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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 2, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser live from the cop26 summit on pbs and around the globe. landmark pledges on how to tackle the climate emergency. over 100 countries agree to cut global methane emissions by 30% by the end of the decade. the us president is calling it a game—changer. methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases there is. it amounts to about half, half the warming we're experiencing today just to methane exposure. a big commitment on protecting the world's trees — 110 nations promise to end and reverse deforestation in the next ten years. the clock is ticking. i mean, we don't have a chance to fail now, and i think
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that's the key message of the secretary general, gutierres, that's our message. world leaders are leaving glasgow later, leaving their technical teams to thrash out the detail in the next two weeks. in other news: the former presidents of world and european football are charged with fraud over the unlawful transfer of more than $2 million. hello, welcome back to glasgow, and the second and final day of the world leaders summit at cop26. there have been more significant announcements — in particular, two significant announcements to try to address the climate emergency. let's just run you through the proposals. first, a global partnership aims to cut methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030. it's being led by america
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and the eu, and more than 100 countries have signed up. but china, russia and india are not part of the pledge. earlier in the day, there was another significant pledge to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. there was also a plan to adopt affordable tech everywhere in the world by 2030. some of it is widely seen as the last big opportunity to tackle further climate change. laura kuenssberg reports. when cultures clash, can they still agree? when there's so much difference, there can be descent. there are so many faces here in glasgow and so many facets of what could be done. are you pleased with what is happening this week? hollywood stars may campaign, but less developed countries may well complain. the united nations fears there's not
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enough trust to bridge the gaps, but deals are being made. 100 leaders signed a promise to stop the destruction in nine years�* time. i'm confident that we can do this, all we need to do is to summon the will to do what we know is right and we know it is necessary and is in our capacity. let's get to work, we can do this. even the leader of the free world can be hemmed in. president biden struggling to push through his green ambitions at home and borisjohnson�*s attention cast over offers many foreign leaders as possible. they will depart tonight leaving instructions with their negotiators. around 100 countries have already signed up to cut the potent greenhouse gas methane by nearly a third by the end of the decade. but away from the glitz of the main
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stage and down a quiet corridor corridor in a tiny office — a sign ofjust how hard an overall agreement will be. chinese president xi isn't here, but one of the most powerful people you have never heard of is here in his place. chinese climate negotiator. my discussions with john kerry and alok sharma were very constructive, but there were still huge gaps. he criticised developed countries for not coming up with cash that promised to help the less wealthy go green and warned that focusing too much and limiting global warming to 1.5, degrees as borisjohnson wanted could destroy the consensus. i am cautiously optimistic in - the sense that on the way to the g20 in rome, i said to some. of you on the plane if this was a football match, -
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then the current score would be 5—1 down in the match| between humanity and climate change. and what you can say now after two days of talks with 120 _ world leaders is that we have pulled back a goal to and i think that we i will be able to take this thing to extra time. - what, or who, is going to score the extra two or three goals that you still need? if there's one thing that gives me confidence or| optimism is the we are starting to i create for the countries that findl it most difficult to transition away |from fossil fuels, we are starting| to create those - coalitions of support. coalitions of support to help them to move on. the first 48 hours here have been frantic. and today, there's been a flurry of promises that should hypothetically make a difference, but it's now that the hard bargaining really starts. remember, borisjohnson wants a deal
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that keeps global warning within safe limits, but here in glasgow right now, it's too early to be sure if that is within reach. they will likely be seeing crashes and arguments, different voices and different views. borisjohnson can be sure what booklet in glasgow. when it near the end of this summit, he returns. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, glasgow. as we've heard, one of the significant deals approved today is a pledge to cut emissions of methane gas. let's take a closer look at why this new deal is important. methane is a greenhouse gas that's second only to carbon dioxide in driving global warming — it's responsible for 25% of it. it's stronger than c02 in the short term, but only lingers in the atmosphere for a relatively short time, so curbing it could deliver immediate effects. here's the us special presidential envoy for climate. it's 20—80 times more destructive than c02.
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it is fully responsible for .5 degrees of the warming of the 1.1 we're at today. and with this initiative, you're making it possible for us to achieve our goal to be able to lower the warming by .2 degrees. more than 100 countries have signed up to the pledge. less encouraging is that three of the countries responsible 0ur science correspondent, rebecca morelle, has the details. from emissions from cars to rubbish rotting in landfill sites from emissions from cows to rubbish rotting in landfill sites and flares from oil and gas, methane is escaping into the atmosphere. but today, more than 100 countries agreed to cut the gas by 30% in a deal brokered by the united states and the eu. we have to cut emissions first. and methane is one of the glasses we can cut fastest.
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doing that will immediately slow down climate change. methane is an important greenhouse gas, making up about 20% of global emissions. it's extremely potent and has caused about 50% of current global warming. cutting all methane by one third by 2030 would reduce global temperatures by about .3 degrees by 2040. tackling methane from the oil and gas industry will be a priority. the easiest way to reduce emissions is to plug any leaks. you can't see methane unless you use a special camera like this one. it's a colourless, odourless gas. but because it doesn't last for very long in the atmosphere, if you cut methane emissions now, you make a big difference first. you make a big difference fast. it's why reducing methane is seen as one of the easier climate fixes. but there will be challenges. agriculture, including rice production, is one of the biggest
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emitters of methane. solving that will be much harder. the countries who've signed up to this deal account for about half of global methane emissions. but there are some notable absences — namely china, russia and india — who haven't come on board. to achieve this 30% global target, we will need them to step up. but having more than 100 countries on board including some on board, including some of the largest emitters, and covering the vast majority of globally traded natural gas is a very big deal. this shows the levels of methane being released all around our planet. now, for the first time, there's a target to cut the greenhouse gas. at a conference trying to stop temperatures from rising above safe limits, this is a significant step for the world. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. the day's other major pledge puts trees, the earth's lungs, at the top of the agenda. the problem — deforestation. and the response — over 100 countries promising to end and then reverse deforestation,
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and all in under ten years. the countries making the agreement account for 85% of the world's forests. the pledge is being backed up with $19 billion in private and publicfunding. last year, it was reported that deforestation of the amazon rainforest in brazil had surged to its highest level since 2008. forests still cover about 30% of the world's land area, but they are disappearing at an alarming rate. between 1990 and 2016, the world lost 502,000 square miles of forest, an area larger than south africa. colombia is home to some of the amazon rainforest, and was one of the signatories of the deforestation agreement. here's president duque. i come from a country where 52% of our land is tropical forest. 35% of our land is amazonic land, and we have 52% of the world's high—altitude ecosystems.
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so, we come today now with a theoretical approach. we come here with clear commitments. we're not waiting until 2030. we are today committing ourselves to protect 30% of our territory as a protected area in 2022, because we must act now. applause while the commitments have been largely welcomed, there remains a degree of scepticism about how they'll be implemented. here's a spokesperson for the human rights group global witness. hopefully we can use this momentum, but this_ hopefully we can use this momentum, but this is_ hopefully we can use this momentum, but this is a _ hopefully we can use this momentum, but this is a problem with a lot of these _ but this is a problem with a lot of these commitments. governments made similar— these commitments. governments made similar pledges in 2014 with the new york declaration. but they didn't meet _ york declaration. but they didn't meet anywhere near the progress
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expected — earlier, i put this scepticism to the president of costa rica. this was his response. in the case of costa rica, we managed _ in the case of costa rica, we managed to— in the case of costa rica, we managed to have _ in the case of costa rica, we managed to have an- in the case of costa rica, wei managed to have an example in the case of costa rica, we - managed to have an example that's successfut — managed to have an example that's successfut in— managed to have an example that's successful. in the _ managed to have an example that's successful. in the 19805, _ managed to have an example that's successful. in the 19805, our- managed to have an example that'5 successful. in the 19805, our fore5tj 5ucce55ful. in the 19805, our forest cover— 5ucce55ful. in the 19805, our forest cover has— successful. in the 19805, our forest cover has dropped _ successful. in the 19805, our forest cover has dropped to _ successful. in the 19805, our forest cover has dropped to 20% - 5ucce55ful. in the 19805, our forest cover has dropped to 20% of- cover has dropped to 20% of the countrx — cover has dropped to 20% of the countrx at _ cover has dropped to 20% of the country. at the _ cover has dropped to 20% of the country. at the beginning - cover has dropped to 20% of the country. at the beginning of- cover has dropped to 20% of the country. at the beginning of last century. — country. at the beginning of last century. it— country. at the beginning of last century. it was— country. at the beginning of last century, it was more _ country. at the beginning of last century, it was more than- country. at the beginning of last century, it was more than 80%.| country. at the beginning of last - century, it was more than 80%. 1980 was 20% _ century, it was more than 80%. 1980 was 20% we — century, it was more than 80%. 1980 was 20%. we managed _ century, it was more than 80%. 1980 was 20%. we managed to _ century, it was more than 80%. 1980 was 20%. we managed to recover- was 20%. we managed to recover forest — was 20%. we managed to recover forest coverage, _ was 20%. we managed to recover fore5t coverage, and _ was 20%. we managed to recover fore5t coverage, and now- was 20%. we managed to recover. fore5t coverage, and now currently, we are _ fore5t coverage, and now currently, we are over — fore5t coverage, and now currently, we are over 50% _ fore5t coverage, and now currently, we are over 50% of _ fore5t coverage, and now currently, we are over 50% of the _ fore5t coverage, and now currently, we are over 50% of the country's i we are over 50% of the country's forest _ we are over 50% of the country's fore5t coverage. _ we are over 50% of the country's fore5t coverage. so _ we are over 50% of the country's fore5t coverage. so that - we are over 50% of the country'5| fore5t coverage. so that example shows _ fore5t coverage. so that example shows that — fore5t coverage. so that example shows that it _ fore5t coverage. so that example shows that it is _ fore5t coverage. so that example shows that it is possible - fore5t coverage. so that example shows that it is possible to - fore5t coverage. so that example i shows that it is possible to recover forests _ shows that it is possible to recover forests and — shows that it is possible to recover forests and reverse _ shows that it is possible to recover forests and reverse deforestation. | nick mabey is co—founder and ceo of the european think tank e3g. let's put apart the day. what's your top line? i think we've seen some good initiatives, but the big things was they have a lot more countries signing up and a lot bigger
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countries they were expecting. i think it shows up behind the conference is a real sense of political momentum. and we also saw the first big coalition. it's a big us, europe and lots of vulnerable countries, they were the powerhouse. laying down their expectations for the next two weeks and they're pretty ambitious. that statement came out and _ pretty ambitious. that statement came out and just _ pretty ambitious. that statement came out and just the _ pretty ambitious. that statement came out and just the last - pretty ambitious. that statement came out and just the last hour. l came out and just the last hour. tell me more about that.- came out and just the last hour. tell me more about that. well, cop has two dynamics. _ tell me more about that. well, cop has two dynamics. either _ tell me more about that. well, cop has two dynamics. either money - tell me more about that. well, cop has two dynamics. either money or| has two dynamics. either money or progressive countries coming together saying we need to do more. this is that second version. they say they want to see more from everybody. they want their short—term and long—term targets.
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they want to see people stop using coal, they want to see a much more aggressive action on methane. so it's really a political expression of some initiatives, and they want to see this in the agreement and coming out of this week. that we are going to instruct our negotiators negotiate on this.— negotiate on this. there's no agreement — negotiate on this. there's no agreement on _ negotiate on this. there's no agreement on call. - negotiate on this. there's no agreement on call. but - negotiate on this. there's noj agreement on call. but there negotiate on this. there's no - agreement on call. but there was an interesting agreement about... i've been told thatjoe biden is giving a press conference. hold that thought. we will come back to you. for hostin: we will come back to you. for hosting the — we will come back to you. fr?" hosting the world at a critical moment, as well as prince charles, who is put together a very significant operation over the last six or seven years of trying to bring the private sector to work on a number of these issues. glasco must start, you might be tired of hearing me say, but a decisive
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decade of action so we can keep the limit of 1.5 decade of action so we can keep the limit of1.5 degrees decade of action so we can keep the limit of 1.5 degrees within the region. we have to keep accelerating our progress. today's agreement, more than 100 countries representing 85% of the world's forests reversing deforestation by 2030, is a great example of the kind of ambition we needin example of the kind of ambition we need in the united states, and the us is proud. the united states is going to keep raising the ambition. from the 2005 levels by 2030. this decade we have to make significant progress. by the way, i can't think of any two days or more that have been accomplished then these two days. i've announced initiatives
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that will make sure we hit the target of including today two new rules to reduce methane losses and existing gas operations. thanks to the effort of ourjoint effort with the effort of ourjoint effort with the eu, we've grown global methane pledge and raised from nine countries signing onto that pledge. more than 100 countries have signed on. that's about half the world's methane admissions. 70% of the world's global gdp. spur innovation, capitalise finance for a cleaner economy and driving high standard infrastructure through the build back better initiative. we had a great meeting today where we talked about the whole focus of my bill back better initiative adopted by
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the g7, was that everything should be focus as we help the rest of the world that needs it badly and focused on climate. the example is if you build an oil well, if you build a gas or oil refinery, you will have to mix 30 years. well, why not invest now to provide for the help of nations and solar capacity or when capacity? the point is although... we also brought through the new president emergency plan for adaptation. i'm getting tired of acronyms, it's called prepare. we also released our overall long—term strategy that outlines how we'll get to net zero emissions by 2050. we know that this must be a whole of
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society effort. i also want to thank the representatives from the private sector �*s who are dedicating themselves to the climate action efforts we're all making. that leadership together with action advice has been essential in the united states. that's why despite the previous administration pulling us out of the paris agreement, and refusing to even acknowledge there is a climate crisis, we still brought down emissions. i also want to acknowledge that passion and power with young people who are doing such vital work to remind us of our moral obligation to future generations. as i said yesterday, it's notjust a moral imperative, it's notjust a moral imperative, it's an economic imperative as well. investing in our clean energy future is an enormous opportunity, for every country to create good paying jobs and spur a broad—based economic recovery. you've heard me say
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before, when i think of climate crisis, i think ofjobs. that's what the bill back better framework will do for the american people. it's going to bring historic investment addressing the crisis, it's going to cut greenhouse gas emissions by well over a gigaton by 2030, it's going to save consumers�* over a gigaton by 2030, it�*s going to save consumers�* money and tax credits and weatherization of their homes, it�*s also going to pride manufacturing credits to make sure the night united states is competing in energy markets in the future is like wind turbines. it�*s also going to accelerate electric vehicles and build a nationwide network of 500,000 charging stations of power. it's 500,000 charging stations of power. it�*s about jobs. 500,000 charging stations of power. it�*s aboutjobs. it�*s about competitiveness versus complacency. it's competitiveness versus complacency. it�*s about making the world safer, cleaner, healthierand it�*s about making the world safer, cleaner, healthier and a place where children all around the world can look to the future in a way they
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can�*t now. there is so many other things that have happened today that i feel good about, things that have happened today that ifeel good about, but let things that have happened today that i feel good about, but let me start. i�*ll be happy to take your questions, feel? watching on tv a lot. ., ~ questions, feel? watching on tv a lot. ., ,, , ., questions, feel? watching on tv a lot. ., ~' , ., , questions, feel? watching on tv a lot. ., ,, i. , . questions, feel? watching on tv a lot. ., , . ~ lot. thank you very much, mr president- — lot. thank you very much, mr president. your— lot. thank you very much, mr. president. your disappointment lot. thank you very much, mr- president. your disappointment with actions _ president. your disappointment with actions in _ president. your disappointment with actions in rome and the lack of willingne55 from the chinese president to show up. but i want to ask more _ president to show up. but i want to ask more broadly when you assess a5k more broadly when you assess where _ a5k more broadly when you assess where things stand right now, your diplomats— where things stand right now, your diplomats have had difficulties in engaging with some of their counterparts. you have a chinese counterpart5. you have a chinese military— counterparts. you have a chinese military that has tested them is still this— military that has tested them is still this summer. what is your generat— still this summer. what is your general assessment of where things stand _ general assessment of where things stand and _ general assessment of where things stand and are you concerned that the potential— stand and are you concerned that the potential for armed conflict is
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growing? potential for armed conflict is . rowin: ? potential for armed conflict is rrrowin ? , ., potential for armed conflict is rarowin? , . potential for armed conflict is rarowin? _ growing? let me start off by addressing _ growing? let me start off by addressing the _ growing? let me start off by addressing the first - growing? let me start off by addressing the first part - growing? let me start off by addressing the first part of l growing? let me start off by l addressing the first part of the statement, and that is i indicated that china and russia not showing up in saudi arabia was a problem. we showed up. we showed up, and by showing up, we had a found impact on the way the rest of the world is looking at the united states and its leadership role. i think it�*s been a big mistake, quite frankly, for china not showing up. the rest of the world will look to china and say what value are they providing? they�*ve lost the ability to influence people around the world and all the people here at cop26, the same i would argue with regard to russia. with regard to the more profound question about being worried about an armed conflict, no i�*m not, buti
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worried about an armed conflict, no i�*m not, but i have had, as i said before, talked about this. i may be mistaken. as i�*ve said, i look at china and i�*ve had hours of conversations with xi jinping, both person as vice president and since i�*ve been president at least five or six hours worth. i�*m going to be having a virtual summit with him. i�*ve made it clear, this is competition, it does not have to be conflict. i�*ve also indicated to him so i�*m not reluctant to say it publicly, and we expect them to play by the rules. we�*re not going to change our attitude. we also made it clear that we have to work on doing the things like —— dealing with things like cybersecurity and a
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whole range of issues, but i�*m not looking for, i don�*t anticipate there will be a need for physical conflict, but as you�*ve heard me say before, my dad had an expression. he said the only conflict worse than one that�*s intended is one that�*s unintended. so, my meetings with him virtually, i want to make sure there�*s no misunderstanding. it�*s competition, not conflict, so there is no on intent. peter? mr president. _ is no on intent. peter? mr president, you _ is no on intent. peter? mr president, you are touting on this business — president, you are touting on this business that... _ president, you are touting on this business that... but _ president, you are touting on this business that... but your- president, you are touting on this business that... but your party. business that... but your party stilt— business that... but your party still is — business that... but your party still is not _ business that... but your party still is not behind _ business that... but your party still is not behind it. _ business that... but your party still is not behind it. joe - business that... but your party. still is not behind it. joe manchen catted _ still is not behind it. joe manchen called it— still is not behind it. joe manchen called it a — still is not behind it. joe manchen called it a recipe _ still is not behind it. joe manchen called it a recipe for— still is not behind it. joe manchen called it a recipe for economic - called it a recipe for economic crisis — called it a recipe for economic crisis he _ called it a recipe for economic crisis he said _ called it a recipe for economic crisis. he said he _ called it a recipe for economic crisis. he said he never- called it a recipe for economic - crisis. he said he never signed off on the _ crisis. he said he never signed off on the framework. _ crisis. he said he never signed off on the framework. do _ crisis. he said he never signed off on the framework. do you - crisis. he said he never signed off on the framework. do you have i
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crisis. he said he never signed off on the framework. do you have of specific _ on the framework. do you have of specific commitment _ on the framework. do you have of specific commitment from - on the framework. do you have of| specific commitment from senator mansion— specific commitment from senator mansion to — specific commitment from senator mansion to support _ specific commitment from senator mansion to support your _ specific commitment from senator mansion to support your bill - specific commitment from senator mansion to support your bill back. mansion to support your bill back tfetter— mansion to support your bill back better bitt, — mansion to support your bill back better bill, and _ mansion to support your bill back better bill, and how— mansion to support your bill back better bill, and how do _ mansion to support your bill back better bill, and how do you - mansion to support your bill back. better bill, and how do you respond to those _ better bill, and how do you respond to those criticisms? _ better bill, and how do you respond to those criticisms?— better bill, and how do you respond to those criticisms? number one, i'm not aroin to those criticisms? number one, i'm not going to — to those criticisms? number one, i'm not going to talk _ to those criticisms? number one, i'm not going to talk about _ to those criticisms? number one, i'm not going to talk about the _ not going to talk about the specifics of my conversations. we have in this proposal what he has anticipated, and that is looking at the fine treatment of detail under the fine treatment of detail under the actual initiative. i believe thatjoe will be there. with regard to the issue of whether or not he thinks he�*s worried about the inflation area or negative impact on the economy, i think that i made it clear tojoe — i apologise to repeat - 17 clear tojoe — i apologise to repeat — 17 nobel laureates said it would lower inflation, increased competition, create 2 millionjobs lower inflation, increased competition, create 2 million jobs a year, etc. so, i understand joe is
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looking for the precise detail to make sure nothing got slipped in in terms of the way in which the legislation got written, but different than he acknowledged. but i think we�*ll get this done. you i think we'll get this done. you mentioned _ i think we'll get this done. you mentioned inflation. _ i think we'll get this done. you mentioned inflation. you said you had no _ mentioned inflation. you said you had no short—term _ mentioned inflation. you said you had no short—term answer- mentioned inflation. you said you had no short—term answer to - mentioned inflation. you said youl had no short—term answer to bring down _ had no short—term answer to bring down gas — had no short—term answer to bring down gas prices, _ had no short—term answer to bring down gas prices, what _ had no short—term answer to bring down gas prices, what is _ had no short—term answer to bring down gas prices, what is not - had no short—term answer to bring down gas prices, what is notjust. down gas prices, what is notjust -a5 down gas prices, what is notjust gas prices — down gas prices, what is notjust gas prices. rents— down gas prices, what is notjust gas prices. rents are _ down gas prices, what is notjust gas prices. rents are up, - down gas prices, what is notjust gas prices. rents are up, the - down gas prices, what is notjustl gas prices. rents are up, the cost of everyday— gas prices. rents are up, the cost of everyday items _ gas prices. rents are up, the cost of everyday items are _ gas prices. rents are up, the cost of everyday items are up, - gas prices. rents are up, the cost| of everyday items are up, inflation is at a _ of everyday items are up, inflation is at a 13— of everyday items are up, inflation is at a 13 year— of everyday items are up, inflation is at a 13 year high. _ of everyday items are up, inflation is at a 13 year high. when - is at a 13 year high. when specifically— is at a 13 year high. when specifically should - is at a 13 year high. when - specifically should americans is at a 13 year high. when _ specifically should americans expect those _ specifically should americans expect those prices — specifically should americans expect those prices to— specifically should americans expect those prices to come _ specifically should americans expect those prices to come down? - specifically should americans expect those prices to come down?- those prices to come down? look, first of all. — those prices to come down? look, first of all. a _ those prices to come down? look, first of all, a significant _ those prices to come down? look, first of all, a significant reason - first of all, a significant reason why prices are up is because of covid affecting the supply chain. i�*m not trying to be... i know you know this. number two... i'm not trying to be... i know you know this. number two... studio: joe biden know this. number two... studio:
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joe biden giving — know this. number two... studio: joe biden giving him _ know this. number two... studio: joe biden giving him 's_ know this. number two... studio: joe biden giving him 's thoughts. l know this. number two... studio: l joe biden giving him 's thoughts. as joe biden giving him �*s thoughts. as well that economic imperative. american�*s leadership is vital. to our viewers, thank you for watching. for the 0pec nations to pump more oil. we�*ll see what happens on that score sooner than later. number three, i think if you take a look at what we�*re talking about, look to this coming thanks giving. when a situation —— we�*re in a situation where we find that we are in a very different circumstance. last thanksgiving, as i said this year, we�*re working on a supply chain, but last thanksgiving, i sat down with my wife, my daughter and my son—in—law. this thanks giving, we are all in a very different there circumstance. things are a hell of a lot better, and wages have gone up
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higher. we have generated real economic growth. it doesn�*t mean these dislocations aren�*t real. they do affect people�*s lives. 0ne these dislocations aren�*t real. they do affect people�*s lives. one reason why i decided to talk about the need to deal with the operation that occurs in some of the pricing of beef and chicken and other things is that dot might... that whether or not there is a violation of any trust laws and what they�*re doing. there�*s a lot to look at, but the bottom line is that i think — and anyone who would prefer, as bad as things are in terms of hurting families now — trade this thanksgiving for last thanksgiving. jen epstein, wall streetjournal.
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excuse me, i beg your pardon. bloomberg. excuse me, i beg your pardon. bloomberg— excuse me, i beg your pardon. bloomberg.- especially i excuse me, i beg your pardon. - bloomberg.- especially since bloomberg. got it. especially since my granddaughter _ bloomberg. got it. especially since my granddaughter works _ bloomberg. got it. especially since my granddaughter works for - bloomberg. got it. especially since my granddaughter works for you guys. i�*m in trouble. i�*m my granddaughter works for you guys. i'm in trouble-— i'm in trouble. i'm going to ask a very bloomberg _ i'm in trouble. i'm going to ask a very bloomberg question. - i'm in trouble. i'm going to ask a very bloomberg question. have i i'm in trouble. i'm going to ask a i very bloomberg question. have you decided _ very bloomberg question. have you decided who you will nominate to chair— decided who you will nominate to chair the — decided who you will nominate to chair the federal reserve board? if not, chair the federal reserve board? if not. can— chair the federal reserve board? if not. can you — chair the federal reserve board? if not, can you speak a little bit about — not, can you speak a little bit about what you're thinking about in your choice — about what you're thinking about in your choice for fed chair and the other— your choice for fed chair and the other seats _ your choice for fed chair and the other seats that are open? this is the latest — other seats that are open? this is the latest that a president has gone without— the latest that a president has gone without nominating somebody the year before _ without nominating somebody the year before a _ without nominating somebody the year before a nominee needs to be selected _ before a nominee needs to be selected. are you concerned about potentially having a shorter timeline?— potentially having a shorter timeline? ., ., ., , timeline? no, no, no. iwill be makin: timeline? no, no, no. iwill be making those _ timeline? no, no, no. iwill be making those announcements | timeline? no, no, no. iwill be - making those announcements very quickly. it�*s been in training for some time, number one. numbertwo, i
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also would indicate that i think we will have plenty of time to make sure all the major nominees are able to be cleared in time. number three, i�*ve given a lot of thought to it and i�*ve been meeting with economic advisers with the best choices. but i�*m not going to speculate now. nancy, cbs? ithink i�*m not going to speculate now. nancy, cbs? i think you i�*m not going to speculate now. nancy, cbs? ithink you had i�*m not going to speculate now. nancy, cbs? i think you had your hand up, i�*m sorry. nancy, cbs? i think you had your hand up, i'm sorry.— nancy, cbs? i think you had your hand up, i'm sorry. thank you very much. hand up, i'm sorry. thank you very much- some _ hand up, i'm sorry. thank you very much. some of _ hand up, i'm sorry. thank you very much. some of the _ hand up, i'm sorry. thank you very much. some of the commitment . hand up, i'm sorry. thank you very i much. some of the commitment you made _ much. some of the commitment you made won't — much. some of the commitment you made won't happen— much. some of the commitment you made won't happen unless _ much. some of the commitment you made won't happen unless congre55| made won't happen unless congress passes— made won't happen unless congress passes future — made won't happen unless congress passes future legislation. _ made won't happen unless congress passes future legislation. how- made won't happen unless congress passes future legislation. how do i passes future legislation. how do you convince _ passes future legislation. how do you convince republicans- passes future legislation. how do you convince republicans and - passes future legislation. how do. you convince republicans and even some _ you convince republicans and even some democrats— you convince republicans and even some democrats to _ you convince republicans and even some democrats to get _ you convince republicans and even some democrats to get behind - you convince republicans and even. some democrats to get behind more spending _ some democrats to get behind more spending if— 5ome democrats to get behind more spending if they— some democrats to get behind more spending if they look— some democrats to get behind more spending if they look at _ some democrats to get behind more spending if they look at this - spending if they look at this conference _ spending if they look at this conference and _ spending if they look at this conference and say, - spending if they look at this conference and say, "chinal spending if they look at this - conference and say, "china isn't meeting — conference and say, "china isn't meeting these _ conference and say, "china isn't meeting these goals, _ conference and say, "china isn't meeting these goals, russia - conference and say, "china isn't - meeting these goals, russia doesn't intend _ meeting these goals, russia doesn't intend to. _ meeting these goals, russia doesn't intend to. india— meeting these goals, russia doesn't intend to, india doesn't— meeting these goals, russia doesn't intend to, india doesn't plan- meeting these goals, russia doesn't intend to, india doesn't plan to, - intend to, india doesn't plan to, why should _ intend to, india doesn't plan to, why should we?" _ intend to, india doesn't plan to, why should we?" white -
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intend to, india doesn't plan to, why should we?" white- intend to, india doesn't plan to, why should we?" white because we want to be able _ why should we?" white because we want to be able to _ why should we?" white because we want to be able to breathe - why should we?" white because we want to be able to breathe and - why should we?" white because wej want to be able to breathe and lead the world. i mean it sincerely. i think, presumptuous it for a bit to say, but the fact that china trying to assert, understandably, a new role in the world as a world leader, not showing up, come on. the single most important thing is cutting the attention of the world is climate. everywhere. from iceland to australia. itjust is gigantic issue. they walked away. how do you do that and claim to be able to have any leadership now? same with putin and russia. he has serious, serious claimant problems, and he is mum on his willingness to do anything past
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climate problem. so i genuinely believe, and i mean this from the bottom of my heart — when i said it the g7 that america was back, you know, people wondered whether that was really true. we were able to change the dynamic of a lot of things coming out of the g7. what i�*m about to say sounds awfully self—serving — two world leaders came up to meet today and said thank you for your difference. you are moving people. so i think the fact that america showed up and decided to lead and lay out clearly what it wished to do, for example, as i said, the mere fact that we were able to go from 7—8 countries
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talking about the deal with the whole notion of methane, you know, now 100 nations have signed on. 100 nations have signed on to reduce methane by 30% by 2030. and methane is 20 times more toxic to the environment than c02. so we are making real progress, the deforestation issue, look what we�*ve been able to put together. one of the things that i feel best about, and i don�*t claim any unique credit for it, but i think that we�*ve gotten for the first time a combination of, in dealing with the international problems and circumstances that affect all nations, that we�*ve not only gotten countries off the sidelight in terms of making significant financial
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contributions, but literally trillions of dollars worth in the private sector jumping trillions of dollars worth in the private sectorjumping on. they know they�*ve got to play an incredibly positive part in dealing with these problems. it�*s real, it�*s genuine. so ijust think problems. it�*s real, it�*s genuine. so i just think that, you problems. it�*s real, it�*s genuine. so ijust think that, you know, that old expression, the proof in the pudding is in the eating. ifeel confident we will get done what we need to get done at home in order to deliver. and lastly, you know, if you take a look at what economies are growing that�*s what you —— what economy is growing? the united states. it has problems, mostly qovu and the supply chain. but we have 6 millionjobs, we are leading the world in terms of the fastest growing major economies. we are going through a difficult time in
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the world because of covert mat, because of supply chain consequences, because of the environment and all that it�*s occurred. but as i said to you earlier, and i really mean it, i think presents a gigantic opportunity to press the restart button and move in a direction that i think the vast majority of countries and, look, i�*m sure if you interview other world leaders that are here, the vast majority think this is an opportunity. they aren�*t sure exactly what to do exactly how to do it, not that i all the answers, but they know that growth rests in dealing with the economy in a way that affects the whole notion of what we will do about climate change. it�*s a gigantic opportunity.
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0k, change. it�*s a gigantic opportunity. ok, i called on the wall street journal but i got the wrong one. let�*s try the real wall street journal. let's try the real wall street journal. . ~' , ., , let's try the real wall street journal. ., ,, , ., , . ., journal. thank you very much, we are the real wall — journal. thank you very much, we are the real wall street _ journal. thank you very much, we are the real wall street journal _ journal. thank you very much, we are the real wall street journal for - the real wall street journal for mr president, you tweeted earlier asking — president, you tweeted earlier asking virginia and newjersey residents— asking virginia and newjersey residents to vote, democrats are struggling in a state you won by ten points _ struggling in a state you won by ten points are — struggling in a state you won by ten points. are you seeing these problems is a rebuke of your presidency? could this signal your real tosses — presidency? could this signal your real losses for democrats in the midterms? we real losses for democrats in the midterm?— real losses for democrats in the midterms? ~ ., ., ., midterms? we are going to win. i think we're _ midterms? we are going to win. i think we're going _ midterms? we are going to win. i think we're going to _ midterms? we are going to win. i think we're going to win - midterms? we are going to win. i think we're going to win in - think we�*re going to win in virginia. and you know you reported it being close, the race is very close. it�*s about who shows up, who turns out. granted i won by a large margin, but the point of the matter is that we all knew from the beginning, this was going to be a tight race. and it is tight. this could get down to turn out and, i guess is i�*ll be landing at 1am east
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coast time, that�*s probably about the time we will start hearing what the time we will start hearing what the results are. i think we will win newjersey, as well. but the off year is always unpredictable, especially when we don�*t have a general election going on at the same time. that�*s been the case up and down a long time, especially as virginia has turned more and more blue. but having said that, i don�*t believe and i�*ve not seen any evidence whether or not i am doing well or poorly, whether or not i�*ve got my agenda passed or not will have any real impact on winning or losing. even if we had passed my agenda, i wouldn�*t claim we won because biden�*s agenda passed. but i think it�*ll be very close, i think we�*ll get down to, as you all know, turnout, and i think that based on what i have heard so far, it�*s awful
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hard for me to be prognosticating, which i don�*t like doing as president anyway, from overseas. but i hope that every eligible voter in virginia and newjersey shows up and votes. and the more of them that do the better our chances are. i think we�*re going to win. all right, npr, scott? we're going to win. all right, npr, scott? ., ., . ., scott? you mentioned climate activists before _ scott? you mentioned climate activists before and _ scott? you mentioned climate activists before and i - scott? you mentioned climate activists before and i want - scott? you mentioned climate activists before and i want to i scott? you mentioned climate i activists before and i want to ask something about them. the atmosphere around _ something about them. the atmosphere around the _ something about them. the atmosphere around the conference here is sceptical. _ around the conference here is sceptical, and it's pretty angry. ctaimant — sceptical, and it's pretty angry. claimant activists feel like decades and decades of cops have led to broken — and decades of cops have led to broken promises, and even if all these _ broken promises, and even if all these goals are reached, it'sjust not enough right now. and i'm wondering what you would say to the people _ wondering what you would say to the people outside who are really angry at this— people outside who are really angry at this conference, especially at this moment where joe manchin has
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created _ this moment where joe manchin has created more doubt that your legislation will pass, and you've -ot legislation will pass, and you've got a _ legislation will pass, and you've got a very— legislation will pass, and you've got a very conservative supreme court — got a very conservative supreme court about to take a look at whether _ court about to take a look at whether your epa can regulate greenhouse gas emissions. what's your message to people outside who worry— your message to people outside who worry this _ your message to people outside who worry this isn't enough given the crisis? _ worry this isn't enough given the crisis? . worry this isn't enough given the crisis? , ., . ~' worry this isn't enough given the crisis? , ., ., ,, ., , ., crisis? first of all, i think anyone who is focused _ crisis? first of all, i think anyone who is focused on _ crisis? first of all, i think anyone who is focused on the _ crisis? first of all, i think anyone i who is focused on the environment should be worried. we�*ve got a lot more work to be done. we�*ve done more work to be done. we�*ve done more than we�*ve ever done though, that�*s the point. and more has to be done. i didn�*t have a single member of this conference come up to me and say, "are you going to pass what you have? how will that affect, what are you going to do?" what they�*re looking at is what�*s happened at everything in terms of dealing with deforestation and building back better, and how we will be able to focus. when�*s the last time you heard world leaders sit down
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together and agree that what they�*ll do is deal with the needs of the infrastructure of other countries, that they�*ll focus first and foremost on whether or not what the climate impact is of that. so i think, look, there�*s a reason for people to be worried. i�*m worried. i�*m worried if we don�*t continue to move forward and make the kind of progress we are now making that at all — we throw into jeopardy the prospect that we will be able to keep the temperature from rising above 1.5 celsius. but i�*m optimistic that there is, how can i say it, i suppose the best way to say it, i suppose the best way to say it, i suppose the best way to say it, scott, is that what i feel is that the populations of each of
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our countries have a different perspective than they did at, 25. not necessarily because of the leaders of any countries, including mine, all of a sudden people are seeing these things happen that they didn�*t think would happen. we�*ve seen people drown in their basements in queens, new york, because of flooding and rain. we�*ve seen more territory burned down in the united states since the first of the year than makes up the entire landmass of the state of newjersey. they�*ve seen hurricanes with top winds of 178 mph. so they are looking at these things, the water is warming, they are seeing a whole range of things occurring around the world that haven�*t happened. and it�*s like, whoa — because what i used to get, there�*s no reason why anyone would remember this, get, there�*s no reason why anyone would rememberthis, but get, there�*s no reason why anyone would remember this, but back when
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they find republican by the guy in —— dick lugarfrom the they find republican by the guy in —— dick lugar from the state of indiana, he and a chairman or ranking members of a foreign relations committee, 20 years ago we end up proposing, and worked but got no enthusiasm, a thing for debt for nature swabs. people looked at us like, what are you doing? why forgive the debts of people who will burn down more of the forest was? now everybody goes, "well, what else can you do?" so i think there�*s a whole different attitude that�*s out there. i think this is being led, and i�*m not being solicitous here, i think this is being led by, you know, my granddaughters and their friends, that generation. i think they�*re out there going, whoa. and they�*re out there going, whoa. and they are having a profound impact on
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their parents and grandparents about what�*s happening. then all these climactic and things are happening, and now people are paying attention like they�*ve never done before. there�*s a lot more to do and it�*ll determine whether or not we will be able to fund what we are talking about. but for example, even if the funding didn�*t come from some other governments, you have the private sector now engaged in they�*re talking about investing literally trillions of dollars off the sidelines. it is bankers who are now deciding — i talked to you all a long time ago that you had major corporate america pricing carbon. times are changing, wejust corporate america pricing carbon. times are changing, we just have enough sense as world leaders to get it right. thank you also very much.
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that�*s all so much. jae it right. thank you also very much. that's all so much.— that's all so much. joe biden summing _ that's all so much. joe biden summing up _ that's all so much. joe biden summing up his _ that's all so much. joe biden summing up his thoughts - that's all so much. joe biden summing up his thoughts on | that's all so much. joe biden i summing up his thoughts on his two days here in glasgow. we were nick mabey is cofounder and ceo of the european think tank, e3g. what about this issue of america�*s roll? we showed up and showed some leadership. you�*re in the back rooms all the time, what sort of leadership is american show that america shown the last two days? he�*s obviously pleased that people have joined and pleased that there�*s not many people asking about his infrastructure bill. but i think his biggest leadership that hasn�*t been picked up is the big back dust build back better initiative, which is about delivering hundreds of millions to other countries to clean. all these world leaders
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agreed that they need to work much stronger together to fill the gap in the trillions needed for countries to get off coal, just like we�*ve seen south africa agree a deal with the us, the uk, germany and france to get them off coal, that�*s one of the biggest events of today. so the us really was stepping up a bit more. 50 us really was stepping up a bit more. ., ., ., , ., ., more. so that initiative was not on the agenda — more. so that initiative was not on the agenda at _ more. so that initiative was not on the agenda at all _ more. so that initiative was not on the agenda at all until— more. so that initiative was not on the agenda at all until he - more. so that initiative was not on the agenda at all until he let - more. so that initiative was not on the agenda at all until he let it i the agenda at all until he let it yesterday?— the agenda at all until he let it esterda ? . , . the agenda at all until he let it esterda? . , . . yesterday? that was very much biden cominr in yesterday? that was very much biden coming in and — yesterday? that was very much biden coming in and wanting _ yesterday? that was very much biden coming in and wanting to _ yesterday? that was very much biden coming in and wanting to move - yesterday? that was very much biden coming in and wanting to move that l coming in and wanting to move that forward and put some momentum behind it. so that was a surprise to everybody, but in the end this helps developing countries by thinking there�*s more to these than just announcements, he really owns this. all this face—to—face he�*s doing with leaders, he talks about these things and they go away with a bit more trust that he�*s got a difficult congress, but he�*ll come back with something real. and that gives them more confidence to offer more. what
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more confidence to offer more. what about his leadership _ more confidence to offer more. what about his leadership in _ more confidence to offer more. what about his leadership in south america? because you�*ll know there�*s a lot of scepticism around the deforestation deal today, they�*ve cut down record amounts of rain forest in brazil this year, then we getjair forest in brazil this year, then we get jair bolsonaro showing forest in brazil this year, then we getjair bolsonaro showing up here saying he loves the rain forest. does he, or does he love the cash that comes with it? i does he, or does he love the cash that comes with it?— that comes with it? i don't think an bod that comes with it? i don't think anybody has _ that comes with it? i don't think anybody has any _ that comes with it? i don't think anybody has any faith _ that comes with it? i don't think anybody has any faith in - that comes with it? i don't think i anybody has any faith in bolsonaro and they�*re waiting for the elections next year. in 2014 they said they�*d stop deforestation, didn�*t happen. this initiative has more grid and more money, and it�*s also something to do with how our consumption of soybeans and palm oil affects the money. so there�*s more in this one, but i think the general view of people is, as he said, the proof is in the pudding. nice start, let�*s see them deliver over the next ten years. but they�*ve learned some lessons, that�*s the good thing, and hopefully it�*ll produce some real action in the next ten years to stop deforestation.— action in the next ten years to stop deforestation. nick, thanks for your atience, deforestation. nick, thanks for your patience. it — deforestation. nick, thanks for your patience. it is _ deforestation. nick, thanks for your patience, it is really _
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deforestation. nick, thanks for your patience, it is really useful- deforestation. nick, thanks for your patience, it is really useful to - patience, it is really useful to have you here because you�*ve seen things in the back room that we don�*t see, so it�*s important to get that perspective, thank you. don't see, so it's important to get that perspective, thank you. thank ou ve that perspective, thank you. thank you very much- _ back in 2016, ahead of the paris agreement in 2016, developed countries made a commitment to mobilise $100 billion a year from 2020 to support developing countries deal with the impact of climate change. on that, here�*s the british prime minister borisjohnson. although the uk has this week committed a further $1 billion of international climate finance, taking our total to £12.6 billion by 2025. actually, just a few hours ago, japan announced another $10 billion over the next five years, a big commitment from japan. the reality is that the developed world will still be late and hitting the $100 billion target.
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borisjohnson boris johnson speaking earlier. sara jane ahmed is the finance adviser to the vulnerable group of 20 — a group countries particularly vulnerable to climate change. we were just talking about american leadership, and you may be heard nick saying that america led yesterday and brought a lot of countries together to start putting more money towards the developing nations in the smaller states. you obviously advise on the finance side — do you think that money is forthcoming? is - do you think that money is forthcoming?— - do you think that money is forthcomina? , ., , ., , ., forthcoming? is not 'ust a question of forthcoming. — forthcoming? is not 'ust a question of forthcoming, but i forthcoming? is notjust a question of forthcoming, but also _ forthcoming? is notjust a question of forthcoming, but also access i forthcoming? is notjust a question | of forthcoming, but also access and cost of capital. currently as we know, the current covid climate crisis together, this dual crisis has caused severe indebtedness, the fact that there is a lack of adaptation finance and very expensive claimant risk insurance means we suffer losses in damage all the time —— claimant risk. just today there was a leader summit with the claimant vulnerable countries where there was a declaration with
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the claimant emergency pack on this delivery plan, and the 500 billion between 2020—24 highlighting as well at developing countries are already spending 30% of their public finances on adaptation alone. boris johnson said _ finances on adaptation alone. boris johnson said that _ finances on adaptation alone. boris johnson said that the _ finances on adaptation alone. boris johnson said that the japanese had come forward with an extra $10 billion in funding. we know the 100 billion in funding. we know the 100 billion pledge was made in 2009 is late, it will be late, whatever, is supposed to arrive in 2023. does that japanese funding that�*s arrived today take us somewhere near the target, and does it open finance a bit quicker?— bit quicker? 2023 is quite far off considering _ bit quicker? 2023 is quite far off considering that _ bit quicker? 2023 is quite far off considering that we _ bit quicker? 2023 is quite far off considering that we need - bit quicker? 2023 is quite far off considering that we need to i considering that we need to transition our economies this decade, which means every year we wait means 2040, 2050, all those impacts from those studies that we hear of will come closer and closer. we already see from the latest ipcc
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report that claimant is accelerating. equally important to claimant as a transfer, which is entirely missing from claimant resistant technologies, we need that to be delivered along with finance. but the point you were just making his adaptation is critical because claimant changes here and will be here after whatever we do to cut emissions. here after whatever we do to cut emissions-— here after whatever we do to cut emissions. , . ., ., , emissions. green technology is also critical because _ emissions. green technology is also critical because as _ emissions. green technology is also critical because as we've _ emissions. green technology is also critical because as we've seen - emissions. green technology is also critical because as we've seen overl critical because as we�*ve seen over the last few months, there�*s been severe volatility in the fossil, gas and coal markets, and this is incredibly expensive for developing countries as well. it�*s also good for the economy and the environment. i have to leave that there because everything is truncated after the president, but thank you for your
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patience. lots of new announcements, the methane deforestation, the technology announcements are very important, as well. but listening to mick before he went tojoe biden, but he sees is the most significant thing is the north and south coming together to set ambition and the two weeks going forward. he thinks that�*s quite a sizeable statement they�*ve made in the last hour, maybe we�*ll get more of that later in the evening. studio: thanks for the full update from glasgow. if you�*re watching and want further information on the issues christian was discussing, you can get that through the bbc news website. let�*s turn to ethiopia. the government has declared a nationwide state of emergency. it�*s called on residents in the capital to take up arms against rebels. and it�*s done that because of an an anti—government alliance that it fears will march on the capital. here�*s ethiopia�*s justice minister.
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translation: a state of emergency will be presented to the house - of people�*s representatives within 48 hours and enacted. however, the implementation of the declaration will start today onwards from the time it was declared with the council of ministers. at the centre of this is the tigrayan people�*s liberation front — or tplf. it�*s been in conflict with the government for a year, fighting for greater autonomy. the group has reportedly captured two cities in amhara about 400 kilometres from addis ababa — you can see them labelled here. and rebels have been strengthened by fighters from another group from the 0romo ethnic group. here�*s one tigrayan commentator based in the netherlands on what he�*s hearing. at this moment, we are hearing the report that the to grey and forces have taken control of both cities ——
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tigre. to the ephod and the direction of audie sababa dutch audie the special area is the area to the... they have stated their goals, one of them is to break the siege on tigre. beverly 0chieng, is a sub saharan african conflict specialist and media analyst for bbc monitoring. good to have your back. can you help us understand why this is for layering at the moment, wisest? they�*ve been able to get in the
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conflict that started in the tigray region in november last year, and it�*s quite some progress. there have been escalated threats. the rebel forces have not been deterred by the air strikes taking place, it and they continued progressing forward. this is armed... the somali region is beefing up security, and as a whole they are calling in special forces to fight against the rebels. given these two groups wanting greater autonomy for their respective parts of ethiopia, where they marching on the capital which is outside those areas —— why are they marching? it is outside those areas -- why are they marching?— they marching? it is interesting because at _ they marching? it is interesting because at the _ they marching? it is interesting because at the start _ they marching? it is interesting because at the start of - they marching? it is interesting because at the start of the - because at the start of the conflict, it did not feel like it would build to this extent, and there is a possibility the premise or may have miscalculated in his war effort. the two groups see themselves as fighting against adversity, which is the prime minister taking the capital would
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mean... and other concern is the fact that these groups want to speak for a way to assert their authority and power, and this way they�*d be able to prove that point. haifa and power, and this way they'd be able to prove that point. now we've heard the government _ able to prove that point. now we've heard the government say - able to prove that point. now we've heard the government say to - able to prove that point. now we've| heard the government say to people to register your weapons and prepare for an attack on the city. do you think that�*s a realistic possibility or the government is trying to animate its own supporters by exaggerating the threat? it is animate its own supporters by exaggerating the threat? it is very difficult to get _ exaggerating the threat? it is very difficult to get a _ exaggerating the threat? it is very difficult to get a sense _ exaggerating the threat? it is very difficult to get a sense of - exaggerating the threat? it is very difficult to get a sense ofjust - exaggerating the threat? it is very difficult to get a sense ofjust how| difficult to get a sense ofjust how much mobilisation is taking place, notjust for the government but even the rebel forces. but there is a sense of desperation because of the fact of the rebels have been much closer than expected. there is a sense that there will be a possible escalation into a civil war. there is fears of a growing humanitarian crisis, but also a duty of patriotism, and that�*s with the premise or was trying to tap into
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when he made his comments on saturday when he released a statement calling for arms. bearing for everything _ statement calling for arms. bearing for everything you're _ statement calling for arms. bearing for everything you're saying, - statement calling for arms. bearing for everything you're saying, is i for everything you�*re saying, is there anything from the regional powers to de—escalate the situation? that�*s been very tricky, of course it is the seat of the african union and so far, with this threat that�*s been growing, there�*s been violence from them. the regional countries are under their own scene, sue don has had a coup recently, the intergovernmental authority has been able to on weigh in on the crisis in sudan. there have been concerns about tigray �*s on statements, some tweets shared a showing that there is some partisanship, so there�*s not enough political resources to be able to direct efforts towards anticipating this crisis. beverly, we always _ anticipating this crisis. beverly, we always appreciate _ anticipating this crisis. beverly, we always appreciate your - anticipating this crisis. beverly, we always appreciate your help | we always appreciate your help understanding this particular conflict, thank you very much indeed. that ends this edition of
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outside source, live from here in the bbc news room in london. goodbye. good evening. for most of us, today turned into one of those bright but rather chilly autumn days with some spells of sunshine and 1—2 showers. you can see some shower clouds popping up there for a weather watcher in west wales. the satellite picture shows that many of those showers did focus in across northern and western areas, areas exposed to the breeze. and those showers, when they did crop up, gave some pretty impressive skyscapes, some nice rainbows out there. and some of those showers will continue through tonight, especially around the coasts — some of the showers wintry over the highest ground in northern scotland. not as many showers for inland spots, in fact, it�*ll turn really quite cold for some, down towards the south, temperatures as low as minus one celsius, allowing for a touch of frost and, for parts of england and wales, some fog patches to take us into tomorrow morning.
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tomorrow is another sunshine—and—showers day for most of us. again, the showers mainly around the coast, but i think we will see a few more drifting inland across parts of northeast england, down into the midlands and east anglia as we head through the afternoon. the wind, if anything, a little stronger than it was today and temperatures will struggle — highs between 8—12 celsius. now as we move through wednesday night into thursday, this area of high pressure will start to build its way in — and that will have the effect of killing off some of the showers, there won�*t be as many showers around on thursday. there will still be some across parts of pembrokeshire and cornwall, some to start off for east anglia and the southeast, they should tend to clear. and then, for many, especially across england and wales, we will see some spells of sunshine, but with more cloud toppling in towards northern ireland and scotland, certainly a chilly feel to the day, 7—12 celsius. now through thursday night into friday, our area of high pressure will drift a little further southwards, and we�*ll see a feed of cloud working its way in from the west. so generally speaking,
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quite a lot of cloud in the mix on friday, that cloud producing some outbreaks of patchy rain, especially in northwest scotland, and equally some breaks in that cloud, some sunny spells for eastern and southern parts. but it�*ll feel a little milder by this stage, 11—13 celsius. and that�*s the theme we take with us into the weekend — some milder weather with a lot of cloud, and certainly across the northern half of the uk, the potentialfor some rain at times, it�*ll be quite windy, too. further south, the cloud should break here and there to give a little bit of sunshine and a milder weekend for all of us.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm... world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. in other news — two metropolitan police officers are convicted of taking and sharing photos of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after the sisters were found murdered in north london. the officers are told to expect prison terms.

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