Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 2, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

1:00 pm
today at one: the glasgow climate summit secures two major deals to help combat global warming. there's agreement to cut methane emissions, a major contributor to climate change, by at least 30% by 2030. and a deal to reduce the deforestation of the world's major woodland areas. we have to stop the devastating loss of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. we have a special report from brazil, where destruction of the rainforest helps local people survive. we are being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here, we are at the edge of a national park, an area that's supposed to be protected.
1:01 pm
our other main stories this lunchtime: convicted of taking and sharing pictures of these murdered sisters — two met police officers are told to expectjail terms. mps are calling for the introduction of smart motorways to be paused until the government can prove they�* re safe. and the former chelsea boss antonio conte is appointed the new manager at tottenham. coming up in sport on the bbc news channel: looking to boost their semifinal hopes ahead of playing england, south africa bowl out bangladesh for 84 at the t20 world cup. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
1:02 pm
world leaders at the global climate summit in glasgow are today agreeing two major deals to try to combat rising global temperatures. the first covers methane emissions, and the second is on deforestation. the agreement on methane, which is being led by america and the eu, aims to cut emissions of the gas by at least 30% by 2030. this despite some of the world's biggest polluting countries not being involved in the deal. with more from glasgow, here's our science correspondent, victoria gill. the visible flare of methane release. scientists say this potent greenhouse gas has been responsible for about half the human induced warming of the planet we've experienced so far. now a global partnership to tackle emissions by plugging leaks and covering landfill sites has been announced at the cop26 climate conference in glasgow. the initiative, led by the us and eu, pledges to cut emissions
1:03 pm
of the gas by at least 30% by 2030. china, russia and india, some of the world's top methane emitters, have not signed up. some of the big emitters need to join the pledge. so china, russia, for example. if we are going to achieve those big reductions that we need, then they need to come on board as well. the loss of forests around the world, estimated to be responsible for about 15% of greenhouse gas emissions, has been the subject of this crucial climate summit�*s first major deal. countries who signed the agreement, including brazil, russia, china and indonesia, represented 85% of the world's forests. the pledge, and the £15 billion behind it, has been broadly welcomed. but deforestation has actually increased since a similar pledge was launched in 2014, and it is not yet clear exactly how those who cut down forests to make money would be provided with the financial incentive
1:04 pm
to protect these vital carbon storing ecosystems instead. this is a hugely ambitious pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50% of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement is notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it's actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. some scientists remain sceptical of the progress here. a survey of climate scientists suggests many are not confident that global emissions can be cut quickly enough to avoid a climate catastrophe. it is a mixture of promise and pessimism here in glasgow. while there has been some early steps forward and key agreements on issues like methane emissions and deforestation, those are voluntary agreements and they are going to be put to the test at the same time that scientists say we are running out of time to slash emissions. in the gulf between words and action, the global temperature continues to rise, but as the leaders conclude
1:05 pm
their speeches and the negotiators take over, there is much more talking to do. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. brazil is among the countries to sign up to the second major deal of the day out of glasgow, a pledge on deforestation. last year, the felling of woodland in brazil's amazon rainforest, reached a 12 year high. the amazon contains around a third of all the tropical rainforests left on earth, and crucially, helps capture vast amounts of carbon dioxide, a major contributor to global warming. but illegal as well as legal logging is a huge problem. from rondonia state, in the brazilian amazon, our international correspondent 0rla guerin has more details. the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy
1:06 pm
it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. well, we are making our way now deeper into the forest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that's supposed to be protected. but campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn't worried about the planet, he's worried about his family. his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls
1:07 pm
here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle.
1:08 pm
but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she's spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples — or trying to. this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here
1:09 pm
is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morellejoins me from the cop—26 conference in glasgow. i'm interested in the deal on methane. just how important is it, given that some of the biggest emitters haven't signed up? yeah, methane is — emitters haven't signed up? yeah, methane is really _ emitters haven't signed up? yeah, methane is really interesting. - emitters haven't signed up? yeah, methane is really interesting. it'sl methane is really interesting. it's only relatively recently that we have realised the contribution it makes to climate change, so there is not so much methane in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, but it is incredibly potent. we think it accounts for about half of all global warming that we are seeing, half of that warming in the atmosphere. the difference is, it doesn't stick around in the atmosphere for very long, ten years compared to hundreds of years. so if you can make a cup now, a big cut, you can make a cup now, a big cut, you will make a big difference, and
1:10 pm
fast. and really, scientists involved say, if you can cut these emissions by 30% by 2030, all of the global methane emissions, it really will make a big difference and reduce global temperatures by 0.2 degrees. lots of countries who are emitting methane have signed up, and if you add them all together, it actually will make a significant current difference, about 50% of all methane emissions, but there are key countries missing. china, india, russia. we have never had a target for methane emission cuts before, so this is definitely a start. qm. this is definitely a start. 0k, rebecca. — this is definitely a start. 0k, rebecca, thanks _ this is definitely a start. 0k, rebecca, thanks for- this is definitely a start. 0k, rebecca, thanks for that. i let's get the politics of all this from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, also in glasgow. adam, a couple of big deals early on in the conference. some up the mood
1:11 pm
of the gathering so far.— of the gathering so far. number ten is very happy _ of the gathering so far. number ten is very happy with — of the gathering so far. number ten is very happy with the _ of the gathering so far. number ten is very happy with the reaction - is very happy with the reaction to the forest deal, and they say even though it is a pledge first made in 2014, it did not include brazil and china then. it includes brazil and china then. it includes brazil and china now. it is also a big tick for one of borisjohnson�*s very high profile four pledges for this gathering, to take action on trees, but what about the other three — to phase out coal, petrol and diesel vehicles across the globe, and to sort out that huge amount of funding thatis sort out that huge amount of funding that is meant to be going from rich countries to poorer countries quit smack those other three priorities are very —— to poorer countries quit those are very much to be confirmed. there are several more days to go. there are several more days to go. the prime minister had an apology to issue to an israeli minister who is a wheelchair user and was turned away from the venue yesterday. it is
1:12 pm
away from the venue yesterday. it is a sore point at the event, because the kop prides itself on the idea of inclusivity, open to everyone, whether you are a president, a member of the royal family, whether you are a president, a member of the royalfamily, a minister or a campaigner. then the prime minister will head home this afternoon to london, downing street having to defend the fact that he is using a plane, saying it is using sustainable jet fuel. two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters who were found stabbed to death in a park in london. pcs deninaffer and jamie lewis distributed the images of bibaa henry and nicole smallman after being assigned to guard the crime scene injune last year. danyal hussein, who's 19, was sentenced to at least 35 years injail last week for the murder of the women. helena wilkinson reports. bibaa henry and nicole smallman had been celebrating with friends hours before they were murdered. it was in this park where their bodies were discovered. they'd been ferociously attacked.
1:13 pm
today their mother came to court to hear two met police officers admit taking photos of her daughters' bodies, and sharing them. this is them, pc deninaffer 47, and pcjamie lewis. they were meant to be protecting the crime scene but instead they breached a cordon to take photos of the bodies, which they then shared on whatsapp. lewis edited one of the pictures, superimposing his own face on, with the victims in the background. in court, the officers sat side by side in the dock. "guilty," they said, as the clerk read them the charges they faced. both admitted one count of misconduct in a public office. what the two officers did has added to the sisters' family's grief and despair. after the hearing, their mother spoke outside court. if these police officers do not get a custodial sentence, it will not send the message.
1:14 pm
you are not above the law. you are not going to be protected. the independent office for police conduct said there was no place in policing for this behaviour, and it had to stop. a culture where some officers don't see anything wrong with sharing deeply offensive messages and where others feel unable or unwilling to challenge has to change, and it has to change now. judge mark lucraft qc told the officers the matters were extremely serious. he granted them conditional bail and told them they would receive prison sentences for their crimes. the officers will be sentenced at a later date. helena wilkinson, bbc news, at the old bailey. the environment secretary, george eustice, says he welcomes further talks to try to de—escalate the row with france
1:15 pm
over post—brexit fishing rights. paris has delayed measures it threatened to introduce from today, blocking british boats from landing their catches at french ports. there's anger over the number of licences the uk and jersey have processed for french vessels to fish in their waters. ministers from both sides are to meet on thursday to discuss fish and a range of brexit issues. here's our europe correspondent, jessica parker. a fishing boat leaving the line early this morning after overnight the french government said it would hold off on retaliation of a post brexit fishing rights. annerly poulos my husband catches the flesh, she sells them and says the current situation cannot carry on —— anne aly�*s husband. translation: we situation cannot carry on -- anne aly's husband. translation: we had to work, we need _ aly's husband. translation: we had to work, we need it, _ aly's husband. translation: we had to work, we need it, we're _ aly's husband. translation: we had to work, we need it, we're like - to work, we need it, we're like everyone else needing to eat and raise our kids. if nothing moves, we will move.
1:16 pm
raise our kids. if nothing moves, we will move-— will move. there were suggestions british vessels _ will move. there were suggestions british vessels could _ will move. there were suggestions british vessels could be _ will move. there were suggestions british vessels could be stopped i british vessels could be stopped from unloading catches, along with tougher border checks. this processor says french licences to fish in the waters off the uk and channel islands are important, but so are getting supplies from british boats. , ., , , so are getting supplies from british boats. , ., ,, , ., ., . , boats. jobs depend on it. politics have to consider _ boats. jobs depend on it. politics have to consider both _ boats. jobs depend on it. politics have to consider both ports, - boats. jobs depend on it. politics have to consider both ports, thatj have to consider both ports, that means the fishermen and earth, processes, there is something like 304 fishing boats and 5000 people working in the factories. emmanuel macron and — working in the factories. emmanuel macron and boris _ working in the factories. emmanuel macron and boris johnson - working in the factories. emmanuel macron and boris johnson both - working in the factories. emmanuell macron and boris johnson both know macron and borisjohnson both know fishing can be an emotive political issue. france says more small vessels should be licensed. both had to show they have fished in the relevant waters before. yesterday we had constructive _ relevant waters before. yesterday we had constructive talks _ relevant waters before. yesterday we had constructive talks will _ relevant waters before. yesterday we had constructive talks will be - relevant waters before. yesterday we had constructive talks will be made . had constructive talks will be made clear that if vessels have evidence and can bring it forward we will consider it, that will be further discussions on thursday so there is
1:17 pm
a big de—escalation. discussions on thursday so there is a big de-escalation._ a big de-escalation. talks will continue leading _ a big de-escalation. talks will continue leading up _ a big de-escalation. talks will continue leading up to - a big de-escalation. talks will continue leading up to a - a big de-escalation. talks will- continue leading up to a high-level continue leading up to a high—level political nation in paris on thursday between the british brexit minister lord frost tan france's europe minister. both men had some level of reputation put talking tough. dozens of licenses remain outstanding, with both sides complaining about potential brexit treaty breaches. the possibility of escalation has been delayed but it has not disappeared. jessica parker, bbc news. our political correspondent, iain watson, is at westminster. london and paris both want de—escalation, but are they anywhere near agreement? we de-escalation, but are they anywhere near agreement?— near agreement? we are in a situation — near agreement? we are in a situation where _ near agreement? we are in a situation where they - near agreement? we are in a situation where they throw i near agreement? we are in a - situation where they throw really centres on a relatively small number of licences for a relatively small number of small boats, so we may well yet get to a resolution of this issue but it seems to be taking on
1:18 pm
symbolic significance. forsome issue but it seems to be taking on symbolic significance. for some time the french have suggested that uk government has been backpedalling on its pulse brexit commitments, the british government says it is implementing the new trade drills and the french have to catch—up. language by uk officials and ministers today to describe the negotiations are consensual, constructive, the term de—escalation has been used, it is possible the issue will be resolved by the end of the week, but in that meeting between cabinet minister lord frost and the french european affairs minister on thursday it will not just be fishing discussed but also the thorny issue of the northern ireland protocol. there has been a lot of difference between the two sides on what the uk government thinks it needs to see change in the protocol and what the eu is willing to concede. the french european affairs minister said the government understand the language of force, lord frost accused the eu of
1:19 pm
beginning to damage the good friday agreement, so there is by no means any guarantee this issue will be settled and we could simply see a fishing row replaced by a wider row which has the possibility of really sparking a trade dispute. ian watson at westminster, _ sparking a trade dispute. ian watson at westminster, thank _ sparking a trade dispute. ian watson at westminster, thank you. - mps and peers have been told they should wear face masks, following a rise in cases of covid—19 around parliament. public tours have also been cancelled, with a review of the measures in two weeks. mps have been encouraged to wear masks since the legal requirement ended injuly, but many have chosen not to do so. at least 19 people have been killed in two powerful explosions in the afghan capital, kabul. the first blast was at the gate of a military hospital, with the other close by. our correspondent secunder kermani is in kabulfor us. what's more happened? details are still emerging _ what's more happened? details are still emerging that _ what's more happened? details are still emerging that the _ what's more happened? details are still emerging that the attack - what's more happened? details are still emerging that the attack began with a suspected suicide bombing
1:20 pm
outside the gate to the military hospital in kabul, that was followed by gunfire and another explosion. it is not clear exactly how many attackers were involved, taliban spokesperson told us four assailants were killed, one was arrested and the attack is now over, but in the last few minutes i have heard sporadic gunfire from the direction which this incident was taking place. the attack targeted a military hospital, a previously treated soldiers from the afghan army and now treated both members of the taliban and members of the previous government's army. in the past this hospital has been targeted by the islamic state group, in 2017 they killed more than 30 people there and all the suspicion will be that this is their work yet again, they have been responsible for a spate of suicide bombings in recent weeks, targeting both ordinary civilians under the taliban. real
1:21 pm
concern here that although isa as much as powerful than the taliban, they are still able to carry out these deadly attacks. secunder kermani in _ these deadly attacks. secunder kermani in kabul, _ these deadly attacks. secunder kermani in kabul, thank you. i and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel: deal done — the former chelsea boss antonio conte is confirmed as tottenham's new manager a day after the sacking of nuno espirito sa nto. mps have called for a pause in the rollout of all—lane smart motorways, until the government can prove they�* re safe. they were designed to allow for more
1:22 pm
traffic by turning the hard shoulder into an extra lane. but safety campaigners say they've contributed to several deaths. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. marching through westminster yesterday, each coffin represents someone killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorways, intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane without having to use more land. if a car breaks down in a live lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be built for years until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five—year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years' worth of safety evidence on the network as currently exists, and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed
1:23 pm
safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the m1 smart motorway. our aim is to just get the hard shoulder back in every single instance. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they say to pause them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, then i can get them banned in the meantime.
1:24 pm
the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways. it's admitted that improvements had not always been made as quickly as they could have in the past, but that it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. the health secretary, sajid javid, has been answering mps' questions at the health and social care committee. it's the first time he's faced the committee since becoming health secretary injune. our health correspondent nick triggle has been watching. big day for the health secretary, what has he search? this big day for the health secretary, what has he search?— big day for the health secretary, what has he search? this was off the eak of what has he search? this was off the peak of last — what has he search? this was off the peak of last week's _ what has he search? this was off the peak of last week's government - peak of last week's government announcement that there would be more funding for the nhs, particularly mournful facilities, new hospitals, equipment and community health herbs. and the mps, led by former health secretary jeremy hunt, were asking whether plans were for extra staff to work in the facilities. there was no detail on the spending plans last
1:25 pm
week about training and workforce budgets. the mp said the nhs is facing a workforce crisis now, there are more than 90,000 vacancies, 7% of posts are unfilled and the fear is that could get worse as large numbers of staff reach retirement age. sajid javid promised two things, firstly by the end of the 93v things, firstly by the end of the gay short—term plan to help tackle the backlog in hospital treatment, and then by the spring a long—term 15 year plan —— firstly, by the edge of the year. as he was reminded by mps on the committee, making promises is one thing and delivering is another, the government has already promised 6000 extra gps in this parliament and is the health secretary himself admitted, they are not on track to meet that. hick not on track to meet that. nick triu ule, not on track to meet that. nick triggle. many _ not on track to meet that. nick triggle, many thanks. - 11 billion wet wipes are used in the uk every year, and they cause more than 90% of the blockages in our sewers. that's because the vast majority of them contain plastic, which doesn't break
1:26 pm
down or decompose. now one mp is propsing a new law to change the way they're produced. ione wells reports. we use wet wipes all the time, don't we? to wipe our surfaces, to take our make—up off, to clean up after kids. they're pretty sturdy things, but a lot of them end up on our river banks. the thames river bank near battersea bridge looks like a normal river bank, but peel at the surface of the ground and it's covered in wet wipes that have overflowed from our drains. so, it's notjust sand, it's held together by wipes. chris works for the charity thames 21 that clean up the thames river bed. so the problem we've got is that an awful lot of the wipes that are flushed down the toilet shouldn't be. obviously, a lot of material like make—up wipes, cleaning wipes are much tougher and have plastic fibres in them which make them much stronger, and that means they don't break down and they get into your sewage system in the same way, theyjust fall apart slowly, but they are still very tough. they change the shape of the river bed, they break down into pieces, smaller pieces that animals can eat.
1:27 pm
the wet wipes that don't end up on our river banks and in our rivers end up here in our sewage system, and that can lead to all kinds of other problems, like blocking the sewers themselves. this footage shows wet wipes being pulled from one sewer by thames water. they merge with oil and grease to form blockages. thames water are working with the labour mp for putney, fleur anderson, who is trying to change the law to ban plastics from wet wipes. so, 90% of wet wipes have actually got plastic in. i think lots of people don't realise they are a single use plastic. those wet wipes clog up our sewers and drains and we have been here seeing the result of that, so that puts more money on our water bills as well. if only the wet wipe companies would just change the way that they make wet wipes, and it's very easy to do, then that would be a huge environmental benefit but also a financial benefit to us all. the government say they are looking at the effects of wet wipes
1:28 pm
with plastics on sewers to try and find solutions. ione wells, bbc news. almost half the states in america are holding elections this week for the local committees that control the budgets, operating procedures and education policies of tens of thousands of schools. but this year the power of school boards is under intense scrutiny in the era of culture wars and covid, with mask mandates, vaccine requirements and the representation of american history sparking numerous confrontations on the campaign trail. sophie long has more from the state of colorado. in castle rock, colorado, school board elections have traditionally been quiet, you could even say dull, affairs. but they are becoming more colourful. the county is lying to you, and you know it, and you are either complicit or you don't know it. the campaign trail may look civilised in sleepy suburbia, but things are getting scary. cowards always hide their face.
1:29 pm
it's a school board election in one county in the entire united states, but to us, it's everything about our children's education, and each side is trying to say, we know what's right, and the other side, it's not just wrong, it's evil. everything about them is, is, is just going to destroy our children. angry shouting. these small pieces of cloth have caused quite a commotion. they have led to school board members being attacked and intimidated, trolled on social media, even stalked in public. although people are engaged in these elections, the pandemic has really brought home the wide national political divide. teacher stacey adair is currently on unpaid leave for refusing to wear a mask in the classroom. people were just so intense about it. it was an insane year. i was willing to get written up for not enforcing the mask.
1:30 pm
if they want to wear the mask, fine. if they take it off because they want to breathe, it's not myjob. there is nowhere in myjob description that says i'm a mask enforcer. it's notjust mask mandates that have wiped the smiles off parents' faces but a change in curriculum and claims schools are teaching critical race theory, the idea that racism is embedded in america's public policies. teachers are being accused of indoctrinating children while they watch their academic scores tumble. but teachers say they're are just delivering the syllabus in a more inclusive way. we're just trying to make them aware from both perspectives and let them make up their mind as to how they feel about that afterwards. and i think that's kind of what teaching history should be about. the things that are going on here are making me absolutely crazy. across the country, what should be local, nonpartisan elections have become highly charged, sometimes violent, deeply political affairs. a sign of what's to come as we approach
1:31 pm
the mid—term elections next year.

22 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on