Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 3, 2021 6:00am-9:00am GMT

6:00 am
good morning, and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. our headlines today: reunited with her parents. four—year—old cleo, whose disappearance sparked a nationwide search in australia, has been found safe and well. forcing big finance firms to do their bit to help the climate. some of the uk's richest companies are told to prove their green credentials. the chancellor rishi sunak will explain his plans in glasgow today but green groups say they aren't tough enough. i'll explain all. footballers supporting front line workers. premier league starjordan henderson shows us how players�* donations are helping nhs staff. late drama and a late goal from cristano ronaldo
6:01 am
salvages manchester united a point in the champions league against atalanta. good morning. it's a chilly start and prostate for some of us with some patchy fog and then it will be another day of sunshine and showers, another day of sunshine and showers, a lot of their showers on the coast, eight feet making it inland and breezy than yesterday. i will have all the details later. it's wednesday 3rd of november. our top story: a four—year—old girl who went missing from a remote australian campsite nearly three weeks ago has been found alive and well following a huge search operation. cleo smith was discovered by police in a locked house — and has now been reunited with her parents. a 36—year—old man is being questioned by police. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. alive and well. the news cleo smith's parents have been waiting more than two weeks for. a police team broke their way
6:02 am
into a locked house in carnarvon about 1am. they found little cleo in one of those rooms. one of the officers picked her up into his arms and asked, "what's your name? " she said, "my name is cleo." cleo was reunited with her parents a short time later. this is the outcome we all hoped and prayed for. for now, welcome home, cleo. the four—year—old had vanished from her family's tent while camping on the western australian coast. it sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. her disappearance gripped australia and a reward of $1 million was offered for information leading to her location. leo's mother ellie smith expressed her relief saying "our family is whole again." a man is in custody and being questioned by detectives. australia's prime minister scott
6:03 am
morrison, who is currently in scotland for the cop 26 climate summit, said this was "wonderful, relieving news". more details have yet to emerge about how little cleo disappeared and how she was found, but for now, a family's nightmare is over and a country's prayers have been answered. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. shaimaa joins us now from sydney. one can only imagine the relief of cleo�*s family. we just heard that written statement and i suspect we will hear more but that must have been a wonderful moment. it is will hear more but that must have been a wonderful moment.- been a wonderful moment. it is a wonderful moment _ been a wonderful moment. it is a wonderful moment for _ been a wonderful moment. it is a wonderful moment for this - been a wonderful moment. it is aj wonderful moment for this family been a wonderful moment. it 3 —. wonderful moment for this family who have been in a nightmare for more than two weeks but i have never seen so many happy policemen in my life. wejust heard from so many happy policemen in my life. we just heard from the western australian police commissioner with the team that were overseeing the
6:04 am
rescue and investigation operation and he said this was our special day to be able to return little cleo to the arms of her parents, he said she is alive and healthy and back with her mum and dad. the police said the investigation will continue, they didn't give much detail about what happened in the lead up to the rescue, or the state of the house they found her in, theyjust confirmed she was taken from her family's tent on that day and that a 36—year—old man is now in custody. huge relief for the smith family. and give us a sense of the extent australia was engaged in the search because by all accounts it had become the story in astoria, a four—year—old girl missing for such a long period. if i four-year-old girl missing for such a long period-— four-year-old girl missing for such a long period. if i look at my found feed on social— a long period. if i look at my found feed on social media _ a long period. if i look at my found feed on social media it _ a long period. if i look at my found feed on social media it is _ a long period. if i look at my found feed on social media it is cleo's - feed on social media it is cleo's
6:05 am
picture, that first picture of her after she was rescued in a hospital bed, happy and smiling and waving at the camera and it has captured australia's heart from the moment she was announced missing until it was announced she was alive and well and rescued. we heard from one of the officers who smashed into that house and he said at the beginning it was short and any relation, he said he wanted to make sure it was her, he asked three times what her name was and the third time she said my name is cleo and they walked out of the house and called the parents and said someone here wants to speak to you and it was clear and then he said when they were reunited in the hospital, the first word was mummy and there were hugs and kisses and a lot of tears. this is a huge amount of relief at the family's ordeal is over, the outcome that the whole country has hoped for.
6:06 am
a plan to stop firms from investing in fossil fuels will be announced by the chancellor at the cop 26 climate summit later. rishi sunak will promise to "rewire the entire global financial system" — to cut carbon emissions. here's our science and environment correspondent, victoria gill. cautious optimism — that was how borisjohnson summed up the mood as world leaders concluded their two—day meeting at cop 26. the negotiations, though, will continue here. there have already been a flurry of early deals on reversing deforestation, cutting emissions and cleaning up steel production, and financial incentives have been promised for new green technologies. despite the optimism, presidentjoe biden criticised the leaders of both china and russia for not turning up. the fact that china are trying to assert, understandably, a new role in the world is a world leader, not showing up? come on. today is set to be all about the money. the chancellor, rishi sunak,
6:07 am
is expected to give details on how the uk's financial institutions can help meet our climate goals. trillions of private sector capital is to be committed to decarbonisation and there will be new requirements for financial institutions to publish their own net zero plans. meanwhile, amid the talk of trillions, developing countries at cop 26 are still waiting for delivery of a much more modest and crucial financial promise. more than a decade ago, developed nations committed to providing the equivalent of 100 billion us dollars every year to fund the poorest, most vulnerable countries, transition to cleaner energies and to enable them to protect themselves against the impacts of climate change. that money was promised by 2020 and the promise was broken. the $100 billion target will not be met this year. for countries suffering the most in what has been called the decisive decade for climate action, there is very little room to miss these deadlines.
6:08 am
victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in glasgow this morning. great to see you there. we know the chancellor is due to your today but some world leaders are due to leave. how much has been achieved in the last two days? fix, how much has been achieved in the last two days?— last two days? a lot of big amazing soundin: last two days? a lot of big amazing sounding headlines _ last two days? a lot of big amazing sounding headlines had _ last two days? a lot of big amazing sounding headlines had been - last two days? a lot of big amazing i sounding headlines had been achieved but like with all headlines it's a goodidea but like with all headlines it's a good idea to read what's underneath them so you look at all the financed up them so you look at all the financed up to date and you get this number of $120 trillion that could be invested in climate change in the next 30 years but then you look at the small print and ask ok, we'll company still be allowed to invest in coal and oil company still be allowed to invest in coaland oiland company still be allowed to invest in coal and oil and gas for quite a few of those decades? then you speak to developing countries who are already feeling the effects of
6:09 am
climate change and they say they don't want lots of new money necessarily, what about the old doubts that we cannot pay now and it's the same with some announcements yesterday and there were a lot, this big pledge of reducing methane, that other green house gas that we talk about lasting carbon dioxide. lots of countries who produce a lot of methane have not signed up to that pledge and the stuff about forestry we spoke about yesterday, lots of those commitments are voluntary and that is why boris johnson yesterday continued to strike a cautious turn. he made a point that you feel hear everyone coming together and making pledges carries a lot of momentum, everyone is being very enthusiastic and diplomatic but when they leave here, does everyone stick to their word? there are a lot of negotiations still to go. this conference does not finish until friday although a
6:10 am
lot of the big names have got on their privatejets. lot of the big names have got on their private jets.— lot of the big names have got on their private jets. their private 'ets. thank you, adam fleminu. a leading scientist advising the government on its response to the coronavirus pandemic has stepped down from his role. in a statement, sirjeremy farrar said he resigned from sage at the end of last month to focus on his work as the director of a medical charity. but he also warned that the covid rates in the uk were "concerning", saying the situation was "a long way from over". a new recruitment campaign to fill more than 100,000 vacancies in the social care sector has been launched in england. it comes as providers warn of an increasing staffing crisis fuelled by compulsory covid vaccinations for workers, and rising wages in other areas of the economy. we need an enormous investment, the monies that have been released thus far are just the tip of the iceberg. we need to really get to grips with
6:11 am
the underfunding of social care. we need to do that straightaway because we can recruit people but we have to keep them and to keep them we have to be able to pay them and compete with other industries. scientists in the united states have given the go—ahead for children aged between five and 11 to receive a pfizer coronavirus vaccine. the decision means around 28 million more young people are eligible for a jab. us presidentjoe biden has described the move as a "turning point in the battle against covid". shall we go to carroll, who chaikin revealed told me this morning she had to scrape the ice off her car? good morning, it's a cold start to the day, in parts of southern england the temperature is —2, in parts of wales it is —1 and as well as frost there is fog across the midlands and south—east. that should lift readily, ease us into a chilly
6:12 am
day and one of sunshine and showers. many of them will be on the couch exposed to this northerly wind but some will get inland and be heavy and thundery with pale and wintry as far south as the mountains of wales. there will also beat sunshine but it will feel pretty chilly. these are the wind strengths, gusting perhaps 40 the wind strengths, gusting perhaps a0 miles per r down the north sea coastline, these represent the average wind speed so for most it will not be a regularly windy day, a brisk breeze. temperatures of 8—12 degrees but if you are exposed to that northerly wind especially on the north sea coastline it will feel cold. overnight we continue with showers, a lot of them will find, many falling on mountains north of wales are likely to be wintry and another cold and windy night especially down that north sea coastline. temperatures falling to
6:13 am
freezing and perhaps lower across central scotland and if you are inland in the shelter we could see temperatures are low enough for a touch of frost. tomorrow morning we start on that frosty night, not as many showers but one thing you will notice is it will feel rather chilly, likely to be the chilly state of the week with a new weather front bringing rain across the north west. thank you, we will see you again soon. chancellor rishi sunak will announce new rules for uk companies and banks at the climate conference in glasgow today. nina's back from scotland and is looking at what he'll be discussing. yes, the first thing i did was have a very hot bath.— a very hot bath. was it freezing? great to be _ a very hot bath. was it freezing? great to be in _ a very hot bath. was it freezing? great to be in there, _ a very hot bath. was it freezing? great to be in there, really - great to be in there, really interesting so we had all the big leaders and then they start heading home to die and people like rishi sunak start coming in. today is all
6:14 am
about banks and finance, stay awake. because money talks when it comes to bringing down that climate change curve. one of the sticking points is how much richer countries should give to poorer nations to help them cut their own emissions and cope with the impact of climate change. remember nations like ours industrialised earlier and arguably have a responsibility to contribute. in 2009, developed countries promised to provide $100 billion a year, that's about £73 billion. the target was supposed to have been met last year, but now we know it won't now be achieved until 2023. so that's quite disappointing. the other approach is what big corporations can do and we will find out more about that today.
6:15 am
financial institutions, they take our money and try to give us a return for it. so that we can retire and have a pension. now, how they get that return, that's going to be key for the green transition. they can invest more money in oil companies, or they can invest it in companies that do clean energy. and that decision is crucial. we have to triple clean energy investment by 2030 to reach $4 trillion a year if we have any hope of trying to reach our net zero target by 2050. so rishi sunak taking the stage today. he so rishi sunak taking the stage toda . , . . ., . today. he will get up and announce what he will _ today. he will get up and announce what he will call _ today. he will get up and announce what he will call the _ today. he will get up and announce what he will call the first _ today. he will get up and announce what he will call the first net - today. he will get up and announce what he will call the first net zero l what he will call the first net zero aligned financial centre, he says thatis aligned financial centre, he says that is what the uk will be. so this is looking at the businesses that manage our money, so when you pay into your pension pot or your insurance, how do they invest your
6:16 am
money to get that return that ends up money to get that return that ends up in your pocket? it's asking businesses to be fully transparent about where that money is invested. if net zero aligned financial centre, is it a place or is it an idea? . , , u, idea? the idea is the uk will become the world's first. _ idea? the idea is the uk will become the world's first. but _ idea? the idea is the uk will become the world's first. but is _ idea? the idea is the uk will become the world's first. but is it _ idea? the idea is the uk will become the world's first. but is it a _ idea? the idea is the uk will become the world's first. but is it a unit, - the world's first. but is it a unit, are there _ the world's first. but is it a unit, are there people _ the world's first. but is it a unit, are there people working - the world's first. but is it a unit, are there people working there l the world's first. but is it a unit, l are there people working there or the world's first. but is it a unit, - are there people working there or is itjust are there people working there or is it just a are there people working there or is itjust a principle? if are there people working there or is itjust a principle?— itjust a principle? if you listen, charlie- -- _ itjust a principle? if you listen, charlie... and _ itjust a principle? if you listen, charlie... and explaining - itjust a principle? if you listen, charlie... and explaining it - itjust a principle? if you listen, charlie... and explaining it now itjust a principle? if you listen, i charlie... and explaining it now so every business will sign up to be open and transparent about where their money is being invested in is it going into fossil fuels or sustainable energy and if the uk can make all the businesses do that, we become the uk's first net zero aligned financial centre. 50 become the uk's first net zero aligned financial centre. so it's a domestic policy? _ aligned financial centre. so it's a domestic policy? yes _ aligned financial centre. so it's a domestic policy? yes but - aligned financial centre. so it's a | domestic policy? yes but globally the chancellor _ domestic policy? yes but globally
6:17 am
the chancellor will _ domestic policy? yes but globally the chancellor will confirm - domestic policy? yes but globally the chancellor will confirm that i the chancellor will confirm that more than a00 companies around the world have signed up to some tough carbon goals and this is quite significant because between them these firms own or manage about £95 trillion worth of assets, so that's a really good start. but it's like deforestation yesterday, it's whether they stick to these pledges. for us as consumers is a chance to say my pension is going to these people, do i want the money to go to them or whether place that is helping the environment but environmental groups site they don't have to do it so does it really count? let's take a look at today's papers. the daily telegraph reports the prime minister is attempting to reform the house of commons standards watchdog. the paper says it comes after its decision to ban conservative mp owen paterson from parliament for alleged breaches of lobbying rules. the i newspaper has looked at data
6:18 am
on boosterjabs and found third doses for over—50s will not be completed until february if england's programme continues at its current rate. it means the christmas deadline would be missed. the daily mirror also focuses on problems with the vaccine roll—out, reporting social care could be "pushed to the brink of collapse" because 60,000 unjabbed staff face the sack within days. and climate stories still dominate many of the front pages as the cop 26 summit continues in glasgow. the guardian leads with new research showing the heatwaves and wildfires that caused widespread devastation in europe this summer would not have happened without global heating. i think you have an inside page here. , , ., i think you have an inside page here. , ., ._ here. this is a story from the daily mail. apologies _ here. this is a story from the daily mail. apologies if _ here. this is a story from the daily mail. apologies if you _ here. this is a story from the daily mail. apologies if you have - here. this is a story from the daily mail. apologies if you have been l mail. apologies if you have been following the space programme
6:19 am
closely and have heard this. astronauts heading home from the international space station may have to cross their legs on theirjourney back to read because of a leaky toilet. four crew due to return this month have been told they will have to rely on back—up undergarments. normally you'd during spacewalks because of a problem with the spacex capsules. apparently the engineers first noticed the issue after a three—day flight and then the alarm went off because some liquid was in the wrong place. you went off because some liquid was in the wrong place-— the wrong place. you don't want that! it's not _ the wrong place. you don't want that! it's not like _ the wrong place. you don't want that! it's not like you _ the wrong place. you don't want that! it's not like you can - the wrong place. you don't want that! it's not like you can call. the wrong place. you don't want| that! it's not like you can call the plumber at any point. i wonder how long they have to cross their legs for. , .., long they have to cross their legs for. , u, . , for. until they can get their hands on their back-up _ for. until they can get their hands on their back-up undergarments, | on their back—up undergarments, which is my new phrase for the day. as a woman we can all aspire to be a little bit more like cricketer
6:20 am
eileen who has just passed her 110th birth date smiling. eileen ashe build for england before going on to work for mi6 during the first world war. she puts her long innings down to two important things and you will love both of them, one is yoga and second a glass of red wine every day. second a glass of red wine every da . ” :: second a glass of red wine every day. iii}? cricketer, worked for mi6 day. 110? cricketer, worked for m16 and still day. 112? cricketer, worked for m16 and still smiling. day. 110? cricketer, worked for m16 and still smiling. is _ day. 110? cricketer, worked for m16 and still smiling. is it _ day. 110? cricketer, worked for m16 and still smiling. is it her _ and still smiling. is it her birthday _ and still smiling. is it her birthday today? - and still smiling. is it her birthday today? no, - and still smiling. is it her birthday today? no, she| and still smiling. is it her i birthday today? no, she has and still smiling. is it her _ birthday today? no, she has passed it alread . birthday today? no, she has passed it already- i — birthday today? no, she has passed it already. i think _ birthday today? no, she has passed it already. i think in _ birthday today? no, she has passed it already. i think in her _ birthday today? no, she has passed it already. i think in her case - birthday today? no, she has passed it already. i think in her case we - it already. i think in her case we can say happy — it already. i think in her case we can say happy birthday - it already. i think in her case we | can say happy birthday whenever it already. i think in her case we i can say happy birthday whenever it was. i can say happy birthday whenever it was. ., ., ~ ., . . , , was. i want to know what yoga she is doinu. at the start of the pandemic, liverpool captain jordan henderson called on fellow footballers to donate a portion of their salary to help support health care workers on the front line. jordan's efforts helped to raise millions of pounds for the group nhs charities together and now, more than a year on, he's been to meet some
6:21 am
of those who have benefited. i went along with him. it's incredible, from all the lads in the premier league, to be able to raise so much money. even when the pandemic is over, the wellbeing and mental health of a lot of the staff will need to be treated carefully. shall i swap my mask, yeah, get rid of that one. it's just here on the left. hi, everyone, hi, are you ok? jordan, when you started players together, what made you think of it in the first place, why did you start it? well, i think on the telly you could see how much struggle the nhs were going through. i remember at the beginning, i don't even know if there was enough ppe at the beginning. staff coming in unprotected and having to treat patients
6:22 am
and staff, and then going home to their families at all of that sort of stuff. and that, when you are watching that on the telly, that was quite shocking. my name is kate lyons, i'm a critical care nurse. the amount of patients that were coming through that were a lot sicker than we were used to looking after. it was a bit of a challenging experience for all of the staff up there. and the support that we've had from nhs charities has meant that i can carry on being a functional human. you know, i'm notjust nurse kate who gets completely exhausted at work, i've got the tools to live a functional life and be happy in my life. so i cannot thank you enough. well, to be, to be honest, i'm not here for you to thank me. i'm here to say thank you to all of you for what all of yous have done. i can only imagine how tough it's been. i i'm edna, one of the matrons of thel accident and emergency department. it was a challenging time, -
6:23 am
when actually, there are loads of people from the care home that comes to a&e, all covid, - one after the other. so injust a matter of, like, - what a week, we had loads of death. and the hardest thing, is, like, we cannot allow relatives to be with them because we have to take care oflhem — we have to protect them - so that they won't get the virus. i know i'm not the jenny i was before. and, just to come to terms with that is quite difficult. how was that, meeting the people who have been on the front line? it was quite emotional, because obviously, what they've been through and telling their own stories. all of them different. now we're going to go to the place that actually, everyone can escape to. hi, you ok? nice to meet you. we have a one—to—one room there.
6:24 am
if staff are a bit upset or distressed, we take them through to this one—to—one room. itjust makes it a bit more private and confidential. ah, brilliant. in the first couple of waves, l it wasjust mayhem and chaos and people needed to come in and draw breath. - now people are absolutely knackered. they've given so much over the last year and a half, - and we really need to look. after them, help them nurse themselves, and come back to health. yeah, yeah. nice to meet you, thank you very much, thanks. thank you. bye! so, what was that like today, what was it like to finally meet the staff here? yeah, i think they show great strength, and they speak about the teamwork and togetherness of everyone coming together which i really, really liked. what message do you take away from this now? what more might you be able to do? what they have suffered, it's a form of trauma, really. saying goodbye to loved ones
6:25 am
and families can't come in, and that could stay with them for a long time. so i think to be able to support them and get the right help that they need and support around them will be really important going forward, and that's notjust for now, that's going to be years down the line. you can see a longer version of that report at around 8:10am, when we will also be speaking to the head of nhs charities together, ellie orton. and alongside the money raised, clearly a big buzz for those individuals who got to meet him. they didn't know he was coming so there was a little ripple doing to there was a little ripple doing to the hospital. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. more than 30 people have been arrested after hundreds of fireworks were thrown in woolwich town centre on sunday night. one man had a suspected heart attack
6:26 am
after after a firework was thrown at him and four police officers were also badly injured. greenwich council says general gordon square will be closed until sunday. police have been meeting with people living in croydon to try to reassure them about safety following concerns particularly over the risk to women. more than 5,000 domestic abuse cases were recorded in the borough last year, higher than anywhere else in the capital. officers have also been encouraging people to use an online reporting system called street safe to tell them the areas where they feel at risk. we know where reported crime is taking place. what we don't know is where women feel unsafe, in particular. so what it does, it gives us a chance to actually understand that picture. so it won't generate a police response but we will look at that data, and then look to see how we can problem solve those areas so they become safe. london's ageing river crossings are an international embarrassment according to a new report by city hall's transport committee. it says the closure of hammersmith bridge caused huge disruption. it's called for the ownership and management of crossings to be better co—ordinated and for more investment to maintain them.
6:27 am
let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. the dlr has minor delays between lewisham and bank, it's a faulty train. and the metropolitan line has minor delays between harrow—on—the—hill and amersham, not enough trains running again. remember for all the latest travel news where you are you can tune into your bbc local radio station, there are regular updates on there throughout the morning. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold and frosty start to the day across the capital. in a few spots, temperatures have slipped below freezing so there are a few pockets of air frost around. along with some mist and fog patches that will lift and clear fairly slowly as we head through the morning, helped by a strengthening northerly wind that will start to become quite brisk as we head through the afternoon. for many of us, though, it is a bright start to the day and we will continue to see those bright spells. there will be areas of cloud drifting down on that northerly wind and maybe one or two showers as well as we head through the afternoon. most likely out
6:28 am
towards eastern areas. temperatures for some spots will struggle to get out of single figures. so it's feeling quite chilly today, particularly with that northerly wind. highs between nine and 11 celsius. this evening and overnight, with the strength of that northerly wind, and also plenty of cloud, temperatures should stay above freezing. five, six celsius, and frost free largely into thursday morning. watch out for a few showers again. on thursday, still the chance of a few showers, but a blustery day. temperatures hitting nine, maybe 10 celsius. likely to be the coolest day of this week. and then on friday, we start to draw in more of a north—westerly wind and that will make the air feel a bit milder. should stay mild on friday night forfireworks night. on saturday it turns rather windy and there could be a few spells of rain at times. i'll be back in half an hour. do take a look at our website for much more. now it's back to charlie and sally, bye for now.
6:29 am
hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and charlie stayt. coming up on breakfast this morning. why madagascar is on the brink of "the world's first climate—induced famine". we've a special report from the island nation at 7.30. a milestone match for middlesbrough manager, neilwarnock. we'll get his reaction to breaking the record for most games in charge of an english professional football team. and we'll get the lowdown on season two of medical drama temple, from star daniel mays, who joins us just before eight. there were more than 9,500 people in uk hospitals with covid yesterday, the highest number since early march. let's check in with one of our frontline gps to find out
6:30 am
what's going wrong and what we can do to stop the spread. dr rosemary leonard joins us from south london. good morning. do you just want to reflect on a moment on that hospitalisation figure? the hospitalisations _ hospitalisation figure? tue: hospitalisations are hospitalisation figure? t'te: hospitalisations are creeping hospitalisation figure? tte: hospitalisations are creeping up. we are seeing a lot of covid cases, particularly in young people who have yet to be vaccinated, but unfortunately, some, some older people, who have not generally, who have not been vaccinated, are being admitted to hospital. the vast number of these admissions are in unvaccinated people. at some of the extremely vulnerable unfortunately are now catching covid. hagar are now catching covid. how frustrating _ are now catching covid. how frustrating is _ are now catching covid. how frustrating is that _ are now catching covid. how frustrating is that for - are now catching covid. how frustrating is that for you . are now catching covid. how frustrating is that for you to hear about today, rosemary? tt’s frustrating is that for you to hear about today, rosemary? it's really frustratin: about today, rosemary? it's really frustrating particularly, _ about today, rosemary? it's really frustrating particularly, living - about today, rosemary? it's really frustrating particularly, living in i frustrating particularly, living in the capital as i do, i was up in central london at the weekend, went up central london at the weekend, went up on the tube, and i would say i was in the minority in being someone who was wearing a mask. and i do
6:31 am
think we need to really have a rethink about making people wear masks again. not only to stop the spread of covid, actually, but we are seeing huge spike in the number of coughs and colds and we need to remember that masks can help stop the transmission of all viruses, not just covid, but the standard winter bugs as well. just covid, but the standard winter bugs as well-— just covid, but the standard winter bus aswell. ., ., , , , ., bugs as well. how does this play out in our bugs as well. how does this play out in your own — bugs as well. how does this play out in your own surgery, _ bugs as well. how does this play out in your own surgery, when _ bugs as well. how does this play out in your own surgery, when you i bugs as well. how does this play out in your own surgery, when you are i in your own surgery, when you are seeing patients? we in your own surgery, when you are seeing patients?— in your own surgery, when you are seeing patients? we are incredibly bus . seeing patients? we are incredibly busy- huge _ seeing patients? we are incredibly busy. huge numbers— seeing patients? we are incredibly busy. huge numbers of— seeing patients? we are incredibly busy. huge numbers of coughs i seeing patients? we are incredibly| busy. huge numbers of coughs and colds, some covid cases, we had several yesterday, people who tested positive for covid and were unwell. it's up to s to judge whether they need to go to hospital or not. we are also at the same time trying to give covid boosters and the flu vaccine and i have to be honest, the flu vaccines, we are giving them as fast as we can, but being as busy as we are and trying to give the covid basis as well, the flu vaccines aren't going as fast as may be we
6:32 am
would like but we are going as fast as we can. , ., . as we can. interesting to read in the papers _ as we can. interesting to read in the papers this— as we can. interesting to read in the papers this morning - as we can. interesting to read in the papers this morning reports| the papers this morning reports suggesting that the booster programme might not be completed until early next year, potentially february, which is clearly longer than expected. is that your experience from what you are seeing in your own practice? the experience from what you are seeing in your own practice?— in your own practice? the problem is, it's a in your own practice? the problem is. it's a lack— in your own practice? the problem is, it's a lack of— in your own practice? the problem is, it's a lack of manpower. - in your own practice? the problem is, it's a lack of manpower. how. is, it's a lack of manpower. how many people can be put onto the booster programme? we have got such huge demand at the surgery as well. when the first vaccine programme is going on, there were places open like the science museum, big centres and also a lot of people who had been furloughed from otherjobs were helping out. they are now back in regularjobs. the science museum is now back open again. so the number of sites that are actually open for vaccines is smaller than before. and it's just a question of, vaccines is smaller than before. and it'sjust a question of, where vaccines is smaller than before. and it's just a question of, where deep the manpower? can it'sjust a question of, where deep the manpower?— the manpower? can you give us a sna shot the manpower? can you give us a snapshot -- _ the manpower? can you give us a snapshot -- where _ the manpower? can you give us a snapshot -- where do _ the manpower? can you give us a snapshot -- where do you - the manpower? can you give us a snapshot -- where do you put i the manpower? can you give us a| snapshot -- where do you put the snapshot —— where do you put the manpower? can you give us a
6:33 am
snapshot, the pressure you are under to administer the flu vaccine and the booster, you say it is a manpower issue, can you hire other people to help you? is it the building you are working in, what could change which means you could get to your patients quicker? iiit could change which means you could get to your patients quicker?- get to your patients quicker? in our local centre. _ get to your patients quicker? in our local centre, we _ get to your patients quicker? in our local centre, we have _ get to your patients quicker? in our local centre, we have a _ get to your patients quicker? in our local centre, we have a wonderful l local centre, we have a wonderful workforce of retired doctors and nurses who come back to help us out. and if there were more of those, it would really, really help us. we also have a space problem. we are using a big health centre but there are three practices working together, because we are working with the pfizer vaccine, we have to keep it on the site unless we are going at to home visits, we can't spread it out to different surgeries. this one surgery we are using, they are also working to capacity dealing with all of the standard coughs and colds and the winter pressure. so it's both. for an one winter pressure. so it's both. for anyone who _ winter pressure. so it's both. for anyone who is concerned, is it safe to get your flu jab and your covid
6:34 am
booster at the same time? absolutely, it is safe. and actually, it's the most efficient way of doing it. and it's what we're trying to encourage people to do. and interestingly, people are worried about it, we say, it's perfectly safe in the same way that when you have traveljabs in the old days when we were all going travelling, you would often have severaljabs travelling, you would often have several jabs all travelling, you would often have severaljabs all on the same arm and although we offer, you say we can have them in different arms, i recommend you have it in one arm. yes, you have one pretty sore arm but it means you can sleep on the other one. if you have a vaccine in both arms, which one do you sleep on? so we tend to say, put them both in one arm, the one you don't sleep on, then you will be able to sleep the following night. fin on, then you will be able to sleep the following night.— the following night. on practical advice, the following night. on practical advice. both _ the following night. on practical advice, both the _ the following night. on practical advice, both the flu _ the following night. on practical advice, both the flu jab - the following night. on practical advice, both the flu jab and i the following night. on practical advice, both the flu jab and the | advice, both the flu jab and the covid booster, you await an invitation, that is the principal? yes, yes, you will get a text. there are now some walk—in centres for the
6:35 am
covid boosters. also if you have been sent in and invitation and you can get a flu jab, lots of pharmacies are giving out flu jabs, lots can go to their local pharmacy. once you have had your information, go and get it done.— go and get it done. always good to chat, thank — go and get it done. always good to chat. thank you — go and get it done. always good to chat, thank you very _ go and get it done. always good to chat, thank you very much. - later on we'll be speaking to the deputy chief medical officerfor england, professorjonathan van tam, and putting your questions to him in a special programme with radio 5live. he will remember for many of his press conferences, he has a way of communicating which people don't and he loves a metaphor
6:36 am
my my goodness, i think the teams are in the changing, maybe they are warming up, we will kick—off at past eight. yesterday we asked what you wanted us to ask professorjonathan van—tam and it's fair to say you were very keen to take up that offer.
6:37 am
rising case numbers is clearly a big concern and what that could mean as we get closer to christmas. we also had a lot of questions about the reintroduction of restrictions and how likely that is to happen. and vaccines for teenagers and boosterjabs were also big issues. we'll address those too. that's all to come in a special extended interview with professorjonathan van—tam between 8.30am and 9am today. so, that's coming up later, right now it isjohn with the sport. cristiano ronaldo has done it again. united were losing last night, at risk of moving from first to third in the qualifying group, the chance of qualifying would have been out of their hands but he produces a brilliant equaliser in the 91st minute. , , ., brilliant equaliser in the 91st minute._ there l brilliant equaliser in the 91st| minute._ there is brilliant equaliser in the 91st i minute._ there is still minute. crisis over? there is still a feelin: minute. crisis over? there is still a feeling that _ minute. crisis over? there is still a feeling that for _ minute. crisis over? there is still a feeling that for all— minute. crisis over? there is still a feeling that for all of _ minute. crisis over? there is still a feeling that for all of the - a feeling that for all of the players they have in the money they have spent and standout moments from cristiano ronaldo, is it papering over the cracks and little bit? the
6:38 am
91st minute? _ over the cracks and little bit? the 91st minute? 0h! over the cracks and little bit? the 91st minute? oh! yes, _ over the cracks and little bit? the 91st minute? oh! yes, he - over the cracks and little bit? the 91st minute? oh! yes, he has- 91st minute? oh! yes, he has certain! 91st minute? oh! yes, he has certainly bailed _ 91st minute? oh! yes, he has certainly bailed ole _ 91st minute? oh! yes, he has certainly bailed ole gunnar i certainly bailed ole gunnar solksjaer out today. but you wonder how long it will go on. ronaldo's rescue act once again, his late goal salvaging a draw against atalanta while the reigning champions chelsea beat malmo. joe wilson was watching. so, is it time for manchester united to relax? well, is it ever? 12 minutes at atalanta, shot at the goalkeeper, and in. and here we go again. varane's injury soon forced the manager into reorganisation. well, pass it fast, give and go and mostly, get it to ronaldo. brilliant goal! that's an equaliser. but here comes duvan zapata. it's the replay that was studied for two minutes before, yeah, they decided onside. the goal stood. how could united recover? not how, it's who. injury time, the repair man. ronaldo, 2—2, yeah, the last gasp hero for all time.
6:39 am
remember 1979? in malmo, they do. european cup finalists then. success takes money these days but pride is still priceless. the swedish defence kept chelsea out for 55 minutes. no star strikers for chelsea, they are injured, so it needed this kind of thing. hakim ziyech to finish. 1—0 was enough. joe wilson, bbc news. antonio conte's clearly settling into life as the new manager of tottenham. so much so he slept at the training ground before his appoitment. the former chelsea manager met his new squad yesterday having signed a deal that will keep him at the club until the summer of 2023. he said he's deligted to be back at a club with the ambition to be a protagonist once again. his first game will be at home in the europa conference league on thursday. a real milestone for middlesbrough manager neil warnock last night, into the record books for the most games managed in english football. the game against luton took the 72—year—old's tally to 1,602 games. jeff brown reports.
6:40 am
at the age of 72, he is as enthusiastic as ever and still smiling. and while neil warnock knows that when you've been around as long as he has, you'll make a few enemies as well as friends, it really doesn't bother him. all i have tried to do in my career is, try and make the fans who i work for, try and make them happy. try and make them smile, try and give them something to talk about each week. you know, i've been called a marmite man and all sorts of things, haven't i? and that's even in your own fans, some dislike you, you know. i actually love marmite and bovril, me, so i'm in that camp at the minutes. like anything else, you know, i think when you're my age, you do get labelled. dinosaurs and all that lot, long ball merchants. you know, i look at some of the teams in our league now and i have never ever been as long as them in a million years but because they're young,
6:41 am
they don't get criticised. when they're my age, it's dinosaurfootball, you know. but i don't know what they were, what do they call them big dinosaurs? yeah, whatever, what is it? tyrannosaurus rex. tyrannosaurus rex, yeah, there's one or two of them in our league at the minute. he says he's been too busy to write a book about his life in the game which almost ended on page one. working as a part—time chiropodist, he steered scarborough into the football league in 1987. his and their first game remembered chiefly by the damage caused by visiting fans from newly relegated wolves. i remember saying to graham turner when they were erupting, the wolves fans, over there, "come on, we've got to go across the pitch and calm your lads down or they're going to abandon the game". just before we get to their fans, this drinks can comes whizzing past my head and i bent down to pick it up thinking, i'll squash it — full of sand, it would have killed me if it hit me! fortunately, he survived,
6:42 am
setting off on a 3a year tour to all corners of the football map. in that time, the game and the level of criticism has changed. but not neil warnock�*s philosophy. you can't let it affect you for long. you've just got to let it go in and just do your best and that's all i do. that's why i've lasted so long that's how i see life, that's how i see football. you've got to enjoy it and you've got to try and get your fans to enjoy it while they can. jeff brown, bbc news. we will be speaking to neil a little after 7:30am. mpjulian knight, the chair of the dcms, has called on the board of yorkshire county cricket club to resign after a leaked report emerged apparently containing details of the investigation into the treatment of former player azeem rafiq. a story published by espn says the report concluded that a racially offensive term used towards rafiq was regarded as "banter". the club says it will not take disciplinary action against any player, employee or executive over the harassment.
6:43 am
the ecb has begun its own investigation and said, "we are sorry that, as a sport, this has not yet been resolved." health secretary sajid javid tweeted "heads should roll" and that if ecb did not take action "it's not fit for purpose". shortly after, the culture secretary nadine dorries also tweeted saying, "the ecb investigation must be swift and fully transparent. racism must be confronted, and never written off as just "banter". and it's a big night ahead for cylcist alex dowsett in mexico for cyclist alex dowsett in mexico tonight as he attempts to break cycling's prestigious hour record to raise awareness of haemophilia. the british rider is the only known able—bodied elite sportsperson with severe haemophilia a, a condition which prevents the blood from clotting. here he is in training. he's hoping to win back the record he held previously before bradley wiggins took it off him in 2015. he'll need to do more than 220 laps
6:44 am
of the velodrome at more than 3a miles per hour. unfortunately, this time round, because we are in mexico, we won't have the buzz of a packed stadium like we had in manchester in 2015. so it's going to be, it's going to be a bit more lonely out there. but i know i've got plenty of people, i've got close people inside the track, and, yeah, i think the message of why i'm doing our record, that will be in my thoughts as well throughout the attempt. best of luck, it will be at altitude and the airwill best of luck, it will be at altitude and the air will be thinner which should help him break the record. and you'll be able to watch it live on the bbc red button, iplayer and bbc sport app from just before ten o'clock. good luck to him. which isn't to bring you some images. we have been following this story —— we just want to bring you some images. this is
6:45 am
the story of cleo smith. four—year—old cleo smith disappeared from herfamily�*s four—year—old cleo smith disappeared from her family's tent and camp site in western australia. this was 18 days ago. her parents throughout have been issuing pleas for people, if they knew where she was, she has been found. she was in a locked house, and the images we can show you now are the moments immediately after she was discovered. clea. you now are the moments immediately after she was discovered.— after she was discovered. cleo, my name is cameron. _ after she was discovered. cleo, my name is cameron, how _ after she was discovered. cleo, my name is cameron, how are - after she was discovered. cleo, my name is cameron, how are you? i after she was discovered. cleo, my| name is cameron, how are you? we after she was discovered. cleo, my i name is cameron, how are you? we are going to go and see your mummy and daddy, ok? are you ok? $5 going to go and see your mummy and daddy, ok? are you ok?— daddy, ok? are you ok? as you can see, this daddy, ok? are you ok? as you can see. this was _ daddy, ok? are you ok? as you can see, this was the _ daddy, ok? are you ok? as you can see, this was the moment _ daddy, ok? are you ok? as you can see, this was the moment she i daddy, ok? are you ok? as you can see, this was the moment she was i see, this was the moment she was taken out of the house by detectives who had been searching for her for 18 days. we know that in the few seconds leading up to this image, she had been asked by a police officer to say her name. he asked her three times and at the third
6:46 am
attempt, she said, my name is cleo. that's the moment that they knew that they had her she was safe. a team of seasoned detectives with many years' experience in tears this morning in the last few hours as cleo smith was discovered. she had gone missing from inside her family's tent at a campsite, 18 days ago. there had been a massive search effort and many appeals across australia. this is the moment officers rescued herfrom a locked house. officers rescued her from a locked house. ., , , ., ., house. you get the sense of how calm and auiet house. you get the sense of how calm and quiet to — house. you get the sense of how calm and quiet to the _ house. you get the sense of how calm and quiet to the police _ house. you get the sense of how calm and quiet to the police officers - and quiet to the police officers were being there as they first found her. they asked her, what is her name, her name is cleo. by all accounts, we were speaking to our correspondent, more details are emerging, but as she was carried out of the house, one of the officers said to her, gave her a phone and
6:47 am
said, to her parents, there is someone who wants to speak to you. that was the moment they knew for sure that their daughter who had been missing for 18 days was to be reunited with them. we will have more on that story at 7am. let's go to carol for the weather. a cold start particularly in southern parts of the country, temperatures just below freezing. also some mist and fog around with visibility in parts of the midlands and the south—east as low as 100 metres and for some, even more below that. today it will be chilly with sunshine and showers. risk winds down the north sea coastline and a lot of the showers are blowing in on the wind on the coastline but some of them will make progress in nine through the day. some of them have been thundering through the day, and you can see how they are draped around the coast, and a few making
6:48 am
progress across northern england into the ward is the midlands. more cloud across england today than yesterday, still cloud across scotland with sunny breaks. risk winds down the north sea coastline. northern ireland and north west scotland, brighter, but still showers in wales and the south—west. a few were in central areas, and some of the showers making their way into the wash and east anglia. i mention to the brisk winds down the north sea coastline particularly, so if you are exposed to this if you are out for a walk later, it will feel cold. generally it is not as windy as it was yesterday. temperatures eight to 12 or 13 degrees. as we head on through the evening and overnight, we start off with showers but they will fade, anywhere north of wales on the mountain, they are likely to be wintry in nature. risk winds gusting down the north sea coastline and
6:49 am
cold enough in sheltered parts and western parts away from the coasts for a touch of frost. tomorrow we start on a largely dry and bright note, some sunshine, still a stiff breeze coming down the north sea coastline with gusty wind blowing in some showers but if anything they will not be as many showers as we will not be as many showers as we will see today. temperatures eight to 12 degrees but don't forget the wind chill if you are exposed to the northerly wind. on friday, the wind changes direction to a westerly so it will not feel as cold. quite a bit of cloud around an patchy light rain and drizzle along some western fringes, especially the northwest. temperatures, nine to 13. if anything on saturday it will be that bit milder but we have a weather front coming in from the west, bringing in some strengthening winds, which is something to bear in mind if you are going to the fireworks on saturday evening. brighter skies in the south—east.
6:50 am
thank you very much. "unprofessional, disrespectful and deeply insensitive" — that's how the met police commissioner described the actions of two officers who shared photographs of two sisters murdered in a park last year. the officers have been told to expect prison sentences after admitting to breaching a cordon and taking pictures of the bodies of bibaa henry and nicole smallman. the sisters' mother mina smallman has called on the commissioner, dame cressida dick, to "get the rot out once and for all". police officers that should have been protecting the area had actually taken selfies and sent them out to a dentist and a doctor, and a whatsapp group. there's details of this whole incident that we cannot share with you. but they will come out in time. big institutions make the big mistake of covering up their dirty laundry. they think it will make us respect
6:51 am
them because we don't know about it. up up but the truth is, _ we know about your dirty linen. and it only protects the bad people. expose them, deal with them, charge them, get them out of the police force. what we need is true police serving. it's notjust a job, it's a pastoraljob. it's a job where human beings should matter to you. we are joined now by rick muir, the director of the police foundation think tank. good morning to you, rick muir. mina smallman's words there speak themselves. at the beginning, she said, this was the final straw. can ijust said, this was the final straw. can i just get you to said, this was the final straw. can ijust get you to react said, this was the final straw. can i just get you to react to said, this was the final straw. can ijust get you to react to her comments? i just get you to react to her comments?— i just get you to react to her comments? . ~ , . , comments? yeah, i think she has summed up _ comments? yeah, i think she has summed up the — comments? yeah, i think she has summed up the situation - comments? yeah, i think she has
6:52 am
summed up the situation very i comments? yeah, i think she has i summed up the situation very well. it's absolutely vital that in a police organisation, there is a culture of not tolerating behaviour of this kind. i'm absolutely sure that the vast majority of police officers will be appalled by the behaviour of these two officers. but what the case gives rise to, and a number of other cases give rise to, is a that misogynistic comments —— are concerned that misogynistic comments and disrespectful behaviour may maybe not being reported enough and not being called out, they may be being tolerated and may be what we need is to make sure that police officers are holding each other to the absolute highest standards and that's precisely what she was calling for just there. that's precisely what she was calling forjust there. tithe that's precisely what she was calling forjust there. calling for 'ust there. one thing that calling forjust there. one thing that sometimes _ calling forjust there. one thing that sometimes people - calling forjust there. one thing that sometimes people may i calling forjust there. one thing that sometimes people may be| that sometimes people may be confused by, often the reaction officially to something like this, and there are not many things like this, is that these small number of individuals are doing something. but there is a different picture, which is, as you said yourself a moment
6:53 am
ago, sometimes these things are shared. one individual does something which a lot of other people think is an abomination, and yet, it doesn't get called out. it doesn't get passed up the line. so there is absolutely an air of, an agreement within that says that things can happen and don't make fuss. that seems really monstrous. yeah, absolutely. ithink fuss. that seems really monstrous. yeah, absolutely. i think you have put your finger on it. yeah, absolutely. i think you have put yourfinger on it. the yeah, absolutely. i think you have put your finger on it. the fact is it will only be a very small number of people who behave in this extreme and appalling fashion, the question is, is there a wider culture around it which allows that kind of behaviour to be tolerated and continue? so what we really need to make sure is that we challenge that culture, and that all levels within policing, it's made absolutely clear what the expectation is in terms of people's behaviour, and that people are encouraged to call things out,
6:54 am
they are encouraged to report things, and that is communicated very clearly at all levels of leadership. very clearly at all levels of leadership-— very clearly at all levels of leadership. very clearly at all levels of leadershi -. �* , ., , ., . leadership. anyone listening to what ou are leadership. anyone listening to what you are saying _ leadership. anyone listening to what you are saying may _ leadership. anyone listening to what you are saying may well _ leadership. anyone listening to what you are saying may well agree i leadership. anyone listening to what you are saying may well agree with l you are saying may well agree with you, absolutely, but why has not happened as yet? t you, absolutely, but why has not happened as yet?— you, absolutely, but why has not happened as yet? i think probably it hasn't been — happened as yet? i think probably it hasn't been taken _ happened as yet? i think probably it hasn't been taken seriously - happened as yet? i think probably it| hasn't been taken seriously enough, particularly sexism and misogyny. i think that in the past, policing has moved on, it has improved, the kind of overt racism and sexism you probably would have seen in police stations in the 19705 and 805 for example, that is in the past. but what we have seen from a number of cases recently is subculture is being allowed to develop where some of these appalling uses of language and behaviour are being allowed to be tolerated. i think it's a question of leadership. i think what you need is it needs to be made absolutely clear at all levels from front—line supervisors right up to chief officer level that these kind of things, we will not turn a blind eye to these things. we will not just not report them if they are
6:55 am
seen, they will be called out... fin seen, they will be called out... on that theme, you talk about leadership, is it tenable for the people who are leading an organisation, and it could be any organisation, and it could be any organisation but we are talking about the police force, is it tenable for those people who are in charge of that organisation during a time when by your own admission there has been a culture that allowed things, why should tho5e allowed things, why should those same leaders stay in place? weill. same leaders stay in place? well, i'm not same leaders stay in place? well, im not going _ same leaders stay in place? well, im not going to — same leaders stay in place? well, i'm not going to comment - same leaders stay in place? well, i'm not going to comment on i same leaders stay in place? well, i'm not going to comment on the | i'm not going to comment on the individual leaders. i think what has become apparent in recent periods is that the police have not responded effectively enough to these issues. and in particular there has been a sort of institutional defensiveness in the reaction. and i think policing, and it's notjust true of the met police, we have seen it in other police organisations as well, this reluctance to apologise, this not coming out and communicating effectively with the victims' families, not always being open and
6:56 am
transparent. if you look at the enquiry into whether the way the police handled the daniel morgan murder, it was very much about this institutional defensiveness. police officers has to ask, why is the instinctive reaction is to try and pull back and defend the organisation? you need to get out there on the front foot and be open and honest and apologise quickly when it is clear that something horrible has gone wrong. rick muir, thank ou horrible has gone wrong. rick muir, thank you for— horrible has gone wrong. rick muir, thank you for your _ horrible has gone wrong. rick muir, thank you for your time _ horrible has gone wrong. rick muir, thank you for your time is _ horrible has gone wrong. rick muir, thank you for your time is money, l thank you for your time is money, director of the police foundation. we will be live —— time this morning. we will be live in australia in a few minutes were a four year girl has been found after being missing forfour ? 18 days. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm sonja jessup. more than 30 people have been arrested after hundreds of fireworks were thrown in woolwich town centre on sunday night. one man had a suspected heart attack after a firework was thrown at him and four police officers were also badly injured.
6:57 am
greenwich council says general gordon square will be closed until sunday. police have been meeting with people living in croydon to try to reassure them about safety following concerns over violence in the borough in recent months including several murders. the area also had the highest number of domestic abuse cases recorded last year — more than 5,000 were recorded. officers have been encouraging people to use an online reporting system called street safe to tell them the areas where they feel at risk. we know where reported crime is taking place. what we don't know is where women feel unsafe, in particular. so what it does, it gives us a chance to actually understand that picture. so it won't generate a police response but we will look at that data, and then look to see how we can problem solve those areas so they become safe. london's ageing river crossings are an international embarrassment according to a new report by city hall's transport committee. it says the closure of hammersmith bridge caused huge disruption. it's called for the ownership and management of crossings to be better co—ordinated and for more
6:58 am
investment to maintain them. let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. the dlr is not running between gallions reach and beckton. there's a problem with a faulty train— and the metropolitan line has minor delays between harrow—on—the—hill and amersham — not enough trains running again. now remember for all the latest travel news where you are you can tune into your bbc local radio station. there are regular updates on there throughout the morning. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold and frosty start to the day across the capital. in a few spots, temperatures have slipped below freezing so there are a few pockets of air frost around. along with some mist and fog patches that will lift and clear fairly slowly as we head through the morning, helped by a strengthening northerly wind that will start to become quite brisk as we head through the afternoon. for many of us, though, it is a bright start to the day and we will continue to see those bright spells. there will be areas of cloud
6:59 am
drifting down on that northerly wind and maybe one or two showers as well as we head through the afternoon. most likely out towards eastern areas. temperatures for some spots will struggle to get out of single figures. so it's feeling quite chilly today, particularly with that northerly wind. highs between nine and 11 celsius. this evening and overnight, with the strength of that northerly wind, and also plenty of cloud, temperatures should stay above freezing. five, six celsius, and frost free largely into thursday morning. watch out for a few showers again. on thursday, still the chance of a few showers, but a blustery day. temperatures hitting nine, maybe 10 celsius. likely to be the coolest day of this week. and then on friday, we start to draw in more of a north—westerly wind and that will make the air feel a bit milder. should stay mild on friday night forfireworks night. on saturday it turns rather windy and there could be a few spells of rain at times. i'll be back in half an hour. do take a look at our website
7:00 am
good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. our headlines today: reunited with her parents. four—year—old cleo, whose disappearance sparked a nationwide search in australia, has been found safe and well. forcing big finance firms to do their bit to help the climate. some of the uk's richest companies are told to prove
7:01 am
their green credentials. footballers supporting front line workers. premier league starjordan henderson shows us how players' donations are helping nhs staff. late drama and a late goal from cristano ronaldo salvages manchester united a point in the champions league against atalanta. it's a chilly start to the day and it will be chilly generally, a day of sunshine and showers, some showers will be heavy and thundery with some hail and gusty winds especially down the north sea coastline. i will have the details later. it's wednesday the 3rd of november. our top story: a four—year—old girl who went missing from a remote australian campsite nearly three weeks ago has been found alive and well following a huge search operation. cleo smith was discovered by police in a locked house and has now been reunited with her parents. a 36—year—old man is being questioned by police.
7:02 am
our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. alive and well. the news cleo smith's parents have been waiting more than two weeks for. a police team broke their way into a locked house in carnarvon about 1am. they found little cleo in one of those rooms. one of the officers picked her up into his arms and asked, "what's your name? " she said, "my name is cleo." cleo was reunited with her parents a short time later. this is the outcome we all hoped and prayed for. for now, welcome home, cleo. the four—year—old had vanished from her family's tent while camping on the western australian coast. it sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. her disappearance gripped australia and a reward of $1 million was offered for information leading to her location. leo's mother ellie smith expressed
7:03 am
her relief on social media, saying "our family is whole again." a man is in custody and being questioned by detectives. australia's prime minister scott morrison, who is currently in scotland for the cop 26 climate summit, said this was "wonderful, relieving news". this is every parent's worst nightmare and the fact that nightmare and the fact that nightmare has come to an end and our worst— nightmare has come to an end and our worst fears _ nightmare has come to an end and our worst fears were not realised is 'ust worst fears were not realised is just a _ worst fears were not realised is just a huge relief and a moment for great _ just a huge relief and a moment for greatioy _ more details have yet to emerge about how little cleo disappeared and how she was found, but for now, a family's nightmare is over and a country's prayers have been answered. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. shaimaa joins us now from sydney. we arejust seeing we are just seeing those images of the moment the officers rescued
7:04 am
clear, incredible images of her. do you have any idea yet how she is at the moment? the you have any idea yet how she is at the moment?— you have any idea yet how she is at the moment? the police didn't give much detail— the moment? the police didn't give much detail about _ the moment? the police didn't give much detail about those _ the moment? the police didn't give much detail about those moments l much detail about those moments leading up to her being rescued can details about the state of the house she was found in but they said she was in good health, she was back with mum and dad and one of the officers who found her, detective senior sergeant cameron blaine said she was like an energiser bunny, she had so much energy. he described the moment they found her in that house when they broke in and found her in a room and they said initially it was a short and in relation to the he said it looked like leo but he wanted to make sure it was her, he asked three times what was her name and a third time she said my name is cleo and then we left the house, they called the parents and said someone here wants to talk to you and it was clear. he then described
7:05 am
the moment the family was reunited in hospital, he said the first word was an excited mummy, he said there were hugs and kisses and tears. this is the end of an ordeal that lasted nearly three weeks for the smith family, at resort right under police had hoped for and that the whole nation has hoped for. t can had hoped for and that the whole nation has hoped for. i can believe it from watching _ nation has hoped for. i can believe it from watching news _ nation has hoped for. i can believe it from watching news coverage i nation has hoped for. i can believe l it from watching news coverage over the last few weeks and there have been times in the last 18 days and imagine many people had almost expected the worst. thea;r imagine many people had almost expected the worst.— imagine many people had almost expected the worst. they had. this was headline _ expected the worst. they had. this was headline news _ expected the worst. they had. this was headline news for _ expected the worst. they had. this was headline news for days - expected the worst. they had. this was headline news for days and i expected the worst. they had. this i was headline news for days and days. this is the biggest story in the country today no doubt that from the moment she was announced missing all those days leading up as the days went by the police said we have a theory she has been abducted and we are looking through pieces of evidence, they got volunteers and lots of messages, a lot of support
7:06 am
for those big searches but people were fearing the worst. the police themselves said they had grave concerns about cleo's well—being and thatis concerns about cleo's well—being and that is never good news but the police commissioner for western australia said they didn't give up hope and the family didn't, it took a lot of strength for that family. i'm looking at one of the pictures in cleo's home town of carnarvon where she was found, a big sign saying welcome home cleo. it is a small community, they were all devastated and i'm sure now like the rest of the country they are rejoicing. th rest of the country they are rejoicing-— rest of the country they are re'oicina. . , ., , rejoicing. in the last few moments we have heard _ rejoicing. in the last few moments we have heard from _ rejoicing. in the last few moments we have heard from one _ rejoicing. in the last few moments we have heard from one of- rejoicing. in the last few moments we have heard from one of the i we have heard from one of the officers who found cleo, officer cameron blaine. t officers who found cleo, officer cameron blaine.— officers who found cleo, officer cameron blaine. . . cameron blaine. i asked her what her name was. — cameron blaine. i asked her what her name was. one _ cameron blaine. i asked her what her name was, one of— cameron blaine. i asked her what her name was, one of the _ cameron blaine. i asked her what her name was, one of the guys _ cameron blaine. i asked her what her name was, one of the guysjumped . cameron blaine. i asked her what herj name was, one of the guysjumped in and picked _ name was, one of the guysjumped in and picked up and ijust wanted to be sure _ and picked up and ijust wanted to be sure that it was clear, i wanted to be _ be sure that it was clear, i wanted to be sure — be sure that it was clear, i wanted to be sure it— be sure that it was clear, i wanted to be sure it was hurt so i said what _ to be sure it was hurt so i said what your— to be sure it was hurt so i said what your name and she didn't answer
7:07 am
so i what your name and she didn't answer so i said _ what your name and she didn't answer so i said what's her name and she didn't— so i said what's her name and she didn't answeragain and so i said what's her name and she didn't answer again and i asked a third _ didn't answer again and i asked a third time — didn't answer again and i asked a third time and she said my name is cleo _ third time and she said my name is cleo. ., . ., . third time and she said my name is cleo. ., _, . ., ., cleo. you could hear from the gas behind him _ cleo. you could hear from the gas behind him the _ cleo. you could hear from the gas behind him the effect _ cleo. you could hear from the gas behind him the effect this - cleo. you could hear from the gas behind him the effect this case i cleo. you could hear from the gas| behind him the effect this case has had on police officers. that is detective sergeant cameron blaine and a sense of mission accomplished for the police this morning. he sounded for the police this morning. tie: sounded quite emotional, i heard him when the press conference was happening and he sounded emotional, he said the bestjob in the world was picking up that phone and calling cleo's parents and telling them she was alive and well and they would reunite them in hospital and while there are still many details to emerge about how she disappeared, how she was taken into this house, the state of that house, all the moments leading up to that rescue. the police say the investigation is still going on and i think the big
7:08 am
moment will be that this four—year—old girl will spend the night with her family and there were many nights the family feared this wouldn't happen.— wouldn't happen. absolutely. the incredible story _ wouldn't happen. absolutely. the incredible story of _ wouldn't happen. absolutely. the incredible story of cleo _ wouldn't happen. absolutely. the incredible story of cleo smith, i wouldn't happen. absolutely. the | incredible story of cleo smith, who has been found safe and well. thank you very much. it is now 7:10am a plan to stop firms from investing in fossilfuels will be announced by the chancellor at the cop 26 climate summit later. rishi sunak will promise to "rewire the entire global financial system" to cut carbon emissions. here's our science and environment correspondent, victoria gill. cautious optimism — that was how borisjohnson summed up the mood as world leaders concluded their two—day meeting at cop 26. the negotiations, though, will continue here. there have already been a flurry of early deals on reversing deforestation, cutting methane emissions and cleaning up steel production, and financial incentives have been promised for new green technologies.
7:09 am
i think we got a lot done. despite the optimism, presidentjoe biden criticised the leaders of both china and russia for not turning up. the fact that china, trying to assert, understandably, a new role in the world as a world leader, not showing up? come on. today it's set to be all about the money. the chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to give details on how the uk's financial institutions can help meet our climate goals. trillions of private sector capital is to be committed to decarbonisation and there will be new requirements for financial institutions to publish their own net zero plans. meanwhile, amid the talk of trillions, developing countries at cop 26 are still waiting for delivery of a much more modest and crucial financial promise. more than a decade ago, developed nations committed to providing the equivalent of 100 billion us dollars every year to fund the poorest, most vulnerable countries' transition to cleaner energies and to enable them to protect
7:10 am
themselves against the impacts of climate change. that money was promised by 2020 and the promise was broken. the $100 billion target will not be met this year. for countries suffering the most in what has been called the decisive decade for climate action, there is very little room to miss these deadlines. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. adam fleming is in glasgow this morning. we had two days of talk from world leaders about grand ambitions and that we are down to the cash and there are some mind—boggling numbers looking around. tt’s there are some mind-boggling numbers looking around-— looking around. it's worth reminding ourselves how _ looking around. it's worth reminding ourselves how the _ looking around. it's worth reminding ourselves how the process _ looking around. it's worth reminding ourselves how the process works. i looking around. it's worth reminding l ourselves how the process works. the first two days was world leaders making lots of speeches and doing deals and announcing them in a sometimes confusing way, now we will
7:11 am
have a series of themed days around different subjects, energy, transport, young people. today its finance and that's why we have people like the chancellor coming here to dive to make his big financial announcement and behind—the—scenes you have officials, diplomats, civilservants officials, diplomats, civil servants and officials, diplomats, civilservants and negotiators working on lots of complex technical stuff around the paris climate change agreement which are designed to limit the increase in global temperatures to either two degrees or 1.5 degrees this century and that slightly impenetrable process lasts until a week on friday but it means we will get a series of eye—catching announcements and you have to read the small print. what we are getting today is a lot of money, trillions and trillions of pounds ready to be invested in green stuff, but whether it actually gets
7:12 am
invested is another matter and whether it actually goes to stuff you could truly call green is another matter, and i think boris johnson hit the nail on the head yesterday in his press conference before he headed home when he said at events like this you get a lot of energy and enthusiasm and diplomacy and people being friendly with each other but also sometimes he said that can give you a false impression of progress so i think it's still far too early tojudge of progress so i think it's still far too early to judge whether this conference is a success, whether the many deals that have been announced in the first few days will be a success in the real world. adam, thank you _ success in the real world. adam, thank you very — success in the real world. adam, thank you very much. _ a leading scientist advising the government on its response to the coronavirus pandemic has stepped down from his role. in a statement, sirjeremy farrar said he resigned from sage at the end of last month to focus on his work as the director of a medical charity. but he also warned that the covid rates in the uk were "concerning", saying the situation was "a long way from over".
7:13 am
allies of a conservative mp found to have breached commons lobbying rules will try to stop him being suspended from parliament today. the mp5' watchdog has recommended that owen paterson be suspended for 30 days for using his position to benefit two companies that paid him as a consultant. mr paterson rejected the findings and said the inquiry had not been fair — and today his supporters will try to vote down his suspension. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. a beautiful rainbow. good morning, it is a beautiful rainbow and we will see a few of these today but it's also actually starting some temperatures freezing in the south with some patchy fog that will lift, leaving us with a chilly day of sunshine and showers, most of which will be on the coastlines but some will make it
7:14 am
inland. anywhere from north wales north on the tops of the mountains could be wintry. these white circles represent the average wind speed, the cuts will be higher than this and it will be windier than yesterday, especially down the north sea coast. the northerly wind will accentuate the cold feel and these are our temperatures, 8—13. this evening we start with showers, a lot of them will fight fraud from north wales north on the mountains they could be wintry, still quite brisk. in that in sheltered areas we could see a touch of frost but there shouldn't be issues with any fog and we are looking at these as our overnight lows so another chilly start to tomorrow but still a fair bit of sunshine, not as many showers as today, a weak weather front across the north west will introduce thicker cloud and patchy rain and it looks like tomorrow will be the
7:15 am
chilly estate of the week with temperatures between seven and 11 degrees. as we head into friday there will be a fair bit of cloud during the day, the wind will change direction for westerly, western areas will be prone to patchy light rain and drizzle especially western scotland, righteous skies in the south—east and then on saturday it will be milder but windy especially in the north and west. that's something to consider if you have any fireworks displays in the evening during saturday night and then into sunday their winter swings back to a north—westerly direction and that means it will be cooler for many of us but there will be some sunshine around but as we head into the early part of next week, it looks like it will be unsettled at least for some of us. thanks, carol, see you later on. over the past few months, we've reported on the growing staffing crisis within social care
7:16 am
in england — where there are more than 100,000 job vacancies. providers say burnout caused by the pandemic, low pay and the introduction of rules around compulsory covid vaccines, have pushed many people to look for other work. now a new recruitment campaign aimed at encouraging more people into a career in care, has been launched by the government in england. let's take a look. alice made her home her own. so that is part of the advertising campaign that is going out. professor martin green is the head of the representative
7:17 am
body care england, and joins us now. it's worth emphasising the scale of the problem, as in the workforce problem the industry has. t the problem, as in the workforce problem the industry has.- the problem, as in the workforce problem the industry has. i think we have at severe _ problem the industry has. i think we have at severe workforce _ problem the industry has. i think we have at severe workforce problem i problem the industry has. i think we j have at severe workforce problem at the moment and we have about 160,000 vacancies in social care so what we want to see is not only a campaign like the one launched today but a really clear workforce strategy to come from government for social care. ~ . ., ,, ~ come from government for social care. . ., ., y., ., , come from government for social care. ~ . ., ~ , . care. what do you think is the real roblem? care. what do you think is the real problem? i _ care. what do you think is the real problem? i know— care. what do you think is the real problem? i know it _ care. what do you think is the real problem? i know it has _ care. what do you think is the real problem? i know it has not - care. what do you think is the real. problem? i know it has not happened overnight but clearly what happened during the pandemic has polarised things, people had become more and more burnt out is the phrase that has been used. what has been the long term problem getting people into the care industry? t long term problem getting people into the care industry?— long term problem getting people into the care industry? i think part ofthe into the care industry? i think part of the problem — into the care industry? i think part of the problem has _ into the care industry? i think part of the problem has been - into the care industry? i think part of the problem has been that i into the care industry? i think part of the problem has been that it i into the care industry? i think part| of the problem has been that it has never been seen as a career. people talk aboutjobs in social care and we have to remind people you can build a really good careers in
7:18 am
social care. there are issues about the entry level in terms of funding and money you get but we should remind people that if you go into social care there are some brilliant careers you can develop and i would like to see people coming from other sectors into social care at other levels than front—line level so we have our front—line care challenge but also a management and support a range ofjobs that people can do and support a range ofjobs that people can do in those areas so there are some great careers in social care and we have to make sure people understand that.— and we have to make sure people understand that. sometimes if a 'ob has a decent — understand that. sometimes if a 'ob has a decent salary i understand that. sometimes if a 'ob has a decent salary attached i understand that. sometimes if a 'ob has a decent salary attached to i understand that. sometimes if a job has a decent salary attached to it, i has a decent salary attached to it, therein lies the respect or understanding it has which thereby would attract more people into the industry. what do you do about perry? because it is notoriously low at the starting point in the care industry. the —— about pay? tt is industry. the -- about pay? it is and we have _
7:19 am
industry. the -- about pay? it is and we have to _ industry. the -- about pay? it is and we have to do _ industry. the —— about pay? tt 3 and we have to do something about that and that is why i want to see concerted action from the government. yesterday the secretary of state talked about having a 15 year workforce plan for the nhs and it's ridiculous to have an nhs workforce strategy and ignore social care so what i want from the secretary of state is an integrated strategy. we constantly hear about how these two parts of the system should be integrated and yet we still see government coming forward with an nhs strategy and ignoring the social care sector. these are two parts of the same system and that needs to be acknowledged. t that needs to be acknowledged. i remember speaking to a care home operator who said they would love to pay their staff more because they deserve to be paid more but they don't have the finances that come from local authority. when you put that point to government they say it is up to the local authority how much money they give care homes to pay their staff. central government
7:20 am
says that a decision locally as to how much they pay their staff. how do you break that problem there? t do you break that problem there? i think we have to crack it and it partly requires government to come up partly requires government to come up with enough money so local authorities are clear they have the money and also that when the money arrives it gets to the front line and resort throughout covid there was a huge amount of extra money going into local authorities especially at the start of the pandemic only according to the public accounts committee 0.5 billion of that reached front line care so the government needs a clear strategy and it needs to be more prescriptive about where money goes when it is devolved to local authorities.— when it is devolved to local authorities. can i ask about mandatory _ authorities. can i ask about mandatory vaccines - authorities. can i ask about mandatory vaccines and i authorities. can i ask about| mandatory vaccines and the authorities. can i ask about i mandatory vaccines and the fear authorities. can i ask about - mandatory vaccines and the fear that even work care workers, for whatever reason, because of this will no
7:21 am
longer do those jobs can do you have any chance yet of numbers? tote longer do those jobs can do you have any chance yet of numbers? we don't have any sense _ any chance yet of numbers? we don't have any sense of _ any chance yet of numbers? we don't have any sense of numbers _ any chance yet of numbers? we don't have any sense of numbers but i any chance yet of numbers? we don't have any sense of numbers but it - any chance yet of numbers? we don't have any sense of numbers but it is i have any sense of numbers but it is another pressure on the workforce and regardless of whether you agree or disagree with mandatory vaccination, it's rather ridiculous that the government comes forward with a policy that seems to have no strategy on how to deal with the impact on the workforce and this is another example of sao social care has been left behind in government thinking and if they don't involve a strategy around things that will have an impact on the workforce, they need to think about how they might fill some of the gaps created by their policy. might fill some of the gaps created by their policy-— by their policy. have you got one ointer in by their policy. have you got one pointer in that _ by their policy. have you got one pointer in that direction - by their policy. have you got one pointer in that direction as - by their policy. have you got one pointer in that direction as to - by their policy. have you got one i pointer in that direction as to what they could do to stem that tide immediately?— they could do to stem that tide immediately? they could do to stem that tide immediatel ? , , ., ., immediately? first they need to do somethin: immediately? first they need to do something about _ immediately? first they need to do something about the _ immediately? first they need to do something about the migration - something about the migration system. we have an immediate problem in social care and we should be able to recruit from overseas as well as
7:22 am
building our own workforce and what i want is for them to come up with immediate measures to deal with the challenges we face now and then to have a clear long—term strategy and how we build our own workforce, train, support and pay people for the very complexjobs train, support and pay people for the very complex jobs they do. professor mark green, and keep very much. professor mark green is from care england. —— martin green. "a turning point in our battle against covid—19" — that's how us president, joe biden, described the decision to approve vaccines for all children over the age of five in the united states. the jabs are expected to be rolled out from today. our north america correspondent, nada tawfik, has been to florida to gauge how communities there feel about the decision. the simple joy of passing time together. it's something the simons value now more than ever. after the whole family came down with covid, nine—year—old mckenna suffered complications which sent her away to the hospital for a week. it was our worst nightmare coming true.
7:23 am
everybody had said that, you know, kids recover really easily, it's not that big of a deal. both of us were vaccinated, my parents were vaccinated. my 14—year—old of course is vaccinated. so, like, you know, we felt like we minimised our risks. sick with pneumonia, and anaemia, mckenna was hooked up to oxygen and given antibiotics. it wasn't until she had a blood transfusion that she finally improved. across the united states, households now have the option to vaccinate their young ones. those who get covid in this age group largely have mild symptoms or none at all but they aren't completely immune. this is a place i hope most parents never get to see. dr kenneth alexander specialises in infectious diseases and was a consultant for moderna. he is concerned that vaccine hesitancy could slow efforts to end this pandemic. these vaccines are new, so i can't look you in the eye and say... i don't know what's going to happen
7:24 am
20 years from now. that being said, can we come up with any examples of vaccines that have long—term effects? not that i can think of. this is an adult vaccine thatjust came out of the freezer. now, the one for younger children will be a third of the dose. it will still be two shots given three weeks apart. now, clinics all across the country are going to rush to administer these before they expire. so convincing parents will be key. how many of you would feel uncomfortable giving your young children a covid vaccine? the group moms for liberty was a vocal opponent of mask mandates. it's quickly grown in influence to 50,000 members nationwide. we used to take care of our children in this country, put them first, women and children. and now all of a sudden, our children are meant to be vaccinated to protect other people? when there is risk for them?
7:25 am
we don't know what the long—term effects will be? many more parents are still on the fence if vaccine rates are teenagers are any indication. months after the cdc approved the shots for that age group, less than 50% got the jab. even with all the unknowns and the rare risks, the simons believe one thing for certain. that the covid vaccine could have kept their daughter out of the hospital. nada tawfik, bbc news, florida. you are watching bbc breakfast, still to come... after helping to raise millions of pounds for nhs staff during the pandemic, liverpool captainjordan henderson has visited the front line to meet some of those the money has benefitted. we've a special report just after 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup.
7:26 am
more than 30 people have been arrested after hundreds of fireworks were thrown in woolwich town centre on sunday night. one man had a suspected heart attack after a firework was thrown at him and four police officers were also badly injured. greenwich council says general gordon square will be closed until sunday. police have been meeting with people living in croydon to try to reassure them about safety following concerns over violence in the borough in recent months, including several murders. the area also had the highest number of domestic abuse cases recorded last year. more than 5,000 were reported. officers have been encouraging people to use an online system called street safe to tell them the areas where they feel at risk. we know where reported crime is taking place. what we don't know is where women feel unsafe, in particular. so what it does, it gives us a chance to actually understand that picture. so it won't generate a police response but we will look at that data, and then look to see how we can problem solve those areas so they become safe. london's ageing river crossings
7:27 am
are an international embarrassment according to a new report by city hall's transport committee. it says the closure of hammersmith bridge caused huge disruption. it's called for the ownership and management of crossings to be better co—ordinated and for more investment to maintain them. he's been missed by many children and a few parents, but dippy the diplodocus is coming back to the natural history museum. the much loved dinosaur cast has been on a four year tour of the uk. he's returning, albeit as part of a temporary exhibition, next summer. let's take a look at the travel this morning. there's no dlr between gallions reach and beckton. the metropolitan line has minor delays and there's no overground between surrey quays and clapham junction. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold and frosty start to the day across the capital. in a few spots, temperatures have slipped below freezing so there are a few pockets of air frost around. along with some mist and fog patches that will lift and clear
7:28 am
fairly slowly as we head through the morning, helped by a strengthening northerly wind that will start to become quite brisk as we head through the afternoon. for many of us, though, it is a bright start to the day and we will continue to see those bright spells. there will be areas of cloud drifting down on that northerly wind and maybe one or two showers as well as we head through the afternoon. most likely out towards eastern areas. temperatures for some spots will struggle to get out of single figures. so it's feeling quite chilly today, particularly with that northerly wind. highs between nine and 11 celsius. this evening and overnight, with the strength of that northerly wind, and also plenty of cloud, temperatures should stay above freezing. five, six celsius, and frost free largely into thursday morning. watch out for a few showers again. on thursday, still the chance of a few showers, but a blustery day. temperatures hitting nine, maybe 10 celsius. likely to be the coolest day of this week. and then on friday, we start to draw in more of a north—westerly wind and that will make the air feel a bit milder. should stay mild on friday night forfireworks night.
7:29 am
on saturday it turns rather windy and there could be a few spells of rain at times. i'll be back in an hour, do take a look at our website for much more at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. as world leaders continue to try to hammer out an agreement on climate change, the issue is already having a devastating effect on millions of people across the globe. madagascar, an island nation off the coast of east africa, is on the brink of what the un is calling "the world's first climate—induced famine". here's our climate editor, justin rowlatt. a warning, you might find some of the images in his report upsetting. almost a million people are suffering severe food shortages in madagascar, the un says. many are on the verge of starvation. marare gathers her
7:30 am
family around her. they've lived their entire life in this village. they used to grow maize, rice and potatoes. but now the ground is bone dry. translation: there hasn't been any rain, not a single _ drop has hit the soil. all the crops we planted failed. everything fails. it is agony for marare's daughter to see her children go without food. translation: my son doesn't keep quiet when he's hungry. _ he pulls on my shoulder and climbs on my lap, crying forfood, saying, "i'm hungry, i'm hungry, i'm hungry". but where can i find food to give him? he does not understand that there is no food. he thinks there is food but we hide it from him. the world food programme is currently providing emergency money and food to people here but it
7:31 am
says the situation is desperate. first time i saw, ijust cried. i was really, really shocked about the situation of the children. you can see in the faces that the child is very sick, and almost could die. insects are part of the diet in madagascar. but for some children, they are now the only food available, the un says. historians will look back at madagascar as probably the first time a country was brought to the brink of famine just by climate factors. no war in madagascar, no conflict. but if you ask me, do i think this will be the last time this happens? no way, i have no doubt that there will be more cases like this. don't imagine that the climate crisis is some vague future threat, warns the un. marare is worried it is already too late for her family.
7:32 am
translation: i have no hope that i will stay alive. _ i will die. and when i think of my family, i realise that we will all die, because we have nothing to eat to survive. that was justin rowlatt reporting there. let's speak to frederica andriamanantena from the world food programme. good morning. great to see this morning. incredibly disturbing images there in that report. how close is madagascar two, well, are they on the brink of disaster now? good morning. yeah, indeed. it's quite terrible sounds and images we are hearing now. we have tens of thousands of people on the baker famine due to climate induced
7:33 am
activities. —— on the brink of famine and so we have to act now, evenif famine and so we have to act now, even if maybe it's a bit too late, but we have to do something. how did it aet but we have to do something. how did it net to but we have to do something. how did it get to this — but we have to do something. how did it get to this point, _ but we have to do something. how did it get to this point, frederica? - but we have to do something. how did it get to this point, frederica? in - it get to this point, frederica? in the case of madagascar, it didn't come overnight. talk about drought, mainly, sandstorms that settled year after year. the last five years, the population in the southern part of the country have been facing a little bit more and more droughts, and rain becoming scarce, and families losing their means of production, and losing their way to find food to feed their children year after year. so it has been there, but more and more frequent. we saw pictures there of children eating insects to survive. we heard from the woman who said that at the
7:34 am
end of the report she said she believes it is too late for her and for her family. believes it is too late for her and for herfamily. what believes it is too late for her and for her family. what help believes it is too late for her and for herfamily. what help might believes it is too late for her and for her family. what help might be able to be put into place, what do they need right now?— they need right now? well, it's ma be they need right now? well, it's maybe not _ they need right now? well, it's maybe not too _ they need right now? well, it's maybe not too late. _ they need right now? well, it's maybe not too late. there - they need right now? well, it's maybe not too late. there are| they need right now? well, it's i maybe not too late. there are still a lot of things we can do together. the wfp, along with the government and other partners, we need to work together to provide water, to provide infrastructure for health centres. we need to work together to integrate all those actions that we used to do separately. we used to provide a package of services to this population altogether. bind provide a package of services to this population altogether. and i'll be seeinr this population altogether. and i'll be seeing other— this population altogether. and i'll be seeing other countries - this population altogether. and i'll be seeing other countries now - this population altogether. and i'll . be seeing other countries now headed for the same desperate situation? —— are we seeing other countries headed for the same situation? yes. are we seeing other countries headed for the same situation?— for the same situation? yes, we are startin: to for the same situation? yes, we are starting to see _ for the same situation? yes, we are starting to see the _ for the same situation? yes, we are starting to see the beginning - for the same situation? yes, we are starting to see the beginning of- starting to see the beginning of
7:35 am
what could be another climate induced situation. so if madagascar suddenly can send a message that we need to act now before other countries can be affected by those kind of climate consequences as well, then we need to show it for madagascar as well. you well, then we need to show it for madagascar as well.— well, then we need to show it for madagascar as well. you say we need to act now. — madagascar as well. you say we need to act now. you _ madagascar as well. you say we need to act now, you are _ madagascar as well. you say we need to act now, you are in _ madagascar as well. you say we need to act now, you are in glasgow- madagascar as well. you say we need to act now, you are in glasgow for. to act now, you are in glasgow for cop26, for that big conference on climate change, what do you need to out of this conference? i am climate change, what do you need to out of this conference?— out of this conference? i am here to tell the stories _ out of this conference? i am here to tell the stories of _ out of this conference? i am here to tell the stories of the _ out of this conference? i am here to tell the stories of the madagascan i tell the stories of the madagascan people. we need to see government, we need to seek commitment altogether for better policies, for emissions policies to tackle the effect toilet change. we need to see commitments for finance adaptation. we need to see developing countries have the voice heard as well. find have the voice heard as well. and for those people who might doubt
7:36 am
climate change, what would you say to them this morning? i climate change, what would you say to them this morning?— to them this morning? i would 'ust urre to them this morning? i would 'ust urue them to them this morning? i would 'ust urge them to �* to them this morning? i would 'ust urge them to hear, i to them this morning? i would 'ust urge them to hear, to i to them this morning? i would 'ust urge them to hear, to listen h to them this morning? i would 'ust urge them to hear, to listen toi- to them this morning? i would just. urge them to hear, to listen to what the lady in your report said before. her children are dying because of climate change.— climate change. frederica andriamanantena, - climate change. frederica andriamanantena, thank| climate change. frederica i andriamanantena, thank you climate change. frederica - andriamanantena, thank you so climate change. frederica _ andriamanantena, thank you so much for your time this morning. thank you very much indeed.— for your time this morning. thank you very much indeed. you can watch more of justin rowlatt�*s report on the situation in madagascar in a panorama special tonight. that's at 7.30pm on bbc one. it's 7:36am, let's get the sport now with john. it's 7:36am, let's get the sport now withjohn. if it's 7:36am, let's get the sport now with john. if you it's 7:36am, let's get the sport now withjohn. if you spend a fortune, john, on a player, what you want is them to come in and do the business when you need them to do the business. ., ., when you need them to do the busines— business. yeah, and cristiano ronaldo did _ business. yeah, and cristiano ronaldo did that _ business. yeah, and cristiano ronaldo did that last - business. yeah, and cristiano ronaldo did that last night. . business. yeah, and cristiano l ronaldo did that last night. the thing is with manchester united at the moment, they have spent a lot of money on some very talented players.
7:37 am
a talented individual. but money on some very talented players. a talented individual.— a talented individual. but you have not to t a talented individual. but you have got to try and _ a talented individual. but you have got to try and bring _ a talented individual. but you have got to try and bring them - a talented individual. but you have got to try and bring them all - got to try and bring them all together and that is the challenge facing ole gunnar solksjaer at the moment and the performances have not been at the level they are expecting with the level of investment. performances like cristiano ronaldo last night, who scored a late equaliser against atalanta which means that their qualification hopes are arrive —— alive. he means that their qualification hopes are arrive -- alive.— are arrive -- alive. he has actually aid to are arrive -- alive. he has actually paid to himself. _ are arrive -- alive. he has actually paid to himself. some _ are arrive -- alive. he has actually paid to himself. some people - are arrive -- alive. he has actually paid to himself. some people say| paid to himself. some people say ossibl paid to himself. some people say possibly that _ paid to himself. some people say possibly that is _ paid to himself. some people say possibly that is papering - paid to himself. some people say possibly that is papering over - paid to himself. some people say possibly that is papering over the | possibly that is papering over the cracks and you cannot always rely on cristiano ronaldo to produce moments of magic, right, perhaps?— of magic, right, perhaps? anyway! i don't know! — of magic, right, perhaps? anyway! i don't know! i _ of magic, right, perhaps? anyway! i don't know! i don't _ of magic, right, perhaps? anyway! i don't know! i don't know— of magic, right, perhaps? anyway! i don't know! i don't know the - of magic, right, perhaps? anyway! i don't know! i don't know the answer to that question!— to that question! most of the time, ou can to that question! most of the time, you can rely _ to that question! most of the time, you can rely on _ to that question! most of the time, you can rely on him _ to that question! most of the time, you can rely on him to _ to that question! most of the time, you can rely on him to produce - you can rely on him to produce something. you can rely on him to produce something-— you can rely on him to produce somethinl. , ., ., you can rely on him to produce somethina. , ., ., , something. ole gunnar solks'aer is still in the spotlight. * manchester united salvaged that draw against atalanta in the champions league. coming from behind twice in italy,
7:38 am
this goal from duvan zapata put atalanta 2—1 up in the second half but once again, cristiano ronaldo came to his side's rescue in the 9ist minute, his fourth consecutive goal in the champions league this season and perhaps most importantly for united, they stay top of their group. as a big player once again produces a big moment at the right time. he does provide those moments and i'm sure chicago bulls didn't mind having michaeljordan either so sometimes teams have the players they have and that's why they are at man united and that's why they are champions and chicago bulls, you just come up with those moments and for me i know there are votes coming up but cristiano is just getting better and betterfor us. defending champions chelsea beat swedish side malmo i—0 thanks to hakim ziyech's second half goal. malmo didn't manage a single shot on target and it means chelsea only need a draw at home againstjuventus in their next match to qualify for the knockout stage. we got the job done. i think maybe now we getjudged by results
7:39 am
but who doesn't? we wanted the result, we needed the result, we expected the result from us and we delivered so we did not suffer through difficult situations in our box that we did not allow the awkward situations, not at all, we never lost concentration. it was a deserved win, a close one. now there was a landmark match for middlesbrough manager neil warnock last night who took charge of his 1,602nd match, a new record in english football. and delighted to say neiljoins us now. morning, neil. hey, john. i know you said in the lead-up to _ hey, john. i know you said in the lead-up to the — hey, john. i know you said in the lead-up to the game _ hey, john. i know you said in the lead-up to the game against - hey, john. i know you said in the l lead-up to the game against luton lead—up to the game against luton last night that humour has played a big part in getting you where you are today, i hope you are still smiling this morning because you didn't get the result you would have wanted it last night. hat didn't get the result you would have wanted it last night.— wanted it last night. not at all but i think ou wanted it last night. not at all but i think you have _ wanted it last night. not at all but i think you have got _ wanted it last night. not at all but i think you have got to _
7:40 am
wanted it last night. not at all but i think you have got to have - wanted it last night. not at all but i i think you have got to have humour. especially in disappointing times. just listening to your broadcast there, i think would have christian error —— cristiano ronaldo on saturday if i could! everything is so drab at the moment with coaches, and i don't think there is enough humour around. and i don't think there is enough humouraround. we and i don't think there is enough humour around. we have got to try and put a smile on faces. a disappointing result last night but we had quite a few young lads out and they did quite well.— and they did quite well. humour aside, and they did quite well. humour aside. what _ and they did quite well. humour aside, what has _ and they did quite well. humour aside, what has been _ and they did quite well. humour aside, what has been the - and they did quite well. humour aside, what has been the hyde i and they did quite well. humour i aside, what has been the hyde this remarkable run? —— behind this remarkable run? —— behind this remarkable run? —— behind this remarkable run? i remarkable run? -- behind this remarkable run?— remarkable run? -- behind this remarkable run? i think 'ust that desire to keep * remarkable run? i think 'ust that desire to keep winning _ remarkable run? i thinkjust that desire to keep winning and - remarkable run? i thinkjust that| desire to keep winning and trying remarkable run? i thinkjust that i desire to keep winning and trying to be successful. not getting two down when things go wrong. not getting too high when you are flying. and having good family, really. sharon, my wife, has been immense and she has had problems as well. she has been immense. and then the kids, i have got william, amy, natalie and james, they have been really supportive. and you need, behind the scenes, you have seen all of the
7:41 am
vitriol that has been mentioned toward some managers in the last few months, you need that behind you because it isn't an easyjob. i cannot really see anybody beating this record if i'm honest, because i just don't think there is time now whereas where i started, you plan for three or four years, now you play for three or four games. just rive us a play for three or four games. just give us a sense, _ play for three or four games. just give us a sense, you talked about your first match in the 805, how much is the game change now? the way that money has certainly changed things quite considerably, setting in the top flight, give us a sense of how you feel the game has changed in the time you have been a manager. once you go as high as a top—flight, you have got as much discipline because players run the show. they have got their agents, it is a nightmare for managers now. the game is pretty much still the same. my successes have always been putting fires out and building teams. i haven't really had a top class players. i think a good dressing
7:42 am
rooms have never changed. you have got to get success if you get a good dressing room. most of all for a manager you have got to have a good chairman. i've had a few good ones and a few bad ones. has chairman. i've had a few good ones and a few bad ones.— and a few bad ones. has it affected thins? and a few bad ones. has it affected things? the — and a few bad ones. has it affected things? the big _ and a few bad ones. has it affected things? the big things _ and a few bad ones. has it affected things? the big things about i things? the big things about football and clubs in the lower league is the hope and dream you can rise to the divisions. the influx of money has certainly changed that and somewhat inhibits that from happening. what is your take on it, do you think the fans can still dirty dream in this day and age? i think parachute —— dare to dream in this day and age? i think parachute payments, i don't think that should happen as much as it does. i still think there is a possibility there. i look at clubs like the miss argyll, —— like plymouth argyle, pretty low budget for that division but still expectations. you can rise to the top with a bit of luck. and a team that can surpass... money is
7:43 am
not everything, it will get you so far but it isn't the be all and end all. that team spirit, and the crowds, last night we got clapped off last night, the young lads got capped off. it would have been easy to have a go at us. it's important that you get the club together. and i still think it is a possibility, like i did at nottinghamshire county, from the bottom division into the top flight, i still think it is possible. mi into the top flight, i still think it is possible.— into the top flight, i still think it is possible. all that help you have had through _ it is possible. all that help you have had through your- it is possible. all that help you have had through your career. it is possible. all that help you i have had through your career has clearly paid off. no one has been promoted more times than you than in english football. i wonder if we will see one more with middlesbrough this season. great to speak to you many congratulations on that record. thank you very much.— many congratulations on that record. thank you very much. �*iescrz. i don't thank you very much. 1602. i don't think anyone _ thank you very much. 1602. i don't think anyone else _ thank you very much. 1602. i don't think anyone else will— thank you very much. 1602. i don't think anyone else will ever - thank you very much. 1602. i don't think anyone else will ever beat that _ think anyone else will ever beat that he— think anyone else will ever beat that. , ., , ., ., , , ., that. he is not showing any sign of sto -|n~ , that. he is not showing any sign of stopping. he _ that. he is not showing any sign of stopping. he will — that. he is not showing any sign of stopping, he will be _ that. he is not showing any sign of stopping, he will be 73 _ that. he is not showing any sign of stopping, he will be 73 next i that. he is not showing any sign of| stopping, he will be 73 next month. incredible. ., ., , ., , incredible. that longevity has counted for _ incredible. that longevity has counted for a _ incredible. that longevity has counted for a lot _
7:44 am
incredible. that longevity has counted for a lot and - incredible. that longevity has counted for a lot and best i incredible. that longevity has counted for a lot and best ofl incredible. that longevity has i counted for a lot and best of luck to him. he counted for a lot and best of luck to him. , , ~ , . ., ., , to him. he seems like such a lovely cu . to him. he seems like such a lovely au . real to him. he seems like such a lovely guy. real character _ to him. he seems like such a lovely guy. real character in _ to him. he seems like such a lovely guy. real character in the _ to him. he seems like such a lovely guy. real character in the game, i guy. real character in the game, fair to say- _ guy. real character in the game, fairto say- i— guy. real character in the game, fair to say. i do _ guy. real character in the game, fair to say. i do need _ guy. real character in the game, fair to say. i do need that, i guy. real character in the game, fair to say. i do need that, that'sj fair to say. i do need that, that's what he was saying about the humour, it counts for a lot. find what he was saying about the humour, it counts for a lot.— it counts for a lot. and a supportive _ it counts for a lot. and a supportive family, i it counts for a lot. and a supportive family, he i it counts for a lot. and a - supportive family, he mentioned that _ supportive family, he mentioned that. , ., ., ., ., that. there is a lot of time on the road as a football— that. there is a lot of time on the road as a football manager. i let's have a look at the weather now. good morning. a cold start of the day if you have not ventured out, —2 in farnborough, in glasgow, one, armagh is four degrees. it is a frosty start and there is an patchy fog as well. foremost today, as well as being a chilly day, it will be day of sunshine and showers. a week where the front sinking southwards taking some cloud with it, and the northerly wind, that is bringing some showers. some of those will make it inland as well if you are
7:45 am
exposed to the win, it will feel cold. it will be a brisk wind, a bit stronger than yesterday. it will be 40 to 50 miles an hour. inland it will not be as strong, we are looking at images of eight and i3 looking at images of eight and 13 degrees. this evening and overnight anywhere north of wales on the mountains they are wintry and gusty winds. close guys in central and western areas, away from the coast, there is a chance that we will see temperatures fall low enough for a touch of frost. generally we are looking at temperatures between four and seven degrees. from the end of the week, thursday we have an area of high pressure building in and a week weatherfront of high pressure building in and a week weather front introducing some rain from the north west. it is
7:46 am
going to turn much milder than it has been. and certainly that it has beenin has been. and certainly that it has been in the last few days. on thursday, not as many showers around, still a brisk wind down the north sea coast, gusting 40 miles an hour exaggerating the cold feel. a week weather front coming in across the north west introducing thicker cloud and rain, temperature —wise, nine to ii cloud and rain, temperature —wise, nine to 11 degrees, and on the strength of the wind and it is likely to be the chilly estate of the week. as we had from thursday into the weekend, you can see how the high pressure moves south. then we have another weather front coming our way, we have another weather front coming ourway, bringing in we have another weather front coming our way, bringing in stronger winds and heavier rain. on friday, the wind changes to a milder direction, more of a westerly. we will see a fair bit of cloud during friday, patchy light rain and drizzle, especially in the west and especially in the west and especially across western scotland as we pushed south—west ——
7:47 am
south—east, it will be drier and brighter. on saturday it will be milder, when the especially in the north and west. that is something to bearin north and west. that is something to bear in mind if you have something fireworks display is planned, keep in touch with the weather. on sunday a northerly wind, and some sunshine in london. into next week, the early part especially in the north, it's looking pretty unsettled. thank you. let's return to our main story now. the remarkable news that four—year—old cleo smith, who went missing from a remote australian campsite nearly three weeks ago, has been found alive and well. let's cross now to the scene. we can speak to reporter ben downie from 7 news australia. very good morning to you. if i can, i will give you the opportunity to take us through the closing moments of the discovery by the police. we
7:48 am
have got some footage we were showing and we will show it in a moment, the moment we were brought? because she was brought out but can you take us through the scene? absolutely. we are standing outside the home in question in carnarvon, a small town in rural western australia, 1000 kilometres north of perth. this has been the centre of the investigation and the search and rescue effort of the four—year—old girl cleo smith who went missing on october 16 from a family tent on a campsite. they had not been a trace of her since, not a footprint, the clothing, all the sleeping bag that was taken from the tent until this morning. just after 12:45pm, detectives acted on information that they had and pounced on this home behind me. they batted down the door. there wasn't the offender inside who had abducted cleo but he was inside. the detectives picked her up and asked her her name and she responded by saying, it's clear. we will see the moment she was
7:49 am
brought out, she was asked her name, and the heart—warming moments the detectives had pulled off what they had been working towards. 140 detectives working around the clock, the finest from the western australian police force. they have arrested a 34 —— 36—year—old carnarvon man, terence kelly, he is currently in custody inside a hospital sale of the self harming himself in a cell that he was in. he worked alone, according to the police. they are working through a list of 380 possible names of people who could have abducted cleo but until yesterday they had not had a divide any formal suspects until early this morning —— they did not have any formal suspects. terence has been described as a quiet man and acts alone, which fits the way he is alleged to have abducted cleo. it has surprised the neighbours. it
7:50 am
is a tiny time and they have been pulling around the family —— a tiny town. her parents put a lot of interviews out there to keep the tips coming through to police so that people would come forward in the hope they would find their child. it came with exposing themselves to online trolls and hateful comments. and their tenacity has been rewarded in the ultimate way today with detectives pulling off a miracle that mary p people were beginning to think was possible. were beginning to think was ossible. , , ., , possible. -- very few people were bearinnin possible. -- very few people were beginning to _ possible. -- very few people were beginning to think— possible. -- very few people were beginning to think was _ possible. -- very few people were beginning to think was possible. l possible. -- very few people were i beginning to think was possible. we showed those scenes he described as cleo was carried out of the house, extraordinary images. take us through what happened next. i understand a phone call was made and the parents and cleo were reunited. yeah, this is one of the most heart—warming things about this story. you don't get to sit outside a crime scene and report something nice very often. the family officer that had been dealing with his heartbroken family called them in
7:51 am
the middle of the night at about 1am saying, i think we have got someone you want to talk to. they picked up the phone and they heard cleo's voice. and they broke down in tears. she was on her way to the hospital but they had to halfway from here to the small caernarvon hospital, because the parents intercepted them. the moment little cleo saw her mother she shouted, mummy, and ran over to her. we were told by the police commissioner but there were tears in the detectives eyes. they described her demeanour as, a little energiser bunny. described dispassionate group despite the incredible ordeal and separation from her parents, at whatever she was forced to endure over those weeks, she remains an upbeat and positive child. when the parents gave their first interview to the media, they said that cleo was a fighter and she could survive whatever was thrown at her. those words have been vindicated in the
7:52 am
best possible terms now and we know that she has been discharged with medical clearance from hospital and she is ok and with herfamily. thank she is ok and with her family. thank ou ve she is ok and with her family. thank you very much. _ she is ok and with her family. thank you very much. for _ she is ok and with her family. thank you very much, for that _ she is ok and with her family. thank you very much, for that update. i you very much, for that update. extraordinary scenes this morning. as cleo, 18 days she had been missing. and now reunited with her parents. much more on that story coming up in the next hour or so. from playing the good cop in des, to the bad cop in line of duty, it's safe to say actor daniel mays knows a thing or two about crime dramas. in the latest series of temple he once again delves into the criminal underworld, this time playing the role of a london tube worker who helps establish an illegal medical clinic. let's take a look. i need your help. i want you to do some jobs. jobs?! surgeries, yes. here, i can't see any other way. we can't bring anyone down here,
7:53 am
you said so yourself. well, what else can we do? what about that guy? what guy? that guy. the guy? yeah. you said we'd have nothing to do with him. he's not right, you know? what do you mean, not right? i mean he's not right. do you know any other guy who can get us £50,000 just like that? yeah, but him, really? i don't know. i mean, that guyjust seems big, right? that is a big thing to do. call him. now? yeah. and daniel mays is with us now. good morning. first of all, great hair, for both of the actors in those clips, fantastic. in hair, for both of the actors in those clips, fantastic.- those clips, fantastic. in that particular— those clips, fantastic. in that
7:54 am
particular scene, _ those clips, fantastic. in that particular scene, i _ those clips, fantastic. in that particular scene, i got i those clips, fantastic. in that. particular scene, i got clippers those clips, fantastic. in that i particular scene, i got clippers and shaved right to the middle of my head. we wanted to go with a different haircut. you head. we wanted to go with a different haircut.— different haircut. you did it yourself? _ different haircut. you did it yourself? yes, _ different haircut. you did it yourself? yes, i _ different haircut. you did it yourself? yes, i regretted| different haircut. you did it| yourself? yes, i regretted it different haircut. you did it i yourself? yes, i regretted it once they shouted _ yourself? yes, i regretted it once they shouted action. _ yourself? yes, i regretted it once they shouted action. have - yourself? yes, i regretted it once they shouted action. have i i yourself? yes, i regretted it oncej they shouted action. have i really agreed to do this? mas they shouted action. have i really agreed to do this?— they shouted action. have i really agreed to do this? was that covid measures. _ agreed to do this? was that covid measures. you — agreed to do this? was that covid measures, you didn't _ agreed to do this? was that covid measures, you didn't have - agreed to do this? was that covidj measures, you didn't have people agreed to do this? was that covid i measures, you didn't have people to do that for you, or you just had the urge? do that for you, or you 'ust had the urae? ., �* , , , urge? no, i'm 'ust completely insane! urge? no, i'm 'ust completely r— urge? no, i'mjust completely insane! ithought_ urge? no, i'mjust completely insane! i thought it _ urge? no, i'mjust completely insane! i thought it might i urge? no, i'mjust completely insane! i thought it might be i urge? no, i'mjust completelyj insane! i thought it might be a completely interesting character trait. , , . , trait. temple is incredible, it has chan . ed trait. temple is incredible, it has changed again — trait. temple is incredible, it has changed again this _ trait. temple is incredible, it has changed again this series, i trait. temple is incredible, it has changed again this series, you i trait. temple is incredible, it has i changed again this series, you don't need to have seen the first season. it helps because it gives you that history but i think it is a much bigger and bolder second season. it's not so much in the bunker, we had a climactic shoot—out at the end of season one, it's much more above ground. and it'sjust taking on a whole new life. teii ground. and it's 'ust taking on a whole new life.— ground. and it's 'ust taking on a whole new life. tell us about your character- — whole new life. tell us about your character- i _ whole new life. tell us about your character- i play _ whole new life. tell us about your character. i play a _ whole new life. tell us about your character. i play a guy _ whole new life. tell us about your character. i play a guy called i whole new life. tell us about your character. i play a guy called lee| character. i play a guy called lee simmons. _ character. i play a guy called lee simmons, and _ character. i play a guy called lee simmons, and underground - character. i play a guy called lee - simmons, and underground doomsday
7:55 am
prep. if you don't know the story, mark strong plays a high—flying surgeon, i am a mark strong plays a high—flying surgeon, iam a prep mark strong plays a high—flying surgeon, i am a prep and we start this illicit clinic underneath temple tube station. what's interesting about this season with my character, he gets involved in climate change activism. i keep looking and thinking thinking it could not be any more relevant. his story pretty much this season, he is cocooned in the bunker, it's about how he finds his voice again through climate change activism and find his place in the world again. if climate change activism and find his place in the world again.— place in the world again. if people have not caught _ place in the world again. if people have not caught up _ place in the world again. if people have not caught up with _ place in the world again. if people have not caught up with it - place in the world again. if people have not caught up with it so - place in the world again. if people have not caught up with it so far. have not caught up with it so far and they hear, illicit underground surgery... and they hear, illicit underground surue , and they hear, illicit underground surgery... yes! they might think, it isn't for me- _ surgery... fez! they might think, it isn't for me. where surgery... iesi they might think, it isn't for me. where do surgery... iesi they might think, it isn't for me. where do we go in terms of graphic surgery business? the thing about temple is, it's kind of like a bonkers premise but that is the reason why i love the show. it's a show that you cannot categorise. yes, it has medical operations in it but it isn't a
7:56 am
medical drama, it's a police procedural, essentially it is essentially a crime thriller, edge of your seat stuff. there are quite gruesome scenes in it, open heart surgery and speed operation. find surgery and speed operation. and are ou 0k surgery and speed operation. and are you ok with — surgery and speed operation. and are you ok with this _ surgery and speed operation. and are you ok with this stuff? _ surgery and speed operation. and are you ok with this stuff? this _ surgery and speed operation. and are you ok with this stuff? this is - surgery and speed operation. and are you ok with this stuff? this is the - you ok with this stuff? this is the thin , you ok with this stuff? this is the thing. charlie. — you ok with this stuff? this is the thing, charlie. in _ you ok with this stuff? this is the thing, charlie. in acting _ you ok with this stuff? this is the thing, charlie. in acting world, i you ok with this stuff? this is the | thing, charlie. in acting world, i'm not squeamish. it was reality, i think i would probably be on the floor. but mark strong, he's a surgeon and he has the kind of do all that. my character is pretty inept. he basicallyjust stands there holding blood bags. it's a bit gruesome! there holding blood bags. it's a bit aruesome! ~ there holding blood bags. it's a bit cruesome! ~ ,, ., ., , gruesome! mark strong, i always ima . ine, gruesome! mark strong, i always imagine, would _ gruesome! mark strong, i always imagine, would be _ gruesome! mark strong, i always imagine, would be quite - gruesome! mark strong, i always imagine, would be quite a - gruesome! mark strong, i always - imagine, would be quite a formidable person to act alongside. there is a lot of charisma coming. not saying you don't have it, he'sjust got lot of charisma coming. not saying you don't have it, he's just got a certain thing. for you don't have it, he's 'ust got a certain thing-h you don't have it, he's 'ust got a certain thing. for me, i think mark is the perfect _ certain thing. for me, i think mark is the perfect leading _ certain thing. for me, i think mark is the perfect leading man. - certain thing. for me, i think mark is the perfect leading man. he - certain thing. for me, i think mark is the perfect leading man. he is l certain thing. for me, i think mark| is the perfect leading man. he is an exceptional actor. is the perfect leading man. he is an exceptionalactor. like is the perfect leading man. he is an exceptional actor. like you say, he has a natural gravitas and presence. and i think what he does with this role is absolutely second to none. i
7:57 am
think the quality of mark is, particularly in this character he's playing, he's completely in touch with the inner life of the character. in many respects he's quite a minimal actor but when you see him up there on screen it's all there behind the eyes. you always all need a raised _ there behind the eyes. you always all need a raised eyebrow. - there behind the eyes. you always all need a raised eyebrow. you - there behind the eyes. you always| all need a raised eyebrow. you are the busiest — all need a raised eyebrow. you are the busiest man _ all need a raised eyebrow. you are the busiest man in _ all need a raised eyebrow. you are the busiest man in showbiz, - all need a raised eyebrow. you are the busiest man in showbiz, des . all need a raised eyebrow. you are the busiest man in showbiz, des is the busiest man in showbiz, des is the most _ the busiest man in showbiz, des is the most requested on itv have, i think _ the most requested on itv have, i think. is— the most requested on itv have, i think. , ., j the most requested on itv have, i think. , ., . ., the most requested on itv have, i think-— that - the most requested on itv have, i think._ that was | think. is it really? wow! that was an incredible _ think. is it really? wow! that was an incredible series. _ think. is it really? wow! that was an incredible series. we - think. is it really? wow! that was an incredible series. we were - think. is it really? wow! that was an incredible series. we were up| an incredible series. we were up four and nta. — an incredible series. we were up four and nta, shall— an incredible series. we were up four and nta, shall we - an incredible series. we were up four and nta, shall we share - an incredible series. we were up| four and nta, shall we share our story? four and nta, shall we share our sto ? ., ., ., ., ., story? you are nominated for your two documentaries. _ story? you are nominated for your two documentaries. sally - story? you are nominated for your two documentaries. sally was - story? you are nominated for your. two documentaries. sally was sitting in front of me _ two documentaries. sally was sitting in front of me and _ two documentaries. sally was sitting in front of me and she _ two documentaries. sally was sitting in front of me and she said, - two documentaries. sally was sitting in front of me and she said, if - two documentaries. sally was sitting in front of me and she said, if the i in front of me and she said, if the cameras come near you, it pretty much means that you have one. they did that, sally was giving me the thumbs up, and the winner was a different thing and i was like, thank you so much, sally! i turned around and —
7:58 am
thank you so much, sally! i turned around and said, _ thank you so much, sally! i turned around and said, you _ thank you so much, sally! i turned around and said, you have - thank you so much, sally! i turned around and said, you have one! i around and said, you have one! sorry~ — around and said, you have one! sorry. -- — around and said, you have one! sorry. -- you _ around and said, you have one! sorry. —— you have won it! all around and said, you have one! sorry. -- you have won it! all the actint sorry. -- you have won it! all the acting skills _ sorry. -- you have won it! all the acting skills kicked _ sorry. -- you have won it! all the acting skills kicked in. _ sorry. -- you have won it! all the acting skills kicked in. i _ sorry. -- you have won it! all the acting skills kicked in. i know- sorry. -- you have won it! all the| acting skills kicked in. i know how to handle this, _ acting skills kicked in. i know how to handle this, clap _ acting skills kicked in. i know how to handle this, clap and _ acting skills kicked in. i know how to handle this, clap and green, i to handle this, clap and green, green and bear it. we to handle this, clap and green, green and bear it.— to handle this, clap and green, green and bear it. we shared a great losers face- — green and bear it. we shared a great losers face. yours _ green and bear it. we shared a great losers face. yours was _ green and bear it. we shared a great losers face. yours was particularly i losers face. yours was particularly tood! losers face. yours was particularly good! shall _ losers face. yours was particularly good! shall we — losers face. yours was particularly good! shall we see _ losers face. yours was particularly good! shall we see it _ losers face. yours was particularly good! shall we see it now? - losers face. yours was particularly good! shall we see it now? no, i losers face. yours was particularly - good! shall we see it now? no, never doint it good! shall we see it now? no, never doing it again. — good! shall we see it now? no, never doing it again, winners _ good! shall we see it now? no, never doing it again, winners face _ good! shall we see it now? no, never doing it again, winners face only - doing it again, winners face only from _ doing it again, winners face only from iiow— doing it again, winners face only from now on!— doing it again, winners face only from now on! , ., i. ., from now on! during covid you have been working _ from now on! during covid you have been working a _ from now on! during covid you have been working a lot. _ from now on! during covid you have been working a lot. i _ from now on! during covid you have been working a lot. i was _ from now on! during covid you have been working a lot. i was very - been working a lot. i was very luc , been working a lot. i was very lucky. temple _ been working a lot. i was very lucky, temple came - been working a lot. i was very lucky, temple came back- been working a lot. i was very lucky, temple came back for. been working a lot. i was very - lucky, temple came back for season two, we also shot a second season of code 404, another comedy for sky. one of our produce is really implemented all of the covid restrictions on protocols and she was a trailblazer. people want content, it is a safe space, you are tested three times a week and i am
7:59 am
just thankful that i was busy unable to work throughout. in actual fact, it helps the show, temple, because it helps the show, temple, because it allowed us to get access to locations that you would never get into. �* .., , locations that you would never get into. �* , ., locations that you would never getj into-— yes. into. because it was quieter? yes, we were in — into. because it was quieter? yes, we were in bar _ into. because it was quieter? yes, we were in bar italia _ into. because it was quieter? yes, we were in bar italia in _ into. because it was quieter? yes, we were in bar italia in soho - into. because it was quieter? yes, we were in bar italia in soho and i we were in bar italia in soho and aldwych train station and these amazing places which gives the show some expansive cinematography. i think it is a show which depicts london unlike anything i have seen before. ~ ., v london unlike anything i have seen before._ what's - london unlike anything i have seenj before._ what's next? london unlike anything i have seen. before._ what's next? i before. what's next? what's next? i sho- before. what's next? what's next? i shot ? before. what's next? what's next? i shop ? were — before. what's next? what's next? i shop ? were shot _ before. what's next? what's next? i shop ? were shot in _ before. what's next? what's next? i shop ? were shot in an _ before. what's next? what's next? i shop ? were shot in an episode - before. what's next? what's next? i shop ? were shot in an episode of i shop ? were shot in an episode of inside no nine which i am thrilled about it because i have worked with steve pemberton a number of times, and i said, get me on that show of yours! that will be up next year. and i also did an anthony horowitz murder mystery, magpie murders. is that a shirt orjacket? a _ murder mystery, magpie murders. is that a shirt orjacket? ajacket, - that a shirt or 'acket? a 'acket, and it is that a shirt orjacket? a 'acket, and it is becoming h that a shirt orjacket? ajacket, and it is becoming increasingly| that a shirt orjacket? ajacket, - and it is becoming increasingly warm as this interview goes on! there is
8:00 am
not a bead as this interview goes on! there is not a head of sweat on both of you! we are used to it, that's all. that's because we aren't wearing our coat _ that's because we aren't wearing our coat 0r— that's because we aren't wearing our coat. , ., . .. it is coat. or shirt 'acket thing. it is called a coat. or shirtjacket thing. it is called a shacket, _ coat. or shirtjacket thing. it is called a shacket, charlie. - coat. or shirtjacket thing. it is called a shacket, charlie. you| coat. or shirt jacket thing. it is - called a shacket, charlie. you learn somethint called a shacket, charlie. you learn something new _ called a shacket, charlie. you learn something new every _ called a shacket, charlie. you learn something new every day. - called a shacket, charlie. you learn something new every day. ready i called a shacket, charlie. you learn i something new every day. ready with our something new every day. ready with your winners — something new every day. ready with your winners face? _ something new every day. ready with your winners face? do _ something new every day. ready with your winners face? do stay _ something new every day. ready with your winners face? do stay with - something new every day. ready with your winners face? do stay with us! i your winners face? do stay with us! the winner— your winners face? do stay with us! the winner 7 — your winners face? do stay with us! the winner ? make a headline coming up!
8:01 am
good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. our headlines today: safe, well, and reunited with her parents. nationwide search in australia has been found alive. four—year—old cleo whose disappearance sparked an 18—day nationwide search in australia has been found alive. i said what your name and she didn't answer so i said what's her name and she didn't answer again and i asked a third time and she said my name is cleo. forcing big finance firms to do their bit to help the climate. some of the uk's richest companies are told to prove their green credentials. the chancellor rishi sunak will explain his plans in glasgow today but green groups say they aren't tough enough. i'll explain all. footballers supporting front line workers. premier league starjordan henderson shows us how players' donations are helping nhs staff. also this hour, amid continuing concerns over coronavirus rates,
8:02 am
we'll put your questions to the england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van tam. it's a chilly start to the day and it will be chilly generally. sunshine and showers, some of those heavy and thundery with hail and some brisk winds. i will have all the details later. it's wednesday 3rd november. our top story: a four—year—old girl who went missing from a remote australian campsite nearly three weeks ago, has been found alive and well following a huge search operation. cleo smith was discovered by police in a locked house and has now been reunited with her parents. a 36—year—old man is being questioned by police. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. this is the moment police found four—year—old cleo smith. mi; this is the moment police found four-year-old cleo smith. my name is hen . four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry- how — four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry- how are _ four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry. how are you? _ four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry. how are you? we _ four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry. how are you? we are - four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry. how are you? we are going i four-year-old cleo smith. my name is henry. how are you? we are going to| henry. how are you? we are going to take you to see your mum and dad.
8:03 am
i asked her what her name was, one of the guysjumped in and picked her up and ijust wanted to be sure that it was cleo, i wanted to be sure it was her so i said what your name and she didn't answer so i said what's her name and she didn't answer again and i asked a third time and she said my name is cleo. big hugs, kisses and lots of tears. as you can expect. the four—year—old had vanished from her family's tent while camping on the western australian coast. it sparked one of the biggest police operations in the area with extensive air, land and sea searches. her disappearance gripped australia and a reward of $1 million was offered for information leading to her location. cleo's mother ellie smith expressed her relief on social media,
8:04 am
saying "our family is whole again." a man is in custody and being questioned by detectives. australia's prime minister scott morrison said this was "wonderful, relieving news". this is every parent's worst nightmare and the fact that nightmare has come to an end and our worst fears were not realised isjust a huge relief and a moment for greatjoy. more details have yet to emerge about how little cleo disappeared and how she was found, but for now, a family's nightmare is over and a country's prayers have been answered. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. shaimaa joins us now from sydney. we were just watching the closing pictures in the report of cleo being found, incredible scenes and i know
8:05 am
there has been huge reaction to the news over there. i’m there has been huge reaction to the news over there.— news over there. i'm 'ust looking at twitter news over there. i'm 'ust looking at rwitter rignt _ news over there. i'm 'ust looking at twitter right now — news over there. i'm just looking at twitter right now and _ news over there. i'm just looking at twitter right now and this _ news over there. i'm just looking at twitter right now and this bit - news over there. i'm just looking at twitter right now and this bit of - twitter right now and this bit of footage and cleo's picture in the hospital are dominating the timeline. she is trending in australia, best news of the year, huge prize for western australian police and a big placard of welcome home cleo, many people thanking the police for sharing the video and sharing the picture. this is a story that has captured this nation's heart from day one when she was announced mustang, disappeared from that family tent on the coastline in western australia with those fears police have said, concerns all the way to today when they announced she was alive, well and back with mum and dad. the outcome her parents and the police wanted but i must say the
8:06 am
outcome that all of australia hoped and prayed for. outcome that all of australia hoped and prayed for-— and prayed for. incredible scenes. do we know _ and prayed for. incredible scenes. do we know what _ and prayed for. incredible scenes. do we know what the _ and prayed for. incredible scenes. do we know what the latest - and prayed for. incredible scenes. do we know what the latest is - and prayed for. incredible scenes. do we know what the latest is on | and prayed for. incredible scenes. i do we know what the latest is on how she is herself?— she is herself? yes, the police said she is herself? yes, the police said she was happy. _ she is herself? yes, the police said she was happy, healthy, _ she is herself? yes, the police said she was happy, healthy, that - she is herself? yes, the police said she was happy, healthy, that she l she is herself? yes, the police said i she was happy, healthy, that she was like an energiser bunny, she was full of energy. they did not give much detail when they came out in the presser about the state of the house she was income the moments leading up to the rescue but they did say she did not appear to be physically harmed when they found her. they took to the hospital for checkups generally she was in good shape and good spirits and very happy to see her parents and i'm sure her parents must be absolutely relieved. it's getting late now and it will be about bedtime for cleo and for the first time in 18 days she will spend the night with her family and there was so much fear that this would not happen but it is
8:07 am
tonight. it that this would not happen but it is tonitht. , ., ., ., ,, ., tonight. it is great to talk to you, that shaimaa _ tonight. it is great to talk to you, that shaimaa khalil _ tonight. it is great to talk to you, that shaimaa khalil live - tonight. it is great to talk to you, that shaimaa khalil live from - tonight. it is great to talk to you, i that shaimaa khalil live from sydney with the incredible news that four—year—old cleo smith has been found safe and well. chancellor rishi sunak will announce new rules for uk companies and banks at the climate conference in glasgow today. nina's back from scotland and is looking at what he'll be discussing. what is the emphasis today? many world leaders have gone away. dar; world leaders have gone away. day three, world leaders have gone away. li— three, world leaders world leaders have gone away. liiag three, world leaders heading home and other negotiators stuck in. todayis and other negotiators stuck in. today is the term of the chancellor. how will his moves stand up to that accusation of "words over action?" let's start with a global commitment which has been quite well—received — if it's kept to. more than a50 businesses which control 40% of all the money held by big banks and funds around the world have committed to playing their part of that target to limiting climate change to 1.5%,
8:08 am
essentially promising to only buy and invest in a green way. domestically the aim for the uk is for us to become the first net zero aligned financial centre. what does that mean? the aim is to make companies be transparent about where their cash is spent and whether that helps or hinders the net zero target, put crudely are you investing in a wind farm over fossil fuels for example? but take note ? they might have to tell us where its being spent ? but they won t have to do anything about it. and you ll be forgiven for an eye roll. in 2009 developed countries promised to give £100 billion by 2020 to help developing nations invest in climate control but the estimate is it will not happen until 2023, south three
8:09 am
years too late. but what this does do is raise awareness around consumers, we will be better armed when it comes to making ethical choices. important to remember this is only day three of a fortnight, more will be announced towards the end of next week and the hard work starts after that.— a leading scientist advising the government on its response to the coronavirus pandemic has stepped down from his role. in a statement, sirjeremy farrar said he resigned from sage at the end of last month to focus on his work as the director of a medical charity. but he also warned that the covid rates in the uk were "concerning", saying the situation was "a long way from over". a new recruitment campaign to fill more than 100,000 vacancies in the social care sector has been launched in england. it comes as providers warn of an increasing staffing crisis fuelled by compulsory covid vaccinations for workers, and rising wages in other areas of the economy.
8:10 am
time to catch up on all the well and look ahead to the next few days. good morning, carol. good morning, carol. good morning, carol. good morning to you both. if you haven't stepped outside it's a chilly start to the day, especially for southern england and south wales and it will be chilly or are you are. sunshine and showers coming in on windward coast on a brisk wind but also a weak weather fronts sinking south produces some showers and some of those are making it inland, some could be heavy and thundery with some hell. these white circles represent the average wind strength and we are looking at gusts around a0 miles per autumn at some of us having got more than that accentuated the cold feel and our temperatures are 8—13 . today and into tonight any work from north
8:11 am
wales northwards on mountain tops are likely to see wintriness indows showers but through the night a lot of those will fade and under clear skies in scotland it's worth looking to see if you spot the northern light generally speaking it will be a cold light especially in sheltered central and western areas with temperatures falling low enough for a touch of frost so that leads us to a touch of frost so that leads us to a chilly start to tomorrow, still some showers around but plenty for us today and still some gusty winds around the north sea coastline. thicker cloud and rain and these are our temperatures, seven in the north to 11 in the south, the chilly estate of the week, tomorrow. i understand this morning you were having to scrape the ice off on the shower. it was one degree where i was but it felt like it was freezing.
8:12 am
it's one of those days where you site it is freezing but technically not, it was one degree. carol, thank you. it's 8:11am. at the start of the pandemic, liverpool captain jordan henderson called on fellow footballers to donate a portion of their salary to help support healthcare workers on the frontline. jordan's efforts helped to raise millions of pounds for the group nhs charities together and now, more than a year on, he's been to meet some of those who have benefited. i went along with him. when you made that phone call all those months ago as captain and you got in touch with all the premier league captains to talk about what you could do to help, did you ever think that one day you would be able to come and visit a hospital where staff are benefiting from that first thing you did? not really, it's incredible, from
8:13 am
all the [ads in the premier league, to be able to raise so much money. but also it was more not only about the money, the support to the staff all over the country, really. even when the pandemic is over, the wellbeing and mental health of a lot of the staff will need to be treated carefully. shall i swap my mask, yeah, get rid of that one. it's just here on the left. hi, everyone, hi, are you ok? jordan, when you started players together, what made you think of it in the first place, why did you start it? well, i think on the telly you could see how much struggle the nhs were going through. i remember at the beginning, i don't even know if there was enough ppe at the beginning. staff coming in unprotected and having to treat patients
8:14 am
and stuff, and then going home to their families and all of that sort of stuff. and that, when you were watching that on the telly, that was quite shocking. i obviously have a family member in the nhs, up back where i'm from, who i speak to and she was telling us how difficult it was at the beginning, constantly how it was throughout. my name is kate lyons. i'm a critical care nurse. the amount of patients that were coming through that were a lot sicker than we're used to looking after, it was a bit of a challenging experience for all of the staff up there. and the support that we've had from nhs charities has meant that i can carry on being a functional human. you know, i'm notjust nurse kate who gets completely exhausted at work, i've got the tools to live a functional life and be happy in my life. so i can't thank you enough. well, to be, to be honest, i'm not here for you to thank me.
8:15 am
i'm here to say thank you to all of you for what yous have done. i can only imagine how tough it's been. so for us to give backjust a little bit meant an awful lot to us and notjust me, players at liverpool, players across the premier league, in the women's game as well, that was the biggest thing, for us to try and do something. everything has changed what we do. having to ring families over facetime _ when i speak to my cousin up north, some of the stories are heartbreaking. the families, i don't know whether they are now but they weren't allowed in at one period to say goodbye. i'm edna panambo, one of the matrons of the accident and emergency department. it was a challenging time, when actually, there are loads of people from the care home that comes to a&e, all covid, one after the other. so injust a matter of, like, one week, we have loads of death.
8:16 am
and the hardest thing, is, like, we cannot allow relatives to be with them because we have to take care of them. we have to protect them so that they won't get the virus. psychologically all the stuff we are affected as well psychologically all the staff are affected as well because this is something new. everyone, to the porters, to the housekeepers, to the cleaners, it's teamwork so we survived because of it but it was a challenging time. my name is paul evans. i'm the head of operations for acute emergency medicine. looking at sickness rates around stress, anxiety, mental fatigue and over mental health condition, will be able to introduce wobble rooms, psychological supports, cbt sessions to really support those members of the team in being in work and if they have to go off, getting them back to work you say a wobble room,
8:17 am
what that mean? a safe space where they can have 5 minutes on their own so they can check in with themselves, chicken with a colleague if need be and understand what they need in that moment in time to help them get to that challenging moment or that challenging day. for me it was life—saving. i know i'm not the jenny i was before. and, just to come to terms with that is quite difficult. how was that, meeting the people who have been on the front line? it was quite emotional, because obviously, what they've been through and telling their own stories, all of them different. we spoke to a handful of people there, talking about... there will be a lot more in this hospital alone and then you're talking about all over the country, all over the world, so many people suffering because of this pandemic. now we're going to go to the place that actually, everyone can escape to. hi, you ok? nice to meet you.
8:18 am
it was literally like i'm overwhelmed, i need time out from this. so now it's about recovering and looking after your mental health post—covid so the acute phase has settled but everyone is exhausted and everyone is completely overwhelmed by what they've been through and we have been hit hard in liverpool. we have a one—to—one room there. if staff are a bit upset - or distressed, we take them through to this one—to—one room. itjust makes it a bit more private and confidential. l ah, brilliant. in the first couple of waves, it wasjust mayhem and chaos and people needed to come in and draw breath. now people are absolutely knackered. they've given so much over the last year and a half, and we really need to look after them, help them nourish themselves, come back to health. yeah, yeah. i thought it was brilliant that you both spoke up so clearly about getting vaccinated because as you say, people listen to footballers and football managers
8:19 am
and those kind of messages are so helpful in terms of reducing pressure on the hospitals. yeah, just listen to the gaffer. listen to the gaffer, that's it! nice to meet you, thank you very much, thanks. thank you. bye! so, what was that like today? what was it like to finally get to meet the staff here? yeah, i think they show great strength, and they speak about the teamwork and togetherness of everyone coming together, which i really, really liked. and obviously the hubs and courtyards and a space for them has been a massive plus for them, so really honoured and humbled to be able to come and meet them. i wanted to do it for a long time so to be able to do it has been really nice to see them face—to—face and to thank them for everything they have done for us. what message do you take away from this now? what more might you be able to do? i think the biggest thing
8:20 am
is the mental health going forward and what they have suffered is a form of trauma, really. saying goodbye to loved ones and families can't come in, and that could stay with them for a long time. so i think to be able to support them to get the right help that they need and support around them will be really important going forward, and that's notjust for now, that's going to be years down the line. we're joined now by ellie orton, head of nhs charities together. great to see you again. it's interesting, right at the start of the pandemic we didn't know this was happening, jordan henderson cold all the captains together and started to organise trying to front rice for nhs charities. how much of an impact has that money had? we saw a little
8:21 am
impact but we know it's much broader than that. the impact but we know it's much broader than that. ,., . impact but we know it's much broader than that. . , impact but we know it's much broader than that. , ., than that. the impact is through the whole uk and _ than that. the impact is through the whole uk and what _ than that. the impact is through the whole uk and what happened - than that. the impact is through the whole uk and what happened when | whole uk and what happened when jordan called the players together and made that collective announcement, it was over 100 players back in april 2020 who all made an announcement on social media that they had collectively and voluntarily come together to be able to donate to nhs charities together, the impact that had with the funds they collected and gave to nhs charities together, which was millions, has been amazing but also it was the profile that led to us being able to raise millions more on those funds have gone throughout the whole of the uk to every single nhs trust and health board in the country and we know from our recent research that two out of three, over two thirds of staff, have been able
8:22 am
to benefit from psychological support, well—being rooms, which is exactly where this funding has gone. what occurs to me is that lots of people, i used the phrase ordinary people, i used the phrase ordinary people advisedly, they don't make announcements about giving money to charities like years and do it anyway, that's the life blood of what you do, isn't it? absolutely, and the support _ what you do, isn't it? absolutely, and the support that _ what you do, isn't it? absolutely, and the support that we - what you do, isn't it? absolutely, and the support that we have - what you do, isn't it? absolutely, and the support that we have hadj and the support that we have had from the public over the last 18 months has been incredible and we are so grateful to everybody that supported nhs charities together, everyone who has gone i love the nhs, can see what staff are going through, how much they have put their heart and soul and all the skills and passion they have into caring for patients and we are so grateful for the amazing support we have. , ., .., grateful for the amazing support we have. i. .. ., . have. tell me if you can watch the staff need — have. tell me if you can watch the
8:23 am
staff need and _ have. tell me if you can watch the staff need and describe, _ have. tell me if you can watch the staff need and describe, if- have. tell me if you can watch the staff need and describe, if you i staff need and describe, if you know, the sort of thing they have been through in the last 18 months because i know the staff we met on that day, many of them talked about being exhausted, mentally and physically burnt out.— being exhausted, mentally and physically burnt out. there is a lot of exhaustion. _ physically burnt out. there is a lot of exhaustion. our _ physically burnt out. there is a lot of exhaustion. our latest - physically burnt out. there is a lot of exhaustion. our latest research says that nearly eight out of ten staff think the pressures they are under now are as significant as at the peak of the pandemic and this is from staff who have been moved from one area in the nhs where they normally work to then going into icu to look after patients, stories of having to say goodbye to patients when their loved ones couldn't be there and staff wanting to take off their rubber gloves so they are having skin to skin, and then the guilt they feel of a man going to take covid home to my family is? am
8:24 am
i going to be putting other people at risk? and then the sheer vast quantity of patients that they are looking after so there is the trauma but then there is the physical exhaustion, but fantastic staff, they put patients first and apply that nhs staff talk about in terms of working for the nhs is incredible but that is why we need to continue to be there for them and continue to support because we have winter pressures, growing numbers of covid cases and a backlog of patients and exhausted staff, so continuing to support the route the charities is a really vital thing to do. i support the route the charities is a really vital thing to do.— really vital thing to do. i suppose there was always _ really vital thing to do. i suppose there was always a _ really vital thing to do. i suppose there was always a danger - really vital thing to do. i suppose there was always a danger afterl really vital thing to do. i suppose - there was always a danger after what seems like a long time ago, clap for
8:25 am
carers, those moments which were very significant and emotional for people, there was always a danger that was then and then everyone gets on with theirjobs and are back to work on some of it gets forgotten. i think clapping and saying thank you is really important but if people want to be able to do more, that is whatjordan thought, we have the ability to do more here and hundreds of thousands of people across the country have thought i can do something more to help and this is an unprecedented time, the nhs has never been through this before so it is possible from every nhs trust and health board in the country has their own charity and we are the overarching umbrella organisation thatis overarching umbrella organisation that is there supporting them and supporting nhs staff and patients and theirfamilies. supporting nhs staff and patients and their families.— and their families. lovely to see ou here and their families. lovely to see you here this — and their families. lovely to see
8:26 am
you here this morning, - and their families. lovely to see you here this morning, ellie, i and their families. lovely to see l you here this morning, ellie, chief executive of nhs charities together. for the next half of the programme we will bejoining bbc radio for the next half of the programme we will be joining bbc radio five live for that special interview with the deputy chief medical officer jonathan van tam. we will put your coronavirus questions to him but first it's time to get the news, travel and weather where you work this morning. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. more than 30 people have been arrested after hundreds of fireworks were thrown in woolwich town centre on sunday night. one man had a suspected heart attack after a firework was thrown at him, and four police officers were also badly injured. police have been meeting with people living in croydon to try to reassure them about safety following concerns over violence in the borough in recent months including several murders. the area also had the highest number of domestic abuse cases recorded last year, more than 5,000 were reported. officers have been encouraging people to use an online system
8:27 am
called street safe to tell them the areas where they feel at risk. we know where reported crime is taking place. what we don't know is where women feel unsafe, in particular. so what it does, it gives us a chance to actually understand that picture. so it won't generate a police response but we will look at that data, and then look to see how we can problem solve those areas so they become safe. london's ageing river crossings are an international embarrassment according to a new report by city hall's transport committee. it says the closure of hammersmith bridge caused huge disruption. it's called for the ownership and management of crossings to be better co—ordinated. he's been missed by many children, and a few parents, but dippy the diplodicus is coming back to the natural history museum. the much loved dinosaur cast has been on a four year tour of the uk. he's returning, albeit as part of a temporary exhibition, next summer. travel now. there's no dlr between gallions reach and beckton and the metropolitan line
8:28 am
has minor delays. the problems on the overground have cleared up. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another cold and frosty start to the day across the capital. in a few spots, temperatures have slipped below freezing so there are a few pockets of air frost around. along with some mist and fog patches that will lift and clear fairly slowly as we head through the morning, helped by a strengthening northerly wind that will start to become quite brisk as we head through the afternoon. for many of us, though, it is a bright start to the day and we will continue to see those bright spells. there will be areas of cloud drifting down on that northerly wind and maybe one or two showers as well as we head through the afternoon. most likely out towards eastern areas. temperatures for some spots will struggle to get out of single figures. so it's feeling quite chilly today, particularly with that northerly wind. highs between nine and 11 celsius. this evening and overnight, with the strength of that northerly wind, and also plenty of cloud, temperatures should
8:29 am
stay above freezing. five, six celsius, and frost free largely into thursday morning. watch out for a few showers again. on thursday, still the chance of a few showers, but a blustery day. temperatures hitting nine, maybe 10 celsius. likely to be the coolest day of this week. and then on friday, we start to draw in more of a north—westerly wind and that will make the air feel a bit milder. should stay mild on friday night forfireworks night. on saturday it turns rather windy and there could be a few spells of rain at times. stay with us on bbc one because we have a bbc breakfast and 5 live special 0&a with the government's deputy chief medical officer professorjonathan van—tam. good morning and welcome to a specialjoint programme from bbc radio 5 live and bbc breakfast with rachel burden and sally nugent. this morning we're putting your questions to the deputy chief medical officer, professorjonathan van—tam, to get the latest advice on the pandemic as we head into winter. we've been inundated with questions.
8:30 am
thank you for being thank you for bein- with us if you thank you for being with us if you are watchin- online or on the are watching online or on the television or listening on the radio. hundreds of you have got in touch and we've got a lot to get through from boosters to teenage vaccinations to plans for christmas. professor van—tam, good morning. thank you for being with us this morning. i would thank you for being with us this morning. iwould if thank you for being with us this morning. i would if you can first of alljust tell us morning. i would if you can first of all just tell us about the latest data. we have this fairly stark figures yesterday of 293 deaths from coronavirus within 28 days of a positive test. we know that is a slightly skewed picture. give us yoursense slightly skewed picture. give us your sense of where we are at at the moment with this virus. i}i(. your sense of where we are at at the moment with this virus.— moment with this virus. ok, i will to moment with this virus. ok, i will go through _ moment with this virus. ok, i will go through the — moment with this virus. ok, i will go through the data _ moment with this virus. ok, i will go through the data for _ moment with this virus. ok, i will go through the data for you - moment with this virus. ok, i will go through the data for you now. | go through the data for you now. beginning — go through the data for you now. beginning with your deaths figures, what you _ beginning with your deaths figures, what you need to do is always conipare _ what you need to do is always compare the same week, day and week, because _ compare the same week, day and week, because there are variations day by day. because there are variations day by day if _ because there are variations day by day if we — because there are variations day by day. if we look at the tuesday figure. — day. if we look at the tuesday figure, which is often the high
8:31 am
figure. — figure, which is often the high figure. if_ figure, which is often the high figure, if we go back five weeks, we started _ figure, if we go back five weeks, we started at— figure, if we go back five weeks, we started at 180, we then went to 223, 236. started at 180, we then went to 223, 236 and _ started at 180, we then went to 223, 236. and the latest figure is, after 263. _ 236. and the latest figure is, after 263. it— 236. and the latest figure is, after 263. it was— 236. and the latest figure is, after 263, it was 296 or thereabouts. what this tells— 263, it was 296 or thereabouts. what this tells us _ 263, it was 296 or thereabouts. what this tells us is that the deaths are increasing — this tells us is that the deaths are increasing. there might be some artefacts— increasing. there might be some artefacts in the very latest figures, _ artefacts in the very latest figures, but essentially deaths are increasing. if you then look at hospital— increasing. if you then look at hospital admissions, those have plateaued, in the last four days. and if— plateaued, in the last four days. and if you — plateaued, in the last four days. and if you look at the total number of patients— and if you look at the total number of patients in hospital with covid, those _ of patients in hospital with covid, those have gone down in the last two or three _ those have gone down in the last two or three days. but only a small bit that they— or three days. but only a small bit that they have gone down by. so what that they have gone down by. so what that tells _ that they have gone down by. so what that tells me, really, is that we have _ that tells me, really, is that we have to — that tells me, really, is that we have tojust wait that tells me, really, is that we have to just wait and see a little bit longer — have to just wait and see a little bit longer. this could be a pause before _ bit longer. this could be a pause before things go up, it could be the very first _ before things go up, it could be the very first signs that things are beginning to stabilise. but at a high _ beginning to stabilise. but at a high rate _
8:32 am
beginning to stabilise. but at a high rate. and on cases, they are now starting to full. but that mainly — now starting to full. but that mainly reflects the fact that this bil mainly reflects the fact that this big wave — mainly reflects the fact that this big wave we had in teenagers is now starting _ big wave we had in teenagers is now starting to— big wave we had in teenagers is now starting to slip away. my worry is that the — starting to slip away. my worry is that the deaths are increasing, and that the deaths are increasing, and that shows — that the deaths are increasing, and that shows that the infection is now starting _ that shows that the infection is now starting to— that shows that the infection is now starting to penetrate into those older— starting to penetrate into those older age groups. and that's why the really— older age groups. and that's why the really key— older age groups. and that's why the really key thing, if there is one thing _ really key thing, if there is one thing people take away from today, it is that _ thing people take away from today, it is that it— thing people take away from today, it is that if you are called for your— it is that if you are called for your booster, if you are called for a flu _ your booster, if you are called for a flu vaccine, please go and get one _ a flu vaccine, please go and get one this— a flu vaccine, please go and get one. this could be really very important _ one. this could be really very important this winter, it's not the time _ important this winter, it's not the time to— important this winter, it's not the time to be — important this winter, it's not the time to be complacent. we important this winter, it's not the time to be complacent.— important this winter, it's not the time to be complacent. we will talk to ou time to be complacent. we will talk to you about _ time to be complacent. we will talk to you about boosters _ time to be complacent. we will talk to you about boosters and - time to be complacent. we will talk to you about boosters and a - time to be complacent. we will talk| to you about boosters and a second. ijust to you about boosters and a second. i just want to go back to the right. why do you feel that the rates are so high at the moment? yes! why do you feel that the rates are so high at the moment?— so high at the moment? yes, the rates are still _ so high at the moment? yes, the rates are still very _ so high at the moment? yes, the rates are still very high _ so high at the moment? yes, the rates are still very high at - so high at the moment? yes, the rates are still very high at the i rates are still very high at the moment _ rates are still very high at the moment. they are higher than in most of europe _ moment. they are higher than in most of europe. we are running quite hot, ithink— of europe. we are running quite hot, i think that's — of europe. we are running quite hot, i think that's the right expression. and of— i think that's the right expression. and of course it is of concern to
8:33 am
scientists — and of course it is of concern to scientists that we are running this hot, scientists that we are running this hot. this— scientists that we are running this hot, this early in the autumn season _ hot, this early in the autumn season. and from this perspective, i'm afraid _ season. and from this perspective, i'm afraid it— season. and from this perspective, i'm afraid it is caution followed by caution, _ i'm afraid it is caution followed by caution, and we need to watch these data very— caution, and we need to watch these data very carefully indeed over the next days — data very carefully indeed over the next days and weeks. let�*s data very carefully indeed over the next days and weeks.— next days and weeks. let's talk about the _ next days and weeks. let's talk about the science _ next days and weeks. let's talk about the science and - next days and weeks. let's talk about the science and one - next days and weeks. let's talk about the science and one of. next days and weeks. let's talk| about the science and one of the uk's top scientists, sirjeremy farah, who is standing down from sage. is there a thought that perhaps government ministers are not listening to the sage scientists among them?— listening to the sage scientists among them? listening to the sage scientists amont them? . . ., among them? yeah, i have read the s news among them? yeah, i have read the sky news report _ among them? yeah, i have read the sky news report on _ among them? yeah, i have read the sky news report on sir— among them? yeah, i have read the sky news report on sirjeremy's - sky news report on sirjeremy's resignation. and i think it's very clear— resignation. and i think it's very clear he — resignation. and i think it's very clear he felt that a lot of the information that the government needed — information that the government needed to have from scientists has now been— needed to have from scientists has now been given, that he recognised the need _ now been given, that he recognised the need that he had to really refocus — the need that he had to really refocus on his work at the welcome trust~ _ refocus on his work at the welcome trust~ but— refocus on his work at the welcome trust. but it's a tribute to sir jeremy— trust. but it's a tribute to sir jeremy and so many other scientists
8:34 am
that they— jeremy and so many other scientists that they have supported us so hard and for— that they have supported us so hard and for so _ that they have supported us so hard and for so long and given such invaluable independent advice. i don't _ invaluable independent advice. i don't think i read any more signal in the _ don't think i read any more signal in the that— don't think i read any more signal in the that in that, that sirjeremy recognised — in the that in that, that sirjeremy recognised that most of the advice had been — recognised that most of the advice had been given and he really needed to focus— had been given and he really needed to focus on— had been given and he really needed to focus on the welcome trust. we have to focus on the welcome trust. have heard to focus on the welcome trust. , have heard suggestions that he is not the only scientist who perhaps feels that the government is not following their advice at the moment. can you say with absolute confidence that the government is listening to everything that the scientists are putting to them at the moment? the scientists are putting to them at the moment?— scientists are putting to them at the moment? ., ., , ., the moment? the government has to listen to scientists, _ the moment? the government has to listen to scientists, it _ the moment? the government has to listen to scientists, it has _ the moment? the government has to listen to scientists, it has to - listen to scientists, it has to listen — listen to scientists, it has to listen to— listen to scientists, it has to listen to all sorts of advice from all other— listen to all sorts of advice from all other places. and it has to make really— all other places. and it has to make really very— all other places. and it has to make really very difficult decisions about— really very difficult decisions about what the best course of action is. about what the best course of action is science _ about what the best course of action is science is— about what the best course of action is. science is really important, so is. science is really important, so is the _ is. science is really important, so is the economy, so is the functioning of society. 50 these are 'ust functioning of society. 50 these are just tricky— functioning of society. 50 these are just tricky decisions, there are no easy— just tricky decisions, there are no easy choices left. and frankly there haven't _ easy choices left. and frankly there haven't been for a couple of years now _ haven't been for a couple of years now. ., �* , , haven't been for a couple of years now. . �* , , ,., .,
8:35 am
now. that's interesting, so we have moved from — now. that's interesting, so we have moved from being _ now. that's interesting, so we have moved from being in _ now. that's interesting, so we have moved from being in a _ now. that's interesting, so we have moved from being in a position - now. that's interesting, so we have l moved from being in a position where we are following the signs to following other considerations alongside that. let's move on to some questions from listeners. first of all, darren in kent. what would you like to ask professorjonathan van—tam? you like to ask professorjonathan van-tam? ,., ., ., you like to ask professorjonathan van-tam?— you like to ask professorjonathan van-tam? ,., ., ., �* ., van-tam? good morning. being a tart-time van-tam? good morning. being a part-time commuter, _ van-tam? good morning. being a part-time commuter, i— van-tam? good morning. being a part-time commuter, i have - van-tam? good morning. being a i part-time commuter, i have noticed part—time commuter, i have noticed fewer— part—time commuter, i have noticed fewer people — part—time commuter, i have noticed fewer people gradually— part—time commuter, i have noticed fewer people gradually face - part—time commuter, i have noticed fewer people gradually face masks i part—time commuter, i have noticed. fewer people gradually face masks on public— fewer people gradually face masks on public transport _ fewer people gradually face masks on public transport. does _ fewer people gradually face masks on public transport. does the _ fewer people gradually face masks on public transport. does the professor i public transport. does the professor think that _ public transport. does the professor think that the — public transport. does the professor think that the wearing _ public transport. does the professor think that the wearing of— public transport. does the professor think that the wearing of face - public transport. does the professorj think that the wearing of face masks should _ think that the wearing of face masks should become _ think that the wearing of face masks should become mandatory? - think that the wearing of face masks should become mandatory? and - think that the wearing of face masks should become mandatory? and asi should become mandatory? and as cases— should become mandatory? and as cases rise — should become mandatory? and as cases rise winter _ should become mandatory? and as cases rise winter approaches? - should become mandatory? and as cases rise winter approaches? youl cases rise winter approaches? you were a bit cases rise winter approaches? were a bit difficult to hear that i think— were a bit difficult to hear that i think i_ were a bit difficult to hear that i think i picked up the question. on face coverings, face masks are face coverings— face coverings, face masks are face coverings but people where all sorts of things— coverings but people where all sorts of things as face coverings, i think the evidence over the period of the pandemic— the evidence over the period of the pandemic has become stronger that they are _ pandemic has become stronger that they are useful but they are probably most useful when used in combination with other things. we
8:36 am
should _ combination with other things. we should be — combination with other things. we should be clear that there are probably— should be clear that there are probably some small personal protection effect, but the main effect — protection effect, but the main effect is — protection effect, but the main effect is probably in protecting other— effect is probably in protecting other people. so, are they important? yes, they certainly have a role _ important? yes, they certainly have a role to _ important? yes, they certainly have a role to play. but what i want to do is _ a role to play. but what i want to do is explain that a little bit more in terms — do is explain that a little bit more in terms of. — do is explain that a little bit more in terms of, howl do is explain that a little bit more in terms of, how i frame how useful they are _ in terms of, how i frame how useful they are in — in terms of, how i frame how useful they are in different settings. so, for example, let's begin with outdoor, _ for example, let's begin with outdoor, well ventilated crowds. herer _ outdoor, well ventilated crowds. here it's— outdoor, well ventilated crowds. here, it's really quite a difficult callr _ here, it's really quite a difficult call, because the outdoor and the ventilation— call, because the outdoor and the ventilation is the most important factor _ ventilation is the most important factor so— ventilation is the most important factor. 50 you will probably wear a mask— factor. 50 you will probably wear a mask there — factor. 50 you will probably wear a mask there if the legitimate authority asked you to do so, or if other— authority asked you to do so, or if other people around you felt really uncomfortable that you were not wearing — uncomfortable that you were not wearing one. if you then went into an indoor— wearing one. if you then went into an indoor setting, which involves food _ an indoor setting, which involves food and — an indoor setting, which involves food and drink, then it becomes very difficult _ food and drink, then it becomes very difficult. because you don't wear them _ difficult. because you don't wear them at — difficult. because you don't wear them at the table. you can't take them _ them at the table. you can't take them on — them at the table. you can't take them on and off in between sips of a
8:37 am
drink _ them on and off in between sips of a drink so _ them on and off in between sips of a drink. 50 really, what you should do in my— drink. 50 really, what you should do in my view_ drink. 50 really, what you should do in my view is— drink. 50 really, what you should do in my view is to wear them when mobile — in my view is to wear them when mobile. and use them as you are entering — mobile. and use them as you are entering and exciting the premises. -- exciting — entering and exciting the premises. —— exciting the premises. but that is a small— —— exciting the premises. but that is a small fraction of the total time — is a small fraction of the total time you _ is a small fraction of the total time you spend in there. so there are limitations in terms of how effective — are limitations in terms of how effective they are. if you were to look _ effective they are. if you were to look at _ effective they are. if you were to look at for — effective they are. if you were to look at for example cinemas and theatres, — look at for example cinemas and theatres, you are not interacting with anyone there other than the actors _ with anyone there other than the actors or— with anyone there other than the actors or the screen. you are not interacting — actors or the screen. you are not interacting with the audience. you are seated — interacting with the audience. you are seated quite close together. and for most _ are seated quite close together. and for most people, there should be relatively— for most people, there should be relatively little personal expense involved — relatively little personal expense involved in wearing a face covering involved in wearing a face covering in those _ involved in wearing a face covering in those kind of settings. and finally— in those kind of settings. and finally you have the very high mobility, _ finally you have the very high mobility, high interaction venues such— mobility, high interaction venues such as _ mobility, high interaction venues such as clubs, and here, you can see that they— such as clubs, and here, you can see that they would be very socially
8:38 am
inhibiting to wear face masks. and i think— inhibiting to wear face masks. and i think if— inhibiting to wear face masks. and i think if the — inhibiting to wear face masks. and i think if the epidemiology gets worse in the _ think if the epidemiology gets worse in the uk, _ think if the epidemiology gets worse in the uk, that on its own would not be enough _ in the uk, that on its own would not be enough in — in the uk, that on its own would not be enough in those kind of venues. so i be enough in those kind of venues. so i hope _ be enough in those kind of venues. so i hope that be enough in those kind of venues. sol hope that frames my views be enough in those kind of venues. so i hope that frames my views about the utility— so i hope that frames my views about the utility of face mask.— the utility of face mask. masks are retuired the utility of face mask. masks are required in — the utility of face mask. masks are required in indoor _ the utility of face mask. masks are required in indoor public— the utility of face mask. masks are required in indoor public places i the utility of face mask. masks are required in indoor public places in | required in indoor public places in scotland, wales and northern ireland, different rules to england. some parts of england also, mandate them on public transport, but it isn't always followed as darren was suggesting. andrew has said, what is your opinion on mask wearing on the house of commons? i havejust your opinion on mask wearing on the house of commons? i have just spoken to an mp who said it should be down to an mp who said it should be down to personal choice. do you think mps should be setting an example and wearing a mask at all times when they are working in the house of commons? i they are working in the house of commons?— they are working in the house of commons? . , ., . commons? i have given my advice about the kind _ commons? i have given my advice about the kind of _ commons? i have given my advice about the kind of settings - commons? i have given my advice about the kind of settings and - commons? i have given my advice about the kind of settings and the | about the kind of settings and the differences between them about when people _ differences between them about when people should be wearing face coverings... people should be wearing face coverings- - -— coverings... there is a high mobility — coverings... there is a high mobility and _ coverings... there is a high mobility and high _
8:39 am
coverings... there is a high l mobility and high interaction environment. so in that case that would fall into the category of one of those places you think masks should be worn. i of those places you think masks should be worn.— of those places you think masks should be worn. i don't think i'm in a nosition should be worn. i don't think i'm in a position to _ should be worn. i don't think i'm in a position to judge _ should be worn. i don't think i'm in a position to judge every _ should be worn. i don't think i'm in a position to judge every single i a position to judge every single type of— a position to judge every single type of interaction that occurs in any work— type of interaction that occurs in any work premises, including the house _ any work premises, including the house of— any work premises, including the house of commons.— any work premises, including the house of commons. what about in schools? tracy _ house of commons. what about in schools? tracy asks, _ house of commons. what about in schools? tracy asks, why - house of commons. what about in schools? tracy asks, why are - house of commons. what about in i schools? tracy asks, why are schools not putting masks in place with cases rising in school—age children? some are but not all. the cases rising in school-age children? some are but not all. the department for education's — some are but not all. the department for education's advice _ some are but not all. the department for education's advice is _ some are but not all. the department for education's advice is that - for education's advice is that generally speaking, face masks should — generally speaking, face masks should not be worn. and i can see that they— should not be worn. and i can see that they could be quite inhibiting to the _ that they could be quite inhibiting to the kind of natural expressions of learning — to the kind of natural expressions of learning in children, involving speech— of learning in children, involving speech and involving spatial expression. i think it's difficult for children in schools with face masks — for children in schools with face masks. ., , ., masks. the other thing is about the messa . e masks. the other thing is about the messa t e it masks. the other thing is about the message it sends _ masks. the other thing is about the message it sends out. _ masks. the other thing is about the message it sends out. a _ masks. the other thing is about the message it sends out. a couple - masks. the other thing is about the message it sends out. a couple of. message it sends out. a couple of comments here, gavin, enforcing mask wearing is not working, it is in place. another one here says, no
8:40 am
name, the majority of people of all ages i see are not wearing face masks, there is major complacency or an attitude that covid is over, it is very disconcerting. do you think people in general across the uk have a sense that the pandemic is over and may be mask wearing would help counter that? 50! and may be mask wearing would help counter that?— counter that? so, i think you are ritht, counter that? so, i think you are right. that _ counter that? so, i think you are right. that too — counter that? so, i think you are right, that too many _ counter that? so, i think you are right, that too many people - counter that? so, i think you are i right, that too many people believe that this _ right, that too many people believe that this pandemic is now over. i personally— that this pandemic is now over. i personally feel that there are some hard months to come in the winter, and it— hard months to come in the winter, and it is— hard months to come in the winter, and it is not— hard months to come in the winter, and it is not over. i think a whole range _ and it is not over. i think a whole range of— and it is not over. i think a whole range of behaviours, including the use of— range of behaviours, including the use of face — range of behaviours, including the use of face coverings, but generally the caution — use of face coverings, but generally the caution that people take or do not take _ the caution that people take or do not take in— the caution that people take or do not take in terms of interacting with— not take in terms of interacting with each— not take in terms of interacting with each other, that is going to be a big _ with each other, that is going to be a big determinant in what happens between _ a big determinant in what happens between now and the darkest months of the _ between now and the darkest months of the winter. between now and the darkest months of the winter. 50 that's going to be very important. the other things that are — very important. the other things that are going to be really important are how people respond if
8:41 am
they are _ important are how people respond if they are in _ important are how people respond if they are in need of a booster, if they— they are in need of a booster, if they are — they are in need of a booster, if they are in _ they are in need of a booster, if they are in need of a booster, if they are in need of a flu vaccine, if they— they are in need of a flu vaccine, if they are — they are in need of a flu vaccine, if they are partially vaccinated, or indeed _ if they are partially vaccinated, or indeed if— if they are partially vaccinated, or indeed if they are unvaccinated. that— indeed if they are unvaccinated. that will— indeed if they are unvaccinated. that will be another really important factor in terms of what happens — important factor in terms of what happens over the next few months stop~ _ stop. this is a stop. — this is a specialjoint brokers between bbc breakfast and five live answering your questions from professorjohn van tam. let's get a question from sally in surrey. i'm double jabbed but subsequently i caught covid in august. _ should i have my booster now, or should i wait- until my natural immunity from the virus wanes - in six months' time? professorjonathan van—tam, what's your advice to sally? i think sally said that she had caught— i think sally said that she had caught the virus recently and should she walt— caught the virus recently and should she wait for— caught the virus recently and should she wait for her booster? what we need _ she wait for her booster? what we
8:42 am
need to— she wait for her booster? what we need to be — she wait for her booster? what we need to be in the best position to -et need to be in the best position to get through this winter is for people — get through this winter is for people who are vulnerable, who are eligible _ people who are vulnerable, who are eligible for — people who are vulnerable, who are eligible for the boosters, that's really— eligible for the boosters, that's really the over 50s and people under 50 with _ really the over 50s and people under 50 with high—risk conditions, we need _ 50 with high—risk conditions, we need them — 50 with high—risk conditions, we need them to get their immunity levels _ need them to get their immunity levels as— need them to get their immunity levels as high as possible so that we go _ levels as high as possible so that we go into— levels as high as possible so that we go into the winter with the best overall— we go into the winter with the best overall level of protection for the population and for individuals. 50 my advice — population and for individuals. 50 my advice is, follow the jcvi advice and when _ my advice is, follow the jcvi advice and when you are called for your booster, — and when you are called for your booster, if— and when you are called for your booster, if you are eligible for it, and it— booster, if you are eligible for it, and it can — booster, if you are eligible for it, and it can be given, please have it as soon— and it can be given, please have it as soon as — and it can be given, please have it as soon as possible. and don't forget — as soon as possible. and don't forget flu~ _ as soon as possible. and don't forget flu. we have a very few restrictions in society at the moment _ restrictions in society at the moment. this means all the other respiratory— moment. this means all the other respiratory winter viruses will come back _ respiratory winter viruses will come back we _ respiratory winter viruses will come back. we didn't have any clue to speak— back. we didn't have any clue to speak of— back. we didn't have any clue to speak of last winter because of the lockdown _ speak of last winter because of the lockdown and so forth. that means we have a _ lockdown and so forth. that means we have a population who are more susceptible, less immune to flu at the moment. 50 forthe susceptible, less immune to flu at the moment. 50 for the people who are at— the moment. 50 for the people who are at high— the moment. 50 for the people who are at high risk, who need a flu jab
8:43 am
in the _ are at high risk, who need a flu jab in the winter, it could never have been _ in the winter, it could never have been more — in the winter, it could never have been more important than right now that you _ been more important than right now that you come forward and get it. we have that you come forward and get it. have seen a that you come forward and get it. , have seen a newspaper report this morning that the booster system is running so late, it might not be completed until february at the earliest. what is your indication of how well the booster programme is going at the moment? 50? i how well the booster programme is going at the moment?— how well the booster programme is going at the moment? so, i think all of us want things _ going at the moment? so, i think all of us want things instantly. - going at the moment? so, i think all of us want things instantly. and - going at the moment? so, i think all of us want things instantly. and i i of us want things instantly. and i would _ of us want things instantly. and i would like — of us want things instantly. and i would like it, i would like to wake up would like it, i would like to wake up tomorrow morning and everybody who needed a booster has had one. but i _ who needed a booster has had one. but i know— who needed a booster has had one. but i know that that is not possible. i know that the capacity of the _ possible. i know that the capacity of the nhs to get through boosters is finite _ of the nhs to get through boosters is finite it— of the nhs to get through boosters is finite. it is really important that— is finite. it is really important that we — is finite. it is really important that we stick to the ordering of boosting — that we stick to the ordering of boosting the most vulnerable first, which _ boosting the most vulnerable first, which are _ boosting the most vulnerable first, which are also the people who had their primary doses the greatest time _ their primary doses the greatest time ago — their primary doses the greatest time ago. i think almost 10 million
8:44 am
invitations — time ago. i think almost 10 million invitations have so far been issued for people — invitations have so far been issued for people to come forward for boosters. _ for people to come forward for boosters, and there is another 1.6 million _ boosters, and there is another 1.6 million invites due to go out very, very shortly _ million invites due to go out very, very shortly. so, yes, of course, everyone — very shortly. so, yes, of course, everyone wants to go faster. but we are now — everyone wants to go faster. but we are now picking up really quite considerable momentum and it's really— considerable momentum and it's really important that when you get your call, — really important that when you get your call, come forward as quickly as you _ your call, come forward as quickly as you can— your call, come forward as quickly as you can for your booster. i'm hopeful— as you can for your booster. i'm hopeful that the government will make _ hopeful that the government will make things a bit easier by, through the nhs, _ make things a bit easier by, through the nhs, giving people more warning of when _ the nhs, giving people more warning of when they're booster slot time is coming _ of when they're booster slot time is coming up — of when they're booster slot time is coming up. so they have a few weeks to get— coming up. so they have a few weeks to get in— coming up. so they have a few weeks to get in a _ coming up. so they have a few weeks to get in a book that. not to bring it forward, — to get in a book that. not to bring it forward, but a few weeks notice to book _ it forward, but a few weeks notice to book that and get their place in the system. but i have to tell you, we have _ the system. but i have to tell you, we have lots of questions about boosters — we have lots of questions about boosters. kate says, a few months a no boosters. kate says, a few months ago it _ boosters. kate says, a few months ago it was — boosters. kate says, a few months ago it was not possible to mix pasig -- vaccines, — ago it was not possible to mix pasig —— vaccines, why is it ok now? and
8:45 am
dennis, _ —— vaccines, why is it ok now? and dennis, wife — —— vaccines, why is it ok now? and dennis, wife and i are in our late i705. _ dennis, wife and i are in our late '70s, had — dennis, wife and i are in our late '70s, had to _ dennis, wife and i are in our late '70s, had to jab centre booster, will we — '70s, had to jab centre booster, will we need another boost in six months. — will we need another boost in six months. is — will we need another boost in six months, is there a limit to how many 'abs months, is there a limit to how many jabs one _ months, is there a limit to how many jabs one person can have? two very important questions. a few months _ two very important questions. a few months ago, we did not have the data from the _ months ago, we did not have the data from the booster study where we have deliberately taken people who have either _ deliberately taken people who have either had astrazeneca twice or pfizer— either had astrazeneca twice or pfizer twice, and they volunteered and we _ pfizer twice, and they volunteered and we have been able to test a range _ and we have been able to test a range of— and we have been able to test a range of different boosters. i am very. _ range of different boosters. i am very. very— range of different boosters. i am very, very confident, having seen the data. — very, very confident, having seen the data, that the jcvi's advice to use a _ the data, that the jcvi's advice to use a messenger rna vaccine as the vaccine _ use a messenger rna vaccine as the vaccine irrespective of whether you have had _ vaccine irrespective of whether you have had astrazeneca or pfizer first is the _ have had astrazeneca or pfizer first is the right — have had astrazeneca or pfizer first is the right thing to do. and i'm very. _ is the right thing to do. and i'm very. very— is the right thing to do. and i'm very, very confident in those results — very, very confident in those results are very confident of the data _ results are very confident of the data so — results are very confident of the data. 50 people should have absolutely no reservations following that jcvi _ absolutely no reservations following that jcvi advice. absolutely no reservations following thatjcvi advice. because absolutely no reservations following that jcvi advice. because we absolutely no reservations following thatjcvi advice. because we had choices — thatjcvi advice. because we had choices. but we have made the best
8:46 am
choices— choices. but we have made the best choices for— choices. but we have made the best choices for people based on really hi-h choices for people based on really high quality data which i hope will be in _ high quality data which i hope will be in the — high quality data which i hope will be in the public domain within a few weeks _ be in the public domain within a few weeks and — be in the public domain within a few weeks. and on the second point about, — weeks. and on the second point about, how manyjabs, yeah, this is linked _ about, how manyjabs, yeah, this is linked to— about, how manyjabs, yeah, this is linked to questions that i know people — linked to questions that i know people have sent in around, am i going _ people have sent in around, am i going to — people have sent in around, am i going to have to have a booster every _ going to have to have a booster every six — going to have to have a booster every six months? i think a first principle. — every six months? i think a first principle. it— every six months? i think a first principle, it is that quite likely that the — principle, it is that quite likely that the third dose that you get, the booster dose, is likely to last a little _ the booster dose, is likely to last a little bit — the booster dose, is likely to last a little bit longer than the protection that we had from the first two— protection that we had from the first two doses which is now starting _ first two doses which is now starting to wane. but i can't give you a _ starting to wane. but i can't give you a straight answer to that because _ you a straight answer to that because the truth of the matter is, this is— because the truth of the matter is, this is a _ because the truth of the matter is, this is a new— because the truth of the matter is, this is a new disease stop we're still learning it. we are still learning _ still learning it. we are still learning about how long these vaccines — learning about how long these vaccines will last for after the third — vaccines will last for after the third dose. and we have to wait for those _ third dose. and we have to wait for those data — third dose. and we have to wait for those data before we can give you absolutely emphatic answers. but is
8:47 am
there _ absolutely emphatic answers. but is there some kind of known issue about having _ there some kind of known issue about having to _ there some kind of known issue about having to have repeat doses of vaccine? — having to have repeat doses of vaccine? well, no, there is in. and you can _ vaccine? well, no, there is in. and you can see — vaccine? well, no, there is in. and you can see that from the annual flu 'ab you can see that from the annual flu jab which _ you can see that from the annual flu jab which is — you can see that from the annual flu jab which is —— no there is not and you can _ jab which is —— no there is not and you can see — jab which is —— no there is not and you can see that from the annual flu 'ab you can see that from the annual flu jab which _ you can see that from the annual flu jab which is — you can see that from the annual flu jab which is given a year of the year— jab which is given a year of the year and — jab which is given a year of the year and decade after decade to the elderly— year and decade after decade to the elderly and people with high—risk conditions and it will be the same this winter— conditions and it will be the same this winter and flu remains a really important — this winter and flu remains a really important vaccine this winter. thank ou for important vaccine this winter. thank you for watching _ important vaccine this winter. thank you for watching and _ important vaccine this winter. thank you for watching and listening - important vaccine this winter. t�*iag�*ia; you for watching and listening to us here on bbc breakfast and bbc five live as well. we want to move on to a question about teenagers and vaccines. we had so many around this subject. this is a question from claire. she says, via twitter, will 12 to 17—year—olds who have received a single vaccine dose need second jab at some point and when will this be? it's worth reminding people why it was decided they should only have a single dose in the first place. i
8:48 am
think i had most of that question. 16 to _ think i had most of that question. 16 to 17—year—olds, 12 to 15—year—olds, are all advised to have _ 15—year—olds, are all advised to have the — 15—year—olds, are all advised to have the first dose and it is a matter— have the first dose and it is a matter that is still under scientific consideration. the first part about — scientific consideration. the first part about the second doses. the first part — part about the second doses. the first part about the question, will i first part about the question, will i hope _ first part about the question, will i hope he — first part about the question, will i hope he an answer on the 17—year—olds by the jcvi. the majority— 17—year—olds by the jcvi. the majority of the protection comes from _ majority of the protection comes from the — majority of the protection comes from the first dose, that's why it was important to progress to that stage _ was important to progress to that stage. safety is always the watchword with vaccines. and particularly so with younger age groups — particularly so with younger age groups in— particularly so with younger age groups. in the jcvi particularly so with younger age groups. in thejcvi is particularly so with younger age groups. in the jcvi is rightly proceeding slowly and cautiously on this one _ proceeding slowly and cautiously on this one. and i believe there's plenty— this one. and i believe there's plenty of— this one. and i believe there's plenty of time for decisions to be made _ plenty of time for decisions to be made about second doses. but the answer— made about second doses. but the answer is _ made about second doses. but the answer is not know. the answer is,
8:49 am
that recruit — answer is not know. the answer is, that recruit the answer is not, no, they— that recruit the answer is not, no, they answer— that recruit the answer is not, no, they answer is so far it is being kept _ they answer is so far it is being kept under— they answer is so far it is being kept under review. the they answer is so far it is being kept under review.— they answer is so far it is being kept under review. the jcvi didn't absolutely recommend _ kept under review. the jcvi didn't absolutely recommend absolutelyj kept under review. the jcvi didn't - absolutely recommend absolutely that 12 to 15—year—olds should be having on the jab. emma says, why did the chief medical officer go against that advice? the chief medical officer go against that advice?— chief medical officer go against that advice? . ., ., , that advice? the jcvi did not advise not to vaccinate _ that advice? the jcvi did not advise not to vaccinate 12 _ that advice? the jcvi did not advise not to vaccinate 12 to _ that advice? the jcvi did not advise not to vaccinate 12 to 15-year-olds, | not to vaccinate 12 to 15—year—olds, and the _ not to vaccinate 12 to 15—year—olds, and the mhr i had of course licensed the pfizer— and the mhr i had of course licensed the pfizer vaccine for 12 to 15—year—olds and deemed it to be safe and — 15—year—olds and deemed it to be safe and effective. the jcvi said, it is not— safe and effective. the jcvi said, it is not in— safe and effective. the jcvi said, it is not in our remit, it is not the— it is not in our remit, it is not the territory _ it is not in our remit, it is not the territory we usually consider. to advise — the territory we usually consider. to advise on things like educational benefits _ to advise on things like educational benefits. that's why we are passing the decision over to the chief medical— the decision over to the chief medical officers of the uk, who have them _ medical officers of the uk, who have them taken — medical officers of the uk, who have them taken their own advice and arrived _ them taken their own advice and arrived at — them taken their own advice and arrived at that conclusion. so it isn't _ arrived at that conclusion. so it isn't right— arrived at that conclusion. so it isn't right to say that the jcvi
8:50 am
recommended against it, they absolutely did not. they said, we can take — absolutely did not. they said, we can take this decision based on the competence and the make—up of our committee _ competence and the make—up of our committee this far and at that point we have _ committee this far and at that point we have to — committee this far and at that point we have to hand it over. these are extraordinary times and the jcvi has never— extraordinary times and the jcvi has never had _ extraordinary times and the jcvi has never had to work in this space to this extent — never had to work in this space to this extent ever before. i never had to work in this space to this extent ever before._ never had to work in this space to this extent ever before. i wonder if the are this extent ever before. i wonder if they are also _ this extent ever before. i wonder if they are also now— this extent ever before. i wonder if they are also now considering - this extent ever before. i wonder if they are also now considering this| they are also now considering this one, the vaccination for younger age groups. hazel has asked, what plans are there to vaccinate younger children? in our experience, younger children? in our experience, younger children are carrying covert even if they are not ill and passing it on to their teachers. the carrying covid. in the united states they have approved the vaccine for five to 11—year—olds so is thejcvi considering that? i to 11-year-olds so is the jcvi considering that?— to 11-year-olds so is the jcvi considering that? to 11-year-olds so is the jcvi considerint that? ,. ., ,, considering that? i saw that the us had recommended _ considering that? i saw that the us had recommended it _ considering that? i saw that the us had recommended it this _ considering that? i saw that the us had recommended it this morning. | considering that? i saw that the us i had recommended it this morning. so, had recommended it this morning. 50, the us— had recommended it this morning. 50, the us are _ had recommended it this morning. 50, the us are in _ had recommended it this morning. 50, the us are in a different position to us _ the us are in a different position to us they— the us are in a different position to us. they have a vaccine which is licensed _ to us. they have a vaccine which is licensed in — to us. they have a vaccine which is licensed in a — to us. they have a vaccine which is licensed in a five to 11—year—olds, we do _ licensed in a five to 11—year—olds, we do not —
8:51 am
licensed in a five to 11—year—olds, we do not i— licensed in a five to 11—year—olds, we do not. i would anticipate, but don't _ we do not. i would anticipate, but don't know. — we do not. i would anticipate, but don't know, that the manufacturer pfizer— don't know, that the manufacturer pfizer may— don't know, that the manufacturer pfizer may well file in europe and the uk _ pfizer may well file in europe and the uk in — pfizer may well file in europe and the uk in the next few months. but that's— the uk in the next few months. but that's not— the uk in the next few months. but that's not a — the uk in the next few months. but that's not a matter that i can influence _ that's not a matter that i can influence in any way. it's up to the manufacturers. and then come at that point. _ manufacturers. and then come at that point, where _ manufacturers. and then come at that point, where it's to be the case that— point, where it's to be the case that the — point, where it's to be the case that the vaccine became licensed in a five _ that the vaccine became licensed in a five to— that the vaccine became licensed in a five to 11—year—olds, there would need _ a five to 11—year—olds, there would need to— a five to 11—year—olds, there would need to be — a five to 11—year—olds, there would need to be a — a five to 11—year—olds, there would need to be a jcvi consideration at this point— need to be a jcvi consideration at this point is. need to be a jcvi consideration at this point is— this point is. sorry, i'm confused... _ this point is. sorry, i'm confused... sorry, - this point is. sorry, i'm confused... sorry, i- this point is. sorry, i'm i confused... sorry, i need this point is. sorry, i'm - confused... sorry, i need to this point is. sorry, i'm _ confused... sorry, i need to finish. if ou confused... sorry, i need to finish. if you don't — confused... sorry, i need to finish. if you don't mind. _ confused... sorry, i need to finish. if you don't mind. that _ confused... sorry, i need to finish. if you don't mind. that decision i confused... sorry, i need to finish. if you don't mind. that decision is | if you don't mind. that decision is some _ if you don't mind. that decision is some way— if you don't mind. that decision is some way down the tracks. the big priority— some way down the tracks. the big priority is— some way down the tracks. the big priority is actually the priority who _ priority is actually the priority who need the boosters. the partially vaccinated. — who need the boosters. the partially vaccinated, and the unvaccinated adults _ vaccinated, and the unvaccinated adults. , ., ., adults. jcvi will get to that in due course. understood, _ adults. jcvi will get to that in due course. understood, fine. - adults. jcvi will get to that in due course. understood, fine. i- adults. jcvi will get to that in due course. understood, fine. i know| adults. jcvi will get to that in due l course. understood, fine. i know it is a 5 million person gap in terms of unvaccinated people in this country which is why i understand you are keen to advertise that. it
8:52 am
would surprise me if thejcvi were not even considering it at this stage, even if there has not been a technical process to get it licensed in this country. i’m technical process to get it licensed in this country-— in this country. i'm so jcvi will be considering _ in this country. i'm so jcvi will be considering it _ in this country. i'm so jcvi will be considering it but _ in this country. i'm so jcvi will be considering it but what _ in this country. i'm so jcvi will be considering it but what they i in this country. i'm so jcvi will be considering it but what they need | in this country. i'm so jcvi will be i considering it but what they need to do first— considering it but what they need to do first of— considering it but what they need to do first of all is finished their deliberations over, for example, 16 to 17—year—olds, and they need to find time — to 17—year—olds, and they need to find time to— to 17—year—olds, and they need to find time to study and monitor the effect _ find time to study and monitor the effect of— find time to study and monitor the effect of the booster programme and determine _ effect of the booster programme and determine whether that is that the film determine whether that is that the right stage and if it needs to go any further. 50 there are lots of decisions — any further. 50 there are lots of decisions for the jcvi. any further. 50 there are lots of decisions forthejcvi. i'm any further. 50 there are lots of decisions for the jcvi. i'm trying to say— decisions for the jcvi. i'm trying to say to — decisions for the jcvi. i'm trying to say to you that this is one they will get _ to say to you that this is one they will get too — to say to you that this is one they will get too but i think they need to set— will get too but i think they need to set their own priority on when they— to set their own priority on when they look— to set their own priority on when they look at each of these decisions. and each one, you know, it's not— decisions. and each one, you know, it's not a _ decisions. and each one, you know, it's not a matter ofjust a couple of hours. — it's not a matter ofjust a couple of hours. its _ it's not a matter ofjust a couple of hours, its hours of study of the data _ of hours, its hours of study of the data and — of hours, its hours of study of the data and multiple meetings. it's a difficult _ data and multiple meetings. it's a difficult and painstaking and rightly — difficult and painstaking and rightly so, a very cautious process. you have _
8:53 am
rightly so, a very cautious process. you have covered lots of key information there in a lot of detail. but we have been either dated with questions so ijust want to rattle few rattle few few quickfire questions. because the infection rates are going up, i what is the implication for them to get the masks and social i distancing is mandatory? so, should we be making masks, face coverings, mandatory?— so, should we be making masks, face coverings, mandatory? whether things are mandated — coverings, mandatory? whether things are mandated and _ coverings, mandatory? whether things are mandated and made _ coverings, mandatory? whether things are mandated and made into _ coverings, mandatory? whether things are mandated and made into law- coverings, mandatory? whether things are mandated and made into law or i are mandated and made into law or not is _ are mandated and made into law or not is a _ are mandated and made into law or not is a matter for ministers, and not is a matter for ministers, and not a _ not is a matter for ministers, and not a matter— not is a matter for ministers, and not a matter for scientists. gk. can not a matter for scientists. ok. can we ask not a matter for scientists. can we ask about not a matterfor scientists. cit; can we ask about symptoms? not a matterfor scientists. ii. can we ask about symptoms? this not a matterfor scientists. ©ii. can we ask about symptoms? this comes up all the time. why haven't the symptoms on the government website been updated to reflect current research? people are still ignoring cold like symptoms which we know, this is from margaret on email, which no, we know they are prevalent with the delta variant. so why has the government not updated their advice on that? the
8:54 am
the government not updated their advice on that?— advice on that? the government definitely. _ advice on that? the government definitely, scientists _ advice on that? the government definitely, scientists definitely i definitely, scientists definitely keep— definitely, scientists definitely keep under review the symptoms that are the _ keep under review the symptoms that are the most predictive. we have looked _ are the most predictive. we have looked at — are the most predictive. we have looked at this several times over this yeah — looked at this several times over this year. and the answer always comes— this year. and the answer always comes back from the experts in that field, _ comes back from the experts in that field, that— comes back from the experts in that field, that the key features are the ones that— field, that the key features are the ones that we have already picked out as the _ ones that we have already picked out as the definition and that is what we are _ as the definition and that is what we are staying with for the moment. this question has come in from marie, lots of people asking similar things, how do we prevent a christmas lockdown?- things, how do we prevent a christmas lockdown? , . , christmas lockdown? so... christmas, and indeed all — christmas lockdown? so... christmas, and indeed all of _ christmas lockdown? so... christmas, and indeed all of the _ christmas lockdown? so... christmas, and indeed all of the kind _ christmas lockdown? so. .. christmas, and indeed all of the kind of— christmas lockdown? so... christmas, and indeed all of the kind of darker - and indeed all of the kind of darker winter— and indeed all of the kind of darker winter months, are potentially going to be problematic. and i think the things— to be problematic. and i think the things that are really going to determine this are, first of all, human— determine this are, first of all, human behaviours and caution. over the winter— human behaviours and caution. over the winter months but particularly in the _ the winter months but particularly in the next — the winter months but particularly in the next couple of months if you are talking — in the next couple of months if you are talking about christmas. so it's
8:55 am
how cautious we are. the next one is how cautious we are. the next one is how well— how cautious we are. the next one is how well the — how cautious we are. the next one is how well the vaccination programmes io how well the vaccination programmes -o in how well the vaccination programmes go in terms _ how well the vaccination programmes go in terms of, again, and i don't mind— go in terms of, again, and i don't mind repeating it, the booster. a partially— mind repeating it, the booster. a partially vaccinated coming up for a second _ partially vaccinated coming up for a second dose and unvaccinated people coming _ second dose and unvaccinated people coming to— second dose and unvaccinated people coming to be vaccinated. this offer is evergreen, it is open all the time — is evergreen, it is open all the time flu _ is evergreen, it is open all the time. flu vaccines, they are all really— time. flu vaccines, they are all really key— time. flu vaccines, they are all really key things that will put us in the _ really key things that will put us in the best place for winter. on top of that, _ in the best place for winter. on top of that, we — in the best place for winter. on top of that, we have to keep a weather eye on— of that, we have to keep a weather eye on the — of that, we have to keep a weather eye on the absence of new variant of concern _ eye on the absence of new variant of concern. that's something which is always— concern. that's something which is always out— concern. that's something which is always out there with this virus. something at the moment where there are not— something at the moment where there are not any— something at the moment where there are not any obvious concerns, but we have to _ are not any obvious concerns, but we have to accept that we cannot predict — have to accept that we cannot predict the future and we have to keep— predict the future and we have to keep very— predict the future and we have to keep very close eye on it. something we been following _ keep very close eye on it. something we been following a _ keep very close eye on it. something we been following a lot _ keep very close eye on it. something we been following a lot on _ keep very close eye on it. something we been following a lot on five - keep very close eye on it. something we been following a lot on five live l we been following a lot on five live is vaccination rates amongst professional footballers. there is is vaccination rates amongst professionalfootballers. there is a question here, footballers are seen
8:56 am
as role models, should they not be subject to mandatory vaccination to encourage others to do the same? you have already given us your thoughts on vaccines being mandatory in different settings. but how important is it for people who are high—profile to come out and say, i have been double vaccinated, to encourage others to do the same? nobody should be forced into a position— nobody should be forced into a position where they have got to reveal— position where they have got to reveal any data about their health if they— reveal any data about their health if they don't want to. i think it's entirely— if they don't want to. i think it's entirely 0k _ if they don't want to. i think it's entirely ok for people to make their own decisions about what they are prepared _ own decisions about what they are prepared to disclose in public or not _ prepared to disclose in public or not but— prepared to disclose in public or not but i— prepared to disclose in public or not. but i would say it is always very— not. but i would say it is always very helpful to understand, key influences, people who have big followings in society, to understand that they _ followings in society, to understand that they are on with us in terms of vaccination — that they are on with us in terms of vaccination for the winter. i encourage people who are in these
8:57 am
positions _ encourage people who are in these positions of influence come forwards and say, _ positions of influence come forwards and say, if— positions of influence come forwards and say, if they want to, that they support— and say, if they want to, that they support vaccines. it is entirely up to then — support vaccines. it is entirely up to them. ., ,,., support vaccines. it is entirely up to them. ., . . ~ ., to them. professor van-tam, i know ou love to them. professor van-tam, i know you love a — to them. professor van-tam, i know you love a football _ to them. professor van-tam, i know you love a football analogy. - you love a football analogy. briefly, give us your football metaphor for today, where are we, are we at half—time in the game? i know you played mostly earlier about the 70th _ know you played mostly earlier about the 70th minute, i was listening! —— played _ the 70th minute, i was listening! —— played nty— the 70th minute, i was listening! —— played my clit! i would say i would say we are in half or extra time _ i would say we are in half or extra time i_ i would say we are in half or extra time. i cannot predict it but i think— time. i cannot predict it but i think we _ time. i cannot predict it but i think we have got a few more months to come. _ think we have got a few more months to come. but— think we have got a few more months to come, but we will be in calmer waters— to come, but we will be in calmer waters try— to come, but we will be in calmer waters by spring. i think i was a spring, — waters by spring. i think i was a spring, yeah. untilthen, —— ithink iwill— spring, yeah. untilthen, —— ithink iwill say— spring, yeah. untilthen, —— ithink i will say spring. but until then,
8:58 am
caution, — i will say spring. but until then, caution, this is not over and vaccines— caution, this is not over and vaccines and boosters are really important _ vaccines and boosters are really important. thank you so much, professor— important. thank you so much, professor van—tam, important. thank you so much, professorvan—tam, it important. thank you so much, professor van—tam, it has been that 90 here _ professor van—tam, it has been that 90 here the — professor van—tam, it has been that 90 here the answers. -- professor van-tam, it has been that 90 here the answers.— 90 here the answers. -- it has been fascinating — 90 here the answers. -- it has been fascinating to _ 90 here the answers. -- it has been fascinating to hear _ 90 here the answers. -- it has been fascinating to hear your _ 90 here the answers. -- it has been fascinating to hear your answers. . 90 here the answers. -- it has been | fascinating to hear your answers. we have had so many questions. if you have had so many questions. if you have sent a question into us, thank you very much, sorry we could not get through all of them. we you very much, sorry we could not get through all of them.— get through all of them. we will continue the _ get through all of them. we will continue the conversation. - get through all of them. we will continue the conversation. in i get through all of them. we will| continue the conversation. in the next few minutes you will be talking to medical editor fergus walsh. downstairs on five live we will be continuing the conversation around covid and all of these measures we have been talking about with nicky campbell as well. the have been talking about with nicky campbell as well.— campbell as well. the key things that professor _ campbell as well. the key things that professor mcreddie - campbell as well. the key things that professor mcreddie had - campbell as well. the key things l that professor mcreddie had been talking about this morning, in terms of christmas, a lot of —— professor van—tam, he says it's about human behaviour, about how we behave between now and christmas, that will basically mean what is going to happen at christmas. and also he is
8:59 am
saying we are running hot early in the autumn season, talking about the nhs. but the autumn season, talking about the nhs. �* u, ., , the autumn season, talking about the nhs.�* ., ,_ nhs. but calmer waters by the s-rrin , nhs. but calmer waters by the spring. one — nhs. but calmer waters by the spring. one good _ nhs. but calmer waters by the spring, one good thing - nhs. but calmer waters by the spring, one good thing we - nhs. but calmer waters by the spring, one good thing we can| nhs. but calmer waters by the - spring, one good thing we can take away from this. thank you so much for being part of this today. it is cominr for being part of this today. it is coming op _ for being part of this today. it is coming up to — for being part of this today. it is coming up to 8:59am.
9:00 am
hello, good morning. this is bbc news with the latest headlines. rishi sunak will be outlining a plan at cop26 to stop companies investing in fossil fuels and push money into green energy technologies instead. in australia, 84—macro year old girl has been found alive and well in locked house. i said, "what's your name?" and she didn't answer. "what's your name? " she didn't answer again. so i asked her a third time and she looked at me and she said, "my name is cleo." the board of yorkshire county
9:01 am
cricket club

48 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on