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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 2, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'mjane hill. the headlines... world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. together, we are committing to collectively reduce our methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. brazil is one of the signatories to the deal, but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing
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deforestation of the amazon rainforest. iam i am live at cop26 in glasgow where we will be looking in more detail at those two big announcements of the day so far. i will also be talking to the former australian prime minister, malcolm turnbull. convicted of taking and sharing pictures of two murdered sisters. two met police officers, are told to expectjail terms. calls for plastic in wet wipes to be banned. a labour mp is proposing a new law that could put an end to this. good afternoon.
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world leaders at the global climate summit in glasgow are today agreeing two major deals, to try to combat rising global temperatures. let's cross live to my colleague annita mcveigh who is at the cop26 climate conference. thanks jane and welcome to glasgow, where as you say leaders are agreeing two major deals. the first is a pledge to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. the second, which is being led by america and the eu, aims to cut methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030, this despite some of the world's biggest polluting countries, not being involved in the deal. with more from glasgow, here's our science correspondent, victoria gill. the visible flare of methane release. scientists say this potent greenhouse gas has been responsible
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for about half the human—induced warming of the planet we've experienced so far. now a global partnership to tackle emissions by plugging leaks and covering landfill sites is being announced at the cop26 climate conference in glasgow. the initiative, led by the us and eu, pledges to cut emissions of the gas by at least 30% by 2030. china, russia and india, some of the world's top methane emitters, have not signed up. some of the big emitters need to join the pledge. so china, russia, for example. if we are going to achieve those big reductions that we need, then they need to come on board as well. the loss of forests around the world, estimated to be responsible for about 15% of greenhouse gas emissions, has been the subject of this crucial climate summit�*s first major deal. countries who signed the agreement, including brazil, russia, china and indonesia, represented 85% of represent 85% of
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the world's forests. the pledge, and the £15 billion behind it, has been broadly welcomed. but deforestation has actually increased since a similar pledge was launched in 2014, and it is not yet clear exactly how those who cut down forests to make money would be provided with the financial incentive to protect these vital carbon storing ecosystems instead. this is a hugely ambitious pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50% of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement is notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it's actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. some scientists remain sceptical of the progress here. a survey of climate scientists suggests many are not confident that global emissions can be cut quickly enough to avoid a climate catastrophe. it is a mixture of promise and pessimism here in glasgow. while there has been some early steps forward and key agreements
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on issues like methane emissions and deforestation, those are voluntary agreements and they are going to be put to the test at the same time that scientists say we are running out of time to slash emissions. in the gulf between words and action, the global temperature continues to rise, but as the leaders conclude their speeches and the negotiators take over, there is much more talking to do. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. us presidentjoe biden said nearly 100 countries have signed up to cut their emissions of methane. and one of the most important things we can do in this decisive decade is to keep 1.5 degrees in reach, is reduce our methane emissions as quickly as possible. as had already been stated, it's one of the most potent greenhouse gases there is. it amounts to about half the warming we are experiencing today. just methane.
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so, together, we are committing to collectively reduce on methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. victoria gill is with me now. you have been watching these announcements. we heard about c02 up until this point, not so much about methane. why? this until this point, not so much about methane- why?— until this point, not so much about methane. why? this shows the power ofthe methane. why? this shows the power of the intergovernmental _ methane. why? this shows the power of the intergovernmental panel - methane. why? this shows the power of the intergovernmental panel on - of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, the scientists backed to show this update of the latest climate science. up until now, its potency as a greenhouse gas has not really been fully understood. ipcc recent report said it is responsible for about half of the warming we have experienced so for common human induced warming that we have experience. it's incredibly potent. it's also not as persistent in the atmosphere as c02. so in terms of the bang for your buck if you reduce these may theme
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emissions, relatively easy to do, plugging leaks and covering landfill sites, you get more return for your investment for pets and easier when then c02 which is just locked into so much for our process and how we run the country. low hanging fruit, ursula von der leyen said. exactly that. when it comes to what's on the agenda at cop26, any low hanging fruit, any easy wind on climate change, we talked a lot yesterday about bending that curve, curbing those methane emissions could bend that curve by about 0.2 degrees, that curve by about 0.2 degrees, that gets us to 2.5, not too close to that 1.5 target we talked about so much, but it's an easy wind and there are not many in climate change. it there are not many in climate chance. , , , ., , change. it begs the question, why has it not been _ change. it begs the question, why has it not been done _ change. it begs the question, why has it not been done already? - has it not been done already? exactly. then again, the science on this, the really detailed science is relatively new. it reallyjust shows
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the power of that process of having that continuing scientific assessment and all that data analysed by the worlds best climate scientists and it being brought to the table of policymakers at events like this. . ~ the table of policymakers at events like this. ., ~ , ., , the table of policymakers at events like this. . ~' , ., , . the table of policymakers at events like this. ., ~ ,, , . ., like this. thank you very much for that. we are looking around the world, looking at decisions made in different countries, what impact they are having. the impact of climate change on other more developing nations. well, yesterday, australia's prime minister, scott morrison, who had been criticised by campaigners last week for his country's "net—zero" plan, told the conference that technology will have the answers to a decarbonised economy, particularly over time. driving down the cost of technology and enabling it to be adopted at scale is at the core of the australian way to reach our target of zero emissions by 2050, but we are committing to at this
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cop26. cleaner technology solutions must outcompete existing technologies, if they are to be successful everywhere. and especially so in developing economies. this needs to work, not just in the developed economies of the north atlantic, but in the developing economies of the indo pacific as well. raising the cost of energy just impacts on those who can afford it least. driving the emergence of low emissions technologies and fostering their widespread adoption is at the heart of our plan to reach net zero. i'm joined by malcolm turnbull who served as prime minister of australia from 2015—2018. now a board member of the international
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hydropower association, what message does it send a big australia's commitment to tackling climate change that even though he is here, he seemed less than enthusiastic about the prospect? than enthusiastic about the wowed?— than enthusiastic about the prospect? australia is a big country- — prospect? australia is a big country. currently, - prospect? australia is a big country. currently, the - prospect? australia is a big i country. currently, the federal government, that he leads, is not showing is sufficient commitment to climate action. that is true. the government has come here without any increase in the 2030 target, the ndc, i'm sure you have been talking a lot, is the same, keeping the same as we had at paris when i was prime minister. so australia can do more, it should do more, state governments actually are doing a lot more, the new south wales government for example has a 2030 target of cutting emissions by 50% from 2005 levels.
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so there is more climate, andrew forrest, working with who is the australian iron or billionaire, is committed to being the biggest producer of green hydrogen in the world and is pushing whole green hydrogen agenda.— hydrogen agenda. voices within australia doing _ hydrogen agenda. voices within australia doing much _ hydrogen agenda. voices within australia doing much more, - hydrogen agenda. voices within - australia doing much more, further ahead than the government is at a federal level?— ahead than the government is at a federal level?_ let's i federal level? absolutely. let's look at that _ federal level? absolutely. let's look at that clip _ federal level? absolutely. let's look at that clip we _ federal level? absolutely. let's look at that clip we played - federal level? absolutely. let's look at that clip we played a - federal level? absolutely. let's - look at that clip we played a moment ago where scott morrison said that technology will have the answers, particularly over time. but many people, many scientists, environmentalists, say it's no good talking but answers technology may have no future, it is what we can do right now. what you make of that response from him?— right now. what you make of that response from him? there are two oints. response from him? there are two points- firstly. _ response from him? there are two points. firstly, we _ response from him? there are two points. firstly, we don't— response from him? there are two points. firstly, we don't have - response from him? there are two| points. firstly, we don't have time. we have got to get cracking now. secondly, we have the technology is to move to zero emission economy right now and hydro is a very big part of it, as is green hydrogen.
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you have in scotland and in the uk, pumped hydro schemes, i started a very big one in australia which is being built now, snowy how to 2.0. it's pretty simple. with renewable energy, there will be times of the day you get more energy than you can use. when you have got more energy, in the middle of a sunny day, you take that electricity and pump it to the top of the hill. there is a huge potential to do more of that here in scotland, and right around the world. so long duration storage, the lack of it, is the crisis within the energy crisis and we have to build a lot more of it. when morrison says technology is going to sell things in the future, we will have better technology and existing technologies will be improved, but we have the tools to do the job now and the people who suggest we don't simply don't want to turn up and face up to the responsibilities we have two
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address global warming. i the responsibilities we have two address global warming.- the responsibilities we have two address global warming. i want to entrant in truckee _ address global warming. i want to entrant in truckee for _ address global warming. i want to entrant in truckee for a _ address global warming. i want to entrant in truckee for a moment l entrant in truckee for a moment because we are going to say goodbye now to viewers on bbc world. still with me, malcolm turnbull, former prime minister of australia, now involved in renewable energy. how opposition is australia to moving from coal to solar, hydropower. you were late having the necessary storage capacity to take advantage of renewable energy. is that an issue? . , , of renewable energy. is that an issue? ., , , ., , issue? the answer is we are very well-positioned. _ issue? the answer is we are very well-positioned. we _ issue? the answer is we are very well-positioned. we are - issue? the answer is we are very well-positioned. we are a - issue? the answer is we are very well-positioned. we are a big . issue? the answer is we are very i well-positioned. we are a big fossil well—positioned. we are a big fossil producer today, when that ends and the sooner the better, we can be a clean energy superpower, because we have lots of sunlight, we have lots of wind, it's a big country, lots of huge assets and we have the means to make, be the biggest producer if we choose to become of green hydrogen, which of course has made simply by
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using renewable electricity to electrolyser water. using renewable electricity to electrolyserwater. if using renewable electricity to electrolyser water. if you have no carbon emissions on the way, to making it, and no carbon when it's used, that's the ultimate cleaner fuel. add to that pumped storage, and you have then got an utterly reliable, zero emission energy system. we have got, it sounds too good to be true but it is true, we can have zero emission energy and have affordable energy. it's not going to cost, in australia, the incoming pressure from renewables is actually seen electricity prices come down. but you have got to plan it right, it does notjust happen. you've got to put in the hard yards and make the investment. let’s you've got to put in the hard yards and make the investment. let's talk about pressure _ and make the investment. let's talk about pressure from _ and make the investment. let's talk about pressure from activists. - and make the investment. let's talk about pressure from activists. manyj about pressure from activists. many of them here at cop26. within australia, how much pressure as they are on the government? we are seeing the action at state level. how much pressure from the government from
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activists from voters ultimately, to do more on climate change?- activists from voters ultimately, to do more on climate change? there is ruite a lot do more on climate change? there is quite a lot of— do more on climate change? there is quite a lot of pressure, _ do more on climate change? there is quite a lot of pressure, and - do more on climate change? there is quite a lot of pressure, and you - quite a lot of pressure, and you have seen a number of formerly safe liberal and the australian liberal party which i have led obviously is more like your conservative party than, it's not very small l liberal although there are those in it, like myself. we have seen safe liberal seats lost to smaller liberal independents, who to date have had three characteristics. they are women, smaller liberal, progressive on social issues, and are progressive on climate. that's a political message which is saying the liberal party, with a l, is not delivering the views they voters want. so there is political movement there. the problem we have had with there. the problem we have had with the opposition to claim it action, it has been a toxic trio of
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right—wing politics, as you have seenin right—wing politics, as you have seen in the united states. climate science to nihilism, right—wing media, mostly owned by rupert murdoch, you have seen that in the united states although less so here, particularly the us. and the vested interest of the coal and gas industry. interest of the coal and gas indust . . ~ interest of the coal and gas industry-— interest of the coal and gas indust . ., ,, , . interest of the coal and gas indust . . ~ , . ., industry. thank you very much for our industry. thank you very much for your time- — industry. thank you very much for your time. appreciated. _ industry. thank you very much for your time. appreciated. thank - industry. thank you very much for| your time. appreciated. thank you industry. thank you very much for. your time. appreciated. thank you so much. borisjohnson has apologised to an israeli minister who could not attend the cop26 summit yesterday because it was not wheelchair accessible. karine elharrar was forced to return to her hotel 50 miles away because the only access to the summit in glasgow was by shuttle or walking. earlier today, ms elharrar told the bbc her experience showed the need for better accessibility.
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i think it is a good experience to make sure that for the next time, a un conference will be accessible, because we can talk about accessibility and the rights of people with disabilities, but in life we need to implement all the conventions and all the regulations and that was an experience that showed us we need to pay attention to all the details everywhere. it's incredibly busy here again today, some suggestions, concerns around the capacity actually over across the river clyde in the blue zone, we are in the green zone but in the blue zone, concerns about capacity taking into account covid safety. another really busy day for
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everyone involved at this summit. i will hand you back from glasgow for the moment to jane in the studio in london. studio: thanks very much, we will see you later on with much more from the environment conference. we will talk about those issues here as well. two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters who were found stabbed to death in a park in north london. pcs deninaffer and jamie lewis distributed the images of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after being assigned to guard the crime scene, injune last year. danyal hussein, who's 19, was last week sentenced to at least 35 years in prison for murdering the women. helena wilkinson reports.
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bibaa henry and nicole smallman had been celebrating with friends, hours before they were murdered. it was in this park where their bodies were discovered. they'd been ferociously attacked. today, their mother came to court, to hear two met police officers admit taking photos of her daughters' bodies, and sharing them. this is them, pc deninaffer, and pcjamie lewis. they were meant to be protecting the crime scene, but instead, they breached a cordon to take photos of the bodies, which they then shared on whatsapp. lewis edited one of the pictures, superimposing his own face on, with the victims in the background. in court, the officers sat side by side in the dock. "guilty," they said, as the clerk read them the charges they faced. both admitted one count of misconduct in a public office. what the two officers did has added to the sisters' family's grief and despair. after the hearing, their mother spoke outside court.
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if these police officers do not get a custodial sentence, it will not send the message. you are not above the law. you are not going to be protected. the independent office for police conduct said there was no place in policing for this behaviour, and it had to stop. a culture where some officers don't see anything wrong with sharing deeply offensive messages and where others feel unable or unwilling to challenge has to change, and it has to change now. judge mark lucraft qc told the officers the matters were extremely serious. he granted them conditional bail and told them they would receive prison sentences for their crimes. the officers will be sentenced at a later date. helena wilkinson, bbc news, at the old bailey.
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the environment secretary, george eustice, says he welcomes further talks to try to deescalate the row with france about post brexit fishing rights. paris has delayed measures it threatened to introduce from today, blocking british boats from landing their catches at french ports. there's anger about the number of licences the uk and jersey have processed for french vessels to fish in their waters. ministers from france and the uk are to meet on thursday to discuss fish, and a range of other brexit issues. here's our europe correspondent, jessica parker. a fishing boat leaving the port early this morning after overnight the french government said it would hold off on retaliation over post—brexit fishing rights. this woman's catches the fish, she sells them and says
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translation: we have to work, i we need it, we're like everyone else we have to work, we need it, we're just like everyone else needing to live, eat and raise our kids. so if nothing moves, we will move. there had been suggestions british vessels could be stopped from unloading their catches, along with tougher border checks. this fish processors says french licences to fish in the waters off the uk and channel islands are important, but so are getting supplies in from british boats. jobs depend on it. politics have to consider both parts, that means the fishermen and also us, all the processors, because there is something like 300 or 400 fishermen in boulogne and 5,000 people working in the factories. emmanuel macron and borisjohnson both know fishing can be an emotive political issue. france says more of its small vessels should be licensed. boats have to show they have fished in the relevant waters before.
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we had constructive talks yesterday, where we made clear that _ if there are additional vessels that have evidence and can bring it - forward, we will obviously consider it, and there will be further- discussions on thursday so there l is a big de—escalation of this. i talks will continue leading up to a high—level political meeting in paris on thursday between the uk's brexit minister lord frost and france's europe minister, clement beaune. it is not clear at this stage what resolution will be reached. both men have some level of reputation for talking tough. dozens of licenses remain outstanding, with both sides complaining about potential brexit treaty breaches. the possibility of escalation has been delayed but it has not disappeared. jessica parker, bbc news. at least 19 people have been killed in two powerful explosions in the afghan capital, kabul. the first blast was at the gate of a military hospital, with the other close by. our correspondent secunder kermani has the latest from kabul. the attack began, as you say, with a suspected suicide bombing
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outside the gate to the military hospital in kabul, that was followed by gunfire and another explosion. it is not clear exactly how many attackers were involved, a taliban spokesperson telling us that four assailants were killed, one was arrested and the attack is now over, though in the last few minutes, i have heard sporadic gunfire from the direction which this incident was taking place. this attack targeted a military hospital, it previously treated soldiers from the afghan army, it now treated both members of the taliban and members of the previous government's army. this hospital has, in the past, been targeted by the islamic state group. in 2017, they killed more than 30 people there and all the suspicion will be that this is the work, yet again, of isk, because they have been responsible for a spate of suicide bombings in recent weeks, targeting both ordinary civilians and the taliban. real concern here that
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although is is as much less powerful than the taliban, they are still able to carry out these deadly attacks. mps have called for a pause in the rollout of all—lane smart motorways, until the government can prove they�* re safe. they were designed to allow for more traffic, by turning the hard shoulder into an extra lane. but safety campaigners say they've contributed to several deaths. here s our transport correspondent, caroline davies. marching through westminster yesterday, each coffin represents someone killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorways, intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane, without having to use more land. if a car breaks down in a live lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. drivers not to drive in it.
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now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be built for years, until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five—year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years' worth of safety evidence on the network, as currently exists, and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases that it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away, congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads, which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the m1 smart motorway. our aim is tojust get
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the hard shoulder back in every single instance. so, you know, and we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough, but i welcome the fact that they say to pause them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, then i could get them banned in the meantime. the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways. it's admitted that improvements had not always been made as quickly as they could have in the past, but that it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. we will talk more about that story later in the afternoon, and we will hear from the human element, later in the afternoon, and we will hearfrom the human element, head of the transport the health secretary says he'll set out a plan to deal
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with the backlog of nhs procedures by the end of november. sajid javid's been answering questions from mps on the commons health committee. our health correspondent, nick triggle, says it comes after the government's promise last week of more funding for nhs facilities. the mps, led by former health secretaryjeremy hunt, were asking whether plans were for extra staff to work in the facilities. there was no detail in last week's spending plans about training and workforce budgets. the mp said the nhs is facing a workforce crisis now, there are more than 90,000 vacancies, that means 7% of posts are unfilled and the fear is that could get worse as large numbers of staff reach retirement age. sajid javid promised two things, firstly by the end of the year, a short—term plan to help tackle the backlog in hospital treatment, and then by the spring a long—term 15—year plan. but as he was reminded by mps on the committee, making promises is one thing, delivering is another. the government has already promised 6,000 extra gps in this parliament and as the health secretary himself admitted, they are not on track to meet that.
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before we move to the weather, some news coming through from our geneva correspondence. set blatter, the former fifa president, we are hearing swiss prosecutors have charged him and also charged michel platini, former uefa president, with fraud. we are hearing the swiss attorney—general says that while in office at fifa, he unlawfully arranged a transfer of 2 million swiss francs to michel platini. that just coming through, all the details
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at the moment, doubtless more to come on that. swiss prosecutors this afternoon say they have charged sepp blatter and michel platini with fraud. as soon as we get more details or reaction to all of that, in geneva, we will bring that to you. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello. today is bringing plenty of bright but chilly and crisp autumn weather across the uk. some spells of sunshine, but also some showers. that was how it looked for a weather watcher in devon earlier on. those showers affecting northern and western scotland, some for eastern scotland too. northern ireland, western england and wales, further east, more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, highs of 10—13. through this evening and tonight, showers will continue to pepper coastal areas, some moving further inland across parts of northern england. some of the showers over very high ground in northern scotland, could even be wintry. quite a chilly night in prospect, lowest temperatures across parts of southern england, dropping just below freezing, with a touch of frost and some fog
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patches for parts of england and wales tomorrow morning. we will see some sunny spells, again, some showers, and some more generally cloudy, showery weather drifting across northern england into the midlands. another rather chilly—feeling day. as we look further ahead towards the end of the week, it will slowly turn at little bit milder, a lot of cloud, but not as many showers.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. together, we are committing to collectively reduce our methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. brazil is one of the signatories to the deal — but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge
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of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. in other news: convicted of taking and sharing pictures of two murdered sisters. two met police officers, are told to expectjail terms. a labour mp's proposing a change in the law — to ban plastic from wet wipes. we will be talking more about that wet wipe story in this half an hour and we will be talking about deforestation as well. sport now, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. the deal is done — antonio conte has been confirmed as tottenham's new manager, just a day after the club sacked nuno espirito santo. the former chelsea manager has signed a deal until the summer of 2023. his first game in charge
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will be at home to dutch side vitesse arnhem in the europa conference league on thursday. earlier i spoke to our football reporter simon stone who explained why the conte didn't take the job when he was first approached in the summer: it was too soon, basically, from him leaving inter milan to move to another club. but he said he was left with the impression of this contagious drive and enthusiasm and determination from the tottenham chairman, daniel leavy. he hasn't forgotten that and given this opportunity, he has basically taken it with both hands and he understands there is a determination amongst the executives at tottenham, led by daniel leavey, for the club to be, what he describes as a protagonist again. that means challenging for major honours and
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emulating potter chino's treatments and getting to the finals and semifinals of the champions league finals and challenging at the top end of the league. that is clearly what antonio conte wants, that is his background and that is where he will expect to drive the club for when his contract expires injune 2023. when his contract expires in june 2023. ,, ., ,, ., ,, .,~ ., ., 2023. simon stone speaking to me a short while ago- _ that might not be the only premier league managerial appointment this week — newcastle are reportedly hoping to name unai emery as their new boss before saturday's game against brighton. emery had an 18—month spell in charge of arsenal before being sacked in november 2019. the a9—year—old, currently in charge of spanish side villarreal, has emerged as the leading candidate as newcastle's new owners look to replace steve bruce. manchester united, who were beaten in last season's europa league final by unai emery�*s villareal, are in champions league action tonight. having been thrashed by liverpool — the pressure eased on oie gunnar solskjaer at the weekend when united won at spurs
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but questions remain about his position and a tough test awaits later when they take on atalanta in italy. in the earlier kick off, holders chelsea are away at swedish side malmo. next to rugby union and marcus smith could miss england's game against tonga after a minor leg injury's limited his training before saturday's match. the fly—half�*s been tipped to be given a run in the team this autumn in the absence of george ford. eddiejones says he's ”cautiously optimistic that he'll be all right." other injuries to the squad include max malins who's been ruled out, and freddie steward and raffi quirke who are doubts. and in england's group at the t20 world cup — their next opponents south africa have boosted their hopes of reaching the semi finals by beating bangladesh by six wickets in abu dhabi. put into bat, bangladesh were bowled out forjust 8a. south africa wobbled chasing that small target but captain temba bavuma steadied things. and they knocked off the runs with more than six overs to spare.
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that result puts bangladesh out. meanwhile in the other group, unbeaten pakistan are playing namibia at the moment in abu dhabi looking to make it four wins from four. having won the toss and chosen to bat pakistan are 44 for zero. mohammad rizwan and babar azam at the crease. that's all the sport for now. we are going to talk more about deforestation and the deal that has been announced in glasgow today. brazil is among the countries to sign up to that deal in glasgow about deforestation. last year, the felling of woodland in brazil's amazon rainforest reached a 12—year high. the amazon contains around a third of all the tropical
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rainforests left on earth, and crucially helps capture vast amounts of carbon dioxide, a major contributor to global warming. i will be talking to an expert from chatham house, but let's hear more from the amazon. international correspondent, 0rla guerin sent this report. the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. well, we are making our way now deeper into the forest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that's supposed to be protected.
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but campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn't worried about the planet, he's worried about his family. his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest.
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illegal logging is big business, there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle. but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she's spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples —
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or trying to. this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest. let's get more on this with ana yang, who's from the think—tank chatham house and co—wrote the report rethinking
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the brazilian amazon. good afternoon, thank you for being with us and their one better to talk to than you about this. i am interested in what you make about this pledge coming out of glasgow because on the face of it, it includes brazil?— because on the face of it, it includes brazil? thank you for havin: includes brazil? thank you for having me- — includes brazil? thank you for having me. brazil's— includes brazil? thank you for. having me. brazil's commitment includes brazil? thank you for- having me. brazil's commitment to signing the deal is definitely a very good first step. as one of the well�*s largest copper producer, it will get companies in line with this commitment. but what we need to focus is their policies, and funding measure to put in place to ensure the delivery of these commitments to
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stop deforestation. if you look at the trend of deforestation in the last couple of years, i want to highlight that in 2004 brazil managed to reduce deforestation below 70%. obviously, as you mentioned before, in the last couple of years it has almost doubled. so what i would say is the country know how to stop deforestation. it is not an impossible ask. what we put in place in 2004 was a collective effort between the government and society together. i was part of that movement as well, so it breaks my heart to see what is happening with the brazilian amazon. what has happened in brazil the last couple of years, there were budget cuts for environmental per protection agencies and the legislation put in
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place in 2000 the rights of indigenous people and the amazon population. this is a good step, but we think there are other things we need to focus on. as you mentioned, i co—authored the report called rethinking the brazilian amazon and one of the key messages it wants to deliver is that in order to stop deforestation we need to provide a long—term solution for the region and that includes addressing the social economic aspiration of 12 million people who live there. it is about the livelihood of the people. it is also about changing incentive systems that move the current production system from a deforestation based system to one that adopts low carbon and agricultural practices. you that adopts low carbon and agricultural practices. you said so much that is _ agricultural practices. you said so much that is interesting, - agricultural practices. you said so much that is interesting, you - agricultural practices. you said so l much that is interesting, you talked about how things rolled back from
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previous agreements and if this practice is, in some cases, someone's livelihood, that is their only income, you can have all the targets in the world but if someone has to feed their family, we know what that means. and therefore, what measures can and should any individual government put in place to provide individuals, if needs be, an alternative livelihood so that we don't see deforestation?— don't see deforestation? you're absolutely _ don't see deforestation? you're absolutely right. _ don't see deforestation? you're absolutely right. i _ don't see deforestation? you're absolutely right. i think- don't see deforestation? you're absolutely right. i think it - don't see deforestation? you're absolutely right. i think it is - don't see deforestation? you're absolutely right. i think it is a i absolutely right. i think it is a combination of the stick and carrot. this is what we said the report. we need to avoid the oversimplistic silver bullet solution. there are different facets of the amazon from forest to bustling cities that have different needs. when you are talking about the needs of indigenous people, it will be different to giving education for
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70% of the 30 million brazilians who live in the amazon. i think the second thing is to combine short—term thinking to long—term thinking. short term means brazil needs to stop deforestation now, but also we need to put in long term mechanisms that can include building so people can move out of the production system. also it means support and a clear message that you can incorporate the stakeholders as part of the supply chain for making sure the environmental protection agency have the right measure to punish the activities that drive deforestation.— punish the activities that drive deforestation. , ., ., deforestation. interesting to hear from ou. deforestation. interesting to hear from you- it _ deforestation. interesting to hear from you- it is — deforestation. interesting to hear from you. it is a _ deforestation. interesting to hear from you. it is a huge _ deforestation. interesting to hear from you. it is a huge topic, - deforestation. interesting to hear from you. it is a huge topic, but l from you. it is a huge topic, but thank you for your time.
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much more to come over the course of the afternoon. mps and peers have been told they should wear face masks, following a rise in cases of covid—19 around parliament. public tours have also been cancelled, with a review of the measures in two weeks. mps have been encouraged to wear masks, since the legal requirement ended injuly, but many have chosen not to do so. 11 billion wet wipes are used in the uk every year, and they cause more than 90% of the blockages in our sewers. that's because the vast majority of them contain plastic, which doesn't break down or decompose. now one mp, is propsing a new law to change the way they're produced. ione wells reports. we use wet wipes all the time, don't we? to wipe our surfaces, to take our make—up off,
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to clean up after kids. they're pretty sturdy things, but a lot of them end up on our river banks. the thames river bank near battersea bridge looks like a normal river bank, but peel at the surface of the ground and it's covered in wet wipes that have overflowed from our drains. chris works for the charity thames 21 that clean up the thames river bed. so the problem we've got is that an awful lot of the wipes that are flushed down the toilet shouldn't be. obviously, a lot of material like make—up wipes, cleaning wipes are much tougher and have plastic fibres in them which make them much stronger, and that means they don't break down and they get into your sewage system in the same way, theyjust fall apart slowly, but they are still very tough. they change the shape of the river bed, they break down into pieces, smaller pieces that animals can eat. the wet wipes that don't end up on our river banks and in our rivers end up here in our sewage system, and that can lead to all kinds of other problems, like blocking
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the sewers themselves. this footage shows wet wipes being pulled from one sewer by thames water. they merge with oil and grease to form blockages. thames water are working with the labour mp for putney, fleur anderson, who is trying to change the law to ban plastics from wet wipes. so, 90% of wet wipes have actually got plastic in. i think lots of people don't realise they are a single use plastic. those wet wipes clog up our sewers and drains and we have been here seeing the result of that, so that puts more money on our water bills as well. if only the wet wipe companies would just change the way that they make wet wipes, and it's very easy to do, then that would be a huge environmental benefit but also a financial benefit to us all. the government say they are looking at the effects of wet wipes with plastics on sewers to try and find solutions. ione wells, bbc news. with me now is rajiv chandra, who is the ceo of mum & you, a company which manufactures
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biodegradable baby wipes. hello, good afternoon. good afternoon. — hello, good afternoon. good afternoon, thanks _ hello, good afternoon. good afternoon, thanks for - hello, good afternoon. good afternoon, thanks for having j hello, good afternoon. good - afternoon, thanks for having me. i am assuming your baby wipes don't contain plastic?— contain plastic? they don't and we are a small — contain plastic? they don't and we are a small company _ contain plastic? they don't and we are a small company that - contain plastic? they don't and we are a small company that started i contain plastic? they don't and we l are a small company that started as are a small company that started as a start—up about four years back. we were determined, even when it was not so popular to talk about these things, to go with wipes that were biodegradable because we could make a plant —based wipes for years back and that is the decision we took. are they more expensive to manufacture?— are they more expensive to manufacture? slightly more exoensive. _ manufacture? slightly more expensive, but _ manufacture? slightly more expensive, but when - manufacture? slightly more expensive, but when a - manufacture? slightly more | expensive, but when a small manufacture? slightly more - expensive, but when a small company goes into it, they are likely to be more expensive. but if everybody comes to the party, the costs will go down, obviously.— comes to the party, the costs will go down, obviously. interesting and the challenge _ go down, obviously. interesting and the challenge for— go down, obviously. interesting and the challenge for you _ go down, obviously. interesting and the challenge for you as _ go down, obviously. interesting and the challenge for you as someone . the challenge for you as someone running a company, you are creating something that is a little bit more expensive than other wet wipes we
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might think of and presumably, you have to pass that onto the customer so then you have the dilemma of the customer making a decision as to, can i afford to buy this product, even though i know it is better the environment?— even though i know it is better the environment? ~ , , ., environment? absolutely, but what we have tried to — environment? absolutely, but what we have tried to do, _ environment? absolutely, but what we have tried to do, we _ environment? absolutely, but what we have tried to do, we are _ environment? absolutely, but what we have tried to do, we are not _ environment? absolutely, but what we have tried to do, we are not the - have tried to do, we are not the most expensive wet wipe on the market and we have tried to do it in such a manner that it is not so much more expensive that it is completely out of touch for consumers on a day—to—day basis. what we have tried to do is take a part of the hit. if more people come on board, i think these plant —based wipes could be much more universal reality and costs could come down even more. what is demand like? have you seen demand for your product increase in the four years that you have been manufacturing? it is the four years that you have been manufacturing?— the four years that you have been manufacturing? it is amazing. just to rive manufacturing? it is amazing. just to give you — manufacturing? it is amazing. just to give you an _ manufacturing? it is amazing. just to give you an idea _ manufacturing? it is amazing. just to give you an idea that _ manufacturing? it is amazing. just to give you an idea that the - manufacturing? it is amazing. just| to give you an idea that the overall market for wet wipes is flat in the
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uk. but we have gone from zero to 1 million packs of wipes in the last four years. what it means is, there are enough people in the community who want to be a part of this journey. that is what we want to work towards as well. interesting, and when you _ work towards as well. interesting, and when you hear— work towards as well. interesting, and when you hear the _ work towards as well. interesting, and when you hear the mp - work towards as well. interesting, and when you hear the mp saying | work towards as well. interesting, . and when you hear the mp saying she wants to make it a legal requirement, she is bringing this to parliament to try to get plastic out of all wipes. would that help you? that would create exactly the scenario i think you are talking about? i scenario i think you are talking about? ~ , , scenario i think you are talking about? ~' , , , about? i think it will help us, but it is aroin about? i think it will help us, but it is going to _ about? i think it will help us, but it is going to help _ about? i think it will help us, but it is going to help everyone. - about? i think it will help us, but it is going to help everyone. all. it is going to help everyone. all the pieces that you have been showing this morning, evenjust before i came on, really suggest single—use plastics are not going to break down, they will be in our ecosystems, they will be in our rivers, in our water. we consume
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these micro—plastics, you know, the fish are going to consume these. everyone is going to benefit in the long term. the costs of these are minimal, there is no reason that all of us aren't shifting to plant —based alternatives. of us aren't shifting to plant -based alternatives.- of us aren't shifting to plant -based alternatives. before i let ou no, -based alternatives. before i let you go. you _ -based alternatives. before i let you go. you make _ -based alternatives. before i let| you go, you make biodegradable wipes, am i right in saying, do you have anything on your packaging about please, don't flush these down the toilet? ~ , ,., , .., the toilet? absolutely. ifi can 'ust take the toilet? absolutely. ifi can just take a _ the toilet? absolutely. ifi can just take a small— the toilet? absolutely. ifi can just take a small thing, - the toilet? absolutely. ifi can just take a small thing, i - the toilet? absolutely. ifi canj just take a small thing, i think the toilet? absolutely. if i can - just take a small thing, i think we have to put this on the pack, not legally, we want to put it and make it bigger and bigger. we have to educate them, we have to write blogs and social media posts and send e—mails to our customers and tell them, please don't. it is an
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important point you have touched upon. it is not only about making a plant —based wipes, it is also educating the consumer to dispose them in the best possible manner. 50 them in the best possible manner. so thatis them in the best possible manner. so that is a symbol on your packaging, we only saw it briefly, but the symbol says, don't flush. it is better than other wipes, but don't flush it? , ., , ., , flush it? yes, our blogs will say that and our— flush it? yes, our blogs will say that and our social _ flush it? yes, our blogs will say that and our social media - flush it? yes, our blogs will say that and our social media will. flush it? yes, our blogs will say i that and our social media will say and every brand and every country should be saying that.— and every brand and every country should be saying that. really good to talk to, thank _ should be saying that. really good to talk to, thank you _ should be saying that. really good to talk to, thank you for _ should be saying that. really good to talk to, thank you for your - should be saying that. really good| to talk to, thank you for your time. whatever you are using, do not flush them down the toilet because we don't want to see anymore of those pictures from water, do we? let's just turn to the state for a moment or two.
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almost half the states in america are holding elections this week, for the local committees that control the budgets, operating procedures and education policies, of tens of thousands of schools. but this year the power of school boards is under intense scrutiny, in the era of culture wars and covid, with mask mandates, vaccine requirements and the representation of american history, sparking numerous confrontations on the camapign trail. our correspondent, sophie long has more, from the state of colorado. in castle rock, colorado, school board elections have traditionally been quiet, you could even say dull, affairs. but they are becoming more colourful. the county is lying to you, and you know it, and you are either complicit or you don't know it. the campaign trail may look civilised in sleepy suburbia, but things are getting scary. cowards always hide their face. it's a school board election in one county in the entire united states, but to us, it's everything about our children's education, and each side is trying to say,
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we know what's right, and the other side, it's not just wrong, it's evil. everything about them is, is, isjust going to destroy our children. angry shouting. these small pieces of cloth have caused quite a commotion. they have led to school board members being attacked and intimidated, trolled on social media, even stalked in public. although people are engaged in these elections, the pandemic has really brought home the wide national political divide. teacher stacey adair is currently on unpaid leave for refusing to wear a mask in the classroom. people were just so intense about it. it was an insane year. i was willing to get written up for not enforcing the mask. if they want to wear the mask, fine. if they take it off because they want to breathe, it's not myjob. there is nowhere in myjob description that says i'm a mask enforcer. it's notjust mask mandates that
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have wiped the smiles of parents' faces but a change in curriculum and claims schools are teaching critical race theory, the idea that racism is embedded in america's public policies. they are heading straight back to glasgow because the prime minister has started speaking. it glasgow because the prime minister has started speaking.— has started speaking. it has been re has started speaking. it has been pretty sunny _ has started speaking. it has been pretty sunny today _ has started speaking. it has been pretty sunny today and _ has started speaking. it has been pretty sunny today and there - has started speaking. it has been pretty sunny today and there are | pretty sunny today and there are many days, thanks to our combination of solar and wind we produce more than 50% of our energy from renewables. what we want, the whole objective of this summit is to take these inventions, take these breakthroughs get the finance, get the support to make sure they are disseminated, they are spread around the whole world. so that the whole world shares in the glasgow breakthroughs and shares in our agenda and that we unite across the whole planet to tackle climate change. there is one guy who particularly understands how to do that and who shares that agenda and
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who understands that a single hour, a single hour of sunshine provides enough energy to power the whole earth for a year. you know that, power all human activity on earth for a year. the one man who understands that so well and who has achieved extraordinary things in his own country of india, is the prime minister of india and ladies and gentlemen, one son, one world, one grid, one narendra modi and i have great pleasure in handing over. over to you. applause. that was a brief statement from the prime minister. we will have plenty more from glasgow over the course of the afternoon, as you would expect. i think narendra modi is standing
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up. we will have much more from glasgow in the next little while. it is edging up to the top of the art which means we might be able to squeeze in some weather prospects. hello. today is bringing plenty of bright but chilly and crisp autumn weather across the uk. some spells of sunshine, but also some showers. that was how it looked for a weather watcher in devon earlier on. those showers affecting northern and western scotland, some for eastern scotland too. northern ireland, western england and wales, further east, more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, highs of 10—13. through this evening and tonight, showers will continue to pepper coastal areas, some moving further inland across parts of northern england. some of the showers over very high ground in northern scotland, could even be wintry. quite a chilly night in prospect, lowest temperatures across parts of southern england, dropping just below freezing, with a touch of frost and some fog patches for parts of england and wales tomorrow morning. we will see some sunny spells, again, some showers, and some more generally cloudy, showery weather drifting across northern england into the midlands. another rather chilly—feeling day. as we look further ahead
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towards the end of the week, it will slowly turn at little bit milder, a lot of cloud, but not as many showers. this is bbc news. the headlines... world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. together, we are committing to collectively reduce our methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion—pillared cathedrals of nature.
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brazil is one of the signatories to the deal, but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. two metropolitan police officers are convicted of taking and sharing photos of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after the sisters were found murdered in north london. the officers are told to expect prison terms. the uk environment secretary has welcomed what he calls a big de—escalation of the post—brexit fishing row with france. paris says it will delay introducing punitive trade measures while further talks are held. calls for plastic in wet wipes to be banned. a labour mp is proposing a new law that could put an end to this. and the former chelsea boss antonio conte, is appointed the new manager, at tottenham.
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good afternoon. world leaders at the global climate summit in glasgow are today agreeing two major deals to try to combat rising global temperatures. let's cross live to my colleague annita mcveigh who is at the cop26 climate conference. with the latest from glasgow, let's
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have our first report from science correspondent, victoria gill. the visible flare of methane release. scientists say this potent greenhouse gas has been responsible for about half the human—induced warming of the planet we've experienced so far. now a global partnership to tackle emissions by plugging leaks and covering landfill sites is being announced at the cop26 climate conference in glasgow. the initiative, led by the us and eu, pledges to cut emissions of the gas by at least 30% by 2030. china, russia and india, some of the world's top methane emitters, have not signed up. some of the big emitters need to join the pledge. so china, russia, for example. if we are going to achieve those big reductions that we need, then they need to come on board as well. the loss of forests around the world, estimated to be responsible for about 15%
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of greenhouse gas emissions, has been the subject of this crucial climate summit�*s first major deal. countries who signed the agreement, including brazil, russia, china and indonesia, represented 85% of china and indonesia, represent 85% of the world's forests. the pledge, and the £15 billion behind it, has been broadly welcomed. but deforestation has actually increased since a similar pledge was launched in 2014, and it is not yet clear exactly how those who cut down forests to make money would be provided with the financial incentive to protect these vital carbon storing ecosystems instead. this is a hugely ambitious pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50% of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement is notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it's actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. some scientists remain sceptical of the progress here. a survey of climate scientists suggests many are not confident that global emissions can be cut quickly enough to avoid a climate catastrophe.
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it is a mixture of promise and pessimism here in glasgow. while there has been some early steps forward and key agreements on issues like methane emissions and deforestation, those are voluntary agreements and they are going to be put to the test at the same time that scientists say we are running out of time to slash emissions. in the gulf between words and action, the global temperature continues to rise, but as the leaders conclude their speeches and the negotiators take over, there is much more talking to do. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. us presidentjoe biden said nearly 100 countries have signed up to cut their emissions of methane. and one of the most important things we can do in this decisive decade is to keep 1.5 degrees in reach, is reduce our methane emissions as quickly as possible. as had already been stated, it's one of the most potent greenhouse gases there is. it amounts to about half the warming
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we are experiencing today. just methane. so, together, we are committing to collectively reduce on methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. brazil is among the countries to sign up to that deal out of glasgow, the pledge on deforestation. last year, the felling of woodland in brazil's amazon rainforest, reached a 12—year high. the amazon contains around a third of all the tropical rainforests left on earth, and crucially, helps capture vast amounts of carbon dioxide, a major contributor, to global warming. but illegal as well as legal logging, is a huge problem. from hondoniya state, in the brazilian amazon, our international correspondent, 0rla guerin has more details.
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the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. well, we are making our way now deeper into the forest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that's supposed to be protected. but campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn't worried about the planet, he's worried about his family.
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his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle.
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the heat is building and there is ash falling in the air. no attempt has been made to hide this. it is at the sight of a busy road. when fires like this happen here, it's not a work of nature. it's the work of man. in the globalfight work of nature. it's the work of man. in the global fight against climate change, this is one more
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loss. more wild west than wild amazon. cattle farming is driven by global demand for brazilian beef and backed by president bolsonaro. this man is a second—generation rancher. he says the forest is a living, not a fairy tale. but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she's spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples —
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or trying to. this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores.
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the message from here is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest. i'm joined by director of science at kew gardens although he joins us from the conference itself, joining me from glasgow. thanks so much for your time. we are interested to know of course how encouraged or otherwise you are by what you are hearing around the issue of deforestation?— hearing around the issue of deforestation? ., ,, , ., deforestation? thank you, good afternoon. _ deforestation? thank you, good afternoon, jane. _ deforestation? thank you, good afternoon, jane. i— deforestation? thank you, good afternoon, jane. i think - deforestation? thank you, good afternoon, jane. i think it's - afternoon, jane. i think it's exciting to see the commitment from the global leaders now to hold the deforestation. this is going to lead to huge benefits to climate and to biodiversity. but i think many people are still sceptical so i have been seeking to indigenous communities and they say the decision made here today and glasgow
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are not going to reach all the way to the ground in the amazon. so i share the sympathy of some of the frustration and scepticism many people have shown here and the news and it really hurts to see those images because i grew up seeing those images myself and have seen so much of that forest being lost and i really hope that's going to be the end of that. if really hope that's going to be the end of that-— end of that. if that forest or cuttin: end of that. if that forest or cutting down _ end of that. if that forest or cutting down that _ end of that. if that forest or cutting down that forest - end of that. if that forest or cutting down that forest is| cutting down that forest is someone's livelihood, if that is how they feed their family, surely each government has to have very strong measures in place not only to prevent it but provide those people with alternative incomes and that's the challenge, part of it? its with alternative incomes and that's the challenge, part of it?— the challenge, part of it? its two and that's the _ the challenge, part of it? its two and that's the really _ the challenge, part of it? its two and that's the really critical- the challenge, part of it? its two and that's the really critical part | and that's the really critical part of this pledge, because it is an economic financial package which would allow those people to receive compensation for not cutting down the forest and that's an opportunity cost because of course they could be cultivating soybeans are growing be found in this case, we are paying
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them for not cutting down the rainforest and what has been cut down already. so we absolutely need to understand and listen to the people who are going to be directly affected by this. in many cases, as wejust affected by this. in many cases, as we just saw, its smallholding farmers but even more commonly it's actually quite large soybean plantations and those are not really bringing any benefits in the indigenous areas of the amazon. in two that's a fairly depressing thought, yet you are in glasgow, where lots of countries including brazil, have signed up to this. so are their targets, are there mechanisms that somehow despite what you are explaining, governments will have to try and see this through? irate have to try and see this through? we are have to try and see this through? - are waiting to see the details and i think in the meetings i have had here with ministers, there is a
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sense of hope. i think everyone who is here now over the next few days are committed to making a real change. the question is, how much of those words and commitments are going to translate into real—world action and change? because we have failed before, set some ambitious targets and that has not worked out. we need to work out the details our leaders provide us with and after that we will be able to judge whether or not this is a reasonable step change in what we need to see now. ~' step change in what we need to see now. ~ ,., . step change in what we need to see now. ~ . ., ., �*,, now. like so much of what's being discussed in _ now. like so much of what's being discussed in glasgow, _ now. like so much of what's being discussed in glasgow, a _ now. like so much of what's being discussed in glasgow, a lot - now. like so much of what's being discussed in glasgow, a lot of - now. like so much of what's being discussed in glasgow, a lot of the | discussed in glasgow, a lot of the topics, it's no good if a certain number of countries abide by the target, the changes to mechanism, because everybody needs to do it? it's a really global asset. we are talking about nature and about the benefits nature brings to humanity
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and climate. this is something we need to provide the scientific evidence and understand how the actions that are taken in brazil are going to complement those taken in colombia and other countries around the amazon. it's the same and other tropical regions. we need to tackle this together and that's where i remain optimistic this meeting is going to lead to those plans and actions which will have this long—term benefit and working together in collaboration with a financial model sustaining those plans as well. financial model sustaining those plans as well-— financial model sustaining those lans as well. , , ., ., plans as well. interesting, you have some of the — plans as well. interesting, you have some of the optimism _ plans as well. interesting, you have some of the optimism but - plans as well. interesting, you have some of the optimism but clearly i some of the optimism but clearly there as an awful lot more detail that needs to be fleshed out? i do remain that needs to be fleshed out? i rr remain optimistic. we don't have any choice. we need to get this right. the people are genuinely interested and committed to making this happen. the question is, how are we going to make it different? how will this translate to positive action? we need to see the results, we need to
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see the carbon emissions from now decreasing all the way to 2030. we cannot wait until the next presidency and the next leader is taking over. we need to start now, we can wait till it is too late. 50 we can wait till it is too late. so interesting to talk to you. we will let you get back to the conference and the debates. director of science at kew gardens. thank you very much. we are just across the river clyde from where your last guestjoined you. we are in the green zone. i want to bring you up—to—date with a couple of developing lines here from cop26. this is the second day of the leaders summit, part of the event, the two—week event, these leaders, many of them will be leaving glasgow tonight, many of them returning for
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the end of cop26. before they go at the end of cop26. before they go at the opening, they want to get as many announcements pushed out as possible. this is an interesting one, we are hearing that although president xijinping is not here, his senior negotiator is ended here. very experienced climate negotiator for china and we are seeing reports that he has been pushing back against calls for cop26 in glasgow to aim to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 celsius. the reason that figure is so important, we have heard over and over again from scientists, they say that is the temperature at which we are going to see even more dangerous and deadly impacts from climate change. but the negotiator has said the higher rise, two degrees agreed under the 2015 paris climate accord at the cop was
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that 1.5 we are destroying consensus in many countries would demand a reopening of negotiations. a really interesting intervention from him with many of the scientists campaigners here at cop, saying we absolutely have to go for 1.5. not keeping two degrees n play. i also want to tell you we're hearing another announcement coming up. we think this will form the substance of what boris johnson is think this will form the substance of what borisjohnson is going to talk about. it is a deal on delivering clean and affordable technology by 2030, we are told more than 40 world leaders have signed up to this and it's basically to make clean technologies more affordable, more accessible, and therefore more attractive to those sectors which are currently causing the most pollution. we expect to hear more a
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little later on. let's speak to climate change analyst adriana calderon. she describes herself as a feminist and ijust want she describes herself as a feminist and i just want to talk to you about what greta thunberg said outside the blue zone earlier, yesterday. she was saying that actually the leaders in their are not listening to young climate campaigners. she said the real leadership is coming from outside, from people like you. based on what you have heard from world leaders over, do you agree with her or do you think that they are now at last listening to what you are saying? last listening to what you are sa in: ? . ~ last listening to what you are sa inc? ., ,, i. last listening to what you are sa inc? ., ,, last listening to what you are sa inc? . ~' . ., saying? thank you so much for the ruestion saying? thank you so much for the question and _ saying? thank you so much for the question and for— saying? thank you so much for the question and for the _ saying? thank you so much for the question and for the invitation. - saying? thank you so much for the question and for the invitation. i i question and for the invitation. i do agree with greta's words because most of the leaders say they understand this but if they did understand this but if they did understand this, they would join us in our demands. we are not asking for anything more than act now. all
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of their promises that they have been putting at the cop26, the events are too late. the rm 2030 and we are in 2021. this agreement, these changes that these things will bring will arrive too late to solve the climate crisis. this bring will arrive too late to solve the climate crisis.— the climate crisis. as far as you are concerned, _ the climate crisis. as far as you are concerned, the _ the climate crisis. as far as you are concerned, the protests - the climate crisis. as far as you i are concerned, the protests have the climate crisis. as far as you - are concerned, the protests have to keep going?— keep going? yes, we have to keep aroin keep going? yes, we have to keep aoian until keep going? yes, we have to keep going untilthey— keep going? yes, we have to keep going until they listen _ keep going? yes, we have to keep going until they listen to _ keep going? yes, we have to keep going untilthey listen to us. - keep going? yes, we have to keep going untilthey listen to us. what| going untilthey listen to us. what did ou going untilthey listen to us. what did you make _ going untilthey listen to us. what did you make of— going untilthey listen to us. what did you make of the _ going until they listen to us. what did you make of the statement from the chinese chief negotiator to keep two degrees n play? saying that if the focus is on 1.5 stopping at average temperatures going beyond 1.5, above preindustrial levels, that's going to be off—putting for some of the countries here at cop26 in terms of trying to get a deal and agreement?— agreement? most of the countries don't even get _ agreement? most of the countries don't even get close _ agreement? most of the countries don't even get close to _ agreement? most of the countries don't even get close to 1.5. - agreement? most of the countries don't even get close to 1.5. i - agreement? most of the countries don't even get close to 1.5. i think| don't even get close to 1.5. i think this is more to try to reach an
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agreement because you can see the impact of climate change. they are not doing anything. right now i think it's more that the we have to limit and stay at 1.5.— limit and stay at 1.5. mary robinson. _ limit and stay at 1.5. mary robinson, former- limit and stay at 1.5. mary robinson, former irish - limit and stay at 1.5. mary - robinson, former irish president limit and stay at 1.5. mary robinson, former irish president and you end commissioner and also no member of the group of leaders known as the elders, has talked about what's happening here. she said countries are not in the same boat, some are clinging on, they don't even have a life jacket. she said that climate change is very much a feminist issue, that often, especially in the developing world, it is women who are suffering the greatest impact, whether it is bringing crops, walking further to find clean water, give us your take on what she has had to say and that whole idea of the impact of climate
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change being one that women in the developing world are primarily feeling. irate developing world are primarily feelina. ~ ., ., . developing world are primarily feelin., . ., ., . , ., feeling. we have a term which is not onl both feeling. we have a term which is not only both women _ feeling. we have a term which is not only both women but _ feeling. we have a term which is not only both women but also _ feeling. we have a term which is not only both women but also involves l only both women but also involves marginalised people because as we know the climate change impacts us differently. we want to climate action that tackles sectors and includes them. what they say about women is real. women suffer most from the climate crisis and not only for that but also because they are most of the farmers around the world. there is a thing today that will be discussed called climate reparations. basically, countries can't compromise to donate more than $1 million to countries to be able to extend the climate crisis but it has not been done, that's one of our main demands, to include women and
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people in the conversations. just brin a in a people in the conversations. just bringing this _ people in the conversations. just bringing this back finally to the fridays for future process. protests. what's next for the group? we will keep striking until they are actually listening to our demands and actually doing what we expect them to do or what we expect leaders to act. we will keep striking. we have a strike this friday so if anyone could join us, that would be amazing. anyone could 'oin us, that would be amazina. . ~ anyone could 'oin us, that would be amazina. ., ,, i. , anyone could 'oin us, that would be amazina. . ~ ,, , . anyone could 'oin us, that would be amazina. . ~ , . ., amazing. thank you very much for our amazing. thank you very much for your thoughts- — amazing. thank you very much for your thoughts. i'm _ amazing. thank you very much for your thoughts. i'm joined - amazing. thank you very much for your thoughts. i'm joined now - amazing. thank you very much for your thoughts. i'm joined now by i amazing. thank you very much for i your thoughts. i'm joined now by the environment minister for granada, the caribbean island. the grenada environment minister, simon stiell. borisjohnson was cheering a event with no rent remotely to launch the infrastructure for resilient island states. how important is that for an island like yours which has huge concerns about rising sea levels and
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the impacts of climate change? building resilience for developing island states in the caribbean, critical right now. keeping 1.5 alive is central. but what is equally as important for us is how do we adapt and build resilience to be impact we already face climate change is not theoretical in the islands, it's something we're living day by day with. we are seeing sea levels rise, lives being lost, livelihoods being impacted. we are facing these things every single day. where we are right now, we talk about 1.5, we day. where we are right now, we talk about1.5, we are day. where we are right now, we talk about 1.5, we are currently at 1.1, ona
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about 1.5, we are currently at 1.1, on a trajectory to 2.7. work we're dealing with right now is externally difficult. and even if we were to achieve 1.5, it would still be extraordinarily difficult. initiatives such that launched today, it's a step in the right direction but the scale of challenge we face is enormous. what we saw todayis we face is enormous. what we saw today is a good start but it is just scratching the surface. this is why we call for the $100 billion a year pledge by developed countries is so important and every time we miss those milestones, every fraction of a degree that increases, simply increases that burden and that need to accelerate work on adaptation and that's what we are calling for in this event, strengthening the agenda on adaptation, as important as
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mitigation, in support of those most vulnerable states. for mitigation, in support of those most vulnerable states.— vulnerable states. for our viewers, ex-lain vulnerable states. for our viewers, explain for — vulnerable states. for our viewers, explain for us _ vulnerable states. for our viewers, explain for us absolutely _ vulnerable states. for our viewers, explain for us absolutely clearly i explain for us absolutely clearly what adaptation means. what does it mean for grenade? grenada. how do we counter the im act of grenada. how do we counter the impact of sea-level _ grenada. how do we counter the impact of sea-level rise - grenada. how do we counter the impact of sea-level rise rising? l grenada. how do we counter the i impact of sea-level rise rising? how impact of sea—level rise rising? how do we protect shorelines, through hard engineering, nature —based solutions, how do we protect our vulnerable communities who are losing their homes? how do we protect ourselves against the ravages of hurricane is, floods, droughts? how do we secure our infrastructure so any event of a hurricane or extreme weather events, the damage sustained as less, lives lost are less, and our ability to recover faster, lost are less, and our ability to recoverfaster, better lost are less, and our ability to recover faster, better and faster,
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how do we adapt agriculture? the whole issue of food security, water security, rainfall patterns have changed significantly, affecting food production and as i said, water security. how do we protect ourselves against that? increasing temperatures, the health implications on people, vector—borne diseases which are on our increase. these are all some of the things that are required. in orderfor us to adapt better to these extreme conditions we are continuing to face. ., .,, conditions we are continuing to face. ., ., face. some of the most resonant voices we — face. some of the most resonant voices we have _ face. some of the most resonant voices we have heard _ face. some of the most resonant voices we have heard so - face. some of the most resonant voices we have heard so far i face. some of the most resonant voices we have heard so far havej voices we have heard so far have been people representing some of the island states, the low—lying island states who are absolutely at the forefront of climate change, worried on a daily basis about rising sea
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levels. you were in your first answer focusing on that 1.5, levels. you were in your first answerfocusing on that 1.5, the lower of the targets agreed, that is the figure that no one wants to get above in terms of the global average temperature, because much more dangerous impacts of climate change scientists say will happen if the earth warms to that point. what do you therefore make of that statement from china's chief negotiator a little while ago, saying that two degrees, the higher limit agreed at paris, she'd still be kept in play? he was arguing if you do not do that, it puts up some countries from really coming to an agreement. tiara really coming to an agreement. two dearees is really coming to an agreement. two degrees is not _ really coming to an agreement. “ii-err degrees is not an really coming to an agreement. “i"rn'rrr degrees is not an option. . there is acceptance as science tells us, our
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living experiences are telling us, that to go above 1.5 will be devastating, notjust for that to go above 1.5 will be devastating, not just for those that to go above 1.5 will be devastating, notjust for those of us feeling the impact today, but globally. we are seeing these changing weather patterns, impacting notjust changing weather patterns, impacting not just developing changing weather patterns, impacting notjust developing countries, but developed countries also. we have to work with the science, we have to work with the science, we have to work with the science, we have to work with what in the ipcc is still telling us it is still possible, no matter how difficult it is, it is still possible. this is where political play comes into play, we can still do this. if we let this target slipped it will beat the detriment of all, but especially at my
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greatest concern, is my family back home. it is our communities back home. it is our communities back home whose lives are dependent on the world, especially the g20 who contribute 80% of global emissions. constitute 85% of gdp. the wealth is there, the technology is there and there, the technology is there and the responsibility lies right there. if there is the rail and if there is cooperation, there isn't enough talk about cooperation between parties. and finding solutions collectively. if those barriers that currently exist, that restrain parties from cooperating as they should, unless that happens and you truly have that collective effort then we are going
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to be in some serious trouble. minister, thank you very much for your thoughts on all of that. that is simon steele, ministerfor climate resilience and the environment from the caribbean island of grenade. joining me now is the climate campaigner, josh tregale. good to have you here as well. you were involved in the climate event that brought together delegates from 140 countries. the big difference is you've got together virtually, didn't you?— you've got together virtually, didn't ou? , ., ., ., , didn't you? yes, and one of the big benefits of— didn't you? yes, and one of the big benefits of that, _ didn't you? yes, and one of the big benefits of that, we _ didn't you? yes, and one of the big benefits of that, we could - didn't you? yes, and one of the big benefits of that, we could bring i benefits of that, we could bring people together across time zones so they could still be in school and reduce emissions without people having to travel. did reduce emissions without people having to travel.— reduce emissions without people having to travel. did you have goals for that event, _ having to travel. did you have goals for that event, just _ having to travel. did you have goals for that event, just as _ having to travel. did you have goals for that event, just as there - having to travel. did you have goals
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for that event, just as there are i for that event, just as there are goals for cop26? irate for that event, just as there are goals for com?— for that event, just as there are aoals for cop26? ~ ., ., . ., goals for cop26? we wanted to create a s-ace goals for cop26? we wanted to create a space where — goals for cop26? we wanted to create a space where young _ goals for cop26? we wanted to create a space where young people _ goals for cop26? we wanted to create a space where young people could i a space where young people could come together with the confidence they were representing their country to say, this is what we would do if we were in charge. we knew from talking to our delegates there where main themes they were passionate about. so things like climate education, climate resilience, climate justice, education, climate resilience, climatejustice, health and climate justice, health and wellbeing, climatejustice, health and wellbeing, those things that are not often talked about at cop. what wellbeing, those things that are not often talked about at cop. what with the key conclusions _ often talked about at cop. what with the key conclusions about _ often talked about at cop. what with the key conclusions about that i often talked about at cop. what with the key conclusions about that you i the key conclusions about that you would like to get across to the leaders who were gathered on the other side of the clyde today? i think it is the urgency and the sense of responsibility. the young people knew it would be a problem that would face our generation, maybe not me specifically living in the uk, but lots of delegates would face severe consequences of climate change and so would their children. it is the urgency and the need to act particularly from countries in the global north. the
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act particularly from countries in the global north.— act particularly from countries in the global north. the world leaders we have gathered _ the global north. the world leaders we have gathered here _ the global north. the world leaders we have gathered here today i the global north. the world leaders we have gathered here today have i we have gathered here today have flown in from the various parts of the world around 400 private jets i think, landed at glasgow airport. do you accept the argument that actually despite the carbon footprint that creates the benefit of bringing them together here, talking to one another face—to—face, that overrides what is at stake? there is a benefit of being in one room together. it is so much easier to work out what people are trying to work out what people are trying to say, based on body language rather than being stuck on a screen. it is so much easier and you can make better progress being interned. with good outcomes from a conference like this, it could outweigh the negatives are everybody together. the protester i spoke to a few minutes ago, she said she was in agreement with greta thunberg when she was speaking at a demonstration outside yesterday, saying the leaders in their she believes are
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not actually listening to climate activists like yourselves. do you agree with that or do you think this is different? do you think they are listening to what is being said this time? , ., ., ., ., ., ., time? there is a lot more that looks like they are — time? there is a lot more that looks like they are trying _ time? there is a lot more that looks like they are trying to _ time? there is a lot more that looks like they are trying to listen. - like they are trying to listen. whether they are, i don't know. there has been more engagement before this, than i have noticed in the past. we will see the outcome, being ambitious and sticking to 1.5 degrees and putting it at the heart of the issue. if those things can come out, we can be reassured with a listen to in some degree, but i think we will have to wait to see the outcome.— think we will have to wait to see the outcome. ., ,, i. ., i. the outcome. thank you for your time toda . borisjohnson has apologised to an israeli minister who could not
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attend the cop26 summit yesterday because it was not wheelchair accessible. karine elharrar was forced to return to her hotel 50 miles away because the only access to the summit in glasgow was by shuttle or walking. earlier today, ms elharrar told the bbc her experience showed the need for better accessibility. dr mary keogh is advocacy director at cbm global disability inclusion, an international ngo working to build inclusive communities — shejoins me now. thank you for your time today. you must have been astonished that the delicate couldn't get into cop26? yes, it shouldn't have happened in the first place. we are in the 21st—century and accessibility is nothing new. ithink 21st—century and accessibility is nothing new. i think what happened yesterday highlights the everyday issues that people with disabilities face in terms of access. this is a woman who was going to work and her
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work on the dayjust happen to be at a climate conference and not being able to access negotiations meant she couldn't do herjob. i think it highlights some of the critical issues around accessibility that people with disabilities face around the world. i people with disabilities face around the world. , ., , ., people with disabilities face around the world. i. , ., , the world. i said you must have been astonished and _ the world. i said you must have been astonished and that _ the world. i said you must have been astonished and that was _ the world. i said you must have been astonished and that was in _ the world. i said you must have been astonished and that was in the i astonished and that was in the context of an event like this, where the world is looking on. looking at the world is looking on. looking at the comments of disability campaigners on social media earlier today, lots of them were saying, this is the experience for people with disabilities. why do you think more progress hasn't been made? i am a disabled more progress hasn't been made? i —n a disabled person myself and i have come across this experience myself, where i have arrived at meetings and accessibility wasn't100% and i had to go through a back door. we have to go through a back door. we have to think about getting more disabled people into these decision—making rooms and then it becomes more accessible because it is a natural
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reflex. we are in a world where stigma and attitudes towards people with disabilities doesn't make people think about inclusion. inclusion is critical, particularly like this climate event, which is bringing a spotlight around climate change and people with disabilities are living at the forefront of climate as well. there is an intersection here of the challenges that this high level speaker met and also the challenges that people with disabilities meet on an everyday basis in terms of access. so while it has got media attention at the moment, we need to keep the spotlight on these accessibility issues. it needs to become part and parcel on how conferences are organised. there is a legal mandate which allows this to happen, so a lot of the campaigners are saying, no more excuses, just do what is right and do what you are legally
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obliged to do. do right and do what you are legally obliged to do-— obliged to do. do you think the rublici obliged to do. do you think the publicity around _ obliged to do. do you think the publicity around this _ obliged to do. do you think the publicity around this might i obliged to do. do you think the i publicity around this might actually help drive forward some campaign, some of the campaigns you have been alluding to? some of the campaigns you have been alludina to? �* ., ~' some of the campaigns you have been alludina to? �* ., ~ , alluding to? attention like this brinas. .. alluding to? attention like this brings... but _ alluding to? attention like this brings... but it _ alluding to? attention like this brings... but it is _ alluding to? attention like this brings... but it is always i alluding to? attention like this brings... but it is always an i brings... but it is always an negative attention. i want to see some good news about accessibility and highlighting how conferences can be made accessible. there is a number of examples where this can be drawn from. in terms of future planning we need to be thinking about how the world leaders create accessibility at conferences like this, ratherthan accessibility at conferences like this, rather than what we have seen over the last 24 hours. the this, rather than what we have seen over the last 24 hours.— over the last 24 hours. the bottom line is, over the last 24 hours. the bottom line is. we — over the last 24 hours. the bottom line is, we have _ over the last 24 hours. the bottom line is, we have talked _ over the last 24 hours. the bottom line is, we have talked about i over the last 24 hours. the bottom | line is, we have talked about things being equitable or not around the pandemic. we are not all in the same boat when it comes to access to vaccinations. when it comes to climate change, we are not in the
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same boat because some parts of the world are in immediate danger and when it comes to accessibility for people with disabilities, we are not all in the same boat either? i absolutely agree and much more progress needs to be made. the world leaders are there and the key and this is the opportunity to do that. 0k, mary, thank you your time. bangladesh is one of the countries most severely affected climate change. frequent cyclones, flash floods and tidal surges have made life much more difficult for the 170 million strong population. people in coastal areas are at risk as experts project millions of people could be forced out of their homes. we are pulling away from that at the moment
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to listen to prince william, the duke of cambridge. i to listen to prince william, the duke of cambridge.— to listen to prince william, the duke of cambridge. i am pleased to tell ou duke of cambridge. i am pleased to tell you that — duke of cambridge. i am pleased to tell you that joining _ duke of cambridge. i am pleased to tell you that joining us _ duke of cambridge. i am pleased to tell you that joining us in _ duke of cambridge. i am pleased to tell you that joining us in this i tell you thatjoining us in this room today are some of those best and brightest minds. the e co—innovators of our planet. they are the inaugural earth shock prize finalist. two weeks ago in london we announce the first five winners of the earthshot prize and have ordered each £1 million to scale their solutions. ourfinalists each £1 million to scale their solutions. our finalists are bursting with energy, ideas and ambition. so please expect many of them to come knocking on your doors. their ingenuity is amazing, the potential is off the charts. it is my pleasure to introduce you to the real superstars in this room today. let's start with our three finalists for the earthshot prize to protect and restore nature. john from the
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drc. a community led conservation model that shows us how communities can protect wildlife while feeding their people. tom crowther, based in switzerland leads restore. applause. an online platform that unites people all over the planet to restore the well�*s natural ecosystems. restore the well's natural ecosystems.— ecosystems. and finally, representing _ ecosystems. and finally, representing our - ecosystems. and finally, l representing our earthshot ecosystems. and finally, - representing our earthshot prize winner, the republic of costa rica, cynthia. applause. costa rica has provided an example to the world that deforestation can be turned around while growing your economy. our second earthshot so relevant to this discussion is fix our climate. from bangladesh.
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applause. he tie need an energy and exchange network, allowing people to sell excess energy produced by the sun. and from nigeria, the founder of ready. which makes solar power catchable. and finally the winner who helped create... applause. who helped create an electrolyser in thailand, powering the use of green hydrogen, helping transform how we power our industry and vehicles. these three solutions are physically
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represented in the room today so you can see for yourself how exciting they are. revive our oceans is next. he would have been here but he is lending his insights to another cop panel next door. he is fighting to protect 30% of the world's oceans by 2030. next is the living sea walls team in australia represented by melanie bishop. applause. their irreparable siebel panels are bringing marine life back to coastal sea defences. and based in the bahamas, sam. applause. sam and his team won the prize that climate resistant fast—growing coral. ourfourth earthshot is
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climate resistant fast—growing coral. our fourth earthshot is to build a waste free world. the creator from japan has created a tiny water treatment plant. applause. applause. a water treatment plant that turns 98% of waste water into clean water. next is david. applause. based in canyou, their circular sanitation solution converts human waste into safe products for farmers. and our winner in this category is the city of milan whose food waste helps cut waste while tackling hunger. sadly they couldn't be with us today, but i know he would love to show you how to replicate this world ride. and i am
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proud to introduce you to our winner from india. applause. his pioneering technology creates profitable products from agricultural waste, giving farmers alternatives to crop burning. he couldn't be here today but is helping citizens hold polluters to account in china. i am almost done, i hope ourfinalists have account in china. i am almost done, i hope our finalists have given you cause for optimism. they represent a growing wave of innovators dedicating their time and talent to finding solutions to repair our planet. i am asking you to create the conditions in which they can thrive and their ideas can scale. i will finish with an introduction to our 15th finalists, who also happens to be just 15 years old. our 15th finalists, who also happens to bejust 15 years old. phoenicia, who is over there from india is the brains behind a solar ironing cart. applause.
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with the potential to improve air quality by replacing charcoal with solar power for literally millions of street vendors. this is just one of street vendors. this is just one of her many inventions. she puts us all to shame. we are all privileged to share the stage with you, over to you. applause. for the next two weeks of cop26, we will speak— for the next two weeks of cop26, we will speak about our future. deadlines, milestones, hopes and fears _ deadlines, milestones, hopes and fears i. _ deadlines, milestones, hopes and fears. i, however, i'm not here to speak— fears. i, however, i'm not here to speakabout— fears. i, however, i'm not here to speak about the future. i am the future _ speak about the future. i am the future in — speak about the future. i am the future. in 2013... studio: one of the incredible winners of the earthshot prize, the prize created by prince william. he has just been introducing some of
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the finalists and winners, a couple of whom we have interviewed on the bbc news channel of this first set of awards from the earthshot prize, designed to encourage innovative solutions dealing with climate change. a lot has been going on, we have had pledges on deforestation, stopping that by 2030. also about removing methane from the atmosphere as well by 2030 in a significant way. we are also due to hear more from the uk prime minister, boris johnson a little later on about a deal that more than 40 leaders have signed up to developing clean technology, making it more attractive, more affordable and accessible and more attractive to some of the most polluting sectors. we will have much more on all of those developments throughout the rest of the day on the second day of the leader's summit in glasgow at
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cop26. forthe the leader's summit in glasgow at cop26. for the moment, the leader's summit in glasgow at cop26. forthe moment, it the leader's summit in glasgow at cop26. for the moment, it is back to you, jane. making me feel old watching that remarkable speaker. we will pick up on one of the things mentioned, because one of the significant degree means has been 80 nations agreeing to cut methane by 80% by 2030. one of the big agreements at the summit. methane is a greenhouse gas that's second only to carbon dioxide in driving global warming. it's more potent than c02 in the short—term, but only lingers in the atmosphere for a relatively short time as our climate editor, justin rowlatt explains. you are about to meet methane, the gas that fires your stove, seeps from rotting organic material and bubbles from our stomachs and those of cows and sheep. butjust look what happens when you add a little bit of pure oxygen.
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methane is a much more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. each molecule has 120 times the effect. the real difference between methane and carbon dioxide is that methane breaks down after about a decade, but carbon dioxide will be with us for thousands of years. methane concentrations in the atmosphere have been steadily increasing, but because it breaks down so quickly in the air, the un says if we can cut emissions we can rapidly get rid of this powerful warming gas. that means urgently tackling the methane produced by the oil and gas industry, by agriculture and in our waste. technology can help. a new network of high resolution satellites can identify methane emissions from space. like the methane plume from this rubbish dump in the indonesian capital,
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jakarta. it is spewing methane equivalent to the c02 from three—quarters of a million cars. methane is also linked to air pollution that causes tens of thousands of deaths a year worldwide. i'm joined byjohn lynch, an environmental scientist from the university of oxford. thanks very much forjoining us. i know you have been waiting a long time, it has been a busy afternoon. what do you take from this agreement that has been reached in glasgow? it is important that we recognise methane is a very powerful greenhouse gas and the second most thing mentioned there, it is good news we are moving from objectives to reduce greenhouse gases and putting realfigures in the near
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term. overall it is positive we have got this ambition to reduce methane emissions by 30% by 2030. that is feasible as well. now we have methods to detect methane links. why haven't we been doing this for ages if it is so easy to sort out? in some ways, that is a good question. some of these things are cost saving for the companies. over the last month we have had lots of news about the energy supply and price crisis. and the methane and natural gas, and that has been very expensive. with these leaky pipes that companies are wasting a valuable resource that we still do
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need to burn for energy, unfortunately. if they are being promoted by policy to go and fix those leagues it is saving them money and something we should have been doing already. my worry is, even though it is great we have a real target and we will reduce emissions with this important greenhouse gas, it is things we should have been doing already. maybe the companies would go and do these things for their own efforts and it is carbon dioxide and c02 we need to focus on. if we make these announcements about how great it is we are being ambitious about methane and the fair efforts from carbon dioxide, that is setting us up for a warmer climate in the long term. common dioxide is so long to live, it has an indefinite impact on the climate. many carbon dioxide emissions we don't reduce over the next few decades are going to have warming for centuries to millennia.
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so that is significant, don't take your eye off the key goal here. also a quick thought about the fact china and india are not on board? it is a alobal and india are not on board? it is a global problem. _ and india are not on board? it is a global problem, we _ and india are not on board? it is a global problem, we have - and india are not on board? it is a global problem, we have these i and india are not on board? it is a l global problem, we have these well mixed greenhouse gases, it is not just a local effect, even relatively short lived ones like methane. it is short lived ones like methane. it is short lived ones like methane. it is short lived in a geological sense, it is still a life span of about a decade. we need a global effort to reduce all emissions and we need every country to get on—board with reduction programmes. every country to get on-board with reduction programmes.— reduction programmes. really interesting — reduction programmes. really interesting to _ reduction programmes. really interesting to talk _ reduction programmes. really interesting to talk to. - reduction programmes. really interesting to talk to. thank . reduction programmes. really. interesting to talk to. thank you for your patience, john lynch from the of oxford. thank you, on a very busy afternoon. we are turning to another story attracting a lot of attention today, about wet wipes. 11 billion wet wipes are used in the uk every year, and they cause more than 90% of the blockages in our sewers.
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that's because the vast majority of them contain plastic which doesn't break down or decompose. now one mp is propsing a new law to change the way they're produced. with me now is labour mp fleur anderson, who is calling for the ban on wet wipes containing plastic. thank you forjoining us. lovely to thank you for “oining us. lovely to be “oinina thank you forjoining us. lovely to be joining you- — thank you forjoining us. lovely to be joining you. everyone - thank you forjoining us. lovely to be joining you. everyone is - be joining you. everyone is enthusiastic _ be joining you. everyone is enthusiastic in _ be joining you. everyone is enthusiastic in the - be joining you. everyone is enthusiastic in the terms l be joining you. everyone is| enthusiastic in the terms of be joining you. everyone is i enthusiastic in the terms of why aren't we already doing this? are you confident you have really got cross party support behind you? there is so much support for this, it does beg the question, why hasn't it does beg the question, why hasn't it happened before? yes, cross—party support for this bill and the sponsors of the bill and the mps in the chamber wanting to support this. also support from a lot of organisations, the marine conservation society, wwf, so many constituents and people who use wet wipes. the industry itself says it
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wants to go in this direction. i just think a ban on using plastic in wet wipes would encourage the industry to go further and faster. it is those kind of bold actions we need and what we are talking about in cop26 as well. i need and what we are talking about in cop26 as well.— in cop26 as well. i am really interested — in cop26 as well. i am really interested in _ in cop26 as well. i am really interested in what _ in cop26 as well. i am really interested in what those i in cop26 as well. i am really i interested in what those companies that don't make biodegradable wet wipes, what do they say to you? because presumably you can say to them, why aren't you doing it already? has them, why aren't you doing it alread ? �* , . them, why aren't you doing it alread ? a ., , them, why aren't you doing it alread ? ~ , ., , ., them, why aren't you doing it alread? ., , ., fir already? as i have exactly that. 1096 of wet wipes — already? as i have exactly that. 1096 of wet wipes are _ already? as i have exactly that. 1096 of wet wipes are already _ already? as i have exactly that. 1096 of wet wipes are already made i already? as i have exactly that. 1096 of wet wipes are already made with | of wet wipes are already made with biodegradable sources, bamboo and others. it can be done and it can be done without being more costly. the industry are saying, we are starting to do this, phasing out plastic and we will get there eventually. but what i am saying, is you need to faster. they could, and obviously will say they need to change production. but it can be done
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within the same factories. also retailers, they are wanting to do this and i think a ban would make them move faster. for example, sainsburys own brands are now phasing out the ones with plastic and they will all be plastic free. it shows again that this can be done, retailers want to do it. what we want to know as people who buy wet wipes, we want to know when we go and buy wet wipes, none have plastic in them. it is easy for us to know. at the moment it is a confusing mixture.— confusing mixture. very quick thou a ht confusing mixture. very quick thought about _ confusing mixture. very quick thought about messaging i confusing mixture. very quick i thought about messaging before i confusing mixture. very quick - thought about messaging before i let you go, i did interview the ceo of a company that makes biodegradable wipes but he said we should be doing more that remind people that whatever tight they are buying, don't flush them down the toilet. they just go don't flush them down the toilet. theyjust go out into our rivers and beaches and they are dreadful for the wildlife. they die because they
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ingest these micro—plastics and they are essentially staff because the plastics don't leave their stomachs and they cannot eat any more food. it is causing dreadful damage to wildlife. don't flush any wet wipes. will the government step up? the government has been dragging its feet for years. this is one bolt and environmental action that it could take that could make a huge difference.— take that could make a huge difference. . ~' , ., , . take that could make a huge difference. ., ,, , ., , . ., difference. thank you very much for now. difference. thank you very much for now- more — difference. thank you very much for now. more coming _ difference. thank you very much for now. more coming at _ difference. thank you very much for now. more coming at four _ difference. thank you very much for now. more coming at four o'clock i difference. thank you very much for. now. more coming at four o'clock but let's look at the weather right now. further east more dry weather and
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some spells of sunshine with highs of ten to 13 degrees. through this evening and tonight showers will pat coastal areas and some moving further inland across parts of northern england and some of the showers over high ground over northern scotland could be wintry. but a chilly night in prospect and lowest temperatures across southern england dropping just below freezing with a touch of frost. we will see some sunny spells again and some showers and more generally cloudy, showery weather drifting across northern england into the midlands and another chilly feeling day. towards the end of the week it will turn milder, a lot of cloud but not as many showers.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. together, we are committing to collectively reduce our methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion—pillared cathedrals of nature. brazil is one of the signatories to the deal, but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest.
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we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. in other news... two metropolitan police officers are convicted of taking and sharing photos of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after the sisters were found murdered in north london. the officers are told to expect prison terms. the uk environment secretary has welcomed what he calls a big de—escalation of the post—brexit fishing row with france. paris says it will delay introducing punitive trade measures while further talks are held a labour mp is proposing a change in the law to ban good afternoon.
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more than 80 countries have agreed to cut methane emissions by 30 percent by the end of the decade. the plan, led by the us and the eu, to drastically reduce outputs of the gas was announced at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. with the latest, we can cross to the conference and join my colleague christian fraser. warm welcome back to glasgow. we are seeing leaders roll warm welcome back to glasgow. we are seeing leaders roll out warm welcome back to glasgow. we are seeing leaders roll out the warm welcome back to glasgow. we are seeing leaders roll out the plans warm welcome back to glasgow. we are seeing leaders roll out the plans in front of them. three major deals being put forward to address the climate emergency. focusing on 2030. require a action to make it work. let's run you through what is being proposed. and new global partnership to come emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, by 30% by 2030. led by the united states and eu, signed by more than 80 countries, china, russia and india not part of the pledge. end
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deforestation by 2030, more than 130 world leaders signed on including brazil, indonesia, centralafrican brazil, indonesia, central african states. brazil, indonesia, centralafrican states. all told, it covers 85% of the world's forest. let me take you back to that deal. and why it is so important. methane is a greenhouse gas that's second only to carbon dioxide in driving global warming — it's responsible for 25 percent of it. it's stronger than c02 in the short—term, but only lingers in the atmosphere for a relatively short time. so curbing it could deliver immediate effects. our climate editor, justin rowlatt explains. you are about to meet methane, the gas that fires your stove, seeps from rotting organic material
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and bubbles from our stomachs and those of cows and sheep. theyjust look what happens when you add a little bit of pure oxygen. methane is a much more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. each molecule has 120 times the effect, and the real difference between methane and carbon dioxide is that methane breaks down after about a decade. carbon dioxide will be with us for thousands of years. methane concentrations in the atmosphere have been steadily increasing, but because it breaks down so quickly in the air, the un says, if we can cut emissions, we can rapidly get rid of this powerful warming gas. that means urgently tackling the methane produced by the oil and gas industry, by agriculture, and in our waste. and technology can help. a new network of high resolution
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satellites can identify methane emissions from space. like the methane plume from this rubbish dump in the indonesian capital, jakarta. it is spewing methane equivalent to the c02 from three quarters of a million cars. and methane is also linked to air pollution that causes tens of thousands of deaths a year worldwide. the plan contains measures to stop millions of tonnes of methane from entering the atmosphere. it is being sponsored by the president, joe biden. we are proposing two new rules, one through our environmental protection agency that
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will reduce methane losses from new and existing oil and gas pipelines, and one through the department of transportation to reduce wasteful and potential dangerous links from natural gas pipelines, they have authority over that area. we are also launching a new initiative to work with our farmers and our ranchers to reduce climate scarred agriculture practices and produce methane on farms, which is a significant source as well. and this is all part of our new methane strategy, which focuses on reducing the largest source of methane emissions and putting thousands and thousands of skilled workers in a job all across the united states, i expect in your countries as well. if we deliver on this pledge, we can prevent over 200,000 premature deaths. we can prevent hundred of thousands of asthma—related emergency room visits. and over 20 million tonnes of crop losses a year by reduces ground level zone pollution. i want to thank all those countries that have signed up to the global methane pledge. with this global pledge, we are making cop26 the moment when the world moves from aspiration to action.
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with this global pledge, we are making cop26 the moment when the world moves from aspiration to action. i'm joined now by our science and environment correspondent victoria gill. obviously to be welcomed, 80 countries signed up, always important. the biggest polluters not there. ., , .., important. the biggest polluters not there. . , ~ there. that significant. we will hear repeatedly _ there. that significant. we will hear repeatedly about - there. that significant. we will hear repeatedly about the i there. that significant. we will i hear repeatedly about the absence of agreements from russia, india and china because they are important players in the absence of russian and chinese leader at these talks laying the foundation for maybe not the consensus we were hoping for. it's a really important agreement because it buys the time we need to
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get on this deadline of hitting that emission cut by 2030. scientists are calling this critical decade because the latest science shows we need to slash emissions in half to start to bend that curve closer to the critical 1.5 degrees target. that threshold. and the important thing about methane is the new science, the relatively new science, these government—sponsored scientists giving us the latest and best assessment of the impact of climate change, shows how potent this greenhouse gases and also that it is an easier cut than carbon dioxide, it buys the time more swiftly and more easily. there is not much low hanging fruit in the world of fixing the climate change but methane is one. at the climate change but methane is one. �* ., , ., ., one. at the top of the programme i said we had — one. at the top of the programme i said we had a _ one. at the top of the programme i said we had a flurry _ one. at the top of the programme i said we had a flurry of _ said we had a flurry of announcements, i'm struggling to keep up with everything that has been announced. it seems to me that
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given the fact they cannot get china and russia on board, they are steaming ahead anyway, building the coalition of the willing in a series of deals. would that be a good description?— of deals. would that be a good description? that is fair to say, it's a mix _ description? that is fair to say, it's a mix of — description? that is fair to say, it's a mix of promises - description? that is fair to say, it's a mix of promises and - it's a mix of promises and positivity, also scepticism and pessimism. as we said at the beginning, there are some notable absences. it was about kick—starting this by announcing these agreements, scientists i have spoken to, experts in the realm of what impact this will have, there is concern about how deliverable this is on the ground. we had a big deforestation announcement, an announcement about methane, how do you actually police and enforce that? these are voluntary agreements and with the deforestation announcement, deforestation announcement, deforestation has increased in the
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time since the first since the 2014 agreement. there is some scepticism about the enforcement and we're running out of time to do that. we need to meet emission cuts so we need to meet emission cuts so we need to meet emission cuts so we need to make sure that this works, in pretty short order.— in pretty short order. victoria, thank you _ in pretty short order. victoria, thank you very _ in pretty short order. victoria, thank you very much - in pretty short order. victoria, thank you very much for - in pretty short order. victoria, thank you very much for that. | in pretty short order. victoria, - thank you very much for that. the president of costa rica has just sat down next to me. that is the nature of these summits. dignitaries like yourself plunk yourself down and away we go. what about before deforestation, is this a success story? in deforestation, is this a success sto ? ., , ., deforestation, is this a success sto ? ., ., ., ., story? in costa rica, we managed to have an example _ story? in costa rica, we managed to have an example letter— story? in costa rica, we managed to have an example letter successful. l have an example letter successful. in the 1980s, our forest coverage dropped to 20% of the country. at the beginning of last century it was more than 80%. 1988 was 20%. through policy like national park, payment of environmental services which was
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awarded recently with the award by prince william and other policies we managed to recover forest coverage and currently we are over 50% of the country is forest coverage. that example shows it's possible to recover forest and reverse deforestation.— recover forest and reverse deforestation. . , ., ._ recover forest and reverse deforestation. . , ., ~ deforestation. there was a day like this si . ned deforestation. there was a day like this signed in _ deforestation. there was a day like this signed in new _ deforestation. there was a day like this signed in new york _ deforestation. there was a day like this signed in new york in - deforestation. there was a day like this signed in new york in 2014. i deforestation. there was a day like l this signed in new york in 2014. why is this one different? it this signed in new york in 2014. why is this one different?— is this one different? it out to be different because _ is this one different? it out to be different because the _ is this one different? it out to be different because the clock- is this one different? it out to be different because the clock is - different because the clock is ticking. we don't have a chance to fail and i ticking. we don't have a chance to failand i think ticking. we don't have a chance to fail and i think that's the key message of the secretary general gutierrez, that's our message. that's the message of the small island states. when they address the flaw here in glasgow, they say basically they are pledging for their existence in the nearfuture. and that's why we cannot fail. £31 and that's why we cannot fail. of course the difference this time as there is lots more money. we hope that as well- _
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there is lots more money. we hope that as well. explained _ there is lots more money. we hope that as well. explained that - there is lots more money. we hope that as well. explained that for - there is lots more money. we hopej that as well. explained that for me. i have been — that as well. explained that for me. i have been too _ that as well. explained that for me. i have been too many _ that as well. explained that for me. i have been too many summits - that as well. explained that for me. i have been too many summits as l that as well. explained that for me. i i have been too many summits as i'm sure you have where there is a dizzying out of money pledged. does it come through in a timely fashion? i think it's a matter of trust. we have been talking a lot about trust. trust between the developed world or the rich world, that have the resources for their own and for the others to implement policies. and in the developing world, which they say we have not polluted, we have not burned that much fossil fuel, we did not cause this. we need help. if we get into that conflict it's a matter of who is going to take the first step? i think like in any trust, relation, we both need to take the first step. we need to implement nature —based solutions particularly within the tropics, that's developing world, we need to implement that, and we need to have the finance for development go in. both at the same time. trusting things will happen, both because we
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need it and both because the time has run out. at the last eventjust a few minutes ago, there was a commitment between costa rica, ecuador, panama, colombia, to create a protected area in the pacific in the ocean. for conservation and to tackle both protection our biodiversity in the ocean and climate change. those are the kind of concrete deals that we need here in glasgow and it's a very concrete agreement, it has been enforced and it's going to help change but we are also sending this knesset because it is true that to make that an even more concrete reality, we need support to sustain it. i more concrete reality, we need support to sustain it.— more concrete reality, we need support to sustain it. i have 'ust been speaking i support to sustain it. i have 'ust been speaking to i support to sustain it. i have 'ust been speaking to the i support to sustain it. i have 'ust been speaking to the us i support to sustain it. i have just been speaking to the us special envoy who is corralling the banks and asset managers and credit agencies and stock market and an enormous bit of money will be needed. around 100 trucking dollars by 2050. the problem historically has been that banks and asset
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managers will not funnel money to loads of developing countries because there is more risk and some of the technologies are untested. what do you need to attract the sort of finance that will be on the table? . , . , table? let me frame it this way. ima . ine table? let me frame it this way. imagine you _ table? let me frame it this way. imagine you have _ table? let me frame it this way. imagine you have a _ table? let me frame it this way. imagine you have a kid, - table? let me frame it this way. imagine you have a kid, a - table? let me frame it this way. imagine you have a kid, a son i table? let me frame it this way. j imagine you have a kid, a son or daughter, who is ill. and you need to take them to the hospital. in that moment, you do not consider, you do not do a risk assessment in order to see how much you are going to spend to protect your child. you just do it and perhaps you will commit future investments and so on. this is the case in this scenario, because the real risk is losing the planet. i mean, it sounds so obvious, but it is the real risk. so the risk is defined in terms of
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future investment, or future events. if the risk of a future event is destroying the planet, then i think that reconfigures the whole equation and should reconfigure the question for financial institutions as well. you spell out the risk very well but i havejust you spell out the risk very well but i have just read you spell out the risk very well but i havejust read before you spell out the risk very well but i have just read before you arrived a statement form the chinese delegation who say why are we suddenly talking about 1.5 celsius when in paris we talked about to two? what would you say? evidence and science- — two? what would you say? evidence and science. in _ two? what would you say? evidence and science. in paris, _ two? what would you say? evidence and science. in paris, that _ two? what would you say? evidence and science. in paris, that was - two? what would you say? evidence and science. in paris, that was the l and science. in paris, that was the definition science gave. two years ago, the latest report from the ipcc defined that it was no enough at two, drew the line at 1.5. it's because of evidence. it's not ideology in this case, the best scientists in the world working together state what is the best for all pass in the planet. not ideology. that's not faith, that is
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evidence and subject to discussion, but it is based on evidence and scientific evidence. you but it is based on evidence and scientific evidence.— scientific evidence. you talked about the _ scientific evidence. you talked about the meeting _ scientific evidence. you talked about the meeting you - scientific evidence. you talked about the meeting you have . scientific evidence. you talked - about the meeting you have come from where you met regional partners. does it make a difference? being face—to—face. you have done so much of it on soon i presume. there is it make a difference when you are with close partners and when you are with the big polluters? you can stare them in the face and say look what's happening to my country? i do believe it makes _ happening to my country? i do believe it makes a _ happening to my country? i u believe it makes a difference but also, you have to be willing on one side to say the truth, bluntly. look them in the inc this is wrong. when you have people in front of you and say it's wrong, you might have a better reaction. but also, have the willingness for others to listen. and i have seen many of the leaders being very responsive to that. we are not yet where we want to be, but
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then again, we need to keep thriving, we need to keep pushing. we cannot give up. if we do not fix this, it's a very definite conversation. what's next? i was lookinu conversation. what's next? i was looking at _ conversation. what's next? i was looking at the — conversation. what's next? i was looking at the reaction _ conversation. what's next? i was looking at the reaction from - looking at the reaction from millions of viewers around the world who have been plugged into this, they are really involved in the discussions happening here in glasgow. the feedback we get time and time again as, why are they talking about 2030? 2040, 2050, when the problem is now? it is if there is an infection of procrastination in this building, that people talk about years down the line. they might not even be in power when many of these deals are signed. the? might not even be in power when many of these deals are signed.— of these deals are signed. they do understand — of these deals are signed. they do understand the _ of these deals are signed. they do understand the sense _ of these deals are signed. they do understand the sense of _ of these deals are signed. they do understand the sense of people, l of these deals are signed. they do | understand the sense of people, we need to, it's kind of two lanes. the present time is involved in politics, elections, particular junctures, and a line that is more
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in line with statesmanship. but the big decisions, in the case of costa rica, the decisions people took four decades ago are the ones that allow us now to see we are recovering from deforestation. but this decision was taken four decades ago. for example, costa rica is 99.5% of clean renewable electricity. but that happens because of decisions that were taken seven decades ago. so now, what we are building for decarbonisation, for 2050, in order for that to happen, we need to start now. so perhaps the best way of framing it is the chinese court that says that the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. because you needed to grow, so you better start planting them now. you better have a good plan. and changes not only a matter of establishing priorities,
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but a matter of persistence. changes not only like changing your clothes or views, not only like changing your clothes orviews, changes not only like changing your clothes or views, changes about putting an objective and be very persistent until you reach it. mr objective and be very persistent until you reach it. untilyou reach it. mr president, it has been a — untilyou reach it. mr president, it has been a real— untilyou reach it. mr president, it has been a real pleasure - untilyou reach it. mr president, it has been a real pleasure talking . untilyou reach it. mr president, it| has been a real pleasure talking to you. where are you going now? are you. where are you going now? are you flying home? do you lead your delegation here? the you flying home? do you lead your delegation here?— delegation here? the funny thing about this kind _ delegation here? the funny thing about this kind of— delegation here? the funny thing about this kind of meeting - delegation here? the funny thing about this kind of meeting is - delegation here? the funny thing about this kind of meeting is i . delegation here? the funny thing about this kind of meeting is i do j about this kind of meeting is i do not know. i need to ask my advisers what is next on my agenda. when i try to recap at the end of the day how many sessions i have had, it's quite a few. the good thing is, when one ends like the last one, it's a concrete pact to protect the largest area of the pacific in the ocean for conservation, climate change and biodiversity. that's very concrete. so that kind of thing is very fulfilling. so that kind of thing is very fulfilline. , , so that kind of thing is very fulfilling-— so that kind of thing is very fulfilline. , , ., ., ., ~ fulfilling. keep up the good work, thank ou fulfilling. keep up the good work, thank you for— fulfilling. keep up the good work, thank you for telling _ fulfilling. keep up the good work, thank you for telling us _ fulfilling. keep up the good work, thank you for telling us the - fulfilling. keep up the good work, thank you for telling us the news. thank you very much.—
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thank you for telling us the news. thank you very much. president of costa rica- — thank you very much. president of costa rica- we _ thank you very much. president of costa rica. we are _ thank you very much. president of costa rica. we are going - thank you very much. president of costa rica. we are going to - thank you very much. president of costa rica. we are going to say i costa rica. we are going to say goodbye briefly to viewers on the news channel. you are watching bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters who were found stabbed to death in a park in north london. pcs deninaffer and jamie lewis distributed the images of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after being assigned to guard the crime scene, injune last year. danyal hussein, who's '19, was last week sentenced to at least 35 years in prison for murdering the women. helena wilkinson reports.
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bibaa henry and nicole smallman had been celebrating with friends, hours before they were murdered. it was in this park where their bodies were discovered. they'd been ferociously attacked. today, their mother came to court, to hear two met police officers admit taking photos of her daughters' bodies, and sharing them. this is them, pc deninaffer, and pcjamie lewis. they were meant to be protecting the crime scene, but instead, they breached a cordon to take photos of the bodies, which they then shared on whatsapp. lewis edited one of the pictures, superimposing his own face on, with the victims in the background. in court, the officers sat side by side in the dock. "guilty," they said, as the clerk read them the charges they faced. both admitted one count of misconduct in a public office.
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what the two officers did has added to the sisters' family's grief and despair. after the hearing, their mother spoke outside court. if these police officers do not get a custodial sentence, it will not send the message. you are not above the law. you are not going to be protected. the independent office for police conduct said there was no place in policing for this behaviour, and it had to stop. a culture where some officers don't see anything wrong with sharing deeply offensive messages and where others feel unable or unwilling to challenge has to change, and it has to change now. judge mark lucraft qc told the officers the matters were extremely serious. he granted them conditional bail and told them they would receive prison sentences for their crimes.
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the officers will be sentenced at a later date. helena wilkinson, bbc news, at the old bailey. the environment secretary, george eustice, says he welcomes further talks to try to de—escalate the row with france about post brexit fishing rights. paris has delayed measures it threatened to introduce from today, blocking british boats from landing their catches at french ports. there's anger about the number of licences the uk and jersey have processed for french vessels to fish in their waters. ministers from france and the uk are to meet on thursday to discuss fish, and a range of other brexit issues. here's our europe correspondent, jessica parker. a fishing boat leaving the port early this morning after overnight a fishing boat leaving boulogne—sur—mer early this morning after overnight the french government said it would hold off on retaliation over post—brexit fishing rights. emelie's husband catches the fish, she sells them and says the current situation cannot carry on.
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translation: even if we can't work, we will. - we have to work, we need it, we're just like everyone else needing to live, eat and raise our kids. so if nothing moves, we will move. there had been suggestions british vessels could be stopped from unloading their catches, along with tougher border checks. this fish processors says french licences to fish in the waters off the uk and channel islands are important, but so are getting supplies in from british boats. jobs depend on it. politics have to consider both parts, that means the fishermen and also us, all the processors, because there is something like 300 or 400 fishermen in boulogne and 5,000 people working in the factories. emmanuel macron and borisjohnson both know fishing can be an emotive political issue. france says more of its small vessels should be licensed. boats have to show they have fished
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in the relevant waters before. we had constructive talks yesterday, where we made clear that _ if there are additional vessels that have evidence and can bring it - forward, we will obviously consider it, and there will be further- discussions on thursday so there l is a big de—escalation of this. i talks will continue leading up to a high—level political meeting in paris on thursday between the uk's brexit minister lord frost and france's europe minister, clement beaune. it is not clear at this stage what resolution will be reached. both men have some level of reputation for talking tough. dozens of licenses remain outstanding, with both sides complaining about potential brexit treaty breaches. the possibility of escalation has been delayed but it has not disappeared. jessica parker, bbc news. emergency teams in nigeria are still searching for survivors after a lagos apartment block collapsed while under construction. authorities say the number
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of dead has risen to 16. up to 100 people are missing. 0ur correspondent mayeni jones has been at the scene of the collapse. here at the site of monday's building collapse, there are huge crowds, members of the media, onlookers. the story has really captured the imagination of nigeria, many people are horrified at the sheer scale of the tragedy and the area's been cordoned off this morning, they're not allowing media or individuals to go in as rescue efforts are ongoing. they have been going through night, they have been using generators and floodlights to try and find some of the victims. just this morning they were able to recover two survivors who were alive. authorities say they're hearing the voice of a woman. they have been calling out to her and she has been responding. they're now trying to rescue her. but for many here it is symptomatic of of a problem with lagos construction at the moment. the city's been expanding,
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high rises are going up at breakneck speeds and that's pushing developers to take risks and use cheaper materials. the lagos authorities say the developers of this particular compound were only supposed to go up by 15 storeys, but they went up by 21 and some of materials they used were very cheap. and time and time again, analysts say this is the problem — lack of enforcement of ongoing regulations and the use of cheap materials and inexperienced workers. lagos says it is going to be investigating and will make its findings public, but in the meantime the families of the missing wait anxiously to hear whether their loved ones have been found. the former fifa president sepp blatter and former uefa president michel platini have been charged with fraud, by swiss prosecutors. the swiss attorney generals office says sepp blatter arranged the unlawful transfer of more than £2 million to michel platini in 2011 when the two men were still in office. they have always denied any wrongdoing.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello. today is bringing plenty of bright but chilly and crisp autumn weather across the uk. some spells of sunshine, but also some showers. that was how it looked for a weather watcher in devon earlier on. those showers affecting northern and western scotland, some for eastern scotland too. northern ireland, western england and wales, further east, more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, highs of 10—13. through this evening and tonight, showers will continue to pepper coastal areas, some moving further inland across parts of northern england. some of the showers over very high ground in northern scotland, could even be wintry. quite a chilly night in prospect, lowest temperatures across parts of southern england, dropping just below freezing, with a touch of frost and some fog
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patches for parts of england and wales tomorrow morning. we will see some sunny spells, again, some showers, and some more generally cloudy, showery weather drifting across northern england into the midlands. another rather chilly—feeling day. as we look further ahead towards the end of the week, it will slowly turn at little bit milder, a lot of cloud, but not as many showers.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: world leaders have agreed a plan to drastically cut methane gas emissions, at the un climate summit in glasgow. but china, russia and india are not part of the deal. together, we are committing to collectively reduce our methane by 30% by 2030, and i think we can probably go beyond that. separately, leaders strike a deal to halt and reverse deforestation by the end of the decade. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion—pillared cathedrals of nature.
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brazil is one of the signatories to the deal — but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. in other news... two metropolitan police officers are convicted of taking and sharing photos of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after the sisters were found murdered in north london. the officers are told to expect prison terms. the uk environment secretary has welcomed what he calls a "big de—escalation" of the post—brexit fishing row with france. paris says it will delay introducing punitive trade measures while further talks are held. sport and a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, good afternoon. antonio conte says he's extremely happy to return to coaching and can't wait to start working with the tottenham players — after he was confirmed as the club's new manager, just a day after the sacking of nuno espirito santo. the former chelsea manager has signed a deal until the summer of 2023. his first game in charge will be at home to dutch side vitesse arnhem in the europa conference league on thursday. earlier i spoke to our football reporter simon stone who explained why the conte didn't take the job when he was first approached in the summer. when he was first it was too soon, basically from him leaving inter milan to moving to another club. but he said he was left with the impression of this contagious drive and enthusiasm and determination from the tottenham chairman, daniel leavy. he hasn't forgotten that and given that
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opportunity, he has taken it with both hands and he understands there is a determination amongst executives at tottenham, led by daniel leavey, for the club to be, what he describes as a protagonist again. that means challenging for major honours and get the collective semifinals and finals, including the champions league final and challenging at the top end of the league. that clearly is what antonio conte wants. that is his background and that is where he will expect to drive the club to when his contract expires injune 2023. that might not be the only premier league managerial appointment this week — newcastle are reportedly hoping to name unai emery as their new boss before saturday's game against brighton. emery had an 18—month spell in charge of arsenal before being sacked in november 2019. the 49—year—old, currently in charge of spanish side villarreal, has emerged as the leading candidate as newcastle's new owners look
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to replace steve bruce. manchester united — who were beaten in last season's europa league final by unai emery�*s villareal — are in champions league action tonight. having been thrashed by liverpool — the pressure eased on ole gunnar solskjaer at the weekend when united won at spurs but questions remain about his position and a tough test awaits later when they take on atalanta in italy. in the earlier kick off, holders chelsea are away at swedish side malmo. former fifa president sepp blatter and ex—uefa president michel platini have been charged with fraud in switzerland. an investigation found blatter arranged a payment of more than £1.5 to platini. platini had requested backdated payments for previous work — this was made while blatter was up for re—election as fifa president. blatter, who is 85—years—old and 65—year—old platini now face
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a criminal trial within months. both have long denied any wrongdoing. england captainjoe root has said he is 'thrilled' ben stokes is back in the squad for the ashes series in australia. the all—rounder hasn't played any cricket since march, after taking a break to focus on his mental well being. the squad travel down under this week, ahead of the first test in brisbane on december 8th. ona on a personal level, i am absolutely thrilled he is in a place where he can get back playing and enjoy the sport again. i can imagine it has been very difficult for him being out of the game. and just to hear him on the phone when we've spoken more recently, you can almost hear his smile back down the line, which i think is the greatest thing from my perspective. and in england's group at the t20 world cup —
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their next opponents south africa have boosted their hopes of reaching the semi finals by beating bangladesh by six wickets in abu dhabi. put into bat, bangladesh were bowled out forjust 84. south africa wobbled chasing that small target but captain temba bavuma steadied things and they knocked off the runs with more than six overs to spare. that result puts bangladesh out. england play south africa on saturday. meanwhile in the other group, the unbeaten pakistan are playing the lowest ranked side namibia in abu dhabi. pakistan won the toss and chose to bat. mohammad rizwan hammered 79 off 50 balls, including 24 in the final over, as babar azam added another 70 for pakistan to post 189 runs, losing just two wicklets. so namibia now into bat — they've lost an early wicket — michael van lingen bowled by hasan ali.
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they are currently 54 for one after 8 overs. that's all the sport for now. let's get more on the world leaders promise to end and reverse deforestation by 2030, in the cop26 climate summit�*s first major deal. i'm joined by anders haug larsen, head of policy at the rainforest foundation norway, a non—governmental organization working to protect the world's rainforests. good afternoon. good afternoon. what do ou good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you make — good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you make of — good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you make of what _ good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you make of what you _ good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you make of what you are _ good afternoon. good afternoon. what do you make of what you are hearing i do you make of what you are hearing from glasgow? this do you make of what you are hearing from glasgow?— from glasgow? this is a historic opportunity _ from glasgow? this is a historic opportunity that _ from glasgow? this is a historic opportunity that comes - from glasgow? this is a historic opportunity that comes at - from glasgow? this is a historic opportunity that comes at a - from glasgow? this is a historic. opportunity that comes at a critical time for the rainforest. it is
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important because we need to protect nature, but also to protect us. it is impossible to keep the 1.5 target alive if we don't end deforestation. we are enthusiastic and optimistic, but this will be a game changer for halting deforestation. but it does demand all countries to come back from glasgow and to stop the action straightaway. x�*t�*oll from glasgow and to stop the action straightaway-— straightaway. you are optimistic but how will people. _ straightaway. you are optimistic but how will people, how _ straightaway. you are optimistic but how will people, how will _ how will people, how will governments be forced to adhere to these pledges? because people might remember that there have been previous pledges in the past which haven't been stuck to? it is historic to _ haven't been stuck to? it is historic to have _ haven't been stuck to? it is historic to have 100 - haven't been stuck to? it 3 historic to have 100 countries signing up to this pledge. similarly, we also have an amount of funding we have never seen before to support the rainforest countries, it shows ambition but also to deliver
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results. it sends a message to the donors that they should only fund countries when they see the results. that is how you can reward the most ambitious rainforest countries and help introduce important new policies. so help introduce important new olicies. ., , help introduce important new olicies. ., ., policies. so who is monitoring whether countries, _ policies. so who is monitoring i whether countries, governments policies. so who is monitoring - whether countries, governments are following through on what they are pledging in glasgow? it will following through on what they are pledging in glasgow?— pledging in glasgow? it will be im ortant pledging in glasgow? it will be important to — pledging in glasgow? it will be important to set _ pledging in glasgow? it will be important to set up _ pledging in glasgow? it will be important to set up proper- important to set up proper mechanisms and use existing ones that have already been set up in order to monitor this properly. we need to have verified reductions in deforestation. but it is also important for civil society organisations and especially indigenous people's, both to be part of this pledge and we are quite enthusiastic and optimistic to see indigenous people's being a specific target for at least some of these
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funds. it target for at least some of these funds. , , , ., . . funds. it is interesting you have a decree of funds. it is interesting you have a degree of optimism _ funds. it is interesting you have a degree of optimism about - funds. it is interesting you have a degree of optimism about that. i | funds. it is interesting you have a - degree of optimism about that. i was speaking to another expert in this field who is on the ground in glasgow at the moment and expressed some concern that the delegates there who were representing some of those indigenous communities were concerned that their needs were still not being left elite mecca listen to and this was a livelihood for some people and an alternative means of income needs to be provided for them? means of income needs to be provided forthem? ~ , means of income needs to be provided for them? ~ , , , ., for them? absolutely, up until now indiaenous for them? absolutely, up until now indigenous people's _ for them? absolutely, up until now indigenous people's who _ for them? absolutely, up until now indigenous people's who live - for them? absolutely, up until now indigenous people's who live in - for them? absolutely, up until now indigenous people's who live in the forests need to see these pledges speu forests need to see these pledges spell out in their real lives, they have not been a big part of the funding so far. it is important to see the specific pledge for indigenous people's. we now have funds that will go directly to them and i think moving forward, it will
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be in all of our interests to have them, not only as beneficiaries but providing the big solutions in managing these forests. really interesting _ managing these forests. really interesting to _ managing these forests. really interesting to hear— managing these forests. really interesting to hear your - interesting to hear your perspective. thank you forjoining us from oslo. a group of mps has called for a pause in the roll—out of smart motorways — until the government can prove they are safe. the updates to the motorway system are intended to increase capacity, but safety campaigners say they've contributed to deaths on the roads. here s our transport correspondent, caroline davies.
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marching through westminster yesterday. each coffin represents someone killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorway intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane without having to use more land. if a car breaks down in a live lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be built for years until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years' worth of safety evidence on the network as currently exists. and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england
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to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the m1 smart motorway. our aim is to just get the hard shoulder back in every single instance. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they say to pause them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, then i can get them banned in the meantime. the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways.
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it's admitted that improvements have not always been made as quickly as they could have in the past, but it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. huw merriman is an mp and chair of the transport committee... good evening. in terms of getting apples festival, are you confident that will happen? i do apples festival, are you confident that will happen?— that will happen? i do hope the government — that will happen? i do hope the government will _ that will happen? i do hope the government will look _ that will happen? i do hope the government will look at - that will happen? i do hope the government will look at this. i l government will look at this. i think it is a reasonable report that reflects there is a lack of evidence as to whether they are safe or unsafe. it makes sense until we get more evidence to pause it and then return. then have a independently verified. it's not good enough that national highways that control smart motorways and build them are marking their own homework. it's not been satisfactory before and they haven't delivered on their promises and that needs to change. doers delivered on their promises and that needs to change.— delivered on their promises and that needs to change. does your committee acce -t that
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needs to change. does your committee accept that some _ needs to change. does your committee accept that some people _ needs to change. does your committee accept that some people have - needs to change. does your committee accept that some people have died - needs to change. does your committee accept that some people have died as l accept that some people have died as accept that some people have died as a result of these operating systems? it is not for our committee to determine. in 2019 when the then chief executive of highways england, as the agency was, came before us, he acknowledged some had died on smart motorways because the technology that detects cars stuck in live lanes had not been rolled out as had been promised. he himself made that point, so it's even more damning than a speculating as to whether that had been the case or not. ., ., ., . ., , . not. the motoring organisations have said it would — not. the motoring organisations have said it would want _ not. the motoring organisations have said it would want to _ not. the motoring organisations have said it would want to see _ not. the motoring organisations have said it would want to see emergency | said it would want to see emergency lay—by is every half a mile. was your committee confronted with person, after body, after organisation making the point there was an inherent danger. we might understand why someone wants to try the system to ease congestion, but surely people's lives are important?
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to a certain extent we reviewed this backin to a certain extent we reviewed this back in 2016 when smart motorways were signed off. the pilot that the roads minister signed off on is they would just be emergency refuge areas every 500, half a kilometre i should say. in fact they have been two kilometres. the initial prototype has been expanded on and it is less safe as a result. the safety risks are there, the promises that were given to us over the last five years have not been delivered and that is why we have come up with a report to say enough, this has to be paused until the safety fixes have put in place, untilwe until the safety fixes have put in place, until we have enough evidence that smart motorways are safe mo shib tyrell hatton. there are recommendation as the government has to stop the build—out for the next five years until we know for sure
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they are as safe as can be. ii five years until we know for sure they are as safe as can be. if you aet they are as safe as can be. if you net the they are as safe as can be. if you get the pause. — they are as safe as can be. if you get the pause, the _ they are as safe as can be. if you get the pause, the ones - they are as safe as can be. if you get the pause, the ones that - they are as safe as can be. if you get the pause, the ones that are | get the pause, the ones that are operational, they continue do they? is that where we are at?— is that where we are at? crucially, national highways _ is that where we are at? crucially, national highways rather- is that where we are at? crucially, national highways rather than - national highways rather than focusing on building more of it, would focus on putting these emergency refuge areas into shorter spaces of the road, also getting the satellite vehicle detection technology rolled out to 100% of that 141 miles. then we have more time to evaluate whether the roads are indeed safe. it is difficult with the evidence. look at it for the last five years, the government is right, they appear to be safer than conventional motorways. from 2019, sigh. we need more time to evaluate it. in 2019, sigh. we need more time to evaluate it—
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evaluate it. in terms of those 140 orso evaluate it. in terms of those 140 or so miles _ evaluate it. in terms of those 140 or so miles that _ evaluate it. in terms of those 140 or so miles that are _ evaluate it. in terms of those 140 or so miles that are operational, | or so miles that are operational, could more be done in terms of information? you look at surveys from drivers and the most recent one said only taught elite mother 24% of drivers said they would be confident in knowing what to do if they break down? we in knowing what to do if they break down? ~ ,. , ., . ., ., down? we describe the information as woeful in terms _ down? we describe the information as woeful in terms of— down? we describe the information as woeful in terms of explaining - down? we describe the information as woeful in terms of explaining to - woeful in terms of explaining to drivers what they do. that's why you see 60 to 70% of drivers told by the rac and the aa saying they don't know what to do and don't feel safe on the smart motorways. whilst the government is right to acknowledge people are more likely to use the motorways and come off dangerous a roads where you can change the hard shoulder into a lane, that might be true. if people are worried about driving on the smart motorways because they don't feel safe, they will switch to a roads and that is less safe because there is more chance of having an accident there. all this evidence contradicts itself
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and we need more time to work it out, work out what to do, get it independently verified. we have it on rail, but not on roads. all those measures as a package, i feel are reasonable. i have the government will follow it because it seems reasonable thing to ask for and it should make the roads safer and appealing to drivers.— should make the roads safer and appealing to drivers. thank you for now. he merriman, _ appealing to drivers. thank you for now. he merriman, chair— appealing to drivers. thank you for now. he merriman, chair of- appealing to drivers. thank you for now. he merriman, chair of the i now. he merriman, chair of the transport select committee. the electric vehicle maker, tesla, says it's not actually signed a deal with the car rental company, hertz which pushed its market value above $1 trillion last week. hertz announced it had ordered 100,000 cars in a $4 billion, but tesla's ceo, elon musk, tweeted that no contract had yet been signed. tesla has also recalled nearly 12,000 us vehicles over software glitches that could cause 'false forward collision warnings as well unexpected activation of the emergency breaks.
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to tell us more about this, is our new york business correspondent, michelle fleury. this announcement sent to haslett�*s share price cut its market valuation up share price cut its market valuation up to over 1 share price cut its market valuation up to over1 trillion dollars. there was a lot of excitement but now it turns out that perhaps the deal isn't quite completely as done as everybody thought at the time. we have this tweet from elon musk suggesting a deal, a contract hasn't been signed and there are production issues. the question appears that it's not that hertz intends to buy these vehicles, it is a case of how long it will take to acquire them given the company is struggling to keep up with existing demand even before hertz appeared on the horizon. . , , . ., horizon. there has been a recall of a reasonable _ horizon. there has been a recall of a reasonable number— horizon. there has been a recall of a reasonable number of _ horizon. there has been a recall of a reasonable number of tesla - horizon. there has been a recall of i a reasonable number of tesla models as well? . , ., ., , as well? that is one of the things that raised _ as well? that is one of the things that raised eyebrows, _ as well? that is one of the things that raised eyebrows, the - as well? that is one of the things that raised eyebrows, the timing | as well? that is one of the things l that raised eyebrows, the timing of elon musk�*s tweet because it came at
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the same time they had issued this recall. what is interesting about this recall, a lot of tesla have autonomous driving and a lot of updates are issued for the software over the year. you don't have to bring your car back into a mechanic to get it updated or fixed, it is done through the internet wirelessly. as a way to try and appease american regulators, tesla has said they will recall this car. the first time we have seen this from tesla, that they are prepared to recall this car for safety updates. you have this car market for electric vehicles moving much faster than regulators in different countries have been able to adapt and this is partly trying to get the framework right. i}i(. and this is partly trying to get the framework right.— and this is partly trying to get the framework riuht. ~ . . ~ framework right. 0k, michelle, thank ou for framework right. 0k, michelle, thank you for now- —
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just turning to coronavirus for a moment, some new figures through and the number of cases in the uk. in the number of cases in the uk. in the last 24 hour period, 33,865 cases of covid—19 in the last 24—hour period. the previous 24—hour period was just over 40,000. 40,077. those are the latest figures on covid—19 infections across the uk. we will hear more about the train crash in wiltshire earlier in the week. investigators say one of the two trains involved in the crash in a tunnel had gone through a red signal. several passengers were hurt and a train driver suffered
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life—changing injuries in the collision. the trains collided on the approach to a tunnel near salisbury station on sunday. 11 billion wet wipes are used in the uk every year, and they cause more than 90% of the blockages in our sewers. that's because the vast majority of them contain plastic, which doesn't break down or decompose. now one mp, is propsing a new law to change the way they're produced. lone wells reports. we use wet wipes all the time, don't we? to wipe our surfaces, to take our make—up off, to clean up after kids. they're pretty sturdy things, but a lot of them end up on our river banks. the thames riverbank near battersea bridge looks like a normal river bank, but peel at the surface of the ground and it's covered in wet wipes that have overflowed from our drains. chris works for the charity thames 21 that clean up the thames river bed. so the problem we've got is that
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an awful lot of the wipes that are flushed down the toilet shouldn't be. obviously, a lot of material like make—up wipes, cleaning wipes are much tougher and have plastic fibres in them which make them much stronger, and that means they don't break down and they get into your sewage system in the same way, theyjust fall apart slowly, but they are still very tough. they change the shape of the river bed, they break down into pieces, smaller pieces that animals can eat. the wet wipes that don't end up on our river banks and in our rivers end up here in our sewage system, and that can lead to all kinds of other problems, like blocking the sewers themselves. this footage shows wet wipes being pulled from one sewer by thames water. they merge with oil and grease to form blockages. thames water are working with the labour mp for putney, fleur anderson, who is trying to change the law to ban plastics from wet wipes. so, 90% of wet wipes have actually got plastic in. i think lots of people don't realise they are a single use plastic.
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those wet wipes clog up our sewers and drains and we have been here seeing the result of that, so that puts more money on our water bills as well. if only the wet wipe companies would just change the way that they make wet wipes, and it's very easy to do, then that would be a huge environmental benefit but also a financial benefit to us all. the government say they are looking at the effects of wet wipes with plastics on sewers to try and find solutions. lone wells, bbc news. much more to come from glasgow at the top of the hour. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello. this morning might have come as a bit of a shock to the system, a touch of frost in places, but with this crisp and chilly autumn weather, many of us are getting to enjoy some bright weather. that is how it looked for a weather watcher in essex. however, there are some showers, too. you can see the speckled shower clouds pushing down from the north,
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affecting mostly those areas exposed to the north or north westerly wind. so westerly scotland is a case in point. we have seen some showers here. these will continue across northern and western scotland, some for eastern scotland, too, parts of northern ireland, the western side of england, wales, quite a lot of heavy showers for the channel islands. but further east, more in the way of dry weather. some spells of sunshine and temperatures between ten and 13 degrees. through this evening and tonight showers will continue to pepper coastal districts. we could see some wintry showers developing over very high ground in northern scotland and a few more showers creeping further inland across parts of northern england. temperatures will drop very close to freezing, even below freezing for a few places. the coldest weather of all could be across the far south of england where we could also see some mist and fog patches. in fact, across a good part of england, east wales, there is the risk of the odd fog patch tomorrow morning. through tomorrow, again some sunshine, again some showers, mostly around the coasts, but we will see a few more getting inland across parts of northern england, getting into the midlands and generally some slightly cloudy weather here as well. temperatures eight to 12 degrees at best, so it will still feel quite chilly and some of us will see
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a touch of frost again during wednesday night. for thursday, this little ridge of high pressure tries to topple its way and so that means we will see fewer showers, still one or two getting across west wales into the far south—west of england, some for east anglia and the south—east for a time. but otherwise, more dry weather. some spells of sunshine, although more cloud toppling in from the north—west later on. again, a chilly feel at seven to 12 degrees. now, that cloud moving on towards the north—west is a sign of things to come. as we get into friday, our area of high pressurejust a little further southwards. we will feed more cloud into northern and western parts of the uk, so generally speaking, through friday into the weekend, northern areas will see a lot of cloud. there could be some rain in places, particularly in north—west scotland. further south, some will get to see a little bit of sunshine. generally, a lot of cloud but it will be milder for all of us.
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this is bbc news with christian fraser live at the glasgow summit. there is a deal to/ emissions of methane. , , ., there is a deal to/ emissions of methane-— there is a deal to/ emissions of methane. , , ., ., , methane. this is one of the gases we can cut fastest. _ methane. this is one of the gases we can cut fastest. doing _ methane. this is one of the gases we can cut fastest. doing that will- can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow down climate change. immediately slow down climate chance. ~ ., . immediately slow down climate chance. . ':: :: , immediately slow down climate chance. . ':::: change. more than 100 countries are -a~ledin to change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt _ change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt and _ change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt and reverse - change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt and reverse this - pledging to halt and reverse this for station by the end of the decade. i've been speaking to the president of costa rica about that pledge. this is a live shot from another part of the venue where the
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host of the conference, boris johnson, is about to hold a press

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