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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 2, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm... world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. in other news — two metropolitan police officers are convicted of taking and sharing photos of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after the sisters were found murdered in north london. the officers are told
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to expect prison terms. the former presidents of world and european football are charged with fraud — over the unlawful transfer of more than two million dollars. mps are calling for the introduction of smart motorways to be paused — until the government can prove they�* re safe. bus stops and brawls on the campaign trail says america votes on who should run their schools. good evening and welcome to bbc news. on day two of the global climate summit in glasgow world leaders have reached two landmark agreements today affecting the future of the planet. more than 100 countries — led by the us and the eu — have launched a far—reaching
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initiative — to cut emissions of methane — a gas that's a major cause of global warming. the pledge is to cut emissions by 30 percent by the end of the decade — and if that's achieved — it could play a big part in limiting the rise in global warming to 1.5 degrees. earlier in the day — there was another significant pledge — to stop and reverse the process of deforestation — by 2030. the real breakthrough here is that brazil — where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been cut down — is among the 100 countries backing the pledge. and there's a separate initiative to cut carbon emissions — by boosting the use of clean technologies — in industries such as steel, road transport and agriculture. the summit in glasgow is widely seen as the last big opportunity to tackle further climate change — and its devastating consequences. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has been following the day's events here. when cultures clash, can they still agree? when there's so much difference, there can be descent.
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there are so many faces here in glasgow, so many facets of what could be done. are you pleased with what is happening this week? hollywood stars may campaign, but less developed countries may well complain. the united nations fears there's not enough trust to bridge the gaps, but deals are being made. 100 leaders signed a promise to stop the destruction of forests in nine years�* time. i'm confident that we can do this, all we need to do is to summon the will to do what we know is right and we know is necessary and is in our capacity. let's get to work, we can do this. even the leader of the free world can be hemmed in. president biden struggling to push through his green ambitions at home and borisjohnson�*s attention cast over offers many foreign leaders as possible. they will depart tonight leaving
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instructions with their negotiators. around 100 countries have already signed up to cut the potent greenhouse gas methane by nearly a third by the end of the decade. but away from the glitz of the main stage and down a quiet corridor in a tiny office — a sign ofjust how hard an overall agreement will be. chinese president xi isn't here, but one of the most powerful people you have never heard of is here in his place. chinese climate negotiator. my discussions with john kerry and alok sharma were very constructive, but there were still huge gaps. he criticised developed countries for not coming up with cash that promised to help the less wealthy go green and warned that focusing too much and limiting global warming to 1.5, degrees as borisjohnson wanted could destroy the consensus. i am cautiously optimistic i
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in the sense that on the way to the 620 in rome, i said to some of you on the plane if this - was a football match, _ then the current score would be 5—1 down in the match between humanity and climate change. _ and what you can say now after two days of talks with 120 world leadersi is that we have pulled back a goal |to and i think that we will be ablei to take this thing to extra time. what, or who, is going to score the extra two or three goals that you still need? if there's one thing that gives me confidence or optimism _ is that we are starting to create l for the countries that find it most difficult to transition . away from fossil fuels, we're starting to create those coalitions of support - to help them to move on. the first 48 hours
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here have been frantic. and today, there's been a flurry of promises that should hypothetically make a difference, but it's now that the hard bargaining really starts. remember, borisjohnson wants a deal that keeps global warning within safe limits, but here in glasgow right now, it's too early to be sure if that is within reach. they will likely be seeing clashes and arguments, different voices and different views. borisjohnson can be sure what booklet in glasgow. when it near the end of this summit, he returns. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, glasgow. the first deal reached today was on stopping and reversing the process of deforestation by the end of the decade. borisjohnson says protecting the rain forests in particular is essential if global warming is to be limited to 1.5 degrees. trees are vital to life on earth and they absorb around a third of all carbon dioxide or c02 emitted annually. but according to the united nations
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an estimated 28,000 square miles of forest are lost every year — that's equivalent to 36 football pitches every minute. brazil where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been cut down is among the countries backing the new pledge. the amazon dream — a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn't worried
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about the planet, he's worried about his family. his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting
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a losing battle. and about an hour's drive away, ritual destruction. every year vast areas are cleared by slashing and burning. the heat is building now and there is a falling in the air. no attempt has been made to hide this. it is at the side of a busy road. and when fires like this happen here it is not the work of nature, it is the work of man. in the global fight against climate change, this is one more loss. and here too, lost ground. more wild west than wild amazon. cattle farming is driven by global demand for brazilian beef and backed by president jair bolsonaro.
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henato hammos is a second—generation rancher. he says the forest is a living, not a fairy tale. but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she has spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples, or trying to.
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this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest.
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here with me now is dr stephanie wray who is the founder of nature positive. thanks forjoining us. how significant is this agreement given we've had something similar before that wasn't implemented? absolutely. it is significant. _ that wasn't implemented? absolutely. it is significant. it's _ that wasn't implemented? absolutely. it is significant. it's really _ it is significant. it's really significant that brazil had signed up significant that brazil had signed up to this, being one of the countries that we really need to get on the side in this fight. however, it... it doesn't go far enough, it's not soon enough and it hasn't got enough teeth. not soon enough and it hasn't got enough teeth-— not soon enough and it hasn't got enou:h teeth. , ., , ., ,. enough teeth. exactly how is anyone auoin to enough teeth. exactly how is anyone going to police _ enough teeth. exactly how is anyone going to police any _ enough teeth. exactly how is anyone going to police any of _ enough teeth. exactly how is anyone going to police any of this _ going to police any of this happening including in brazil? it’s happening including in brazil? it's ve happening including in brazil? it�*s very difficult to police but more than that, we are putting the emphasis on the wrong place. we are suggesting that it is all around policing in brazil and indonesia and putting the emphasis on two subsistence farmers in some cases. where is what we need to be doing as
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the wealthy western nations is actually creatively destroying the market for forest risk commodity and moving to a sustainable business model. ~ ., ., , ., moving to a sustainable business model. ., ., , ., ., , moving to a sustainable business model. ., ., ., model. what does that actually mean that everybody _ model. what does that actually mean that everybody has _ model. what does that actually mean that everybody has to _ model. what does that actually mean that everybody has to stop _ model. what does that actually mean that everybody has to stop doing? . model. what does that actually mean that everybody has to stop doing? it | that everybody has to stop doing? it needs huge global collaborations. i'm not suggesting that it's easy and i'm not suggesting that we could alljust and i'm not suggesting that we could all just stop and i'm not suggesting that we could alljust stop using these commodities tomorrow. but we could move from a business model that relies on deforestation to something that at least delivers no net loss of forest even if was still losing some far as we can start rear forcing on a massive scale. much bi aer forcing on a massive scale. much bigger than _ forcing on a massive scale. much bigger than proposed. _ forcing on a massive scale. much bigger than proposed. does - forcing on a massive scale. much bigger than proposed. does that mean people should start or stop eating south american beforejerry? that people should start or stop eating south american before jerry? that is one of the choices _ south american before jerry? that is one of the choices that _ south american before jerry? that is one of the choices that consumers i one of the choices that consumers need to think about. when we are making these decisions about what we buy and what we eat, we need to weigh up whether you really should be able to buy a burger for 99p or a
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t—shirt for 99p. in way that up against whether we are leaving a planet that is survivable for children and grandchildren. just exlain children and grandchildren. just exoiain the _ children and grandchildren. just explain the link between eating a cheeseburger and what's going on in the amazon. if cheeseburger and what's going on in the amazon-— the amazon. if you are eating these commodity products _ the amazon. if you are eating these commodity products that _ the amazon. if you are eating these commodity products that very - the amazon. if you are eating these l commodity products that very cheaply produced it means that somewhere there are costs that haven't been taken into account. because we can't really generate those things at those prices unless somebody is taking a hit. and that somebody is normally a badly paid worker in a tropical part of the world and it's usually the planet. because traditionally the impacts on the planet have been seen as externalities, the knot on anybody�*s balance sheet so we don't us to think about them. we had a report earlier published by the treasury thatis earlier published by the treasury that is going to review that shows we can't continue that kind of unsustainable approach to our economy and we need people to act on that as though the climate were a
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factor that you have to take into an account, that you had to consider the monetary value of the earths resources that you use. and then decisions that are made by businesses and in dependent consumers would be radically different was upjust consumers would be radically different was up just to clarify the point between the link between stuff that people are consuming in the rain forest. it’s that people are consuming in the rain forest-— rain forest. it's because of the urowth rain forest. it's because of the growth of _ rain forest. it's because of the growth of soy _ rain forest. it's because of the growth of soy for _ rain forest. it's because of the growth of soy for example - rain forest. it's because of the | growth of soy for example that rain forest. it's because of the - growth of soy for example that feeds the cattle and that's part of what's going on with deforestation. most deforestation is driven by eight basic commodities or things like beef, leather, soy, palm oil, cocoa, timberand beef, leather, soy, palm oil, cocoa, timber and pulp products that rise from timber. those are the commodities that are really driving the rainforest to be cleared to plant crops as we clear them not only are we losing the biodiversity but we are losing the impact that they have on controlling our climate. we will see how our consumer choices change in coming days, months, years was up thank
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you very much. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are james moore who is the chief business commentator at the independent and annabel denham, who is the director of communications at the iea. the headlines on bbc news... world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. in other news: convicted of taking and sharing pictures of two murdered sisters. two met police officers, are told to expectjail terms. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre.
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good evening. we start with football and the champions league — defending champions chelsea have beaten swedish side malmo1—0. after being frustrated in the first half, the blues went ahead when callum hudson—0doi picked out hakim ziyech to finish. malmo didn't manage a single shot on target. chelsea now have nine points from four matches in group h. manchester united are also in action. they face a tough test against serie a side atalanta. around 15 minutes gone in italy, and united have gone a goal down. the and united have gone a goal down. ball fall to the he the ball fall to the end of the box he fired at home so it is 1—0. antonio conte says he's extremely happy to return to coaching and can't wait to start working with the tottenham players — after he was confirmed as the club's new manager, just a day after the sacking of nuno espirito santo. the former chelsea and inter milan
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manager has signed a deal until the summer of 2023. he's already been out on the training pitch meeting the players this afternoon. his first game in charge will be at home to dutch side vitesse arnhem in the europa conference league on thursday. mpjulian knight, the chair of the dcms, has called on the board of yorkshire county cricket club to resign after a leaked report emerged apparently containing details of the investigation into the treatment of former player azeem rafiq. a story published by espn says the report had concluded that a racially offensive term used towards rafiq was regarded as "ba nter". the club says it will not take disciplinary action against any player, employee or executive over the harassment. the ecb has begun its own investigation and a spokesperson said: "we are sorry that, as a sport, this has not yet been resolved." to the men's t20 world cup now where pakistan have secured their place in the semi—finals after beating namibia by 45 runs. while south africa beat bangladesh by six wickets
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to strengthen their hopes of making the final four — which also means england must wait to have their place in the semi—finals confirmed. patrick gearey reports. from the outside looking in south africa seemed united. the arms of the link, the knees are bent. quentin dukakis included withjust a week ago he definitely wasn't. now they have momentum. rabada speed, hendrixjust they have momentum. rabada speed, hendrix just about held on they have momentum. rabada speed, hendrixjust about held on here, bangladesh couldn't. 24—3 became 34-5. bangladesh couldn't. 24—3 became 311—5. they are superman is injured and no one was able to put on his cloak. nokia finish the job, bangladesh 84 all out. they knew it wasn't enough. that didn't stop south africa momentarily losing their grip. mark rooms a runaway bat might�*ve dismissed him it the next ball it was nick, wicked, south africa three down. time for some
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leadership. didn't release the pressure reaching the semifinals it might depend on net run rate. that means winning quickly. south there with six overs to spare. for bangladesh this tournament has all been a blur. ford namibia it might feel like a hazy dream, few expected them to be involved alongside the best teams in the world. like pakistan who after a slow start took things up several notches. thanks largely to rizwan, he smashed 79, 24 of them from the last over alone. that meant namibia needed a mountain is 190 to win. their truck still do not assume that rocky. it'll be easy to give up when the summit is out of sight but namibia kept kleiman to give abu dhabi to remember them by. pakistan are into the last four though mathematically emphatically. wales captain alun wynjones is out of this weekend's test against the all blacks due
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to a shoulder injury. the 36 year old left the field early in last saturday's 54—16 defeat to new zealand in cardiff, while ross moriarty is also out with a shoulder issue, as the welsh look to bounce back against the world's number one ranked team. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. manchester united against atalanta and chelsea go to the bbc sport website. as we just heard, the former fifa president, sepp blatter and the former head of uefa, michel platini have both been charged with fraud by swiss prosecutors. the trial could begin in months. both deny any wrongdoing. let's speak now to the guardian journalist and author of the book the fall of the house of fifa, david conn. but you make of these latest developments?— but you make of these latest develoments? , , ., ., . developments? very, very dramatic, very serious- —
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developments? very, very dramatic, very serious. it's _ developments? very, very dramatic, very serious. it's been _ developments? very, very dramatic, very serious. it's been a _ developments? very, very dramatic, very serious. it's been a six-year- very serious. it's been a six—year saga sense this payment of 2 million swiss francs from fever under presidency of blatter when he was the president of uefa was up it was revealed in 2015 and both men have served a long banned from football for breaches for the ethics code that the payment was found to represent. but this has been a very long investigation by the swiss attorney general. and it still is a very dramatic and very serious moment for them to face these criminal charges in the list of criminal charges in the list of criminal two is really quite severe. you were involved in breaking the story originally, why was it taking so long? story originally, why was it taking so lona ? . , story originally, why was it taking so lona ? ., , , story originally, why was it taking so lon? , so long? there has been some criticism of _ so long? there has been some criticism of the _ so long? there has been some criticism of the swiss - so long? there has been some criticism of the swiss attorney | criticism of the swiss attorney general that is taken so long. when
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it seems like a relatively straightforward payment of which the main factors are is platini in 2010 was the president of uefa and he sentin was the president of uefa and he sent in an invoice to fisa for 2 million swiss francs saying it was extra money that had been promised where he used to work for fifa. from 1980 to 2002. so work got finished eight years before he said he was 02 million swiss francs. but that amount is not included in any contracts they had at fifa. and platini has said to have had an oral agreement with fifa to have this extra money amounting to 2 million swiss francs that he invoice for eight years later. the swiss attorney general after six years of investigation, his charge both blatter and the president fifa at
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the time with charges of fraud, criminal mismanagement and even forgery of a document. and said that the payment had no legal basis, that's the allegation. as you said in your introduction, both men despite having failed in every defence that they've made in the football processes and bands and football processes and bands and football they still do maintain their innocence and that they don't believe there was anything improper. given charges, important to say that they are denying any wrongdoing on their part, both maintaining their innocence throughout the last six years. just finally, what are the next steps, how long is going to take now to come to court? i don't think, we take now to come to court? i don't think. we don't _ take now to come to court? i don't think, we don't get _ take now to come to court? i don't think, we don't get clear _ take now to come to court? i don't think, we don't get clear dates - take now to come to court? i don't think, we don't get clear dates for| think, we don't get clear dates for how long these things take. but certainly now that they are actually
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charged is not good take another six years for this to be resolved. and blatter is well into his 80s now. i'm sure the swiss authorities are intending to try to address the criticism that it has been slow and at least see it to court before too long. many thanks. two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters, who were found stabbed to death in a park in london. pc deninaffer and pcjamie lewis, who'd been assigned to guarding the crime scene, distributed the images of bibaa henry and nicole smallman injune last year. helena wilkinson has this report from the old bailey. this is one of the last photos of bibaa henry on the left and nicole smallman. hours after it was taken, they were murdered. last week mina smallman saw her daughters' killer sentenced for his crimes. today, she was back again
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at the same court having to endure yet more unimaginable pain. it may sound really ridiculous that this case has brought us to even more anxiety today. it is the most nervous but i felt doing any interview and i think because it was the final straw. these two officers were meant to be guarding the area where her daughters' bodies were found. pc deninaffer, on the left, and pcjamie lewis. but despite their orders, the two officers then breached the crime scene cordon and took photographs of the bodies which they then shared on whatsapp. one of the images was then edited by lewis, who superimposed his own face onto the picture with the victims in the background. today they appeared together in the dock.
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guilty, they both said, to one count of misconduct in a public office. in a statement, the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick said... 0utside court, the independent office for police conduct said there was no place in policing for this behaviour and it had to stop. a culture where some officers don't see anything wrong with sharing deeply offensive messages and where others feel unable or unwilling to challenge, has to change and it has to change now. the two officers who took and shared pictures of the sisters' bodies will be sentenced next month. the judge told them to expect prison sentences. helen wilkinson, bbc
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news, at the old bailey. more than 20 people have been killed and and dozens injured in an attack on afghanistan's biggest military hospital. two explosions were heard at the gate to the hospital in kabul. no—one has admitted carrying out the attack but the taliban has blamed islamic state fighters. at least 15 people are now known to have been killed when an apartment block which was under construction collapsed on monday in the nigerian city of lagos. the authorities say they have put the architect of the building on indefinite suspension. rescuers are preparing to work through a second night in search of survivors. so far only nine people have been rescued. now it's time for a look at the weather. good evening. today turned into a fairly bright but rather chilly autumn day with a mix of sunshine and showers in most places. the showers were most plentiful around the coasts, but one or 2 did creep
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further inlands towards the eastern side of england. and as we head through this evening and overnight, we will continue to see 1—2 showers, particularly around the coasts. inland spots will turn a largely dry and it'll be another rather chilly night — temperatures in parts of southern england could drop to just below freezing, with a touch of frost and some fog patches likely across parts of england and east wales in particular. so into tomorrow, it's another sunshine—and—showers day — many of the showers focusing in around the coasts, but some are likely to drift across northern england, down into the midlands and parts of east anglia. temperatures will struggle, 8—12 celsius at best, and it will be a bit breezier than it was today. as we head towards the end of the week, things will slowly but surely turn a bit milder. there will be fewer showers, but more in the way of cloud. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... world leaders have agreed
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a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. in other news — two metropolitan police officers are convicted of taking and sharing photos of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after the sisters were found murdered in north london. the officers are told to expect prison terms. the former presidents of world and european football — sepp blatter and michel platini are charged with fraud — over the unlawful transfer of more than two million dollars. let's return to the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow. this afternoon, borisjohnson admitted there is "still a very long way to go" in tackling climate
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change, but said he was "cautiously optimistic". speaking at a news conference, the prime minister warned world leaders not to think that the job was done. the bbc�*s political editor, laura kuenssberg asked the prime minister what extra steps developed countries will have to take to help developing countries tackle the climate crisis the issues remain very difficult. we have seen some big moves on tackling deforestation, i have talked about, i think, the indian move on decarbonising their power system, getting towards renewables in the way that they are pledging to do is huge and terrific. i think that the commitment that japan made and cash, the $10,000,000 over five years, that is big money, and i will make —— the $10,000,000 over five years, that is big
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money, and that will make a big difference and to me you know, engendering that confidence. but i think the crucial thing that is really happening, if there is one thing that starts to give me confidence or optimism anyway, it is that we are starting to create for the countries that find it the most difficult to transition away from fossil fuels — we are starting to create those coalitions of support to help them to move on. so to help south africa in his vision. several countries, including the uk, are now working to supply eight and a half billion dollars to help accelerate that transition away from that, help decarbonise the south african economy in a major way. and we are starting to see that kind of approach taken around the world in some of the countries that find it most difficult. i have told you, i was at paris, and i remember what it was like. we had this great sense
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that we had agreed this thing that we were going to try and cut c02 together, but it was also a slightly floaty feeling because we didn't know how on earth we were going to do it. and there was no road map, there was no very clear sense of how you could do that. i think what you're starting to see here at cop26 in glasgow is a sense of how actually you can deliver those cuts in co2. speaking in the last hour, president biden praised the accomplishments made in the last two days. however, he criticised the leaders of both china and russia — two of the world's biggest emitters of carbon for �*waking away�* from the cop26 summit in glasgow. look, i mean this sincerely, i think it's presumptuous for me to say, or talk for another leader, but the fact that china trying to assert, understandably, a new role in the world as a world leader, not showing up, come on. the single most
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important thing that has got the attention of the world is climate. everywhere. from iceland to australia, i mean, itjust as a gigantic issue, and they walked away. how do you do that and claim to be able to have any leadership in? the same with vladimir putin and russia. his tundra is burning. literally, the tundra is burning. he has serious, serious climate problems, and he is mum on the willingness to do anything. as we've heard, one of the significant deals approved today by more than 100 countries — is a pledge to cut emissions of methane gas — a major contributor to global warming. the plan is to cut emissions by nearly a third by 2030. less encouraging is that three of the countries responsible for the highest level of emissions — russia, china and india — are not part of this agreement.
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0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has the details. from emissions from cows to rubbish rotting in landfill sites and flares from oil and gas, methane is escaping into the atmosphere. but today, more than 100 countries agreed to cut the gas by 30% in a deal brokered by the united states and the eu. we have to cut emissions first. and methane is one of the glasses we can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow down climate change. methane is an important greenhouse gas, making up about 20% of global emissions. it's extremely potent and has caused about 50% of current global warming. cutting all methane by a third by 2030 would reduce global temperatures by about .3 degrees by 2040. tackling methane from the oil and gas industry will be a priority.
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the easiest way to reduce emissions is to plug any leaks. you can't see methane unless you use a special camera like this one. it's a colourless, odourless gas. but because it doesn't last for very long in the atmosphere, if you cut methane emissions now, you make a big difference fast. it's why reducing methane is seen as one of the easier climate fixes. but there will be challenges. agriculture, including rice production, is one of the biggest emitters of methane. solving that will be much harder. the countries who've signed up to this deal account for about half of global methane emissions. but there are some notable absences — namely china, russia and india — who haven't come on board. to achieve this 30% global target, we will need them to step up. but having more than 100 countries on board, including some of the largest emitters, and covering the vast majority of globally traded natural
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gas is a very big deal. this shows the levels of methane being released all around our planet. now, for the first time, there's a target to cut the greenhouse gas. at a conference trying to stop temperatures from rising above safe limits, this is a significant step for the world. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. joining me now is euan nisbet, who is a professor of earth sciences at royal holloway, university of london. thank you forjoining us. how significant is this deal today do you think? i significant is this deal today do ou think? ~ significant is this deal today do you think?— significant is this deal today do ou think? ~ �* , , you think? i think it's extremely aood you think? i think it's extremely good news- _ you think? i think it's extremely good news. it's— you think? i think it's extremely good news. it's doable, - you think? i think it's extremely good news. it's doable, it - you think? i think it's extremely good news. it's doable, it can i you think? i think it's extremely| good news. it's doable, it can be done pretty quickly. it also involves tropical nations because they can do a lot to buy things like covering landfills. so it's notjust gas. gas leaks are the obvious ones, emissions from coal mines and slow on are important. i'm pleased with the deal at south africa to help it
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remove its coal industry. it is very doable, and it's something that should have been addressed years ago. it's one of the things that actually makes the paris agreement perhaps look possible, but i should warn you that since the paris agreement, the gas that is furthest that's furthest out of compliance of expectation is nothing, so we really need to do this. we expectation is nothing, so we really need to do this.— expectation is nothing, so we really need to do this. we are hearing that china, need to do this. we are hearing that china. india. — need to do this. we are hearing that china, india, russia— need to do this. we are hearing that china, india, russia have _ need to do this. we are hearing that china, india, russia have not - need to do this. we are hearing that china, india, russia have not signed up china, india, russia have not signed up to this. if rice is a big factor, china and india in particular are massive rice producers and consumers. is about 600,000,000 tonnes a year of methane emitted and about 250,000,000 tonnes comes from natural sources. about 250,000,000 tonnes comes from naturalsources. rice about 250,000,000 tonnes comes from natural sources. rice is a relatively small source. the big ones, gas leaks and call nine emissions, and agricultural sources are pretty big, and that is tough because of the role of pastor agricultural in the tropics in particular, but then there are
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things like landfills where we can do a lot about, so the gas industry is easy to do, a lot of the gas is just waste. it's far better to burn it and turn it into electricity than just waste it in the air. equipment has got so much better in the last few years. we can finally find these leaks few years. we can finally find these lea ., , ., ., leaks and we should find them and we should fix them. _ leaks and we should find them and we should fix them. it _ leaks and we should find them and we should fix them. it is _ leaks and we should find them and we should fix them. it is quite _ leaks and we should find them and we should fix them. it is quite doable. . should fix them. it is quite doable. it is a very good initiative. um? should fix them. it is quite doable. it is a very good initiative.- it is a very good initiative. why is this seen as _ it is a very good initiative. why is this seen as only _ it is a very good initiative. why is this seen as only a _ it is a very good initiative. why is this seen as only a short-term i it is a very good initiative. why is i this seen as only a short-term fix? this seen as only a short—term fix? because methane is in the air with an atmospheric lifetime of 9— ten years. it's a very important short—term fix. 0ver years. it's a very important short—term fix. over the centuries, it's c02 that is the big problem, but at least they are doing something about methane, and it's a completely different gas, it also has big impact on air pollution. the other thing about methane, we can do something quickly and now, and then
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we have to hit the carbon dioxide targets also, but at least it gives us helped on the way. individuals at home or thinking _ us helped on the way. individuals at home or thinking what _ us helped on the way. individuals at home or thinking what can - us helped on the way. individuals at home or thinking what can they - us helped on the way. individuals at home or thinking what can they do. | home or thinking what can they do. what can ordinary mortals deal. well, there are a lot of things across the planet. if you are thinking about britain itself, it's actually got an extremely good record of reducing its landfill emissions, which were very large and have come down a lot. britain now needs to fix its gas leak emissions, and then eventually, my personal hope is that we will move away from gas at least for domesticating, and maybe put some fibres down those pipes that go to every house or electricity or something and leave gas completely for a domestic heating. there is a suggestion of putting hydrogen into the gas pipes, but concerned about that because action has also it's an indirect
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greenhouse gas, so i think we can move away from that. globally, though, fixing gas leaks all over the world is something that i think the world is something that i think the industry will be very committed to doing anyway. fik. and we look to doing anyway. 0k. and we look over landfills in the tropics where there are huge landfills, shovelling soil on a landfill is all you need to do. i wish india would come and join becausejust to do. i wish india would come and join because just covering those landfills, you will make the city so much nicer. landfills, you will make the city so much nicer-— much nicer. professor, thank you very much _ much nicer. professor, thank you very much indeed _ much nicer. professor, thank you very much indeed for— much nicer. professor, thank you very much indeed for explaining l much nicer. professor, thank you| very much indeed for explaining a bit about the methane question. many thanks for your time. thank you. if you'd like to keep up—to—date with everything going on, do go to our website. there is a huge amount there that is being constantly updated on what is coming out of cop26. other news now. investigators say "low adhesion" between the track and train wheels was the most likely
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cause of the crash between two trains in salisbury. the trains collided on the approach to a tunnel near salisbury station on sunday. one of the drivers is believed to have suffered "life—changing" injuries. both chains are in the tunnel where they came to rest. we had the latest preliminary findings. this is the picture of events that we know. the great western train from port smith approached the tunnel on a curve from the south. approaching from the east, the southwestern train from london. it passed two signals at danger, one yellow and one bread. now, as the great western train crossed the junction in front of the tunnel, it was struck by the southwestern service in the middle. the force of the impact caused both trains to come off the rails and where then forest into the tunnel together. so, the main focus now is
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why the southwestern service failed to stop at the red light signal. initial evidence indicates that the southwestern train driver applied the brakes as it approached the junction, but the train was unable to stop before passing the signal. this evidence also suggests that the most likely because of this was wheel slide, almost a result between the adhesion of the train wheels and the adhesion of the train wheels and the track. we are continuing to pursue this line of investigation amongst a number of others. the driver of the _ amongst a number of others. the driver of the southwestern train is stale and has his injuries are not thought to be as serious as first feared, but today's findings also suggest he did try to stop the train. the weather had been poor, and with it being autumn, there were leaves on the line, making it slippery. the driver did all he was expected to do by the pub, braked at the appropriate moment, but his
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train slid along the rails because of the rail had conditions we get particularly in autumn, where the moistness on the leaves causes a problem. the next stage for network rail is to clear the wreckage so any track repairs can be carried out. we then track repairs can be carried out. - then need to move the chains, they will be pulled out of the tunnel and we think that they will be lifted away by a road crane and then taken away by a road crane and then taken away from the site, that will allow our teams to get access, relay the track and repair the signalling, make sure it's safe before we reopen the railway. make sure it's safe before we reopen the railwa . , make sure it's safe before we reopen the railway-— the railway. these are 'ust the initial findings h the railway. these are 'ust the initial findings from h the railway. these are just the initial findings from the - the railway. these are just the initial findings from the rail. initial findings from the rail accident investigation branch. their work is ongoing and may yet reveal more. it might also need changes in the way our railways operate to ensure a crash like this cannot happen again. we cannot speak to nigel, the manager of rail editing magazine who east dug next on their
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part. joining us from lincolnshire this evening. rather alarming, part. joining us from lincolnshire this evening. ratheralarming, isn't it, to hear that that train could slide off, it seems to me because of leaves on the line.— leaves on the line. well, not to rally people — leaves on the line. well, not to rally people it's _ leaves on the line. well, not to rally people it's not. _ leaves on the line. well, not to rally people it's not. la - leaves on the line. well, not to rally people it's not. la people| rally people it's not. la people have been warning about this for many years and have taken action to stop it, but it's often presented in the media, i have to say, is a bit of a joke and an excuse. that shows how very serious this problem is. what should be done about it? should trees be cleared away from railway lines? ~ , ,., , trees be cleared away from railway lines? ~ , g trees be cleared away from railway lines? �* , g ., ., trees be cleared away from railway lines? ~ , g ., ., lines? absolutely. my magazine has been campaigning — lines? absolutely. my magazine has been campaigning for— lines? absolutely. my magazine has been campaigning for years - lines? absolutely. my magazine has been campaigning for years about i been campaigning for years about this that there should be no trees at all between the boundary fence is on railway property because it is a leaf all, it's a real danger. it also stops driver is seeing the signals and as we have seen this last weekend both at east and west coast mainlines, they were blocked by falling trees. such a relatively straightforward problem to solve, but whenever network rail tries to
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solve it, it is a massive environmental protest by line ciders, by the woodland trust, trees have no place by the side of the railway in the same way that you don't see them by the sides of runways at airports, for example, they are completely out of place there. ~ ., , .., ., ., they are completely out of place there. ~ ., , ., ., , there. wetmore is coming out of this investigation — there. wetmore is coming out of this investigation and _ there. wetmore is coming out of this investigation and what _ there. wetmore is coming out of this investigation and what further - investigation and what further questions need to be asked, do you think? 0n questions need to be asked, do you think? on that point, if i could just correct one important point from your report which said that two signals had been passed at danger and a yellow signal was described as and a yellow signal was described as a danger signal, and a yellow signal was described as a dangersignal, it and a yellow signal was described as a danger signal, it isn't. i and a yellow signal was described as a danger signal, it isn't.— a danger signal, it isn't. i gaze up du: a a danger signal, it isn't. i gaze up dug a gala — a danger signal, it isn't. i gaze up dug a gala signal _ a danger signal, it isn't. i gaze up dug a gala signal warns _ a danger signal, it isn't. i gaze up dug a gala signal warns the - a danger signal, it isn't. i gaze up dug a gala signal warns the driverj dug a gala signal warns the driver that the next signal is read, and given that passing a signal at danger is the worst thing a driver can do, it's important that we understand that. the adhesion problems are very serious. there are plenty of principles in place about defensive driving. it would seem that what we know from the moment is that what we know from the moment is that this driver was doing all that he could within the rules and within
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the procedures to drive safely when he put the brakes on, his train sled. and this is a big problem in 2012. i train sled for two and a half miles 60mph. it is an issue. the railway will look at this it's like driving your car on black ice. 0ne like driving your car on black ice. one of the anything he can do is drive slower. that the railways will be cut a bit of slack that slower trains on slippery rails are a result of this. it is a real problem. it certainly that trees man —— on the line needs addressing. if you look at that picture that i think you used in your reports and i cannot see it at the minute committee showed that tunnel mouth, it is surrounded by trees overhanging trees. 30 years ago, they were not there. there is an issue there, which is a very serious issue, because rather than handling the problem, it would be good to
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stop at. innate the problem, it would be good to sto at. ~ . ., , the problem, it would be good to sto. at_ . ., ., , ., , stop at. we are many, many while -- there are many. _ stop at. we are many, many while -- there are many, many _ stop at. we are many, many while -- there are many, many miles - stop at. we are many, many while -- there are many, many miles of- there are many, many miles of railway lines with trees potentially to clear, who is checking and how often are they checked, as we head into winter, people are going to be at that worried. innate into winter, people are going to be at that worried.— at that worried. we have 11,000 miles of network, _ at that worried. we have 11,000 miles of network, which - at that worried. we have 11,000 miles of network, which means | at that worried. we have 11,000 i miles of network, which means we at that worried. we have 11,000 - miles of network, which means we had 22,000 miles of tracks from land's 22,000 miles of tracks from lands end to find meth, yarmouth, all of the country. network row monitors this very closely and has got a vegetation policy. it does cleared the lines quite comprehensively on a progressive basis, but it takes time. he instant the chainsaw is started, there are objections, the woodland trust a couple of years ago was urging campaigns with legal actions against network rail for clearing trees. we are seeing now what happens when you have got sleepier rails as a result of leaves and the sort of conditions. so you can rest assure that network rail is very much on the case. you cannot
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correct 35— 40 years of trees growing overnight. it's a historical crack. if you look at pictures on our railways in glendive 1940s crack. if you look at pictures on our railways in glendive1940s and �*505 our railways in glendive1940s and �*50s and steam engines were about there were trees. they kept the banking clear because of the fire risk. 0nce steam engines a british restaurant be cutting back on budgets to save money and trees grew up, and as a result of that historical quirk, we have got lots of trees where they never were and actually now shouldn't be as we are finding our cost. this actually now shouldn't be as we are finding our cost.— finding our cost. this is a week where we _ finding our cost. this is a week where we are _ finding our cost. this is a week where we are praising - finding our cost. this is a week where we are praising the - finding our cost. this is a week - where we are praising the presence of trees that we take your point on this very important safety question. more debate on this i suspect. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. you are welcome. a group of mps has called for the roll out of so—called smart motorways in england to be halted until the government can prove they�* re safe. the smart motorway system — which can mean no hard shoulder — is designed to increase capacity. but relatives of those killed when their vehicles broke down say relying on technology instead of a hard shoulder is dangerous. here s our transport
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correspondent, caroline davies. a sombre procession past parliament. each coffin represents a life lost on the country's smart motorways, carried through westminster yesterday by those who want the system changed. smart motorways use technology to try to ease traffic. they're controversial when they don't have hard shoulders. if a vehicle breaks down in a live lane and can't reach a refuge bay, a red cross is meant to tell motorists not to drive in that lane. the government has argued technology means drivers are more likely to die on a normal motorway than a smart one. campaigners say they are less safe. the transport select committee says it wants existing smart motorways to be made safer. it doesn't want any more hard shoulders to be removed or put back. if you cut the data a number of different ways, it gives different conclusions. in order to get drivers confident that they feel safe enough to use the smart motorway network,
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we need to fix some of these issues that have been outstanding for far too long, and then make a much better determination on the roll—out of smart motorways. but work is continuing. across the country, motorways like this one are having their hard shoulders turned into an active lane for traffic. the committee might want that work to stop, but there's nothing that requires the government to do that, and some campaigners say this report doesn't go far enough. claire's husband died on a smart motorway without a hard shoulder in 2019. our aim is to get the hard shoulder back in every single instance. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they propose pausing smart motorway is because it gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. the government has said that it could have been faster in implementing safety measures, but says it is committed to making smart motorways are safer.
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it says it will respond to the report in due course, but continuing with smart motorways will not be without its obstacles. caroline davies, bbc news. almost half the states in america are holding elections this week, for the local committees that control the budgets, operating procedures and education policies, of tens of thousands of schools. but this year the power of school boards is under intense scrutiny, in the era of culture wars and covid, with mask mandates, vaccine requirements and the representation of american history, sparking numerous confrontations on the campaign trail. our correspondent, sophie long has more, from the state of colorado. in castle rock, colorado, school board elections have traditionally been quiet — you could even say dull — affairs. but they are becoming more colourful. the county is lying to you, and you know it, and you are either complicit or you don't know it. the campaign trail may look civilised in sleepy suburbia,
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but things are getting scary. cowards always hide their face. it's a school board election in one county in the entire united states, but to us, it's everything about our children's education, and each side is trying to say, we know what's right, and the other side, it's not just wrong, it's evil. everything about them is...is... isjust going to destroy our children. angry shouting. these small pieces of cloth have caused quite a commotion. they have led to school board members being attacked and intimidated, trolled on social media, even stalked in public. although people are engaged in these elections, the pandemic has really brought home the wide national political divide. teacher stacey adair is currently on unpaid leave for refusing to wear a mask in the classroom. people were just so intense about it. it was an insane year.
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i was willing to get written up for not enforcing the mask. if they want to wear the mask, fine. if they take it off because they want to breathe, it's not myjob. there is nowhere in myjob description that says i'm a mask enforcer. it's notjust mask mandates that have wiped the smiles off parents' faces but a change in curriculum and claims schools are teaching critical race theory, the idea that racism is embedded in america's public policies. teachers are being accused of indoctrinating children while they watch their academic scores tumble. but teachers say they're are just delivering the syllabus in a more inclusive way. we're just trying to make them aware from both perspectives and let them make up their mind as to how they feel about that afterwards. and i think that's kind of what teaching history should be about. the things that are going on here are making me absolutely crazy. across the country, what should be local, nonpartisan elections have become highly charged, sometimes violent, deeply political affairs.
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a sign of what's to come as we approach the mid—term elections next year. sophie long, bbc news, douglas county, colorado. more on climate change now. a recent poll suggests the public largely supported the uk's prime minister's bid to curb climate change but weren't prepared to pay more than £5 extra a week in tax to fund the policies. another poll suggests only 7% of people in this country thought families like theirs should be funding green transformation. sima kotecha has been to dudley to test the public appetite for self sacrifice to save the planet. ian, how worried are you about the climate from one to ten? i ian, how worried are you about the climate from one to ten?— ian, how worried are you about the climate from one to ten? i would say about four- — climate from one to ten? i would say about four. not _ climate from one to ten? i would say about four. not very _ climate from one to ten? i would say about four. not very worried. - climate from one to ten? i would say about four. not very worried. so - climate from one to ten? i would say about four. not very worried. so how man out about four. not very worried. so how many out of — about four. not very worried. so how many out of ten? _ about four. not very worried. so how
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many out of ten? nine. _ about four. not very worried. so how many out of ten? nine. nine. - about four. not very worried. so how many out of ten? nine. nine. i'm - many out of ten? nine. nine. i'm extremely _ many out of ten? nine. nine. i'm extremely worried. _ many out of ten? nine. nine. i'm extremely worried. cell, - many out of ten? nine. nine. i'm extremely worried. cell, ten? - many out of ten? nine. nine. i'm i extremely worried. cell, ten? yes. goina extremely worried. cell, ten? yes. going they — extremely worried. cell, ten? yes. going they didn't. _ extremely worried. cell, ten? yes. going they didn't, for— extremely worried. cell, ten? yes. going they didn't, for example, i extremely worried. cell, ten? yes. going they didn't, for example, usj going they didn't, for example, us likely, more likely, some are in the middle. �* ., ., ., , middle. i'm not going vegan. very less likely- — middle. i'm not going vegan. very less likely- if _ middle. i'm not going vegan. very less likely. if you _ middle. i'm not going vegan. very less likely. if you ate _ middle. i'm not going vegan. very less likely. if you ate less - middle. i'm not going vegan. very less likely. if you ate less meat, l less likely. if you ate less meat, ou less likely. if you ate less meat, you would _ less likely. if you ate less meat, you would save _ less likely. if you ate less meat, you would save carbon _ less likely. if you ate less meat, you would save carbon dioxide i less likely. if you ate less meat, i you would save carbon dioxide from less likely. if you ate less meat, - you would save carbon dioxide from a lot of carbon dioxide. you are not prepared to do that?— lot of carbon dioxide. you are not prepared to do that? hagar. what you prepared to do that? now. what you eat less meat. _ prepared to do that? now. what you eat less meat, for _ prepared to do that? now. what you eat less meat, for example? now. l prepared to do that? now. what you eat less meat, for example? now. if we did that — eat less meat, for example? now. if we did that now, _ eat less meat, for example? now. if we did that now, it _ eat less meat, for example? now. if we did that now, it would _ eat less meat, for example? now. if we did that now, it would be - eat less meat, for example? now. if we did that now, it would be more i we did that now, it would be more harm than good to us. i ain't giving up my harm than good to us. i ain't giving up my cigarettes out for nobody. you are not going to ditch a car, or are you? i are not going to ditch a car, or are ou? ., �* . , you? iwouldn't ditch it, buti would trade _ you? iwouldn't ditch it, buti would trade date _ you? iwouldn't ditch it, buti would trade date neco - you? iwouldn't ditch it, but i i would trade date neco electric. you? iwouldn't ditch it, but i - would trade date neco electric. what about buying — would trade date neco electric. what about buying less? _ would trade date neco electric. “ifi'isgt about buying less? you would trade date neco electric. iii"isgt about buying less? you got would trade date neco electric. “iii"isgt about buying less? you got some lovely clothes on there. if you're going out on a saturday night, will you go and buy a new dress? you have a very nice coat. are you prepared to keep the same clothes for a lot
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longer, so by lies and perhaps recycle your clothing more? i will re cle recycle your clothing more? i will recycle my _ recycle your clothing more? i will recycle my clothes _ recycle your clothing more? i will recycle my clothes more. - recycle your clothing more? i will recycle my clothes more. i - recycle your clothing more? i ii. recycle my clothes more. i shop at the charity shop sometimes. 50 recycle my clothes more. i shop at the charity shop sometimes. so by less, the charity shop sometimes. so by less. more — the charity shop sometimes. so by less, more likely, _ the charity shop sometimes. so by less, more likely, less— the charity shop sometimes. so by less, more likely, less likely, - less, more likely, less likely, somewhere in the middle? somewhere in the middle- — somewhere in the middle? somewhere in the middle. what _ somewhere in the middle? somewhere in the middle. what about _ somewhere in the middle? somewhere in the middle. what about plastic? - in the middle. what about plastic? plastic i recycle. i live in a complex— plastic i recycle. i live in a complex where there are 35 flats. all of— complex where there are 35 flats. all of them have dashed all our garbage — all of them have dashed all our garbage goes down the chute, there is no recycling. garbage goes down the chute, there is no recycling-— is no recycling. what about a heat 0 um n is no recycling. what about a heat pump four — is no recycling. what about a heat pump four the _ is no recycling. what about a heat pump four the government - is no recycling. what about a heat pump four the government has i is no recycling. what about a heat i pump four the government has said they will give you a £5,000 subsidy. i“ve they will give you a £5,000 subsidy. i've never heard of that. i was readin: i've never heard of that. i was reading about _ i've never heard of that. i was reading about 1,000 - i've never heard of that. i was reading about 1,000 the - i've never heard of that. i was| reading about 1,000 the paper yesterday. some couple had spent thousands of pounds for their heat pumps _ thousands of pounds for their heat pumps for— thousands of pounds for their heat pumps fortheir entire thousands of pounds for their heat pumps for their entire house and now they are _ pumps for their entire house and now they are sitting there with their coats _ they are sitting there with their coats on — they are sitting there with their coats on. , ., ,., they are sitting there with their coats on. , ., y., ., coats on. insulate your home. already done. _ coats on. insulate your home. already done. whose - coats on. insulate your home. already done. whose job - coats on. insulate your home. already done. whose job it i coats on. insulate your home. i already done. whose job it said, already done. whose “ob it said, mari aret, already done. whose “ob it said, margaret, whose _ already done. whose “ob it said, margaret, whose job _ already done. whose job it said, margaret, whose job is - already done. whose job it said, margaret, whose job is it - already done. whose job it said, margaret, whose job is it to - already done. whose job it said, margaret, whose job is it to him| already done. whose job it said, i margaret, whose job is it to him for margaret, whosejob is it to him for of these restrictions if people believe in them? is at up to the
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individual or is it up to the government?— individual or is it up to the rovernment? �*, ., , government? it's both, really. i think there _ government? it's both, really. i think there is _ government? it's both, really. i think there is a _ government? it's both, really. i think there is a lot _ government? it's both, really. i think there is a lot of _ government? it's both, really. i think there is a lot of people i government? it's both, really. i. think there is a lot of people who don't _ think there is a lot of people who don't recycle as much as they should — don't recycle as much as they should |n— don't recycle as much as they should. , . . ., don't recycle as much as they should. , ., . ,, .., , should. in the black country where it is industry _ should. in the black country where it is industry with _ should. in the black country where it is industry with all _ should. in the black country where it is industry with all of _ should. in the black country where it is industry with all of the - it is industry with all of the factories— it is industry with all of the factories and _ it is industry with all of the factories and that - it is industry with all of the factories and that and - it is industry with all of the factories and that and the i it is industry with all of the - factories and that and the smoke it is industry with all of the _ factories and that and the smoke and that over— factories and that and the smoke and that over the — factories and that and the smoke and that over the years, _ factories and that and the smoke and that over the years, my _ factories and that and the smoke and that over the years, my husband - factories and that and the smoke andi that over the years, my husband used to work_ that over the years, my husband used to work in_ that over the years, my husband used to work in the — that over the years, my husband used to work in the rolling _ that over the years, my husband used to work in the rolling hills _ that over the years, my husband used to work in the rolling hills and - to work in the rolling hills and everything. _ to work in the rolling hills and everything. so— to work in the rolling hills and everything, so what _ to work in the rolling hills and | everything, so what difference to work in the rolling hills and i everything, so what difference is to work in the rolling hills and - everything, so what difference is it going _ everything, so what difference is it going to _ everything, so what difference is it going to make _ everything, so what difference is it going to make now? _ everything, so what difference is it going to make now? it's _ everything, so what difference is it going to make now? it's futile. - everything, so what difference is it i going to make now? it's futile. some laces going to make now? it's futile. some places there — going to make now? it's futile. some places there from _ going to make now? it's futile. some places there from deadly _ going to make now? it's futile. places there from deadly speaking going to make now? it's futilem places there from deadly speaking to our correspondent. fascinating to get an instant take on what is going on up in glasgow. let“s catch up with but weather now. good evening. today turned into a fairly bright but rather chilly autumn day with a mix of sunshine and showers in most places. the showers were most plentiful around the coasts, but one or 2 did creep further inlands towards the eastern side of england. and as we head through this evening and overnight, we will continue to see 1—2 showers, particularly around the coasts. inland spots will turn a largely dry and it'll be another rather chilly night — temperatures in parts of southern england could drop
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to just below freezing, with a touch of frost and some fog patches likely across parts of england and east wales in particular. so into tomorrow, it's another sunshine—and—showers day — many of the showers focusing in around the coasts, but some are likely to drift across northern england, down into the midlands and parts of east anglia. temperatures will struggle, 8—12 celsius at best, and it will be a bit breezier than it was today. as we head towards the end of the week, things will slowly but surely turn a bit milder. there will be fewer showers, but more in the way of cloud.
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i“m laura trevelyan in washington, and this is bbc world news america. making progress on methane — world leaders agree to cut methane emissions by a third by the end of the decade. the us president declares the summit a success. i can't think of any two days or more that's been accomplished dealing with climate then these two days. dealing with climate then these two days. cutting down on illegal logging — more than 100 countries agree to stop the destruction of trees. we'll have a special report from the amazon. plus, it's election season here in the us — again. we'll see what a race in virginia could tell us about the national mood.

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