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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 2, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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today at six. some progress is made at the climate summit in glasgow in the race to limit global warming. stopping and reversing the destruction of forests by 2030 is approved by over a hundred countries, including brazil, where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been lost. and methane emissions — a majorfactor in global warming — are meant to be cut by a third by the end of the decade, but the overriding message is one of caution. we must take care to guard against false hope and not to think in any way that the job is done. because it is not. there is still a very long way to go. but much more is expected by campaigners outside the summit — with demands for the rapid phasing
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out of fossilfuels. this week we have been driving less and using _ this week we have been driving less and using plant —based alternatives. and we'll be talking to one family about the practical changes needed to play a part in the fight against climate change. also on the programme tonight. two police officers plead guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters, who were stabbed to death in a park in london. the health secretary admits the government won't hit its target of recruiting 6,000 more gps by 202a. and how smart are smart motorways — a report calls for their rollout to be halted until the government can prove they�* re safe. and coming up on the bbc news channel. tottenham have confirmed the former chelsea and inter milan boss antonio conte is their new manager until the summer of 2023.
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good evening once again from the global climate summit in glasgow where world leaders have reached agreement today on two major areas affecting the future of the planet. more than 100 countries — led by the us and the eu — have launched a far—reaching initiative to cut emissions of methane — a gas that's a major cause of global warming. the pledge is to cut emissions by 30 percent by the end of the decade — and if that's achieved — it could play a big part in limiting the rise in global warming to 1.5 degrees. earlier in the day there was another significant pledge — to stop and reverse the process of deforestation by 2030. the real breakthrough here is that brazil, where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been cut down, is among the 100 countries
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backing the pledge. and there's a separate initiative to cut carbon emissions by boosting the use of clean technologies in industries such as steel, road transport and agriculture. the summit in glasgow is widely seen as the last big opportunity to tackle further climate change and its devastating consequences. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has been following the day's events here. when cultures clash can they still agree? when there's so much difference there can be descent. there are so many faces here in glasgow and so many facets of what could be done. are you pleased with what is happening this week? hollywood stars may campaign but less developed countries may well complain. the united nations fears there's not enough trust to bridge there's not enough trust to bridge the gaps but deals are being made.
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100 leaders signed a promise to stop the destruction of forests nine years. i the destruction of forests nine ears. . . ., ., the destruction of forests nine ears. . _, ., u, ., years. i am confident that we can do this, all we — years. i am confident that we can do this, all we need _ years. i am confident that we can do this, all we need to _ years. i am confident that we can do this, all we need to do _ years. i am confident that we can do this, all we need to do is _ years. i am confident that we can do this, all we need to do is to - years. i am confident that we can do| this, all we need to do is to summon the will to do what we know is right and we know it is necessary and is in our capacity. let's get to work, we can do this.— in our capacity. let's get to work, we can do this. even the leader of the free world _ we can do this. even the leader of the free world can _ we can do this. even the leader of the free world can be _ we can do this. even the leader of the free world can be hemmed - we can do this. even the leader of the free world can be hemmed in. president biden struggling to push through his green ambitions at home and pass thatjohnson had his attention cast over offers many foreign leaders as possible. they will depart tonight leaving instructions with their negotiators. around 100 countries have already signed up to cut the potent greenhouse gas methane by nearly a third by the end of the decade. but away from the glitz of the main stage and down a quiet corridor in a tiny office is a sign ofjust how hard an overall agreement will be.
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chinese president is not here but one of the most powerful people you have never heard of is here in his place. chinese climate negotiator. my place. chinese climate negotiator. my discussions withjohn kerry and alex armah were very constructive. but there were still huge gaps. he criticised developed countries for not coming up with cash that promised to help the less wealthy go green and one that focusing too much and limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees as borisjohnson wanted could destroy the consensus. i am cautiously optimistic _ could destroy the consensus. i am cautiously optimistic in _ could destroy the consensus. i —n cautiously optimistic in the sense that on the way to the g20 in rome i said to some of you on the plane if this was a football match than the current score would be tempted down in the match between humanity and climate change and what you can say
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now after two days of talks with 120 well readers is that we have pulled back a goal to and i think that we will be able to take this thing to extra time. will be able to take this thing to extra time-— will be able to take this thing to extra time. ~ . ., , ., ., extra time. what i who is going to score the extra _ extra time. what i who is going to score the extra two _ extra time. what i who is going to score the extra two or— extra time. what i who is going to score the extra two or three - extra time. what i who is going to score the extra two or three goalsi score the extra two or three goals that you still need? if score the extra two or three goals that you still need?— that you still need? if there's one thin that that you still need? if there's one thing that gives _ that you still need? if there's one thing that gives me _ that you still need? if there's one thing that gives me confidence i that you still need? if there's one thing that gives me confidence ori thing that gives me confidence or optimism is the we are starting to create for the countries that find it most difficult to transition away from fossil fuels, we are starting to create those coalitions of support. to to create those coalitions of su ort. ., , ., ., support. to help them move on. the first 48 hours — support. to help them move on. the first 48 hours here _ support. to help them move on. the first 48 hours here have _ first 48 hours here have been frantic. and today there's been a flurry of promises that should hypothetically make a difference but it is now that the hard bargaining really starts. boris johnson wants it is now that the hard bargaining really starts. borisjohnson wants a deal that keeps global warning within safe limits but here in glasgow might now it is too early to be sure if that is within reach. they will likely be seeing crashes
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and arguments, different voices and different views. borisjohnson can be sure what booklet in glasgow. we are near the end of this vast summit when he will return. as we've heard, one of the significant deals approved today by more than 100 countries is a pledge to cut emissions of methane gas — a major contributor to global warming. the plan is to cut emissions by nearly a third by 2030. less encouraging is that three of the countries responsible for the highest level of emissions — russia, china and india — are not part of this agreement. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has the details. from emissions from cows to rubbish rotting in landfill sites and flares from oil and gas, methane is escaping into the atmosphere. but today more than 100 countries agreed to cut the gas by 30% in a deal brokered
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by the united states and the eu. we have to cut emissions fast. and methane is one of the gasses we can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow down climate change. methane is an important greenhouse gas, making up about 20% of global emissions. it is extremely potent and has caused about 50% of current global warming. cutting all methane by one third by 2030 would reduce global temperatures by about 0.3 degrees by 2040. tackling methane from the oil and gas industry will be a priority. the easiest way to reduce emissions is to plug any leaks. you cannot see methane unless you use a special camera like this one. it is a colourless, odourless gas. but because it does not last for very long in the atmosphere, if you cut methane emissions now you make a big difference first.
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—— fast. it is why reducing methane is seen as one of the easier climate fixes. but there will be challenges. agriculture including rice production is one of the biggest emitters of methane. solving that will be much harder. the countries who have signed up to this deal account for about half of global methane emissions. but there are some notable absences, namely china, russia and india who have not come on board. to achieve this 30% global target we will need them to step up. but having more than 100 countries on board including some of the largest emitters and covering the vast majority of globally traded natural gas is a very big deal. this shows the levels of methane being released all around our planet. now for the first time there is a target to cut this greenhouse gas. at a conference trying to stop temperatures from rising above the safe limits, this is a significant step for the world.
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rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. the first deal reached today was on stopping and reversing the process of deforestation — by the end of the decade. borisjohnson says protecting the rain forests in particular is essential if global warming is to be limited to 1.5 degrees. trees are vital to life on earth — and they absorb around a third of all carbon dioxide or c02 emitted annually. but according to the united nations — an estimated 28,000 square miles of forest are lost every year — that's equivalent to 36 football pitches every minute. brazil — where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been cut down — is among the countries backing the new pledge. in recent years the problem has been getting much worse — over 4,000 square miles of brazilian rainforest were destroyed injust 12 months. 0ur correspondent 0rla guerin has travelled to brazil — to see at first hand the threat to one of the world's great ecological treasures.
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the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn't worried about the planet, he's worried about his family.
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his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle. and about an hour's drive away,
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ritual destruction. every year vast areas are cleared by slashing and burning. the heat is building now and there is ash falling in the air. no attempt has been made to hide this. it is at the side of a busy road. and when fires like this happen here it is not the work of nature, it is the work of man. in the global fight against climate change, this is one more loss. and here too, lost ground. more wild west than wild amazon. cattle farming is driven by global demand for brazilian beef and backed by presidentjair bolsonaro. henato hammos is a second—generation rancher. he says the forest is a living, not a fairy tale.
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but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she has spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples, or trying to.
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this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest. let's keep brazil and the amazon in mind as we speak to rebecca morrell. i think it's fair to say that there is a lot of scepticism around about countries like brazil saying they
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are in favour of this new target but whose track record, let's face it, is not good. whose track record, let's face it, is not good-— whose track record, let's face it, is not good. yes, that's right. the tou:h bit is not good. yes, that's right. the tough bit with _ is not good. yes, that's right. the tough bit with these _ is not good. yes, that's right. the tough bit with these conferences i is not good. yes, that's right. the | tough bit with these conferences is whether their promises actually live up whether their promises actually live up to actions. it's fair to say that they have been given a boost at the start of the conference ? conference. deforestation is vitally important and trees are supposed to suck up and store carbon and if you cut them down and burned them, they release it, and as you've just heard, some of the major forest around the world are carbon emitters. what is significant is getting countries like brazil, indonesia and canada on board, but we had a promise in 2014 that was exactly the same and nothing really happened. methane is really interesting. it's only in the last few years that scientists have realised what a big contribution it is making towards climate change and
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fixing some of the problems is actually straightforward, but it's going to be a challenge. obviously, if you don't get some of the bigger countries on board, they will not solve the problems of climate change, but they will help chip away at it. , . . ., change, but they will help chip away atit. , ., , change, but they will help chip away atit. n. . , . one other development today — boris johnson has formally apologised to the israeli energy minister after she was unable to gain access to the conference in her wheelchair. karine elharrar, who has muscular dystrophy, was forced to return to her accommodation yesterday after waiting for two hours outside the main venue. the prime minister said he was sorry for the confusion. we'll have more from glasgow later in the programme, but now let's have the day's other news with sophie. thank you. two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters, who were found stabbed to death in a park in london. pc deninaffer and pcjamie lewis,
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who'd been assigned to guarding the crime scene, distributed the images of bibaa henry and nicole smallman injune last year. helena wilkinson has this report from the old bailey. this is one of the last photos of bibaa henry on the left and nicole smallman. hours after it was taken, they were murdered. last week, mina smallman saw her daughters�* killer sentenced for his crimes. today, she was back again at the same court having to endure yet more unimaginable pain. it may sound really ridiculous that this case has brought us to even more anxiety today. it is the most nervous i have felt doing any interview and i think because it was the final straw. these two officers were meant to be guarding the area where her daughters�*
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bodies were found. pc deninaffer, on the left, and pcjamie lewis. but despite their orders, the two officers then breached the crime scene cordon and took photographs of the bodies which they then shared on whatsapp. one of the images was then edited by lewis, who superimposed his own face onto the picture with the victims in the background. today, they appeared together in the dock. guilty, they both said, to one count of misconduct in a public office. in a statement, the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick said, what former pcjaffer and pc lewis chose to do that day was utterly unprofessional and deeply insensitive. 0utside court, the independent office for police conduct said there was no place in policing for this behaviour and it had to stop.
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a culture where some officers don't see anything wrong with sharing deeply offensive messages and where others feel unable or unwilling to challenge, has to change and it has to change now. the two officers who took and shared pictures of the sisters' bodies will be sentenced next month. the judge told them to expect prison sentences. helen wilkinson, bbc news, at the old bailey. more than 20 people have been killed and and dozens injured in an attack on afghanistan's biggest military hospital. two explosions were heard at the gate to the hospital in kabul. no—one has admitted carrying out the attack but the taliban has blamed islamic state fighters. the health secretary has admitted the government is not on track to meet its pledge to raise the number of gps in england by 6,000 by 2024. sajid javid was facing mps
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on a commons committee which also heard there was a workforce crisis in the nhs. our health editor hugh pym is here. hugh ? more evidence of the difficulty in finding and retaining staff. yes, that pledge of 6,000 more gps in england by 2024 was made by the conservatives on the 2019 election campaign and now sajid javid says it is not on track and more needs to be done to ensure that it is and back in 2015, the conservatives pledged 5,000 more gps in england by 2020 and it was not met. yes, there were references to the workforce crisis in the nhs on this committee including by the former health secretaryjeremy hunt, and sajid javid was pressed on how much money had been set aside for training of new staff after the spending review announcement of more money for the nhs last week and said that had not been set out. but he did go on to say that there would be a 15 year
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plan for the training of new doctors and nurses under the health professionals but that would not be set out until next spring. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were 33,865 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average, there were 40,068 new cases reported per day in the last week. there were 9,538 people in hospital with covid as of yesterday — the highest number since the first week of march. 293 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test, but that figure includes some deaths in england that were not reported yesterday. on average in the past week, 162 related deaths were recorded every day. and more than 8.3 million people have received their boosterjab, this includes third doses for those with certain health conditions. investigators say "low
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adhesion" between the track and train wheels was the most likely cause of the crash between two trains in salisbury. the trains collided on the approach to a tunnel near salisbury station on sunday. one of the drivers is believed to have suffered "life—changing" injuries. another four small energy providers have gone bust according to the energy watchdog 0fgem. 0mni energy, ma energy, zebra power and ampoweruk have announced they are ceasing to trade. the regulator said it will choose a new supplier for more than 23,000 households and businesses affected. a group of mps has called for the roll out of so—called smart motorways in england to be halted until the government can prove they�* re safe. the smart motorway system — which can include no hard shoulder — is designed to increase capacity. but relatives of those killed when their vehicles broke down say relying on technology instead of a hard shoulder is dangerous. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies.
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a sombre procession past parliament. each coffin represents a life lost on the country's smart motorways, carried through westminster yesterday by those who want the system changed. smart motorways use technology to try to ease traffic. they're controversial when they don't have hard shoulders. if a vehicle breaks down in a live lane and can't reach a refuge bay, a red cross is meant to tell motorists not to drive in that lane. the government has argued technology means drivers are more likely to die on a normal motorway than a smart one. campaigners say they are less safe. the transport select committee says it wants existing smart motorways to be made safer. it doesn't want any more hard shoulders to be removed or put back. if you cut the data a number of different ways, it gives different conclusions. in order to get drivers confident that they feel safe enough to use the smart motorway network, we need to fix some of these issues that have been outstanding for far
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too long, and then make a much better determination on the roll—out of smart motorways. but work is continuing. across the country, motorways like this one are having their hard shoulders turned into an active lane for traffic. the committee might want that work to stop, but there's nothing that requires the government to do that, and some campaigners say this report doesn't go far enough. claire's husband died on a smart motorway without a hard shoulder in 2019. . , ., . 2019. our aim is to get the hard shoulder back— 2019. our aim is to get the hard shoulder back in _ 2019. our aim is to get the hard shoulder back in every - 2019. our aim is to get the hard shoulder back in every single i shoulder back in every single instance. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they propose pausing smart motorway is because it gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. get the legal case in the high court movini. ., . , . moving. the government has said that it could have — moving. the government has said that it could have been _ moving. the government has said that it could have been faster _ moving. the government has said that it could have been faster in _ it could have been faster in implementing safety measures but says it is committed to making smart motorways are safer. it says it will
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respond to the report in due course but continuing with smart motorways will not be without its obstacles. caroline davies, bbc news. tottenham have appointed former chelsea boss antonio conte as their new head coach. conte, who has signed an initial 18—month contract, won the premier league title with chelsea in 2017, and most recently led inter milan to the serie a title in may. the announcement comes after spurs fired manager nuno espirito santo yesterday after just 17 games. let's return now to our top story, the climate summit cop26, and to huw, in glasgow. many thanks. the decisions being made here in glasgow this week and next could well have far—reaching effects on people's everyday lives. cutting carbon emissions will involve people changing their habits ? in their choice of food and goods — which will no doubt present practical challenges. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill has been to meet one
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family in leeds who have been looking to the future. busy family life makes it difficult to count our carbon emissions, but for this family in leeds, decarbonising their daily routine has become a priority. i think edie constantly likes to remind me that i need to do better. do you think it could be made easier, you know, to make the changes that you would like to make? it would be better for the environment if we switched to eating more plant—based things, but we don't really do a lot of that at the moment and we could be better that. as a parent, iam busy, but actually, i need to just make these changes for the better, really. it's kind of the next generation that will be left with these problems. and we'll all need to be part of the solution. according to one in—depth study of our energy use, the uk could halve its demand for energy by 2050 without compromising our quality of life. we've got to reduce emissions i so quickly over the next ten years
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that it means that everybody needs to be involved in the debate - and in positive changes. lower emissions, researchers say, means less consumption. as well as cutting our meat intake, most of us could reduce how many calories we eat. buying less and repairing more could help make a dent in the mountain of electrical waste we produce every year, and researchers are calling for investment in public transport and cycling networks to increase tenfold in the next decade to help us all decarbonise our travel. to work out what that means for their day to day, we organised for edie and jo to get expert advice. i'd never want anyone to feel guilty about their carbon footprint. - it's not always easy to make changes. i you could considerjourneys under a particular distance, _ a shortjourney, could be done by cycling or walking. - well, we are definitely up for the challenge, aren't we, edie? yes, we will try our very best this week. come on, mister! we are just about to walk to the shop. this week we've been driving less and walking more and also
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using plant—based alternative. edie, jo, how did it go? the challenge? we started this week. we've tried really hard to walk wherever was reasonably practical, but i don't think ate as many plant—based alternatives as we could have done. i think they've done fantastically well. l lots of the changes also can lead to a healthier, - more active lifestyle as well, and i think that is what's - positive about this. to slash our emissions as quickly as we need to, scientists say most of us will need to rethink our daily habits and consume a little bit less. victoria gill, bbc news. a sense of the challenges ahead. a lovely sunny day in glasgow. time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. yes, it has been pretty good across central and southern scotland and the inland parts of england and
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coastal areas have seen showers around. tonight showers will continue around the north and west and east coast and the southern areas will turn cold with boston fog patches developing. the weather front will be accentuating the showers across the northern half of scotland as we move through the course of the evening and overnight so plenty of showers and some wintry over the high ground and some grazing into coastal parts and it will affect south west wales and into cornwall, so where we have the showers and the breeze, the temperatures will be five or 6 , but central and southern parts, you can see it cold with a touch of frost and fog to greet us on wednesday. we still have the weather front accentuating the showers as it spreads south so ? so tomorrow most of the showers will be around coastal areas, particularly northern half of scotland with wintry nuts over the high ground on the weather will enhance shower activity in northern england so more cloud around on the showers pushing in a bit further inland. still a bit of
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sunshine, the wind light in the

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