try to get measures down and then i do is import steele or somebody import steel from elsewhere the no better off. my workers have lost theirjobs and things and improved. ithiheh off. my workers have lost their “obs and things and improvedi and things and improved. when we roll our eyes _ and things and improved. when we roll our eyes at _ and things and improved. when we roll our eyes at some _ and things and improved. when we roll our eyes at some of _ and things and improved. when we roll our eyes at some of the - roll our eyes at some of the commitments that australia, saudi arabia, russia are not making, the fact that they are not changing fast
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enough, really the global market will change so that it becomes unprofitable to be doing what they're doing. you unprofitable to be doing what they're doing-— unprofitable to be doing what they're doing. you can flip this into a virtuous _ they're doing. you can flip this into a virtuous circle _ they're doing. you can flip this into a virtuous circle and i i they're doing. you can flip this | into a virtuous circle and i think we're starting to get there. and, you know, australia of course did out in the last two weeks of the 2015 zero objectives. saudi arabia is making other movements. we can see the direction of travel. today you can see that $130 trillion at the core of global finance is saying we are increasingly only looking for net zero aligned projects. we can speak now to simon yewell. he's head of policy and advocacy at positive money. they campaign for what they describe as a fairer and more sustainable banking system. how much progress to think has been made? t how much progress to think has been made? ~ , ., ., . made? i think this announcement marks some _ made? i think this announcement marks some progress. _ made? i think this announcement marks some progress. the - made? i think this announcement i
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marks some progress. the transition plans been made mandatory is a very positive step. especially the idea of it being backed by transition. but, you know, these are plans and the task force in the storm is a regulation buying them. the overarching message both the chancellors today and the announcement we have from mark carney and others is an overall message of let's leave it to the market. and the private sector to fix the problem. there is information gathering, disclosure which is based on the efficient market hypothesis and the assumptions which led to the last financial crisis. if we increase the amount of information, you know, markets will be able to efficiently and rationally realign that we have seen over the past decade or decades that financial firms have known about climate risk and have done very little and are still aligned with the markets are still aligned
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with the markets are still aligned with global heating. . brute with the markets are still aligned with global heating. .— with the markets are still aligned with global heating. . we need a lot more action — with global heating. . we need a lot more action to _ with global heating. . we need a lot more action to government - with global heating. . we need a lot more action to government to i with global heating. . we need a lot more action to government to be i more action to government to be leading the way in driving this transition so we cantjust leave it to the private sector to fix. with more transparency and accountability at a time when the trajectory is clear so does that mean it will be self—fulfilling because of that? tlat self-fulfilling because of that? not necessarily- _ self—fulfilling because of that? tjrrt necessarily. we have to think about how robust they actually are to make sure they are led by science rather than just the vested interests of industry. there's been lots of interest with disclosure and taxonomies in other places such as
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the eu around this. what we need, essentially, is the government and the central banks to be using their muscle to shift financial flows. towards where they are needed. rather than, essentially, the line in private finance do the right thing. in private finance do the right thin. , in private finance do the right thin _ , ., in private finance do the right thin. , ., , in private finance do the right thin._ , ., , in private finance do the right thin. , ., , ., thing. sorry to interrupt you, how would that _ thing. sorry to interrupt you, how would that work? _ thing. sorry to interrupt you, how would that work? that _ thing. sorry to interrupt you, how would that work? that the - thing. sorry to interrupt you, how would that work? that the 20th i would that work? that the 20th century and _ would that work? that the 20th century and central _ would that work? that the 20th century and central banks i would that work? that the 20th century and central banks are i century and central banks are taking, you know, large measures to essentially guide credit to where it was needed more productively and we essentially need to be looking again. and having governments and central banks using, you know, their strategic oversight to the economy and finding out where we need investment and giving quotas and investing in their strategic priority but what we also need more than anything is public investment.
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and rishi sue nack talked about it today but he is not putting his money where his mouth is. we have a figure of 30 billion over three years for public investment in transition. and we need 30 billion a year to ensure green public finance need to be doing most of the heavy lifting if we're going to get a fair transition. private finance will only invest in what a profitable and will be subsidising those costs and paying for those costs. renewables are not that profitable as investment so, as i say, it is going to going to have to do a lot of heavy lifting to make this happen. when you look at what has been happening in terms of investment in fossilfuel happening in terms of investment in fossil fuel companies, happening in terms of investment in fossilfuel companies, it happening in terms of investment in fossil fuel companies, it is actually gone up from the biggest banks in the world since the paris climate agreement. there is necessarily, isn't there? a transition where, when you talk about profitability for banks
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investments, it can't be, you know, whatever the desire is, there has to be a process by which, and it will take time. what do you think would be a sort of realistic time frame? definitely you are right. fossil fuels are far more profitable than renewable energy at the moment but thatis renewable energy at the moment but that is why banks like to fund it so much. these are better investments for them and their balance sheets at the end of the day. this is why we need to be, as i said, a leading the way. and, as you say, there needs to be stuff in the announcement we have had today on new more investment in fossil fuels and we need governments, restricting to invest in fossil fuels. we governments, restricting to invest in fossilfuels. we need no new investment in fossil fuel expansion beyond this year we're going to reach the pathway of net zero x 2050 as well as a tripling of green
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investment. so that is the pathway we need to be looking at what other governments and banks need to be regulating and restricting fossil fuel investments beyond this year. thank you very much forjoining us. let's return to the climate change summit. mikkel larsen is the interim chief executive officer of climate impact x, a global exchange and marketplace for high—quality carbon credits, based in singapore. can you tell us first of all what your organisation dies. explained it ve well. your organisation dies. explained it very well- we _ your organisation dies. explained it very well. we want _ your organisation dies. explained it very well. we want to _ your organisation dies. explained it very well. we want to take - your organisation dies. explained it very well. we want to take urgent l very well. we want to take urgent action to face climate change were looking to decarbonise their own companies in the best possible way
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and carbon offset does that. it allows us to take those urgent actions that we need in terms of investing in some of the carbon things we already have. it also helps reduce the cost because we certainly need all the different ways that we can do that. our company essentially responds to what we think is a problem in the market today. we need to scale quality carbon projects and third the we need to see an integration in the voluntary and compliance markets and so we have different means that we try to do that to resolve some of these issues.— these issues. and so, on that, questions _ these issues. and so, on that, questions have _ these issues. and so, on that, questions have been _ these issues. and so, on that, questions have been asked i these issues. and so, on that, questions have been asked as| these issues. and so, on that, i questions have been asked as to whether an organisation will basically go and offset its flights
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or whatever it is and whether it is actually a realistic transaction in terms of an offset so you are saying you want to get trust in the system. so can you give us an example, then, of how it might work if, you know, business comes to you'd or tell us what they might come to you with and what they might come to you with and what they might come to you with and what they want to offset and how they might do it?— what they want to offset and how they might do it? yes, absolutely. normally the _ they might do it? yes, absolutely. normally the way _ they might do it? yes, absolutely. normally the way it _ they might do it? yes, absolutely. normally the way it happened i they might do it? yes, absolutely. normally the way it happened as i they might do it? yes, absolutely. normally the way it happened as a corporate comes. what they have done is set themselves targets. we have just heard that previous big talk about science —based targets. they look about the best thing they can do right now to reduce their carbon emissions and then they realise that with the best of well, they're not able to completely reduce the carbon to zero. and so they look at how they can finance forestry, man graves, or the types of solutions. and then they measure up how much they need and they will purchase it.
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especially when you talk about what are we doing differently. i mention this issue of trust and you mentioned whether it was realistic. and we need to insert trust in four areas right now. we need to view and search trust in the product itself so that we make sure that the product that is sold would actually deliver what they say they do. if they say they will sequester carbon they say they will sequester carbon the actually do sequester carbon. if the actually do sequester carbon. if the offer deliver local livelihoods and the second thing that has been hidden in the passage trust in the executions. we have seen that transactions have been missing. many of these have been missing. the third area is really in the use of the product. one of the things that the product. one of the things that the credit market has often been criticised for is the displacement of other urgent actions and we are clear that this should not be the case. and we advocate that quite strongly and do keep in mind that it
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is a voluntary actions that we are talking about. company should be doing both decarbonising and buying carbon offset and then finally we believe it is important to have trust in ongoing monitoring because we do realise that in nature —based solutions such as forestry if trees don't keep standing then essentially we have not really done much for the planet. we have not really done much for the lanet. ., ~' ,, , . we have not really done much for the lanet. ., ~ ,, , . ., planet. thank you very much for “oininu planet. thank you very much for joining us- _ coming up in the next hour we'll be live in house of commons for prime minister's questions. stay with us for live coverage. let's catch up with the weather. hello, again. it has been a cold start day for some others. we had some fast first thing and it has been accorded a generally today. but the forecast is one of sunshine and showers. not all of us will see those showers but some of will be
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driven in on brisk winds along windward coasts plus we have a couple of week by the front sinking south. they, too, are enhancing the shower so we will see showers in land as well as along the coasts. equally there is sunshine. anywhere northwards. as i mentioned, brisk winds, and gusts in their black circles. really gusty across the and the west but especially down the north sea coastline and that will accentuate temperatures. tensions ranging from 8—13. we start off with all those showers but overnight a lot of them will fade. anywhere from north wales northwards on the mountains we are likely to see some snow on the brisk winds continue. in some central and western areas in a shout out will be cold enough for a touch of frost but elsewhere there will be too much wind and also those
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showers. as we head towards the end of the week this is thursday's picture. you can see this area of high pressure building on from the atlantic and there is a week by the front coming in across the north west bringing in some rain but the winter changing direction so it is not going to be as cold as represented by the yellows. chasing away the blues. as we head through the course of thursday itself there will not be as many showers. there will not be as many showers. there will be more dry conditions with a fair bit of sunshine. still gusty winds down the north sea coast gusting at about 40 mph again. accentuate in the chilly feel. temperatures 7—11 and thursday is likely to be coldest day of this week. as we had again through thursday and into the weekend we have this area of high pressure slipping southwards. 0pening have this area of high pressure slipping southwards. opening the doors to a new area coming from the atlantic bringing in a weather front. some strong winds and also some heavy rain so on friday there will be changes. a fair bit of
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cabbage patches like rain and drizzle on the west. saturday is milder but windy in the north and west.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the chancellor rishi sunak promises to "rewire the entire global financial system" , to cut carbon emissions. we are going to move towards making it mandatory for firms to publish a clear deliverable plan setting out how they will decarbonise and transition to net zero with an independent task force to define what is required. in australia four—year—old cleo smith who has been missing for 18 days has been found alive and well in a locked house i said, "what's your name?" and she didn't answer. "what's your name? " she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time
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and she looked at me and she said, "my name is cleo." the board of yorkshire county cricket club faces heavy criticism over its handling of allegations of racism by a former player scientists in the united states have given the go—ahead for children aged between five and 11, to receive a pfizer coronavirus vaccine. and — as world leaders try to agree on how to fight climate change, we have a special report from madagascar. let's cross live to the house of commons for prime minister's questions. the prime minister has been busy preaching urgency this week at cop26 but when he sits down with his
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grandchildren one day and asks what he would do that week of cop26 wood he would do that week of cop26 wood he built a hut take one action that would have an immediate impact that is consistent with what he has said and done and take on the bigger c02 emitter in the whole of europe that greedily, voraciously once more and will he ditch his predecessor's pre—90% drop in demand and have a fresh vote in this house to kill off the third runway at heathrow? laughter mr speaker, what this government is going to do, rather than taking steps to damage the economy of this country what we are going to do is get a net is zero aviation, mr speaker. speaken that speaker. that is the future for this country, clean, green, aviation, and, by the way, i think that that has every
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chance of arriving a lot earlier, mr speaker, then a third runway at heathrow!, ., , ~ speaker, then a third runway at heathrow!_ thank | speaker, then a third runway at i heathrow!_ thank you, speaker, then a third runway at - heathrow!_ thank you, mr heathrow! james wilde. thank you, mr seaker. i heathrow! james wilde. thank you, mr speaker- i share _ heathrow! james wilde. thank you, mr speaker. i share my— heathrow! james wilde. thank you, mr speaker. i share my right _ heathrow! james wilde. thank you, mr speaker. i share my right honourable i speaker. i share my right honourable friend's commitments to build back better, build back greener and level “p better, build back greener and level up and i have a project that will deliver on all of those things, rebuilding the ageing queen elizabeth hospital in kings lynn. i have shown him the pictures of the 200 pubs holding up its decaying leaves of the prime minister make the queen elizabeth one of the new scheme is giving people in norfolk, lincolnshire and cambridge at the hospital they need. mr lincolnshire and cambridge at the hospital they need.— hospitalthey need. mr speaker, i know that my _ hospitalthey need. mr speaker, i know that my honourable - hospitalthey need. mr speaker, i know that my honourable friend i hospitalthey need. mr speaker, i | know that my honourable friend is hospitalthey need. mr speaker, i i know that my honourable friend is a huge amount of work to his constituents and i have seen the pictures that he describes and i can tell him that the application is in from the hospital in his constituency. heat is under consideration and i aim to make a final decision in the spring of next year. final decision in the spring of next ear. ~ ., . ., ., year. we now come to the deputy leader of the _ year. we now come to the deputy leader of the labour _ year. we now come to the deputy leader of the labour party, i leader of the labour party, angela
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raynen _ leader of the labour party, angela ra ner. ., ~ i. leader of the labour party, angela ra ner. ., ~' ,, ~ leader of the labour party, angela ra ner. ., ~ ~ .,~ leader of the labour party, angela ra ner. ., ~ ~ ., rayner. thank you, mr speaker, and can i rayner. thank you, mr speaker, and can i share — rayner. thank you, mr speaker, and can i share the _ rayner. thank you, mr speaker, and can i share the opening _ rayner. thank you, mr speaker, and can i share the opening words i can i share the opening words from the fineness said regarding our armed forces and the tremendous work they do in also send my best wishes to all of those recovering in salisbury and give our sincere thanks to the emergency services that responded on that day and i would also like to wish all those elevating tomorrow a happy and peaceful diwali. now, let me start with something on which there should be agreement across all sides of the house. the independent standards process found that a member broke the rules and paid lobbying. the rules on page lobbying. surely the prime minister accepts that this is and should be a serious offence. yet we have seen reports that he will respond by scrapping the independent process and overturning its verdict. in no other profession in our country could someone be found guilty by an independent
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process and just have their mates vote them back into the job. surely, surely the prime minister and his government are not going to do that today. government are not going to do that toda . ., ~ government are not going to do that toda. ., ~ ,,, ., ~ government are not going to do that toda. ., ~ .,~ ., government are not going to do that toda. ., ~ ., , today. no, mr speaker, of course we are not going — today. no, mr speaker, of course we are not going to _ today. no, mr speaker, of course we are not going to do _ today. no, mr speaker, of course we are not going to do that _ today. no, mr speaker, of course we are not going to do that because i are not going to do that because page lobbying, paid advocacy in this house is wrong. let me make absolutely no bones about that. members who are found guilty of that should apologise and pay the necessary penalties, mr speaker, but thatis necessary penalties, mr speaker, but that is not the issue in this case or this vote before us today. the issue in this case which involved a serious family tragedy, mr speaker, is whether a member of this house had a fair opportunity to make representations in this case or whether as a matter of natural justice our procedures in this house allow for proper appeal, mr speaker,
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and that i think is something that should be of interest across this house and should be approached properly in the spirit of moderation and compassion, mr speaker. mr and compassion, mr speaker. tjt speaker, let and compassion, mr speaker. m speaker, let me put this to him simply. if it was a police officer, a teacher, a doctor, we would expect that independent process to be followed and not changed after the verdict. it is one rule for them and one rule for the rest of us. mr speaker, when a conservative member was found guilty of sexual harassment but let off on a loophole, they said the rules couldn't be changed after the event. so they can't change the rules to stop sexual harassment but they can change the rules to allow cash for
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access. so why is the prime minister making it up as he goes along? mr speaker, all the professionals she mentions have a right of appeal, mr speaker, and that is what the house needs to consider. may i respectfully say to her that i believe instead of playing politics on this issue, which is what they are doing, i think that she needs to consider the procedures of this housein consider the procedures of this house in a spirit of fairness, mr speaker, and we on this side of the house instead of playing politics, we are getting on with delivering on the people's priorities. 40 more hospitals, 20,000 more police officers, wages and growth and jobs across this country. those are our priority. across this country. those are our riori . ~ ~ , across this country. those are our riori . ~ ~' , ., �* priority. order. mr perkins, i don't want to see _ priority. order. mr perkins, i don't want to see any — priority. order. mr perkins, i don't want to see any that _ priority. order. mr perkins, i don't want to see any that either. i priority. order. mr perkins, i don't want to see any that either. mr- want to see any that either. speaker,
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want to see any that either. m speaker, this isn't about playing politics in this place, it is about playing by the rules. and as we can see, it is one rule for everybody else and one rule for the tory conservatives. when they break the rules, mr speaker, theyjust remake the rules. and i know that donald trump is the prime minister's hero, but i say to the prime minister in all seriousness, he should learn the lesson is that if you keep cheating the public, it catches up with you in the end. because while they are wallowing in sleaze, the rest of the country faces higher bills, rising costs and damaging tax rises. so i ask the prime minister, can he tell us what is the projected tax increase per household over the next five years? mr increase per household over the next five ears? ~ ,,, ., ~ ., increase per household over the next five ears? ~ .,~ ., five years? mr speaker, what i can tell her is the _ five years? mr speaker, what i can tell her is the recent _ five years? mr speaker, what i can tell her is the recent budget, i
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five years? mr speaker, what i can tell her is the recent budget, whati tell her is the recent budget, what it did was take cash from those who could afford to pay the most and it had very substantial tax cuts for the hardest working and poorest families in this country. we cut £1000 with universal credit taper relief cut for hard—working families, 2 million families had a £1000 tax cut and we are lifting the living wage across the whole country. what we are also doing, mr speaker, is ensuring this country gets on with a high wage, high skill, jobs led recovery. and never let it be forgotten that if we listen to them, we would have none of those things, mr speaker, we would still be in lockdown. mr would still be in lockdown. m speaker, i think he missed out the numbers so let me help him out. the resolution foundation found that by 2026, taxes will be £3000 more per household since he took office. my constituents and his constituents
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are feeling the pinch, and they are worried about christmas as well, mr speaker, because their bills are going up every week and the budget did nothing to help them. so can the prime minister tell them how much was the tax cut that he gave to the banks instead? mr was the tax cut that he gave to the banks instead?— was the tax cut that he gave to the banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very — banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very well — banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very well it _ banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very well it is _ banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very well it is the _ banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very well it is the banks - banks instead? mr speaker, as she knows very well it is the banks and | knows very well it is the banks and the bankers paying far more proportionally as a result of our tax measures to cover the cost of the nhs, and it is a moot point because the £36 billion came from, 50% of it comes from the 14% of the richest in this country, mr speaker, overwhelmingly from the banks and financial services industry who can pay the most. and the astonishing thing, mr speaker, when it came to voting for that £36 billion increase in 48 new hospitals, in 50,000 more nurses, in looking after our public
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services, they voted against it, mr speaker! mr services, they voted against it, mr seaker! ~ .«r services, they voted against it, mr seaker! ~ ., speaker! mr speaker, according to the prime minister's _ speaker! mr speaker, according to the prime minister's own - speaker! mr speaker, according to the prime minister's own budget i the prime minister's own budget documents, it was £4 billion in tax cut and £3000 tax rises per household, good news for the donors who gave his party have £1 million. his bank got a bonus of nearly £8 million. but not so good news for the rest of us, mr speaker. now, mr speaker, is the prime minister said, we remember and celebrate all those who serve our great country, and all those who have lost their lives, leaving behind a loved ones, and those who have sustained life changing injuries and live every day with the consequences of their
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sacrifice. yet hidden in the small print of the budget was £1 billion cut to day to day defence spending. so, mr speaker, will our service men face pay cuts or will there be fewer of them with less support? mr seaker, of them with less support? mr speaker. i _ of them with less support? mr speaker, i think this is incredible we are hearing this from the labour party, when they would have pulled us out of nato and i think the right honourable lady wanted to abolish the army! she wanted to abolish the army! what you have got in this government is spending on defence, which is the highest since the cold war, the biggest uplift since the cold war, and an increase that has restored confidence in this country, around the world, in our ability to defend notjust our own shores but those of our friends and partners as
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well and that is what this government is doing. mr well and that is what this government is doing. well and that is what this covernment is doinu. ~ ,,, ., ~ government is doing. mr speaker, he knows i asked — government is doing. mr speaker, he knows i asked him _ government is doing. mr speaker, he knows i asked him about _ government is doing. mr speaker, he knows i asked him about the - government is doing. mr speaker, he knows i asked him about the annual. knows i asked him about the annual defence budget which his own budget documents show will drop by £i.3 documents show will drop by £1.3 billion. and i hear his fine words, i'm from a military family myself, but i won't take party political lectures from him because too often the government's actions don't match their words. and mr speaker, i think of my constituents who fought in afghanistan and yet was threatened with sanctions because he was unable to physically travel miles to the nearest dwp office. the prime minister's tax cut for short haul flight last week cost £30 million, thatis flight last week cost £30 million, that is 50% more than the government spends on supporting veterans' mental health each year. the charity combat stress has lost funding this
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year as the calls to their helpline have doubled. so will they match our proposal to reinvest the £35 million saved from cancelled mod contracts to support our veterans that surely deserve it? mr to support our veterans that surely deserve it?— to support our veterans that surely deserveit? ~ �*, , , deserve it? mr speaker, it's because we have been _ deserve it? mr speaker, it's because we have been able _ deserve it? mr speaker, it's because we have been able to _ deserve it? mr speaker, it's because we have been able to run _ deserve it? mr speaker, it's because we have been able to run a - deserve it? mr speaker, it's because we have been able to run a strong i we have been able to run a strong economy and take our economy out of lockdown that we have been able to invest massively in the nhs, we have been able to lift spending on defence to record levels and to keep supporting our fantastic public services. that is what our government is able to do, mr speaker, and i must say i enjoy my conversations with her in spite of the insoles and party political points she directs towards us. and i don't want to cause further dissension in the benches opposite, but i think we all agree she has a gigawatt more energy than the right honourable gentleman her friend, gigawatt more energy than the right honourable gentleman herfriend, i'm just putting it out there. but it is
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the same old labour. no plan, no ideas, we are getting on with delivering the people's priorities, taking this country forward, growth, jobs and creativity up. all they do is grave politics while we deliver. thank you, mr speaker. can i thank the prime _ thank you, mr speaker. can i thank the prime minister and government for securing our fantastic stoke—on—trent levelling up funding? and if_ stoke—on—trent levelling up funding? and if we _ stoke—on—trent levelling up funding? and if we are to truly level up opportunities and access opportunities and access opportunities in stoke—on—trent, we must _ opportunities in stoke—on—trent, we must also _ opportunities in stoke—on—trent, we must also improve our poor public transport — must also improve our poor public transport. so would my right honourable friend agreed to look at the possibility for bus franchising in the _ the possibility for bus franchising in the potteries? as he knows, i am a fanatic about buses. i... we are putting 1.2 billion more than to pass funding and i know stoke—on—trent has
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applied but i suggest he takes the suggestion up with the secretary of state for transport. l suggestion up with the secretary of state for transport.— state for transport. i also, as we look forward _ state for transport. i also, as we look forward to _ state for transport. i also, as we look forward to remembrance i state for transport. i also, as we - look forward to remembrance sunday, commend those who served and the military and security services who protect others. sir david attenborough's powerful opening statement to cop26 told us that the journey to net zero means we must recapture billions of tonnes of carbon from the air. the committee on climate change has been clear that carbon capture and storage is a necessity, not an option, to achieve the planet's net zero targets. this week scotland's world leading climate targets have received widespread praise from amongst others the un secretary general. scotland is finding partners across the world to tackle the climate
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emergency but in westminster there is not even a willing partner to deliver the carbon capture project that was long promised. scotland's northeast has been waiting weeks for a clear reason to exactly why it was rejected. no excuses. maybe the prime minister will answer the simple question, does he know exactly how much of the gatekeepers like c02 storage the scottish could deliver? l like c02 storage the scottish could deliver? . . like c02 storage the scottish could deliver? ., ., ., , , , ., , deliver? i am a massive enthusiast for carbon capture _ deliver? i am a massive enthusiast for carbon capture and _ deliver? i am a massive enthusiast for carbon capture and storage - for carbon capture and storage around the whole of the uk. in aberdeen the project remains on the reserve list. we will come back to this and we want to make sure we have a fantastic industry generating clean hydrogen around the country. in the meantime we are supporting an easing scottish plans to get clean
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energy. i want to thank the people of scotland, the people of glasgow, for the way they have helped to host what has been a fantastically well—organised summit so far. it is well-organised summit so far. it is bad enough _ well—organised summit so far. it 3 bad enough that the prime minister rejected the scottish cluster a week before cop26 but what is worse, he clearly doesn't even know or understand what his government was rejecting, so let me tell him. the scottish cluster bed would have stored 30% of the uk's c02 scottish cluster bed would have stored 30% of the uk's co2 emissions and supported the creation of around 20,000 jobs and green industries. it was by far and away the best bed. if this decision was based on science alone it would have been approved on the spot and it is obvious that this was a political decision in westminster to reject it. with these left at the summit, while the prime
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minister reverse his government's massive own goal when it rejected the scottish cluster? l massive own goal when it rejected the scottish cluster? i am massive own goal when it re'ected the scottish cluster?* massive own goal when it re'ected the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourare the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourage him _ the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourage him to _ the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourage him to be _ the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourage him to be a _ the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourage him to be a little - the scottish cluster? i am trying to encourage him to be a little bit - encourage him to be a little bit less gloomy about the prospects of this. i understand exactly what he says and what we are doing is working with the scottish government and i thank the scottish government for their cooperation and all of the support they gave in the last few days and weeks and what they are doing. we will come back to this. but what i may say, what i think it's working well, is the spirit of cooperation between all levels of government in this country and what does not work is confrontation. house prices are rising in east devon with a dream of homeownership becoming out of reach for too many local people. new developments must be affordable with protections in place to restrict the number of
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properties becoming second homes. the loophole allowing second homeowners to avoid being council tax should be close quickly to help local authorities. while the prime minister meet with me and colleagues from across the south—west to discuss this growing crisis across the region? l discuss this growing crisis across the region?— discuss this growing crisis across the reuion? ~ ., ., , ., , the region? i know how strongly he and other colleagues _ the region? i know how strongly he and other colleagues feel _ the region? i know how strongly he and other colleagues feel about - the region? i know how strongly he | and other colleagues feel about this issue which is why we have legislated to introduce higher rates of stamp duty on second homes and we will ensure only genuine businesses can access rate relief but i am certainly happy to meet with colleagues and discuss what further we need to to ensure local people get the homes they need. scotland is vital for the uk's _ get the homes they need. scotland is vital for the uk's energy _ get the homes they need. scotland is vital for the uk's energy needs, - vital for the uk's energy needs, currently and in the future. it is also vital for the future of your capabilities and other low carbon and renewable energies. the words of the minister for energy confirming that it the minister for energy confirming thatitis the minister for energy confirming that it is the rest of the uk
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dependent on scotland, not the other way round. does he not realise that his failure to invest in carbon capture and storage in grangemouth and feeding the potential in my constituency is regarded as an act of deliberate economic vandalism? casting himself less as bond and more as the villain for all of the cop26 world more as the villain for all of the c0 p26 world to more as the villain for all of the cop26 world to see.— more as the villain for all of the cop26 world to see. what the cop26 world can see — cop26 world to see. what the cop26 world can see is _ cop26 world to see. what the cop26 world can see is the _ cop26 world to see. what the cop26 world can see is the astonishing - world can see is the astonishing achievements of scotland and the rest of the uk in developing clean energy sources and i have said to the leader of his party in westminster we will come back to the aberdeen, forgive me, he is a member of a different party, it is the same agenda, though, we will come back to this. what i found encouraging about the last few days of the spirit of cooperation and joint enterprise that i detect that will enable us to
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deliver massive carbon capture across the whole country. darlington station is receiving _ across the whole country. darlington station is receiving £105 _ across the whole country. darlington station is receiving £105 million - station is receiving £105 million thanks to plans to make it hs2 ready. i want to make sure that darlington benefits from high—speed rail so will he meet with myself and the general colleagues to discuss the general colleagues to discuss the eastern like of h52 and reopening the leeds line to allow the whole region to be better connected? l the whole region to be better connected?— connected? i thank him for everything _ connected? i thank him for everything he _ connected? i thank him for everything he is _ connected? i thank him for everything he is doing - connected? i thank him for everything he is doing for. everything he is doing for darlington and he should wait for the integrated rail plan to come out but in the meantime we are updating darlington station, there are plans in place and the chancellor announced £310 million of funding over the next five years to transform local transport networks in the tea valley. the
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transform local transport networks in the tea valley.— in the tea valley. the prime minister says _ in the tea valley. the prime minister says he _ in the tea valley. the prime minister says he is - in the tea valley. the prime minister says he is a - in the tea valley. the prime minister says he is a fanatic| in the tea valley. the prime i minister says he is a fanatic of buses but what about trains and not just in darlington? last wednesday i was notified that a proposal to reinstate the line had not been successful as part of the restoring your railway fund. can i ask what specific plans the government has to invest in the north—east and places like gateshead and south tyneside in my constituency and when it is he going to get serious about levelling up going to get serious about levelling up in our communities instead of using the term is a meaningless populist slogan? she using the term is a meaningless populist slogan?— using the term is a meaningless populist slogan? she must wait for the integrated _ populist slogan? she must wait for the integrated rail— populist slogan? she must wait for the integrated rail plan _ populist slogan? she must wait for the integrated rail plan but- populist slogan? she must wait for the integrated rail plan but the - the integrated rail plan but the north—east will be the beneficiary of the biggest investment in our rail infrastructure beyond hs2 that we have seen for a century. about £96 billion more than we will be putting in and what we want is we
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want the local authority and regional authorities to work with us to ensure we promote the projects that the people really want. thank ou. that the people really want. thank vou- thank — that the people really want. thank you- thank you — that the people really want. thank you. thank you again. _ that the people really want. thank you. thank you again. i _ that the people really want. thank you. thank you again. i want - that the people really want. thank you. thank you again. i want to i you. thank you again. i want to thank him for his support for the early years healthy development appeal and in particularfor the appeal and in particular for the half appeal and in particularfor the half a billion in new money at spending review last week. he often says that talented spread equally across our country but opportunity is not. does he agree that giving every baby the best start for life is the best possible way to level up across our country?— across our country? yes, i have listened to — across our country? yes, i have listened to my _ across our country? yes, i have listened to my right _ across our country? yes, i have listened to my right honourable friend over many years on this issue and she is 100% right in what she says about the importance of early years that that is why we are investing £500 million to support families and children including £82 million to create a network of
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family hubs to bring together services for children of all ages. we are going to continue to invest in children's early years, for example the 15 hours of early education for disadvantaged two—year—olds that has already benefited 1.1 million disadvantaged kids since 2013. l benefited 1.1 million disadvantaged kids since 2013.— kids since 2013. i was recently contacted _ kids since 2013. i was recently contacted by _ kids since 2013. i was recently contacted by a _ kids since 2013. i was recently contacted by a voxel - kids since 2013. i was recently l contacted by a voxel constituent kids since 2013. i was recently i contacted by a voxel constituent his mother tragically committed suicide after criminal domestic abuse by her husband. with the inquest into her suicide finding his actions to be a direct cause. incredibly her abuser stands to inherit her pension and entire estate because she was unable to complete divorce. i am sure the prime minister willjoin me in sending condolences. does he agree that committed domestic abusers should never be able to profit from the claims of their victims and will he meet with my constituent i need to fix this hole in the law? she
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describes _ to fix this hole in the law? she describes a — to fix this hole in the law? she describes a truly _ to fix this hole in the law? she describes a truly tragic and appalling case and i am sure the whole house will describe the —— share the revulsion she has expressed that the outcome of the processes. we will certainly need to have a meeting to see what we can do to address this loophole. hhs have a meeting to see what we can do to address this loophole.— to address this loophole. nhs staff erform to address this loophole. nhs staff perform magnificently _ to address this loophole. nhs staff perform magnificently on - to address this loophole. nhs staff perform magnificently on the i perform magnificently on the pandemic but there are severe shortages in nearly every specialty, so will he support an amendment to the health bill backed by 50 nhs organisations and of the royal couege organisations and of the royal college to allow independent forecasts of the numbers of doctors and nurses we should be training? so we can reassure people despite the pressure today we are at the doctors and nurses for the future. he is riaht and nurses for the future. he is right that _ and nurses for the future. he is right that we — and nurses for the future. he is right that we have _ and nurses for the future. he is right that we have to _ and nurses for the future. he is right that we have to make i and nurses for the future. he is| right that we have to make sure and nurses for the future. he is right that we have to make sure our nhs has the stuff that it needs and
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thatis nhs has the stuff that it needs and that is why there are 50,000 more health care professionals in the nhs this year than there were last year. 12,000 more nurses. and in addition there are 60,000 nurses in training. somebody asked opposite why they were waiting lists, because we have been through a pandemic, and what we are doing is fixing those waiting lists with £36 billion of investment which that party opposite voted against. it which that party opposite voted a . ainst. , which that party opposite voted aaainst. , ., ., ., , ., against. it is a little over a year since i last _ against. it is a little over a year since i last challenged - against. it is a little over a year since i last challenged the i against. it is a little over a year| since i last challenged the prime minister over his campaign promises to the 19505 born women in which case he has done nothing about their pension injustices. can you tell me today, does his government have any plans to deliverjustice for the women involved?— plans to deliverjustice for the
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women involved? this is a very difficult issue _ women involved? this is a very difficult issue as _ women involved? this is a very difficult issue as the _ women involved? this is a very difficult issue as the whole i women involved? this is a very l difficult issue as the whole house knows and the case of the women is not easily addressed. the expenditure involved is very considerable. the tax that would have to be this would be very considerable. we will continue to reflect on all the options to ensure that people across this country get fair pensions. figs that people across this country get fair pensions-— that people across this country get fair pensions. as a mother, i cannot beain to fair pensions. as a mother, i cannot begin to imagine — fair pensions. as a mother, i cannot begin to imagine the _ fair pensions. as a mother, i cannot begin to imagine the pain _ fair pensions. as a mother, i cannot begin to imagine the pain and i begin to imagine the pain and torment of losing a child. a constituent of mine, a veteran who served with distinction in the british army, has been living with a stain every day of his life since the 28th of november 1981. on that day his daughter went missing from a military shopping complex in germany. it was her second birthday. herfamily germany. it was her second birthday. her family are still searching. the 40th anniversary of her disappearance is coming up at the end of this month which will
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undoubtedly be an exceptionally painful event for the entire family. with the prime minister agreed to meet with him father to father and reassure him that his daughter has not been forgotten? l reassure him that his daughter has not been forgotten?— reassure him that his daughter has not been forgotten? i thank her for raising this — not been forgotten? i thank her for raising this absolutely _ not been forgotten? i thank her for raising this absolutely tragic i not been forgotten? i thank her for raising this absolutely tragic case l raising this absolutely tragic case and i know that the thoughts of the whole house will be with the family and of course i will agree to the request and meet father to father. the epilepsy society is a charity and world leading research centre based in my constituency who started the initiative to better understand the initiative to better understand the effects of global warming on epilepsy and the impact is already clear. a recent survey showed in hot weather 62% of those whose seizures were uncontrolled suffered increased severity. would she join
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were uncontrolled suffered increased severity. would shejoin me in —— he joined me in committing to more funding to research the impact of climate change on human health? she raises very interesting aspect of research into epilepsy. we are funding epilepsy research with another £54 million over the next few years and this issue that she raises of a particular link between hot weather or climate change on epilepsy is certainly one we will be going into. it found that it was set up on a false assumptions, including funding that was never obtained and homes that was never obtained and homes that do not exist. now my constituents are going to be left footing the bill. does the prime minister agree that this latest failure shows that they are just not fit to govern and that those responsible should go? it is
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fit to govern and that those responsible should go? it is not the first time that — responsible should go? it is not the first time that the _ responsible should go? it is not the first time that the lib _ responsible should go? it is not the first time that the lib dems - responsible should go? it is not the first time that the lib dems have i first time that the lib dems have campaigned on homes that do not exist or never existed. i think there campaign in chesham, mr speaker, but i will consider the matter he raises. in a recent itv interview, the prime minister was asked about my constituent, jenny garrett. jenny is a victim of the cladding scandal. before last christmas, her building was evacuated because of safety concerns and she has been forced to pay over £5,000 and has to find £1200 a yearfor car pay over £5,000 and has to find £1200 a year for car pick car parking. the work needed to make her building safe has been blocked by the actions of her freeholder. she doesn't know the costs she will face but it is estimated thousands. in his interview, the prime minister said jenny had a frankly unnecessary sense of anxiety. will he meet her to hear why she is worried and do so
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before the building safety bill completes its passage through the house? ., ., ., , ., ., house? the honourable gentleman, and i have every summer _ house? the honourable gentleman, and i have every summer they _ house? the honourable gentleman, and i have every summer they with - house? the honourable gentleman, and i have every summer they with his i i have every summer they with his constituent. i have every sympathy but what i think is unfair is that people such as hair are placed in a position of unnecessarily anxiety about their homes when they should be reassured. i sympathise deeply with people who have to pay for waking watches and other such things. i think it is absurd, mr speaker, but i think what people should be doing is making sure that we do not unnecessarily undermine the confidence of the market and the people in these homes because they are fundamentally not unsafe. many millions of homes are not unsafe and he should have the courage to say
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so. ., . ., so. the new police and crime commissioner _ so. the new police and crime commissioner for _ so. the new police and crime commissioner for the - so. the new police and crime commissioner for the west . so. the new police and crime - commissioner for the west midlands has chosen to cut back on stop and search across the region. can the prime minister confirm that while stop and searches must be proportionate and non—discriminatory, they remain an important part of keeping our streets and our communities safe. yes, i certainly agree with that and it was a point that i raised recently with the labour mayor of london. we agreed on many things, he was very much out of line with the current labour policy on lockdown for instance but he did certainly, i did think he was wrong about stop and search and we mean to make sure thatis and search and we mean to make sure that is part of the armoury of police options when it comes to stopping knife crime will stop if it is done sensitively and in
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accordance with the law, i believe it can be exceedingly valuable. prime minister, we can save the uk taxpayer £200 billion and level up south london's health service will stop saint hospital is set to lose its anda, maternity, intensive care, children's service, renal unit and six to 2% of beds to healthy, wealthy element at a staggering cost of £600 million. but there is an alternative. rebuild st helier, where health is poorest and save £200 million. now, it is not myjob to help the prime minister sought out his budget, but wouldn't this be a good place to start? we out his budget, but wouldn't this be a good place to start?— a good place to start? we are investing _ a good place to start? we are investing in — a good place to start? we are investing in 48 _ a good place to start? we are investing in 48 hospitals, i a good place to start? we are| investing in 48 hospitals, new hospitals and rebels and what is her job, quite frankly, is devoted for £36 billion of investment in the nhs
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which would allow us to take our health services forward. why wouldn't she do that, mr speaker? can i commend the prime minister on his diplomatic efforts in recent weeks and ask him about another serious and grave issue that was raised at the g20 in rome. the strong likelihood of a nuclear ready iran within a matter of weeks or months. what is the uk going to do with our international partners to tackle that if it is via n agreement, will it be stronger and more enduring than the last one, and if it is not, as many people suspect, what is our plan b? l suspect, what is our plan b? i think it is in the interest, _ suspect, what is our plan b? i think it is in the interest, and _ suspect, what is our plan b? i think it is in the interest, and this - suspect, what is our plan b? i think it is in the interest, and this is i it is in the interest, and this is what, in case of making it clear to the iranian is that there's an opportunity for them to do something that i think would be massively in
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the interest of their people and of iran, which is to come back to the table and do a further agreement. that is what needs to happen and thatis that is what needs to happen and that is the posture of the g20 and indeed of our friends and allies around the world. the universal credit cut is _ around the world. the universal credit cut is already _ around the world. the universal credit cut is already hitting i around the world. the universal. credit cut is already hitting people hard. even before the challenges of the pandemic, 39% of children in my constituency grew up in poverty. a local charity i chair has launched a fundraising campaign to support people through the winter months. the prime minister is well—known for his abilities to attract wealthy donors to the party. will he use those skills to boost our campaign, or even better, will he council the cuts? ~ ., ., .,
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cuts? what we have done with universal credit _ cuts? what we have done with universal credit is _ cuts? what we have done with universal credit is abolish i cuts? what we have done with universal credit is abolish the | cuts? what we have done with i universal credit is abolish the old system that unfairly taxed people on universal credit and helped people with a £1 million tax cut because what we on the side of the house believing is rewarding work, mr speaker. that is what the people of this country want to see and that is why we have put the tax cut on those who are on universal credit, that is why we are lifting the living wage and labour, what is their policy? they want to abolish universal credit. a, ., they want to abolish universal credit. ~._ ., ., they want to abolish universal credit. ., ., ., ., , credit. the mayor of london is refusint credit. the mayor of london is refusing to _ credit. the mayor of london is refusing to rule _ credit. the mayor of london is refusing to rule out _ credit. the mayor of london is refusing to rule out the i credit. the mayor of london is i refusing to rule out the so-called refusing to rule out the so—called outer london charge which would be applied to all bagels registered outside greater london across the greater london boundary. this would have terrible consequences for my constituents and only those people who live in the neighbouring constituency. louis french, the excellent candidate for the by—election, has pledged to fight
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this appalling proposal. would my right honourable friend join me in wishing louis french luck with this and to ensure that this silly move from the mayor of london is stopped in its tracks? l from the mayor of london is stopped in its tracks?— in its tracks? i certainly do agree with my honourable _ in its tracks? i certainly do agree with my honourable friend i in its tracks? i certainly do agree with my honourable friend who i in its tracks? i certainly do agree j with my honourable friend who is in its tracks? i certainly do agree i with my honourable friend who is an old friend of mind and i have worked closely with him on london issues for many years and i know where labour's instance are, they always want to put taxes up, particularly on motorists, and i think a checkpoint chigwell would hit working families. with the labour mayor of london needs to do is get a grip on tfl�*s finances and stop walking up the taxes on ordinary people in the city. the walking up the taxes on ordinary people in the city.— people in the city. the prime minister is — people in the city. the prime minister is very _ people in the city. the prime minister is very much - people in the city. the prime minister is very much aware l people in the city. the prime l minister is very much aware of people in the city. the prime i minister is very much aware of my constituent, abducted by plainclothes officers while shopping
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with his new wife in the city of punjab in november. the intervening years have seen allegations of torture overlooked and strong words from his government about the case overshadowed by excitement over a trade deal with the republic of india. therefore, mr speaker, as we approach the fourth anniversary of his arrest tomorrow, with no charges having been brought in the case by the government of india, would his government be able to grant the smallest of favours to his wife and family in dumbarton and declare his detention and auditory one? i family in dumbarton and declare his detention and auditory one?- detention and auditory one? i think for the campaign — detention and auditory one? i think for the campaign he _ detention and auditory one? i think for the campaign he has _ detention and auditory one? i think for the campaign he has been i detention and auditory one? i think for the campaign he has been running for the campaign he has been running for a long time and what i would say to him is that the closeness of our relationship with india in no way diminishes our willingness to raise that case with the government of india and indeed my right honourable
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friend, the foreign secretary, raised it only the last time she was in india. ., raised it only the last time she was in india. ~' , ., , in india. unlike the party opposite, i welcome the _ in india. unlike the party opposite, i welcome the record _ in india. unlike the party opposite, i welcome the record investment i in india. unlike the party opposite, | i welcome the record investment in the nhs announced in the budget. will my right honourable friend support my campaign for a new health centre in rushcliffe in the village of eastlake where the current building is no longer big enough to serve the current population and it will soon need to accommodate 3000 new patients from new building? l will soon need to accommodate 3000 new patients from new building? i am new patients from new building? i am sure the health _ new patients from new building? i am sure the health secretary will do his utmost in the course of the coming decisions to oblige my friend in her campaign. but mr speaker, how incredible that the labour party should continue to catcall and attack the government when they voted against the tax arising measures that are necessary to fund
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our nhs. they are completely inconsistent, they are absolutely no plans and no idea.— plans and no idea. we now come to the statement, _ plans and no idea. we now come to the statement, to _ plans and no idea. we now come to the statement, to the _ plans and no idea. we now come to the statement, to the prime i the statement, to the prime minister~ _ minister. thank you. mr minister. — thank you. mr speaker, i will make a statement about the g20 summit in rome and update the house on cop26 in glasgow. almost 30 years ago, the world acknowledged gathering danger of climate change agreed to do what would have once been inconceivable and regulate the atmosphere of the panic itself by curbing greenhouse gas emissions. and one declaration succeeded another until in paris in 2015, we all agreed to seek to restrain the rise in world temperatures to 1.5 celsius. now,
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after all the targets and the promises and after yet more warnings from our scientists about the peril staring at us in the face, we come to the reckoning. this is the moment where we must turn words interaction. if we fail, then paris will have failed and every summit back to rio dejaneiro in 1992 will have failed. because we will have allowed our shared aim of 1.5 degrees to escape our grasp. even 0.5 degrees of extra warming would have tragic consequences. if global temperatures rise by two degrees, our scientists forecast that we would lose virtually all of the world's coral reefs, the great barrier reef and countless other living marbles would dissolve into an ever warmer and acidic ocean.
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returning the terrible verdict that human beings lacked the will to preserve the wonders of the natural world. in the end, it is a question of will. we have the technology to do what is necessary stop all that remains in question is our resolve. the g20 summit convened by our italian friends and cop26 partner last weekend provided encouraging evidence that the political will exists, which is vitalfor the simple reason that the g20 accounts for 80% of the world economy and a 75% of greenhouse gas emissions. britain was the first g20 nation to promise in law to wipe out our contribution to climate change by achieving zero. a5 contribution to climate change by achieving zero. as recently as 2019, only one other member had made a comparable pledge. today, 18
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countries in the g20 have made specific commitments to achieve a net zero and in the rome declaration last sunday, every member pledged to reduce it by mid century. to that end, g20, including china, agreed to stop financing new international unabated coal projects by the end of this year, a vital step towards consigning coal to history. and every member repeated their commitment to the paris target of 1.5 degrees. in the spirit of cooperation, this amount reached other important agreements. the g20 will levy a minimum corporation tax of 15%. ensuring multinational companies make a fair contribution wherever they operate. over 130
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countries and jurisdictions have now joined this arrangement, showing what we can achieve together when the will exists. the g20 adopted a target of vaccinating 70% of the world's population against covid—19 by the middle of next year and the uk is on track to provide 100 million doses to this effort. by the end of this year, we will have donated over 30 million doses of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine and at least another 20 million will follow next year, along with 20 million doses of thejohnson next year, along with 20 million doses of the johnson vaccine next year, along with 20 million doses of thejohnson vaccine ordered by the government, and the g20 resolved to work together to ease supply chain disruptions which have affected every member as demand recovers and the world economy gets back on its feet. iti it i pay tribute to prime minister
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mariojackie for his expert handling of the summit. far more needs to be done to spare humanity from catastrophic climate change. in the meantime, globalwarming is catastrophic climate change. in the meantime, global warming is already contributing to droughts and brush fires and hurricanes, summoning an awful vision of what lies ahead if we fail to act in the time that remains. so the biggest summit for the united kingdom, we have ever hosted, is under way in glasgow. bringing together 120 world leaders with the aim of translating aspirations into action to keep the ambition of1.5 aspirations into action to keep the ambition of 1.5 degrees alive. i am grateful to glasgow city council, to police scotland, to police across the whole of the uk and to our public health bodies for making this occasion possible and all the hard work. for millions of people across
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the world, the outcome is literally a matter of life or death. for some island states in the pacific and caribbean, it is a question of national survival. the negotiations in glasgow have almost two weeks to run but we can take heart from what has been achieved so far. nations which together comprise 90% of the world economy are now committed to net zero. up from 30% when the uk took over the reins of cop26. yesterday alone, the united states and over 100 other countries agreed to cut emissions of methane, one of the most destructive greenhouse gases by 30% by 2030. 122 countries, with over 85% of the world's artists, agreed to end and reverse deforestation by the same deadline, backed by the greatest ever
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commitment to public funds which i hope will be even more from the private sector. we have promised to derive half our power from renewable sources, keeping millions of tonnes of carbon out of the atmosphere. we had doubled our commitment to climate finance and will contribute another £1 billion if the economy grows as is forecast. we have launched our clean green initiative which will help the developing world to build new infrastructure in an environmentally friendly way. we will invest £3 billion of public money and billions more from the private sector. i had asked the world, the uk has asked the world from action on coal, cars, cash and trees. we have begun to make progress, substantial palpable progress, substantial palpable progress on three out of the four. the negotiations in glasgow have a
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long way to go, mr speaker, and far more must be done. whether we can summon the collective wisdom to save ourselves from an avoidable disaster still hangs in the balance and we will press on with the hard work until the last hour. mr speaker, i commend the statement to the house. i call the deputy leader of the labour— i call the deputy leader of the labour party to respond. thank you, mr speaker- — labour party to respond. thank you, mr speaker- i _ labour party to respond. thank you, mr speaker. i would _ labour party to respond. thank you, mr speaker. i would like _ labour party to respond. thank you, mr speaker. i would like to - labour party to respond. thank you, mr speaker. i would like to thank. mr speaker. i would like to thank the prime ministerfor mr speaker. i would like to thank the prime minister for advanced site of the statement and updating the house on dg 20 summit in rome. it cannot be overstated how crucial the next week and a half is. i am pleased to see there has been some progress, as the prime minister outlined, but the next ten days needs to move beyond prepacked announcements. this is an opportunity for britain, mr speaker alongside ourfriends opportunity for britain, mr speaker alongside our friends and allies
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around the world to deliver historic change, by taking action to reduce emissions right now in this decade we can avoid the worst effects of climate change stop this cannotjust be a political ambition, it is a necessity for humanity. so mr speaker, as the g20 and cop26 continues, i want to assure the prime minister everybody on these benchesis prime minister everybody on these benches is desperate for cop26 to be a success. we hope that our negotiations can bring people together and deliver the urgent solutions to the biggest challenge our world has ever faced. solutions to the biggest challenge our world has everfaced. however, mr speaker, there is some cause for concern. g20 needed to be a springboard to the cop26, a real
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opportunity to show britain's diplomatic strength in bringing people together but also in applying pressure where it is needed. to convince big polluters to meet the commitment to 1.5 degrees and to find solutions to phase out fossil fuels and to ensure a just transition for workers and to create a fairer and greener economy. mr speaker, the g20 did not achieve this. the prime minister is failing in his efforts to convince the world leaders that more must be done. he has welcomed the commitments in the distant future and i accept that. when he knows all too well that we need to halve that carbon emissions now at least by the end of this decade if we are to keep global temperatures down. it is a time for urgent climate action now, not more
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climate delay. now mr speaker, we all know how difficult it is to convince the world to curtail carbon emissions. it is our responsibility to do so. it is the prime minister's responsibility to influence world leaders and lead by example. a5 responsibility to influence world leaders and lead by example. as we try to convince other countries to phase out coal, this government is refusing to make its mind up about coal mines within its own borders. they could have followed the lead of the welsh labour government and changed planning policy to make sure no new coal mines had been developed, but they did not. as we try to convince big emitters to do more when it comes to reducing emissions, unfortunately this government agreed a trade deal with australia removing key climate pledges. it is undermining our
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messages by giving a free pass to our friends. messages by giving a free pass to ourfriends. mr speaker, when our friends. mr speaker, when britain ourfriends. mr speaker, when britain must convince the wealthiest nations in the world to pledge more money to help developing countries cut their emissions and adapt to climate change, what has this government done? they cut development aid that would have funded vital climate projects. how does the prime minister expect to convince others to do more when he is setting such a poor example? mr speaker... mr speaker, ialso is setting such a poor example? mr speaker... mr speaker, i also want to raise the issue of global vaccinations. the g20 last week agreed a vague promise to explore ways to accelerate global vaccination against coronavirus. yet in some of the world's poorest countries, less than 3% of people
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have received even one dose of the vaccine. we all know we live in a globalised world where more of the virus that spreads, the greater the threat of new variants. we are not safe here from covid—19 until people are safe from covid—19 everywhere. there is no more time for rhetoric and it is time for action. the prime minister mentioned our efforts on vaccines but it was revealed last week that the uk is lagging behind all of the g7 countries by one in sharing surplus vaccines with poor countries. this, mr speaker, is shameful. ourfantastic countries. this, mr speaker, is shameful. our fantastic scientists who developed the oxford astrazeneca vaccine are being let down by our prime minister's actions. we need boosterjabs in manchester and booster jabs in manchester and vaccines boosterjabs in manchester and vaccines shared with madagascar. it is now time for actions, prime minister, not words. as the world
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gathers over the next two weeks, we'll hope for a breakthrough that we'll hope for a breakthrough that we need. now britain has a proud history of building alliances and standing upfor history of building alliances and standing up for what is right and i have no doubt we will be able to do it again. i do wish the prime minister well in his effort and i ask him to pay attention and go for the detail on this because if he fails... if he fails to deliver, mr speaker, if he fails to deliver the change we need to this conference, we will all pay the price. mr speaker. — we will all pay the price. mr speaker, the right honourable lady asked me to go through the detail. having said some kind things about her approach now, i think after listening to that i prefer the forensic approach of the pseudo— forensic approach of the pseudo— forensic approach. she is completely an ignorance of the basic facts, mr speaker. we have cut our co2
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emissions by 40 full percent on 1990 levels very largely by moving from 80% dependence on coal 50 years ago to about 1%, 2% today. it is a massive cut that we have not changed the amount for overseas funding. i didn't know if she was paying attention to the news, mr speaker, that only the other day we announced another £1 billion which we were able to do because of the growth in the economy. as for what she is... she is completely wrong about the facts. a5 for what she said about vaccines, i am afraid it is an insult to the incredible work that has been done by the uk vaccine roll—out program across the world. 1.5 billion people have had access to cost priced vaccines thanks to
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the deal this government did with oxford astrazeneca, a record that no other country in the world has, to say nothing of the £548 million extra we put into other areas or the extra we put into other areas or the extra vaccines we are donating by june next year. this country has an outstanding record in supporting vaccination around the world. if she wants to go and look at the detail, i urge her to go off and study it. i welcome, mr speaker, the broad thrust of what she was saying about cop26. i think what she was saying where she sees signs of progress but a lot more to do. i think frankly that she is right. if i could point to the things that happened since g20, i would draw her attention to india's massive commitment to cut c02 india's massive commitment to cut cm by india's massive commitment to cut co2 by 2030, india's massive commitment to cut cm by 2030, by india's massive commitment to cut co2 by 2030, by cleaning up the power system. co2 by 2030, by cleaning up the powersystem. i co2 by 2030, by cleaning up the power system. i would co2 by 2030, by cleaning up the power system. iwould point co2 by 2030, by cleaning up the power system. i would point to the
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£10 billion from japan, $10 billion from japan over the next five years, to support developing countries around the world. i would also point to notjust brazil but russia, china and 110 countries around the world who are signing up to the forestry declaration, to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030. that is a very considerable achievement and it will make a huge difference. we will use consumer power and the power of corporations and the private sector and around the world to effect change. the single most important thing for me that came out of cop26 was an agreement around the world about the basic intellectual approach now being taken by the uk through the clean green initiative and whatjoe biden calls the build back better world. offers the greatest hope for humanity. you not just putting in government money to help countries around the world
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clean up, putting in development aid money, we are massively supporting that, we are now deleveraging in the trillions, the tens, perhaps hundreds of trillions of private sector investment and that is the way to make a difference. if we can get that right at this cop26 it will be a hugely remarkable thing that there is a long way to go. riiaisreh there is a long way to go. given that we are _ there is a long way to go. given that we are now _ there is a long way to go. given that we are now taxing - there is a long way to go. given that we are now taxing people i there is a long way to go. given l that we are now taxing people at there is a long way to go. given i that we are now taxing people at a higher rate than any time since we were impoverished under the government, despite the fact we only produce 1% of global emissions in china produces 27% and we are leading further controls in our industry they are not matching in china and india, further eroding our competitive advantage, will the prime minister gripped all his spending departments and ensure we root out waste and incompetence and create a genuine enterprise low tax economy? yes, that is why we still have one
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of the lowest corporation taxes in spite of the measures we have been obliged to take because of the pandemic. that is why we just put in for instance the 125% super deduction for companies to invest in capital investment in infrastructure and expand their businesses and the results and benefits are already being seen just in results and benefits are already being seenjust in broadband results and benefits are already being seen just in broadband alone. can i think the prime ministerfor advanced sight of his report. g20 was an opportunity to build momentum ahead of the cop26 summit but even the prime minister will admit that the prime minister will admit that the summit largely failed to meet the summit largely failed to meet the demand and desire for increased global cooperation. if we are to meet the global challenges that all of humanity now faces, that needs to change and change very quickly. with a meaningful agreement in glasgow over the course of the coming week and all of us hope that that indeed
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