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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 2, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. the queen issues a rallying cry to world leaders gathering in glasgow appealing to them to rise above politics to avert a climate disaster. we, none of us, will live forever. but we are doing this not for ourselves, but for our children and our children's children, and those who will follow in their footsteps. it is the biggest summit ever to be held here in the uk, with more than 100 world leaders gathered here in glasgow. but what have they done to protect our future and that of the
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next generation? we will look at how far you are willing to go to help save the planet. calls to suspend the rollout of smart motorways. mps say the government needs to prove they are safe. somejos butler brilliance. his 101 helps england beat sri lanka and put them on the brink of the semi finals at the t20 world cup. good morning. today we are looking at a chilly start to the day and a chilly day generally. it also going to be one of sunshine and showers, some will be heavy and tenderly with hail, but not as windy as it will be 7 hail, but not as windy as it will be ? mehedi and heavy and sundry with some hail but not as windy as yesterday. it's tuesday the 2nd of november. our top story. the queen has urged world leaders to "rise above" politics and create a "safer, stabler future" for the planet. she was speaking ahead of the second day of climate talks in glasgow.
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in a video message she said: "the time for words has now moved to the time for action". nina is in glasgow for us. good morning, a misty day here in glasgow, and the speech from the queen was unusually emotional. she talked about her great pride in her family and she talked about her deep fears for the future of the planet. and that emotion was the tone of the day here in glasgow yesterday. the secretary—general of the un said that we are digging our own graves by using fossilfuel. that we are digging our own graves by using fossil fuel. and president joe biden said none of us will escape if we fail to seize the moment. but actually watching yesterday, perhaps the most emotive speeches came from people who stood up speeches came from people who stood up there and who are living with their homes affected by climate change. we will hear from them in a moment. today it is expected that the first major deal will be signed
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on deforestation, to protect and restore forests. yesterday, greta thunberg led a charge saying, no more blah blah blah, so how much other politician's was here into action? on the first day of this crucial climate conference, world leaders, royalty and activists took to the stage to set the tone for the days of negotiations that are ahead. you all have the power here today to be better. to remember that in your meeting rooms and drafting documents are more than just black—and—white objects. to remember that in your words, you wield the weapons that can save us or sell us out. the ceremony and speeches were rounded off with a reception hosted by borisjohnson, attended by the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall and the duke and duchess of cambridge. thank you all very much, thank you.
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it gives me great pleasure, therefore, to introduce her majesty, the queen. the queen, absent on the advice of her doctors, sent a recorded message. a reminder that what's achieved here decides the planet that we leave for future generations. it is the hope of many that the legacy of this summit, written in history books yet to be printed, will describe you as the leaders that did not pass up the opportunity and that you answered the call of those future generations. that you left this conference as a community of nations with the determination and the desire and the plan to address the impact of climate change. and to recognise the time for words has now moved to the time for action. there are some early signs of hope on some major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. today, leaders representing more
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than 85% of the world's forests will commit to halting deforestation and reversing it by 2030. this is a hugely ambitious plans from world leaders pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50% of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement is notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it's actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. some experts remain pessimistic, though. a survey of climate scientists suggests many are not confident that global emissions can be cut quickly enough to avoid a climate catastrophe. his excellency, mr narendra damodardas modi, prime minister of india. and while india, the world's third—largest emitter, used the first day of the conference to announce its own net to zero target date of 2070, that could be too late to avoid the worst consequences of climate change. in the gulf between words
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and action, the global temperature continues to rise. and with 200 countries now at the table, there's a lot more talking to do. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. well, adam fleming, our chief political correspondent, is with us throughout the morning, he was watching yesterday. that was an unusual tone from the queen, wasn't it? what sort of impact do you think that will have? hi. it? what sort of impact do you think that will have?— that will have? hi, nina. ithink it will have had _ that will have? hi, nina. ithink it will have had quite _ that will have? hi, nina. ithink it will have had quite a _ that will have? hi, nina. ithink it will have had quite a big - that will have? hi, nina. ithink it will have had quite a big impact l that will have? hi, nina. ithink it| will have had quite a big impact on the world leaders in the rim last night when —— in the room last night when they were having drinks after the day. last week it was announced the day. last week it was announced the queen would not be here in person and people speculated that would be a negative thing. maybe the fact that she was on video meant it was a little bit more intense than if she was doing a speech at the podium. what made it even more intense was that she talked about her own family, not only her
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children and grandchildren, but i think for one of the first time since he died, she talked about her late husband. this since he died, she talked about her late husband-— late husband. this is a duty i am especially _ late husband. this is a duty i am especially happy _ late husband. this is a duty i am especially happy to _ late husband. this is a duty i am especially happy to discharge. i late husband. this is a duty i am | especially happy to discharge. as the impact of the environment on human— the impact of the environment on human progress was a subject close to the _ human progress was a subject close to the heart of my dear late husband. _ to the heart of my dear late husband, prince philip, the duke of edinburgh — husband, prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. it is a source of great pride _ edinburgh. it is a source of great pride to— edinburgh. it is a source of great pride to me _ edinburgh. it is a source of great pride to me that the leading role my husband _ pride to me that the leading role my husband played in encouraging people to protect _ husband played in encouraging people to protect our fragile planet lives on through the work of our eldest son charles, and his eldest son william — son charles, and his eldest son william i— son charles, and his eldest son william. i could not be more proud of them _ william. i could not be more proud of them. �* , ., ~ ., of them. and then she talked about the fact that — of them. and then she talked about the fact that over _ of them. and then she talked about the fact that over her _ of them. and then she talked about the fact that over her more - of them. and then she talked about the fact that over her more than - of them. and then she talked about the fact that over her more than 70 | the fact that over her more than 70 years on the throne, she had met all of the great statesman, and he had seen what made a good leader. which, as guilt trips go, is a pretty classy one. i'm sure those words will be ringing in the leaders ears when they had their second day of speeches today. in terms of the
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action here at cop, the big announcement we are expecting is on forests. a large group of countries will come together and say that they will come together and say that they will stop deforestation, and then reverse it by planting more trees by 2030. that will be backed up by about £50 billion of investment coming from both governments and companies, and philanthropists as well. as with a lot of the things at cop, the headline sounds really good, there are still quite a few unanswered questions. progress will have to be monitored quite carefully. and a lot of people will say, this was a pledge that was first introduced in 2014 but will actually not happen until 16 years later. i'm sure some communities and some scientists will say, isn't that a little bit too late? the some scientists will say, isn't that a little bit too late?— a little bit too late? the devil as ever in the _ a little bit too late? the devil as ever in the detail, _ a little bit too late? the devil as ever in the detail, thank - a little bit too late? the devil as ever in the detail, thank you, i a little bit too late? the devil as . ever in the detail, thank you, adam fleming. important to say that although this goes on for a fortnight or so, after today and tomorrow, the world leaders begin
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heading home and then it is up to the negotiators to come up with whatever follows. we will be speaking to the former un chief lead on climate change, part of the team he managed to secure the deal in paris which was really solid and tangible but she has been very critical of the british government as host nation saying she thinks they are not necessarily leading from the front. we will talk to her in about 25 minutes. france has postponed a threat to block uk boats from landing at its ports in a row over post—brexit fishing rights. president emmanuel macron says the sanctions are being delayed so negotiations to resolve the disagreement can continue. let's speak now to our correspondentjessica parker. she's at the port of boulogne sur mer. jessica, a slight pause in the argument but no signs of compromise just yet? no, you are right. last night, as you say, the french president emmanuel macron said that while talks were ongoing, the french would
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not impose cross—channel sanctions, as they had threatened to do. there was a deadline of midnight last night. so talks look set to continue. as you suggest, we haven't had any indication of a major breakthrough here. this row is about, this piece —— people may remember that in places like this there is a feeling that french fishing boat are not being granted the licences they need and deserve and should be entitled to under the post brexit trading arrangement. the uk has said it has been fair and is looking at what is outlined in the trade agreement and has granted the licence is issued. there has been ongoing boat by boat analysis going ongoing boat by boat analysis going on to try and see if the evidence can be found if more boats can be granted licences to fish in the waters of the channel islands and the united kingdom. those talks will continue and lauder frost, the brexit minister, will head to paris on thursday, i think that is our new deadline to look forward to now,
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where he will meet the europe minister in france, both known for a fairly robust diplomatic style so it will be interesting to see what emerges from those talks. it is feeling a bit familiar, lots of noise and talks, a deadline missed, it feels like brexit is happening all over again.— it feels like brexit is happening all over aain. . ~ ,, , . all over again. thank you very much indeed. a group of mps has called for a pause in the rollout of smart motorways until the government can prove they are safe. the updates to the motorway system are intended to increase capacity, but safety campaigners say they've contributed to deaths on the roads. here 5 our transport correspondent, caroline davies. marching through westminster yesterday. each coffin represents someone killed a smart motorway. killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorway intended to each congestion. intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane without having to use more land. if the car breaks down in a live
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lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be built for years until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years worth of safety evidence on the network as currently exists. and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away, congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the mi smart motorway.
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our aim is to just get the hard shoulder back in every single incidence. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they say to close them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, that i can get them banned in the meantime. the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways. it admitted that improvements are not always being made as quickly as they could have in the past, but it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. rail officials say two trains which collided in salisbury on sunday evening will remain at the scene for "some time" while they establish what happened. thirteen people were hospitalised after the incident, and police say one of the drivers has suffered "life—changing" injuries. there's continued rail disruption
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in the salisbury area as a result of the crash, with more cancellations expected in the next few days. a new rule is being proposed that would ban the sale or manufacture of wet wipes that contain plastic. more than 11 billion wipes are used every year in the uk, and many end up in our waterways, causing blockages and damaging wildlife. labour mp fleur anderson says manufacturers need to be clear about the contents of their wet wipes, as many consumers are simply unaware of the harm they can cause. good noisy made there! those are some of the main stories. ed sheeran is here later. he has had covid in the last few days, so he's doing interviews from home, he will be talking to us just before 8am. but far more important, we have now got
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carroll with the weather! gosh, i hope he isn't watching! he was onlyjoking! temperature is widely freezing, mist and fog patches, and some frost or some of us. we will have this for the rest of the week with also some showers around and it will feel cold at times. a cold start, showers already, a lot of them coming in across the north of scotland. you can see some of them peppering the coastline as well. some will be heavy with some hail and thunder by the end of the day, they will be wintry on the highest ground in the north of scotland. not as windy as yesterday, although it will be windy across the north west and also the north coast. temperatures, nine to 12 degrees. through the evening and overnight, once again clearer skies, it will be cold, cold enough for a touch of frost, some mist and fog patches forming especially around the midlands and the south—east. the
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show is continuing to drift southwards, and still windy across the rest of the country, the west coast of wales and cornwall. a cold start to the day tomorrow, cloud across the final to scotland and showers moving south. some of them are making it inland. in the northern half of the country on the tops of the hills and mountains, we could see a little bit of snow. temperatures, eight to 12 or 13 degrees. thank you, see you again soon. to many of us, the climate talks in glasgow may feel very far away, with world leaders making decisions that will affect our lives behind closed doors. so what does climate change mean for you? we sent breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin to cop lane in preston to find out. welcome to cop lane. climate activists of all ages recognise that our climate is in crisis. kids have never been more clued up
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about the challenge ahead. i would say, using more renewable types of energy, like water power, solar power and wind power. but what about the grown—ups? many of the most important grown—ups in the world are meeting in glasgow right now to find a plan to fix the problem. some, though, have decided not to attend. so, are we taking this issue seriously enough? in cop lane garage, they might not be talking about cop26, but they are talking about the environment. everyone who talks about changing their car or anything like that, they're always wanting to go electric. but there is a big issue, cost. right, so it's that they are talking about going electric, but they're not going electric? theyjust can't afford it. if it was cheaper, i'm sure it would accelerate. i think i'll be retired before we see it mainstream. the uk's plan is to ban the sale
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of diesel and petrol cars by 2030. over in the local chippy, andreas says he is a new green convert. as we said, we have to save this planet. and it's all inspired by one man. david attenborough is a hero. i've been watching all his programmes, and i have seen their wildlife, how they suffer. and it made me do this major changes, yes. even though it's costing me a lot of money. wooden folks cost three or four times more than the plastic forks. that's a big difference. it is, it is. but it is important to do it. in the vicarage, three generations are wrestling with the challenge, and not everyone is convinced they can make a difference. who is the eco warrior in this house? could it be me? it's grandad, is this accurate, grandad? it is. i like all the cardboard put in the cardboard box and the glass in the glass box. the heating off. at the moment, going forward,
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i think being able to care about the environment is a rich man's game. you need money to be able to show that you care. talking about insulating your house, using the right kind of energy, and all that, it costs money. in fact, only a fifth of uk emissions come from households and we are visiting another to hear a confession. a little bird has told me, you made him last night watch recycling videos on youtube to prep for the interview. yeah. we're not the best, are we? this is going to sound awful, but sometimes it is just, not laziness, just you're in a rush with life. what's in there, archie? can you recycle tinfoil, archie? you can! what's this, mum? can you recycle cardboard, archie? no. you can recycle cardboard, archie! you've been outed. i have. we're going to do better,
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aren't we, archie? last week, borisjohnson said household recycling is not the answer to this crisis. but for so many, it is often the first step. so we've invited an expert over to explain other changes we all need to make to get emmissions right down. the biggest impact that your house has on climate change is from heating it. so things like, this radiator, and your hot water as well. so what kind of boiler do you have? it's a gas boiler. gas is a fossil fuel, it causes climate change when you burn it. and we need to switch to electric heating instead. can i have a look at your fridge? do you have to? the most problematic thing is actually your milk and your butter, and your meat. keeping animals, and particularly cows and sheep, burp and fart, methane. and that's actually a dangerous greenhouse gas. government advisers have suggested that we reduce meat and dairy
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consumption by about 20%. do you have a car? yes, it's diesel. that's what you're going to ask me! diesel is the worst for air pollution, i'm afraid. you'd want to think about getting an electric car. in fact, living without a car or going electric is the single most impactful decision we could make to individually help tackle this crisis. but professor willis says the one thing people really want from global leaders is a very clear message. the government is really nervous about talking to people about what needs to be done. and it's always saying, oh, don't worry your pretty little heads about it, we'll sort it out for you. and that's, it's actually dishonest. and ineffective, because meanwhile, people are sitting there, thinking, i'm really worried about climate change that i feel quite powerless. paper in here. opening cop26 yesterday, borisjohnson said it would be children who willjudge leaders forfailing to act. david attenborough said,
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their future should be the impetus to turn tragedy into triumph. i think i definitely would like a clearer message for absolutely everything that we are supposed to do, and it to be very clear. as a nation, we are really good at sticking by rules. in doing what we are told. we are really good at that. but it's just left to individuals? well, you'lljust do what you think is right, or not. and with the un say we are on track for a climate catastrophe, "or not" is not an option. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. you can learn a lot from that. you can. let's take a look at today's papers. many of the front pages lead with the queen's message to world leaders at the cop26 climate summit, in which she urges them to "rise above the politics" for the sake "of our children".
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"her majesty the green" is the metro's headline. and the daily mail calls the queen's intervention a "deeply personal ultimatum". one of the most—read stories on the bbc news site focuses on an israeli minister, who says she could not attend the summit yesterday because it was not wheelchair accessible. in response, the foreign minister james cleverly said he was "deeply disappointed and frustrated" by the situation and has offered to meet her later today. and you may have spotted this tweet, which was trending yesterday. eyebrows were raised when cnn presenter, wolf blitzer, announced he would be covering the climate summit from edinburgh, 47 miles east of the actual host city, glasgow. a beautiful photograph there, a beautiful photograph of him in edinburgh, saying, here i am, covering this. thousands of delegates are arriving. in his defence. _ delegates are arriving. in his defence, he _ delegates are arriving. in his defence, he has _ delegates are arriving. in his defence, he has made - delegates are arriving. in his defence, he has made a - delegates are arriving. in his defence, he has made a lot. delegates are arriving. in his. defence, he has made a lot of delegates are arriving. in his - defence, he has made a lot of points that the whole thing is in scotland.
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so i feel that a lot of people are saying, should have gone to a popular opticians and all that sort of business. i’m popular opticians and all that sort of business-_ popular opticians and all that sort of business._ i i of business. i'm not with you. i think peeple — of business. i'm not with you. i think people are _ of business. i'm not with you. i think people are being - of business. i'm not with you. i think people are being harsh. l of business. i'm not with you. i i think people are being harsh. ice don't think people are being harsh. ice: don't agree, edinburgh think people are being harsh. ice don't agree, edinburgh and glasgow are different places. i’m don't agree, edinburgh and glasgow are different places.— are different places. i'm sure he's aware, are different places. i'm sure he's aware. but _ are different places. i'm sure he's aware. but it _ are different places. i'm sure he's aware, but it is _ are different places. i'm sure he's aware, but it is generally - are different places. i'm sure he'sl aware, but it is generally scotland. i will give him an excuse. a bizarre story in the daily express. this guy, reverend mike, owned a house in luton and had been working in wales and was told to come back because his neighbours said, there is someone in his house. he came back in his house had been sold and there were builders in the house, renovating it for the new owners. what? 50 renovating it for the new owners. what? ,, :, :, :, renovating it for the new owners. what? :, :, :, , :, what? so he got into the house and said, what? so he got into the house and said. what's — what? so he got into the house and said, what's going _ what? so he got into the house and said, what's going on, _ what? so he got into the house and said, what's going on, found - what? so he got into the house and said, what's going on, found out. said, what's going on, found out that somebody had cloned his driving licence, set up a bank account in his name, and sold the house for £131,000, while he was away in wales. he came back and the house was no longer legally his. so he tries to find out, surely this is
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still my house. so it's going to the police, being looked at by the land registry. apparently he has been told by police that they did not believe a criminal offence had been committed and he finds that and —— believable. he has gone to the land registry to try and get some conversation. how weird, to find that someone has not only moved in but own his house. you that someone has not only moved in but own his house.— but own his house. you would think that someone _ but own his house. you would think that someone is _ but own his house. you would think that someone is investigating - but own his house. you would think that someone is investigating that l that someone is investigating that for him. , that someone is investigating that forhim. , : :, , for him. yes, bedfordshire police have been _ for him. yes, bedfordshire police have been contacted. _ for him. yes, bedfordshire police have been contacted. the - for him. yes, bedfordshire police have been contacted. the land i have been contacted. the land registry say, despite our efforts, we do have a few fraudulent transactions. i we do have a few fraudulent transactions.— we do have a few fraudulent transactions. , :, , :, transactions. i will share with you a iece of transactions. i will share with you a piece of the _ transactions. i will share with you a piece of the daily _ transactions. i will share with you a piece of the daily mail, - transactions. i will share with you a piece of the daily mail, about i transactions. i will share with you | a piece of the daily mail, about the late actress dame diana rigg, she
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left a surprise bequest to her local nail salon manager. she saw her in the last few years of her life really regularly, she did her nails and they became friends. jessica was with her on the day she died, and she left a bequest tojessica, but she left a bequest to jessica, but she left a bequest tojessica, but she had she left a bequest to jessica, but she had donated it back she left a bequest tojessica, but she had donated it back and given it to her grandson because she said that was the sort of relationship they had. they were friends, they knew everything about each other and that's what she wanted to do, pass that's what she wanted to do, pass that back to diana rigg's grandson. isn't that lovely. when diana rigg first went into the nail salon, she didn't know who she was, they were just pals. brute didn't know who she was, they were 'ust als. ~ :, :, : :, just pals. we followed the rickshaw challenae just pals. we followed the rickshaw challenge over _ just pals. we followed the rickshaw challenge over the _ just pals. we followed the rickshaw challenge over the last _ just pals. we followed the rickshaw challenge over the last few - just pals. we followed the rickshaw challenge over the last few years i just pals. we followed the rickshaw| challenge over the last few years on this programme, matt baker will be outside the studio later on. this is the 11th year it has been going on. socially distance and covid friendly this year, he is going from
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manchester to level today. they have raised over 40 —— liverpool today. they have raised over 40 million for children in need. you they have raised over 40 million for children in need.— children in need. you will be out there with _ children in need. you will be out there with him? _ children in need. you will be out there with him? yes, _ children in need. you will be out there with him? yes, we - children in need. you will be out there with him? yes, we will. children in need. you will be out there with him? yes, we will be| there with him? yes, we will be chattin: there with him? yes, we will be chatting to _ there with him? yes, we will be chatting to matt _ there with him? yes, we will be chatting to matt and _ there with him? yes, we will be chatting to matt and rainbow i there with him? yes, we will be i chatting to matt and rainbow later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. great northern, thameslink and southern are installing defibrillators at all of their train stations. it's the largest roll—out of heart restarters on the uk s rail network. they're fully automatic ? so anyone can use them. early chest compressions and defibrillation are said to double the chances of surviving a cardiac arrest. you can't do any harm. it's so important that you get on that chest, pushing in the centre hard and fast and use a defibrillator as soon as possible.
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you're their best chance of survival, so don't be too scared to give it a go. some of london's best known fireworks displays will not go ahead this year. hammersmith and fulham council said events in ravenscourt park and bishops park won't be held due to continuing high rates of covid. tower hamlets, hackney and croydon have also cancelled their annual bonfire night displays. as world leaders continue talks to tackle climate change in glasgow, here one politician is hoping to make a difference by proposing a law banning the sale or manufacture of wet wipes that contain plastic. thames water says every year it clears 85,000 blockages, which are partly down to them. putney mp fleur anderson says as well as causing environmental damage, the cost of clearing them gets passed to customers. a man in luton has described his shock when he found his house had been "stolen." reverend mike hall,who was working away at the time, was alerted by neighbours that someone else was living there
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and building work underway. a bbc investigation found mr hall's identity had been stolen and used to sell the house and bank the proceeds. bedfordshire police is investigating. travel now. this is how tfl services are looking. there's a good service on all lines this morning. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it certainly is a chilly start to the day with clear skies and lighter winds last night. temperatures have dropped low enough for a frost. there is even a few pockets of air frost in some of the rural spots, too. a mist around to lift and clear this morning. that will do so slowly through the morning and it will turn into a fairly decent day of weather, too. with plenty of sunshine around, just feeling colder than it has been of late. the wind certainly a lot lighter, top temperatures of around 12 celsius. the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the vast majority of us it will be a completely dry day. we keep those light winds overnight tonight and lots of long clear skies around as well. so there will be another frost into tomorrow morning along
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with some rather dense patches of mist and fog out there as well. so a murky start to the day. that mist and fog will lift and clear very slowly as we head through the morning. we draw in a northerly wind on wednesday, still fairly light, but it could throw us a few showers at times, also some sunny spells. many of our temperatures will struggle to get out of single figures, so feeling colder. not quite so chilly wednesday night into thursday. thursday, another calm, quiet day of weather. should stay dry. turning more unsettled but milder over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to sally and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. coming up on breakfast this morning... why you should never flush a wet wipe down the loo. we'll look at the campaign to ban wipes that contain plastic because they're clogging up our
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sewers and polluting our rivers. he might have just tested positive for covid, but ed sheeran hasn't let that stop him from releasing his new album. he'lljoin us from isolation just before 8am. and matt baker's doing his 11th rickshaw challenge to raise money for children in need. we'll catch up with him as he sets off on the next leg. you know i was telling you about the reverend who lost his home. bbc radio four are doing an investigation, helping him look into it. good. that means he will be ok. the queen has urged world leaders to rise above politics and address the impact of climate change as they attend the cop26 climate conference in glasgow. in a video message played during the first full day of the summit,
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the queen called on presidents and prime ministers to act now forfuture generations. none of us underestimates the challenges ahead but history has shown that when nations come together in common cause, there is always room for hope. working side by side, we have the ability to solve the most insurmountable problems and to triumph over the greatest of adversities. for more than 70 years, i have been lucky to meet and to know many of the world's great leaders and i have perhaps come to understand a little about what made them special. it has sometimes been observed that what leaders do for their people today is government and politics. but what they do for the people of tomorrow, that is statesmanship. i for one hope that this conference will be one of those rare occasions where everyone will have the chance
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to rise above the politics of the moment and achieve true statesmanship. it is the hope of many that the legacy of this summit, written in history books yet to be printed, will describe you as the leaders who did not pass up the opportunity and that you answer the call of those future generations, that you left this conference as a community of nations with a determination, a desire and a plan to address the impact of climate change and to recognise the time for words has now moved for the time for action. of course the benefits of such actions will not be there to enjoy for all of us here today. we none of us will live for ever. but we are doing this not for ourselves but for our children and our
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children's children and those who will follow in their footsteps. powerful. the queen of course was unable to attend the event, after being advised to rest by doctors. nina's in glasgow for us this morning. good morning. good morning. really interestin: good morning. good morning. really interesting hearing _ good morning. good morning. really interesting hearing from _ good morning. good morning. really interesting hearing from the - good morning. good morning. really interesting hearing from the queen. | interesting hearing from the queen. what is happening in glasgow is not just about hearing from world leaders, although there are more than 100 of them gathered here. it is notjust about hearing from the scientist, the boffins, who know all about climate change it is important to listen to those who know about history. this women led the team which reached the paris agreement, the 1.5 target for limiting climate change. thank you so much. lovely to see you. when the queen, somebody
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like greene, of her stature, makes a statement like this, saying it is an opportunity for true statesmanship to answer the call of the next generation, how does it land with politicians? i5 generation, how does it land with oliticians? , generation, how does it land with politicians?— politicians? is it very significant? it is significant. _ politicians? is it very significant? it is significant. she _ politicians? is it very significant? it is significant. she is _ politicians? is it very significant? it is significant. she is calling - it is significant. she is calling for everyone to step up to their responsibilities that she is also speaking — responsibilities that she is also speaking for the young people. she is very— speaking for the young people. she is very in— speaking for the young people. she is very in tune with the pain and their— is very in tune with the pain and their grief~ _ is very in tune with the pain and their grief. we have seen more climate — their grief. we have seen more climate anxiety among young people and we _ climate anxiety among young people and we have seen before and it is only growing. i really appreciate she is— only growing. i really appreciate she is using her boys, which is unique — she is using her boys, which is unique in _ she is using her boys, which is unique in the world, to really help young _ unique in the world, to really help young people get their voices up to where _ young people get their voices up to where it— young people get their voices up to where it will be listened to. is it blah, blah, blah, orare we
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seeing progress? brute is it blah, blah, blah, or are we seeing progress?— is it blah, blah, blah, or are we seeing progress? we are seeing rouress. seeing progress? we are seeing progress it _ seeing progress? we are seeing progress it can _ seeing progress? we are seeing progress. it can be _ seeing progress? we are seeing progress. it can be defined - seeing progress? we are seeing progress. it can be defined by i seeing progress? we are seeing i progress. it can be defined by what governments are doing. we are having government— governments are doing. we are having government step up to a 2050 target. many of— government step up to a 2050 target. many of them already to the 20 deadly— many of them already to the 20 deadly target, which is all—important to be able to get on track— all—important to be able to get on track to— all—important to be able to get on track to a — all—important to be able to get on track to a ceiling of 1.5 celsius. the other— track to a ceiling of 1.5 celsius. the other bucket that gets forgotten and that _ the other bucket that gets forgotten and that i_ the other bucket that gets forgotten and that i think is as important if not more — and that i think is as important if not more is, _ and that i think is as important if not more is, what is the signal of science _ not more is, what is the signal of science as — not more is, what is the signal of science as well as society? as well as policy— science as well as society? as well as policy doing for the real economy. the fact is at least 50% of what is _ economy. the fact is at least 50% of what is getting announced in glasgow in the _ what is getting announced in glasgow in the last— what is getting announced in glasgow in the last helix has to do with the transformation of the real society. we have _ transformation of the real society. we have $130 trillion of capital markets — we have $130 trillion of capital markets all the different sectors of the finance system going for the commitment of 2050. that all of money— commitment of 2050. that all of money that is going to go into companies that are being
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responsible, that will make a huge difference, a huge difference. good to hear. difference, a huge difference. good to hear- what _ difference, a huge difference. good to hear. what do _ difference, a huge difference. good to hear. what do you _ difference, a huge difference. (13cm to hear. what do you make of the uk as host nation, scotland has hosted nation. france were widely praised as being a big part of the deal that was secured. i’iiii as being a big part of the deal that was secured-— was secured. i'll be leading from the front? _ was secured. i'll be leading from the front? i _ was secured. i'll be leading from the front? i would _ was secured. i'll be leading from the front? i would say _ was secured. i'll be leading from the front? i would say what - the front? i would say what was really _ the front? i would say what was really fascinating about uk, learning from history, this is where the industrial revolution was born stop the _ the industrial revolution was born stop the fact we are being hosted here, _ stop the fact we are being hosted here, where we are actually creeping ourselves _ here, where we are actually creeping ourselves out of the industrial revolution into the new revolution is very— revolution into the new revolution is very historic. i do not think any other— is very historic. i do not think any other country in the world has moved away from _ other country in the world has moved away from coal as quickly as the uk. what _ away from coal as quickly as the uk. what we _ away from coal as quickly as the uk. what we have also seen as the midway from coal— what we have also seen as the midway from coal and gas and oil has not been _ from coal and gas and oil has not been as— from coal and gas and oil has not been as smooth as many would want. the direction — been as smooth as many would want. the direction of travel is definitely the right one. things
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like in the _ definitely the right one. things like in the budget, _ definitely the right one. things like in the budget, cutting - definitely the right one. things like in the budget, cutting air l definitely the right one. things i like in the budget, cutting air tax, was that the right thing to do or does it send out the right message? it is typical of where other countries are. it is exceedingly complex, — countries are. it is exceedingly complex, the transformation. the fact the _ complex, the transformation. the fact the uk— complex, the transformation. the fact the uk has laid out its complexity for everyone to put under the microscope is healthy. everyone is in the _ the microscope is healthy. everyone is in the same conundrum. how do we take something that has been with us, that— take something that has been with us, that has defined our economic and political structure for 50, 100 years. _ and political structure for 50, 100 years. how— and political structure for 50, 100 years, how do we move over in the nick of— years, how do we move over in the nick of time? — years, how do we move over in the nick of time? every time sign says she has— nick of time? every time sign says she has -- — nick of time? every time sign says she has —— you had less time. the targets— she has —— you had less time. the targets every— she has —— you had less time. the targets every time are more
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stringent. forthe uk to targets every time are more stringent. for the uk to lay bad the complexity— stringent. for the uk to lay bad the complexity of that transformation, i income _ complexity of that transformation, i income is _ complexity of that transformation, i income is a — complexity of that transformation, i income is a good thing. -- complexity of that transformation, i income is a good thing.— complexity of that transformation, i income is a good thing. -- lay bare. fascinating — income is a good thing. -- lay bare. fascinating when _ income is a good thing. -- lay bare. fascinating when you _ income is a good thing. -- lay bare. fascinating when you look _ income is a good thing. -- lay bare. fascinating when you look at - income is a good thing. -- lay bare. fascinating when you look at paris l fascinating when you look at paris and the drinks reception last night, how much is it about diplomacy? you do that and we do this. that is all informal chitchat that takes place informal chitchat that takes place in glasgow. that is what made the gathering necessary.— in glasgow. that is what made the gathering necessary. obviously a lot of preparation _ gathering necessary. obviously a lot of preparation has _ gathering necessary. obviously a lot of preparation has been _ gathering necessary. obviously a lot of preparation has been under i gathering necessary. obviously a lot of preparation has been under way l of preparation has been under way for the _ of preparation has been under way for the last— of preparation has been under way for the last two years where we have all been _ for the last two years where we have all been locked up someplace. that was a _ all been locked up someplace. that was a good — all been locked up someplace. that was a good thing. i also must say it was a good thing. i also must say it was a _ was a good thing. i also must say it was a very— was a good thing. i also must say it was a very right decision to bring the conference together and to bring people _ the conference together and to bring people together. a lot does ride on personal— people together. a lot does ride on personal relations, especially on trust _ personal relations, especially on trust it— personal relations, especially on trust it is— personal relations, especially on trust. it is important to build trust — trust. it is important to build trust over— trust. it is important to build trust over scene. to have a personal relationship — trust over scene. to have a personal relationship with people and be able to directly— relationship with people and be able to directly understand what need is,
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what the _ to directly understand what need is, what the true needed, which is very often _ what the true needed, which is very often not _ what the true needed, which is very often not what the expressed need is back to _ often not what the expressed need is back to level to understand that and find common ground is much easier when _ find common ground is much easier when you're — find common ground is much easier when you're all in the same place. we could — when you're all in the same place. we could have pleasant surprises in the next few weeks. very quickly, are we out of our minds to think one are we out of our minds to think one are still alive?— are still alive? no, no. actually, we have to _ are still alive? no, no. actually, we have to keep _ are still alive? no, no. actually, we have to keep 1.5 _ are still alive? no, no. actually, we have to keep 1.5 still - are still alive? no, no. actually, we have to keep 1.5 still alive i we have to keep 1.5 still alive front— we have to keep 1.5 still alive front and _ we have to keep 1.5 still alive front and centre. science has told us very— front and centre. science has told us very clearly it is the only scenario— us very clearly it is the only scenario under which we would be able to— scenario under which we would be able to continue modern civilisation as we _ able to continue modern civilisation as we know— able to continue modern civilisation as we know it. front and centre. not 'ust as we know it. front and centre. not just alive _ as we know it. front and centre. not just alive. glasgow is not going to deliver— just alive. glasgow is not going to deliver that pathway, we are going to get— deliver that pathway, we are going to get much, much closer and where we were _ to get much, much closer and where we were one — to get much, much closer and where we were one or two years ago but we will still— we were one or two years ago but we will still have two chip away at it. lovely— will still have two chip away at it. lovely to — will still have two chip away at it. lovely to have you this morning. she
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summed it up. history has brought us to where we are now but it does not end in glasgow, we all had to pay per day to day until die. later on we will be talking to families in the uk about how far they are willing to go to make that change. thank you. john has made his way into the studio. i hope you have cleared your throat. how you doing? i am very excited about the cricket. people talk about sports men and women doing brilliant things and thatis women doing brilliant things and that is exactly whatjos buttler is doing at the world cup. he has become the first englishman to ever score a century in all three formats of the game. that is quite a feat! when he think how difficult it is to play test cricket and the shorter forms, produce what he has has set
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him apart. has underpinned england's brilliant run so far. something quite special, it is fair to say. joss the boss, as he's being called. brilliant with the bat and the ball at times against sri lanka. he needed a six off the final ball of the innings to take him to his 100. and what did he do? hit out of the ground. unbelievable stuff. he was equally as impressive behind the stumps. look at this run out, helping england to victory by 26 runs, as they went on to win all four of their matches so far. obviously delighted to win the game. i think four from four is exactly what we want. we want to win every game we play. i think the format is tough and there's not much room for error. every game is a massive game. like you said, we had to bat first today and still come through and win the game. we're obviously really happy with that. after sacking nuno espirito santo at the start of the day,
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tottenham were very close to appointing antonio conte at the end of the it. they are in advanced negotiations with the former chelsea manager, who won the premier league and fa cup in his time there. he was interviewed for the job back in the summer before talks broke down. nuno's former club wolves given a helping hand here in their 2—1 victory over everton last night. look at this back pass from ben godfrey! a gift for rauljimnenez to score their second. victory moves them up to seventh. another day, another test for manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer. he'd been under intense pressure after the 5—0 thrashing by liverpool, eased somewhat with the 3—0 win at tottenham on sunday. but back into the cauldron he goes, away to atalanta in the champions league tonight. criticism can go... can make you doubt yourself, or you can stand up for yourself. and i've always enjoyed criticism. so that's. ..
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just keep that coming — that's fine. you know, journalists, pundits, experts, we've all got differentjobs. it's theirjob to give their opinions. that's theirjob. i'm not here to fight with them. chelsea will fancy their chances against malmo in sweden tonight, having won the home game 4—0. they're second in their group, but top of the premier league and the boss is enjoying hisjob. the target is to get better every week, to get better every match and every day and never stop learning and never stop progressing as a coach because this is what it is. now it seems to be a perfect fit from day one for me. i'm super happy to be in this club and be part of the club. cameron norrie still has a chance of taking one of the two remaining spots at the season—ending atp tour finals. he beat federico delbonis in straight sets in his opening match of the paris masters and he could join the world's best
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in turin with a decent run here. andy murray blew seven match points in his match against lucky loser dominic koepfer — the german taking the final set tie—break 11—9. british number two dan evans is also out. and we like to celebrate milestones on this programme. neil warnock picks up one of those later. the most games managed in english professional football. 1,602 matches in charge. that is the most games of any manager in the professional top unbelievable. shall we hearfrom unbelievable. shall we hear from him? i'd no idea about the record, till two weeks ago, if i'm honest. then somebody has told me i've got another record in about 14, 15 games, league games. so i've just got to keep myjob for a few months. that's why i've lasted so long. i think i've put more smiles on people's faces than gloomy looks, and that's how i see life, that's how i see football. you've got to enjoy it and try
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and get your fans to enjoy it while they can. first match back in 1987. what iran has been! he has a phenomenal record of taking teams up. —— what a run it has been! i do not think he would ever have imagined he would go on, still going strong. still a job to do tonight, middlesbrough against luton. 1602. morning. a chilly start to the day. if you haven't yet been my temperatures widely —12 plus six. as we go through the day the forecast is one of sunshine and showers. some will
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be heavy and thundery with ale and it will feel cold as well. —— with hail. the low front has moved away but still a lot of showers rotating around it. not as breezy as yesterday but still breezy and parts of the west. the fog and mist patches will let and there will be sunshine around. also a packet of showers. by the end of the afternoon some of them will be wintry in the mountains in scotland stop it indicates an average wind speed the afternoon. towards western scotland and the north coast of northern ireland it will be that it breezy. temperatures today nine to 12. frequent showers also across the channel islands. this evening and tonight there will be clear skies around. showers moving steadily
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southwards. some of those will be heavy stop under clear skies it will be a chilly night as well. some will be a chilly night as well. some will be starting tomorrow with mr and frost. tomorrow that cold start and the mist and fog to get rid of. when they clear there will be more cloud across parts of england. you could catch a shower almost anywhere. they are coming in on the northerly breeze. as a result it will feel chilly. look at the temperatures! eight to 12 degrees. as we head on into what he ended the week, wednesday into thursday, we eventually say goodbye to the weather front. eventually say goodbye to the weatherfront. high pressure tries to from the atlantic. it will still be noticeably breezy. still breezy across the irish sea as well. we
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could catch one or two showers in areas exposed to it. a lot of dry weather with a fair bit of sunshine around. cloud coming in from the north—west with splashes of rain. that is a weather front. that will slip across the north—west of scotland as we go through the course of friday. for many of us, it will be dry with variable amounts of cloud and the temperature rising. we thought low pressure would take over the weather but now high pressure will take over the weather. things a bit more settled than we thought. we will see you again just after seven o'clock. thank you. the driver of one of the trains involved in a collision near salisbury on sunday night has suffered "life—changing" injuries. an investigation is underway into the cause of the crash, in which several other people were hurt. our reporter andrew plant is in salisbury this morning.
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andrew, what's the latest? good morning to you. from a fairly quiet salisbury station it has to be said. that is because the travel problems here are continuing, particularly if you are trying to get to london or southampton. i am told there are a few replacement busesin told there are a few replacement buses in place. not many people travelling. the track is essentially closed in one direction. the trains exactly where they have been when they collided. they are wedged in there side—by—side, quite awkwardly, half in and half out of the tunnel. it could be weeks before the track is up and running. they have to get them out and then assess what damage has been done to the signalling and tracks around. initially we were told it looked like one train hit something and was derailed and then hit by one coming up from behind. now it looks they were both in fact
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moving, going in the same direction on different tracks and then when the tracks came together they may have collided at that point. there were 92 people on board. most were able to walk away with 13 being treated in hospital. the driver with the most serious injuries, they are described as life changing. it will be a few days before we know what went wrong on sunday evening and in terms of getting the track up and running, that could be several more weeks. :, ~ running, that could be several more weeks. :, ,, , :, running, that could be several more weeks. :, ~' , :, , running, that could be several more weeks. :, ,, , : cameron thrower was a passenger on one of the trains that crashed on sunday. hejoins us now from dorset. thank you for being with us this morning. i assume your entry is from what happened in the carriage. talk us through your experience. what went on? i us through your experience. what went on? :, , , us through your experience. what went on? :,, , ::, :, went on? i was in the first carriage ofthe went on? i was in the first carriage of the train. _ went on? i was in the first carriage of the train, their _ went on? i was in the first carriage of the train, their london - went on? i was in the first carriage of the train, their london to i of the train, their london to honiton train. i got up to get ready to get off at salisbury because i
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was not going to be able to get to sherborne because of the flooding that was on getting on that day. standing up with some other people, waiting to pull into salisbury. the next thing i know there is an almighty noise. i am being thrown about the carriage. worst of all i'd turn around behind me and there is a huge rush of fire and sparks on the door outside. next thing i know! huge rush of fire and sparks on the door outside. next thing i know i am in the dark, on the floor, wondering what happened and realising everything is definitely not as it should be and it was extremely scary in that moment. it should be and it was extremely scary in that moment.— in that moment. it sounds terrifying- _ in that moment. it sounds terrifying. then, - in that moment. it sounds terrifying. then, are i in that moment. it sounds terrifying. then, are you l in that moment. it sounds - terrifying. then, are you checking yourself for injuries? i suppose adrenaline kicks in. what were the moments like after the crash? i didn't realise i was injured till long after. not until near eight o'clock, nine o'clock, when we were in st margaret's church. adrenaline
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was fully pumping. we were looking around to see if anyone were seriously hurt, anyone were seriously hurt, anyone were seriously injured and then immediately afterwards, the daughter of a carriage i had just been in was partially open. me and a passenger in that one tried to. open so people could get out. we couldn't either, it was far too heavy. the power had gonein it was far too heavy. the power had gone in the carriage. we moved to a carriage when i was still light and be around other people, be calm and things like that. it is be around other people, be calm and things like that.— things like that. it is strange. we are all used _ things like that. it is strange. we are all used to _ things like that. it is strange. we are all used to travelling - things like that. it is strange. we are all used to travelling on i things like that. it is strange. we l are all used to travelling on public transport are not many of us speak to each other. in a situation like that, you will start to look out for each other and checking people are ok. at}?! each other and checking people are ok. :, , :, :, , , ok. of all the things that happened, that is one of _ ok. of all the things that happened, that is one of the _ ok. of all the things that happened, that is one of the things _ ok. of all the things that happened, that is one of the things that - ok. of all the things that happened, that is one of the things that made l that is one of the things that made me feel a lot better, was that even in this horrible moment but like the first thing everyone was doing was
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making sure their fellow man was ok, making sure their fellow man was ok, making sure their fellow man was ok, making sure everyone was fine and no one was injured and if they were not they were getting the help we could provide them in that name it. there was a coming together of everyone that we will get through this and trying to make sure we will all be ok and trying to reassure everyone. cameron, it is good your injuries are not too bad. we know the driver of one of the trains are said to have life changing injuries. having gone through what you did on sunday, are you surprised there were not more people on the trains who were injured? i more people on the trains who were in'ured? ~ more people on the trains who were in'ured? ,, :, :, :, injured? ithinki am. having now seen what— injured? ithinki am. having now seen what actually _ injured? ithinki am. having now seen what actually happened i injured? ithinki am. having now seen what actually happened in l injured? i think! am. having now. seen what actually happened in the light of day, in the aftermath, and seeing how much more serious it was, i am very surprised that we kind of... we got as lucky as we did. there were not more serious injuries and only less than 20 of us were injured. when it happened, it was bad, obviously, for us but we did
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not realise the extent. i could not really see what happened to the other train. really see what happened to the othertrain. i had really see what happened to the other train. i had to climb the ramp and poke my head and i could only see part of the damage done to the other train. see part of the damage done to the othertrain. i see part of the damage done to the other train. i think we were really fortunate in that regard. not as many people injured as could have been. especially there were no fatalities from this incident. i know you were on the train for about an hour before you were rescued by emergency services. talk us through what is going on with the arm and how long you will be in that strap for? :, :, , , :, , :, :, for? fortunately, it is only a hard strain many _ for? fortunately, it is only a hard strain many of— for? fortunately, it is only a hard strain many of my _ for? fortunately, it is only a hard strain many of my shoulder i for? fortunately, it is only a hard strain many of my shoulder up i for? fortunately, it is only a hard i strain many of my shoulder up here. pretty much the classic doctor's orders to rest up and not do too much with it. i think my timetable is a week and after that i should be ok. it will still hurt for a while but after this week i should be mostly ok to go back to work. thank
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ou ve mostly ok to go back to work. thank you very much _ mostly ok to go back to work. thank you very much for — mostly ok to go back to work. thank you very much for talking _ mostly ok to go back to work. thank you very much for talking to - mostly ok to go back to work. thank you very much for talking to us. i i you very much for talking to us. i am glad they are only minor injuries. take care of yourself. i am glad you are all ok. we will give you updates if we hear any more news about the driver of one of the trains we are told by police has life changing injuries. you could hearfrom cameron house garriott life changing injuries. you could hear from cameron house garriott was to be the train. he is surprised no one was more seriously injured on that train. we will keep you up—to—date with the travel information in that area. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. great northern, thameslink and southern are installing defibrillators at all of their train stations. it's the largest roll—out of heart restarters on the uk s rail network. they're fully automatic so anyone can use them. early cpr and defibrillation
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are said to double the chances of surviving a cardiac arrest. you can't do any harm. it's so important that you get on that chest, pushing in the centre hard and fast and use a defibrillator as soon as possible. you're their best chance of survival, so don't be too scared to give it a go. as world leaders continue talks to tackle climate change in glasgow, here one politician is hoping to make a difference by proposing a law. banning the sale or manufacture of wet wipes that contain plastic. thames water says every year it clears 85,000 blockages which are partly down to them. putney mp fleur anderson says they cause environmental damage and the cost of clearing them gets passed to customers. some of london's best known fireworks displays will not go ahead this year. hammersmith and fulham council said events in ravenscourt park and bishops park won't be held due to continuing high rates of covid. tower hamlets, hackney and croydon have also cancelled their annual bonfire night displays.
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a man in luton has described his shock when he found his house had been stolen. reverend mike hall, who was working away at the time, was alerted by neighbours that someone else was living there and building work was under way. a bbc investigation found mr hall's identity had been stolen and used to sell the house. bedfordshire police is investigating. travel now, this is how tfl services are looking. there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and tower hill eastbound. a good service on all other lines. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it certainly is a chilly start to the day with clear skies and lighter winds last night. temperatures have dropped low enough for a frost. there is even a few pockets of air frost in some of the rural spots, too. a mist around to lift and clear this morning. that will do so slowly through the morning and it will turn into a fairly decent day of weather, too. with plenty of sunshine around, just feeling colder than it has been of late.
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the wind certainly a lot lighter, top temperatures of around 12 celsius. the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the vast majority of us it will be a completely dry day. we keep those light winds overnight tonight and lots of long clear skies around as well. so there will be another frost into tomorrow morning along with some rather dense patches of mist and fog out there as well. so a murky start to the day. that mist and fog will lift and clear very slowly as we head through the morning. we draw in a northerly wind on wednesday, still fairly light, but it could throw us a few showers at times, also some sunny spells. many of our temperatures will struggle to get out of single figures, so feeling colder. not quite so chilly wednesday night into thursday. thursday, another calm, quiet day of weather. should stay dry. turning more unsettled but milder over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. the queen issues a rallying cry to world leaders gathering in glasgow, appealing to them to rise above politics to avert a climate disaster. none of us underestimates the
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challenge ahead. but history has shown that when nations come together in common cause, there is always room for hope. while leaders are set to announce an agreement to end and even begin reversing deforestation, protecting forests is an integral part of reducing climate change but does this deal go far enough? calls to suspend the rollout of smart motorways. mps say the government needs to prove they are safe. we'll be chatting to ed sheeran. he's currently working from home promoting his new album, as he recovers from a bout of covid. a chilly start to the day—to—day, some of us sing some mist and fog but but for most today it will be sunshine and showers, some of them are heavy with hail and thunder but
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not as windy as yesterday. all of the details later. it's tuesday the 2nd of november. the queen has urged world leaders to "rise above" politics and create a "safer, stabler future" for the planet. she was speaking ahead of the second day of climate talks in glasgow. in a video message she said: "the time for words has now moved to the time for action". nina is in glasgow for us. good morning. it's a slightly frosty glasgow this morning and it will be really interesting to see what impact that speech from the queen had. it was an unusually emotional speech from her, she talked about her enormous pride in herfamily, and talked about her big fears for the future and that was the tone of day one in glasgow. we had from the un secretary—general who said, we are digging our own graves by using fossilfuels and the
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are digging our own graves by using fossil fuels and the us are digging our own graves by using fossilfuels and the us president joe biden said, none of us will escape if we fail to seize this moment. perhaps the most emotive speeches came from people who stood up speeches came from people who stood up to speak about the impact on their homes. they are already feeling the impact of climate change with their homes being destroyed. we had progress from india committing to carbon neutrality by 2070 and today we expect the announcement on deforestation. greta thunberg, the activist, led group of young people yesterday saying, no more blah blah blah. are the politicians translating their words into action? on the first day of this crucial climate conference, world leaders, royalty and activists took to the stage to set the tone for the days of negotiations that are ahead. the ceremony and speeches were rounded off with a reception hosted by borisjohnson, attended by the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall and the duke and duchess of cambridge. the queen, absent on the advice of her doctors, sent a recorded message.
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a reminder that what's achieved here decides the planet that we leave for future generations. it is the hope of many that the legacy of this summit, written in history books yet to be printed, will describe you as the leaders that did not pass up the opportunity and that you answered the call of those future generations. that you left this conference as a community of nations with the determination, a desire and a plan to address the impact of climate change. and to recognise the time for words has now moved to the time for action. there are some early signs of hope on some major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. today, leaders representing more than 85% of the world's forests will commit to halting deforestation and reversing it by 2030. this is a hugely ambitious pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50%
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of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement is notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it's actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. some experts remain pessimistic, though. a survey of climate scientists suggests many are not confident that global emissions can be cut quickly enough to avoid a climate catastrophe. his excellency, mr narendra damodardas modi, prime minister of india. and while india, the world's third—largest emitter, used the first day of the conference to announce its own net zero target date of 2070, that could be too late to avoid the worst consequences of climate change. in the gulf between words and action, the global temperature continues to rise. and with 200 countries now at the table, there's a lot more talking to do. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow.
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our chief political correspondent adam fleming is over there in the blue zone, where the politicians have been meeting and will meet later today. that delivery from the clean, how much will it matter? we have spoken to christianity have spoken to —— clean, how much will it matter? we have spoken to —— the part of the team he secured the deal in paris earlier, and she said that is why we have these conferences to have those moments that will have an impact. do moments that will have an impact. dc you remembera few moments that will have an impact. dc you remember a few days ago when it was first announced that the queen would not go to that reception of world leaders in glasgow on doctor orders? people said, that means that bit of the conference would be a damp squib. it was a total opposite because the queen's message delivered by video instead was incredibly powerful for a few reasons. number one, she talked about her late husband, the duke of edinburgh, and she didn'tjust talk about him, she was sat next to a photo of him surrounded by a cloud of butterflies to reflect the fact that he had been talking about the
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environment for decades. and the brooch she was wearing, the newspapers are saying, which was a butterfly as well, was given to her as an engagement present. so that packs quite an emotional punch. she then went on to talk about the fact that her son and his son also continued with that passion for the environment and climate change. and then the emotions got even more, because she hinted at her own mortality. because she hinted at her own mortality-— because she hinted at her own mortali . :, :, , :, , because she hinted at her own mortali . :, :, , :, mortality. the time of words has now moved to the — mortality. the time of words has now moved to the time _ mortality. the time of words has now moved to the time for— mortality. the time of words has now moved to the time for action. - mortality. the time of words has now moved to the time for action. of- moved to the time for action. of course, — moved to the time for action. of course, the _ moved to the time for action. of course, the benefits of such actions will not _ course, the benefits of such actions will not be — course, the benefits of such actions will not be there to enjoy for all of us _ will not be there to enjoy for all of us here — will not be there to enjoy for all of us here today. we, none of us, will live _ of us here today. we, none of us, will live forever. but we are doing this is— will live forever. but we are doing this is not— will live forever. but we are doing this is not for ourselves, but for our children— this is not for ourselves, but for our children and our children's children. — our children and our children's children, and those who will follow in their— children, and those who will follow in their footsteps. find children, and those who will follow in their footsteps.— in their footsteps. and she also ointed in their footsteps. and she also pointed out _ in their footsteps. and she also pointed out that, _ in their footsteps. and she also pointed out that, in _ in their footsteps. and she also pointed out that, in her- in their footsteps. and she also pointed out that, in her 70 i in their footsteps. and she also l pointed out that, in her 70 years in their footsteps. and she also i pointed out that, in her 70 years on the throne, she had met all the political greats and that meant she
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had a pretty good idea about what made a good leader, which, as guilt trips go, is a pretty classy one. in terms of how the climate conference is going today, the big announcement is going today, the big announcement is about forestry, lots of countries coming together to say that they will halt deforestation and reverse it by planting more trees and more greenery by 2030 and that will be backed up by about £15 billion worth of money from governments, companies, and donors. although the fly in the ointment is, that pledge was first made in 2014. it will not actually be delivered until 16 years after that. , , :, after that. yes, definitely worth lookin: at after that. yes, definitely worth looking at the _ after that. yes, definitely worth looking at the numbers - after that. yes, definitely worth looking at the numbers behind l after that. yes, definitely worth i looking at the numbers behind it. adam fleming, thank you very much. lots to watch out for today and it is important to say, after today, world leaders will begin going to their home nations and then it is handed over to the team of negotiators to get down to the nitty—gritty. part of this is not just about them, it's about hammering the message home to all of
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us that we can all play our part. and we will be hearing from families across the uk later to see what they will do about climate change. we'll be speaking to the environment secretary george eustice at around 7.30 this morning. a group of mps has called for a pause in the rollout of smart motorways until the government can prove they are safe. the updates to the motorway system are intended to increase capacity, but safety campaigners say they've contributed to deaths on the roads. here 5 our transport correspondent, caroline davies. marching through westminster yesterday. each coffin represents someone killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorway intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane without having to use more land. if the car breaks down in a live lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be
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built for years until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years worth of safety evidence on the network as currently exists. and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away, congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the m1 smart motorway. our aim is to just get the hard shoulder back in every single instance.
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so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they say to pause them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, then i can get them banned in the meantime. the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways. it admitted that improvements are not always being made as quickly as they could have in the past, but it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. that is a nice picture. thank you, yes, one of our weather watchers said it in. it is a chilly
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start this morning, it is freezing in some places, but eight degrees in some other places. this lovely picture was sent in from bristol, it shows quite nicelyjust how cold it is. for most it will be a day of sunshine and showers but you know the drill, not all of us will catch one but if you do, it could be heavy with some hail and thunder. also a chilly breeze is coming and the west, especially across north—west scotland and the north coast of northern ireland. these represent the average wind speeds so it is negligible today, not as windy as yesterday. temperatures between nine and 12 degrees. through the evening and 12 degrees. through the evening and overnight, a lot of clear skies, and overnight, a lot of clear skies, a weak system sinking south taking the showers with it. some will be wintry in the northern half of the country but only on the hills and mountains. it will be a chilly night once again, pockets of frost and
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mist and fog patches forming around the midlands and south—east england for example, they will lift quite readily tomorrow. tomorrow if anything there will be more clout across england in particular, as this weather front sinks south, a weak feature. and we have a northerly wind so any were exposed to that is likely to see a shower, especially along the coastline. it will come inland at times. in between, writer skies for scotland, northern ireland and wales. the wind will make it feel cooler than these temperatures at best we are looking at eight to 12 degrees. thank you, hear from you thank you, hearfrom you in half an hour. france has postponed a threat to block uk boats from landing at its ports in a row over post—brexit fishing rights. president emmanuel macron says the sanctions are being delayed so negotiations to resolve the disagreement can continue. let's speak now to our correspondentjessica parker. she's at the port of boulogne sur mer. lovely to speak to you. we will ask
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the environment secretary in a few minutes about this, but compromise, where are we, and how long have we got? where are we, and how long have we not? :, :, , , :, , got? two really good questions! compromise. — got? two really good questions! compromise, where _ got? two really good questions! compromise, where are - got? two really good questions! compromise, where are we, i got? two really good questions! i compromise, where are we, well, it's not really clear there has been any major breakthrough on this issue. certainly the suggestions coming out of the french government and the commission overnight is they feel there has been some progress, exactly what that is isn't clear. speaking to uk government sources yesterday, they were pretty adamant that they feel they are in the right on this issue. what is the issue? as many may be aware, it in ports like this is where french boats claim they are not being granted the access they should be into the waters around england in the post british fishing deal. the united kingdom and jersey reject that, talks have been going on and there was a midnight deadline where the french that they could look at
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retaliatory action if there they progress. at the french president emmanuel macron decided they will let negotiations continue and they have held off on sanctions. talks will continue today. efforts to find a resolution, and we are talking about boat by boat analysis and looking at the evidence as to whether it can be found to grant a licence to those relevant boats, that will continue. in licence to those relevant boats, that will continue.— licence to those relevant boats, that will continue. in terms of what ha--ens that will continue. in terms of what happens over _ that will continue. in terms of what happens over the _ that will continue. in terms of what happens over the next _ that will continue. in terms of what happens over the next 48 - that will continue. in terms of what happens over the next 48 hours, i that will continue. in terms of what i happens over the next 48 hours, that is the pressure on both governments to try and find something that is helpful, and acceptable to both sides? :, ~ , helpful, and acceptable to both sides? :, ,, , :, sides? yeah, i think it will be a little bit of _ sides? yeah, i think it will be a little bit of a — sides? yeah, i think it will be a little bit of a numbers - sides? yeah, i think it will be a little bit of a numbers game i little bit of a numbers game potentially, as to how many licenses might be granted that can potentially allow the french government to say, we have fought for our fishing communities, government to say, we have fought for ourfishing communities, we have got more licenses. there is that but also to look ahead to thursday, we learned last night that lord frost, the brexit minister, will head to
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paris to head to meet the france europe minister, both men are known for their robust diplomacy so it'll be interesting to see how that meeting shakes out. it is all part of a wider brexit tensions, and lord frost is in brussels on friday to meet with the commission to talk about the northern ireland protocol and the ongoing dispute over that as well. it's all part, now, of a wider set of tensions around brexit. so on this fishing issue, for now, the deadline delayed. it does feel rather familiar in terms of what we have seen with brexit where you see a lot of noise, deadline is missed and then pushed back a little way. we will put some of those questions on the fishing issue and some of the other big topics around to george eustace, the environment secretary, in 15 minutes. for more on this, let's
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speak to barrie deas from the national federation of fishermen's organisations who joins us from york. we have had the context of the last couple of minutes, just tell me how are those employed in the fishing industry in this country feeling at the moment? i industry in this country feeling at the moment?— the moment? i think there will certainly be — the moment? i think there will certainly be some _ the moment? i think there will certainly be some relief- the moment? i think there will certainly be some relief that i the moment? i think there will- certainly be some relief that france seems to have stepped back from its belligerent language and threat, and jersey seems to have made a bit of a gesture with temporary licences. i think our feeling is gesture with temporary licences. i think ourfeeling is it's important that licences are notjust handed out like confetti to the eu vessels, for two reasons. one is the trading cooperation agreement was quite explicit that only vessels that have a track record of fishing historically within the uk six to 12 mile limitare historically within the uk six to 12 mile limit are eligible, so we need to find a way to identify those
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vessels. and secondly, because the foundation of sustainable fisheries management really requires access to be limited. if you can't limit the fishing effort in a particular fishery, you have got no hope of managing it through other means. so i think it's important that this matter is settled. but it's really, theissue matter is settled. but it's really, the issue of licences is really a technical matter. i think it is the intervention of probably domestic politics in france that have escalated this out of all recognition from fisheries issue because in terms of your colleagues, the french fishermen that you do come into contact with, are you finding that actually, you all have a lot in common at the moment? we have all got a lot to lose if this is allowed to escalate. trade threats work both ways in the sense that there are businesses in the supply chain on both sides of the
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channel that require this trade in fish and shellfish to continue. the industry in the line is particularly sensitive to that issue. threats of enforcement, at sea, there are many more french vessels fishing in uk waters then we fish in their waters. so who is going to be the loser there? this is not good, it's not good for anybody if this is allowed to get out of hand. what good for anybody if this is allowed to get out of hand.— good for anybody if this is allowed to get out of hand. what support do our to get out of hand. what support do your members _ to get out of hand. what support do your members need _ to get out of hand. what support do your members need at _ to get out of hand. what support do your members need at the - to get out of hand. what support do your members need at the moment| to get out of hand. what support do i your members need at the moment and what are they getting? the your members need at the moment and what are they getting?— what are they getting? the support we need is exactly _ what are they getting? the support we need is exactly what _ what are they getting? the support we need is exactly what the - what are they getting? the support we need is exactly what the uk i we need is exactly what the uk government is doing, holding the line and only issuing licences that demonstrably meet the eligibility criteria. only vessels that have a historic legacy of fishing within
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the mile limit. and also replacing like with like. if you replace a small vessel with large vessel which has been going on over the years, if that continues into the future, equally, we have a management and sustainability problem in our inshore fisheries. that's something that has to be addressed as part of this picture as well. we that has to be addressed as part of this picture as well.— this picture as well. we are here a da ? this picture as well. we are here a day ? you — this picture as well. we are here a day ? you are _ this picture as well. we are here a day ? you are hearing _ this picture as well. we are here a day ? you are hearing that - this picture as well. we are here a day ? you are hearing that lord i day ? you are hearing that lord frost and m and will be in paris —— and clement beaune will be meeting, what do you hope happens? brute and clement beaune will be meeting, what do you hope happens?— what do you hope happens? we hope that this is a — what do you hope happens? we hope that this is a temperature _ what do you hope happens? we hope that this is a temperature reducing i that this is a temperature reducing issue, and it is a case by some things are where it is ship that had been fishing historically but cannot provide the evidence but there will be opportunists to try and slip under the bar because it is very valuable to have an endorsement to
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fish within the uk inshore waters. separating the wheat from the chaff is important. the separating the wheat from the chaff is important-— is important. the environment secretary _ is important. the environment secretary has _ is important. the environment secretary has said _ is important. the environment secretary has said that - is important. the environment secretary has said that the i is important. the environment. secretary has said that the british boat that has been impounded in france has been released, have you heard that this morning?— heard that this morning? that's the first i've heard _ heard that this morning? that's the first i've heard of— heard that this morning? that's the first i've heard of it. _ heard that this morning? that's the first i've heard of it. this _ heard that this morning? that's the first i've heard of it. this seems i first i've heard of it. this seems to be an administrative slip. if we had to cooperating countries this would have been sorted out in a telephone call. instead, because of domestic politics in france, i think, it has reached this level where criminal proceedings have been brought. that'sjust where criminal proceedings have been brought. that's just nonsense, that's crazy. brought. that's 'ust nonsense, that-my._ that's crazy. barrie deas, chief executive _ that's crazy. barrie deas, chief executive of _ that's crazy. barrie deas, chief executive of the _ that's crazy. barrie deas, chief executive of the national i that's crazy. barrie deas, chief. executive of the national fishing organisation, thank you. i hope you are enjoying your breakfast but pay yourself now. —— prepare yourself for this. a staggering 11 billion wet wipes are used in the uk every year, and they cause more than 90% of the blockages in our sewers.
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that's because the vast majority of them contain single—use plastic. now there's a new campaign to change the way they're produced, as ione wells reports. we use wet wipes all the time, don't we? to wipe our surfaces, to take our make—up off, to clean up after kids. they're pretty sturdy things. but a lot of them end up in our river banks. the thames river bank near battersea bridge looks like a normal river bank, but peel at the surface of the ground, and it's covered in wet wipes that have overflowed from our drains. so, it's notjust sand, it's held together by wipes. chris works for the charity thames 21, that clean up the thames river bed. so the problem we've got is that an awful lot of the wipes that are flushed down the toilet shouldn't be. obviously, a lot of material like make—up wipes, cleaning wipes, are much tougher and have plastic fibres in them which make them much stronger, and that means they don't break down and they get into the sewage system in the same way, they just fall apart slowly they are still very tough and you can see they are almost banded together like string.
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they change the shape of the river bed, they break down into pieces, smaller pieces that animals can eat stop. smaller pieces that animals can eat. the wet wipes that don't end up in our river banks and in our rivers end up here in our sewage system and that can lead to all kinds of other problems, like blocking the sewers themselves. this footage shows wet wipes being pulled from one sewer by thames water. they merge with oil and grease to form blockages. so what we are seeing here is the end point of what happens when wet wipes and other unflushables get put into our water network. as you can see, they have been through quite a rigorous treatment process at this point, and even now you can see that they are quite visibly still wet wipes. you can pick those out quite easily. the system is not designed to take plastics of this nature. it is three ps only down the toilet, pee, poo and paper. thames water are working
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with the labour mp for putney, fleur anderson, who is trying to change the law to ban plastics from wet wipes. so, 90% of wet wipes have actually got plastic in, i think a lot of people don't realise they are a single use plastic. those wet wipes can clog up our sewers and drains and we have been here seeing the result of that, so that puts more money on our water bills as well. if only the wet wipe companies would just change the way that they make wet wipes, and it's very easy to do. then that would be a huge environmental benefit but also a financial benefit to us all. the government say they are looking at the effects of wet wipes with plastics on sewers to try and find solutions. in general, they help prefer to help people and companies make better choices rather than banning items. so they are trying to raise awareness about how to dispose of them properly. but fleur anderson says if plastics and wet wipes are not banned, the build—ups we have seen in these sewers will not go away any time soon. ione wells, bbc news.
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that is one for your cornflakes! if you thought that was bad... our reporter mairead smyth is live at a waste water plant in manchester this morning. good morning! this is the largest waste water treatment works in the north—west, and it deals with the weight of 1.2 million people and with that waste, you can just see it, comes this stuff. the majority of this waste is all wet wipes. and the problem with wet wipes, they don't break down, they don't degrade over time. they go into this skip, and there are hundreds of these skips that are taken away from this site every week. i am joined now by the director of waste water treatment. this is serious stuff, isn't it? this is full of wipes and these wipes contain plastic and the damage that is causing, can you explain what is going to our
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waterways and the sewage system here? , :, " , :, here? yes, there are 11 billion wi es here? yes, there are 11 billion wipes used — here? yes, there are 11 billion wipes used in _ here? yes, there are 11 billion wipes used in the _ here? yes, there are 11 billion wipes used in the uk - here? yes, there are 11 billion wipes used in the uk every i here? yes, there are 11 billion i wipes used in the uk every year and 90% contain plastic. the problem that causes for us here is that it blocks the sewers. they interact with the fat, oil and grease that people put down the sewer, that creates blockages and it backs up the sewers and that will come out potentially in people 's homes or gardens or into the environment. we know here in the north—west, we have 25,000 blockages every year, and we remove 12,000 tons of wet wipes from our server, the of 8004 —— small family cars every year —— is the equivalent of 8000 cars. this family cars every year -- is the equivalent of 8000 cars. this is not a new argument _ equivalent of 8000 cars. this is not a new argument that _ equivalent of 8000 cars. this is not a new argument that making - equivalent of 8000 cars. this is not a new argument that making us i equivalent of 8000 cars. this is not i a new argument that making us aware of the amount of plastic in these wipes, do you hope that people will listen, especially with the focus on the environment and climate that people will sit up and listen today and think, i should not put those wipes down the toilet? if i have to
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even use them in the first place? yes, 11 billion are used every year are 90% of plastic, so they are single use plastic, in the same way as you use a plastic bag from the supermarket. we know public consciousness has moved on and people don't use plastic bags in the same way as they did before. we support fleur anderson 's campaign and we hope that people will start to see these as single use plastics and dispose of them in the bin rather than the sewer. brute and dispose of them in the bin rather than the sewer. we have had a lot of coverage _ rather than the sewer. we have had a lot of coverage in _ rather than the sewer. we have had a lot of coverage in the _ rather than the sewer. we have had a lot of coverage in the last _ rather than the sewer. we have had a lot of coverage in the last few - lot of coverage in the last few weeks about waste water treatment works. how much is this contributing to the overflows as well? we works. how much is this contributing to the overflows as well?— to the overflows as well? we know overflows are _ to the overflows as well? we know overflows are caused _ to the overflows as well? we know overflows are caused primarily i to the overflows as well? we know overflows are caused primarily by i overflows are caused primarily by intense rainfall. we know it rains a lot here in the north west and climate change is making it any better so we see more frequent and more intense rainfall. overflows are designed to operate when we had that most intense rainfall. one of the other key reasons is if the sewer gets blocked and these plastic wipes
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start to create a problem which can lead to those overflows. eight start to create a problem which can lead to those overflows.— lead to those overflows. eight of these skips _ lead to those overflows. eight of these skips every _ lead to those overflows. eight of these skips every hour— lead to those overflows. eight of these skips every hour can i lead to those overflows. eight of these skips every hour can be i lead to those overflows. eight of| these skips every hour can be felt at this one site here in the north—west, and it's a real impression of the impact that these wipes are having that people are continuing to flush down the toilet, not just continuing to flush down the toilet, notjust here in the north—west, but right across the country. ispiel]! notjust here in the north-west, but right across the country. well done, mel reid! thank _ right across the country. well done, mel reid! thank you _ right across the country. well done, mel reid! thank you very _ right across the country. well done, mel reid! thank you very much, i mel reid! thank you very much, interesting to be there. absolutely. not nice to see _ interesting to be there. absolutely. not nice to see that _ interesting to be there. absolutely. not nice to see that stuff _ interesting to be there. absolutely. not nice to see that stuff come i interesting to be there. absolutely. not nice to see that stuff come out| not nice to see that stuff come out of the pipe, is it? let us know what you think about that. you can get in contact with us. it is a huge issue, and something which all of us have to think about. still to come... he might have just tested positive for covid, but ed sheeran hasn't let that stop him from releasing his new album. he'lljoin us from isolation in about 15 minutes.
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we will also be speaking to matt baker who is on the second leg of his rickshaw challenge which has raised over £40 million for children in need over the last decade. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. the family of a 22—year—old man with asthma who died in prison are calling for lessons to be learnt to prevent similar tragedies. nile dillon collapsed in his cell in march 2018 after struggling to breathe. prison officers took eight minutes to call an ambulance. an inquest into his death recorded an open verdict, but his parents say mistakes were made. a prison service spokesperson said their deepest sympathies are with mr dillon's family and friends, and they will consider the coroner's verdict and respond in due course. a man in luton has described his shock when he found his house had been "stolen." reverend mike hall,
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who was working away at the time, was alerted by neighbours that someone else was living there and building work was underway. a bbc investigation found mr hall's identity had been stolen bedfordshire police is investigating. great northern, thameslink and southern are installing defibrillators at all of their train stations. it's the largest roll—out of heart restarters on the uk s rail network. they're fully automatic, so anyone can use them. early cpr and defibrillation are said to double the chances of surviving a cardiac arrest. you can't do any harm. it's so important that you get on that chest, pushing in the centre hard and fast and use a defibrillator as soon as possible. you're their best chance of survival, so don't be too scared to give it a go. some of london's best known fireworks displays will not go ahead this year. hammersmith and fulham council said events in ravenscourt park and bishops park won't be held due to continuing high rates of covid. tower hamlets, hackney and croydon have also cancelled their annual
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bonfire night displays. travel now. this is how tfl services are looking. there are severe delays between barking and upminster eastbound. a good service on all other lines. on to the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it certainly is a chilly start to the day with clear skies and lighter winds last night. temperatures have dropped low enough for a frost. there is even a few pockets of air frost in some of the rural spots, too. a mist around to lift and clear this morning. that will do so slowly through the morning and it will turn into a fairly decent day of weather, too. with plenty of sunshine around, just feeling colder than it has been of late. the wind certainly a lot lighter, top temperatures of around 12 celsius. the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the vast majority of us it will be a completely dry day. we keep those light winds overnight tonight and lots of long clear skies around as well. so there will be another frost into tomorrow morning along with some rather dense patches of mist and fog out there as well.
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so a murky start to the day. that mist and fog will lift and clear very slowly as we head through the morning. we draw in a northerly wind on wednesday, still fairly light, but it could throw us a few showers at times, also some sunny spells. many of our temperatures will struggle to get out of single figures, so feeling colder. not quite so chilly wednesday night into thursday. thursday, another calm, quiet day of weather. should stay dry. turning more unsettled but milder over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. "the time for words has now moved to the time for action." that was the rallying call from the queen in a message played to world leaders at the un's climate conference yesterday. but how confident is the uk government that decisive action will be taken?
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joining us now is the environment secretary, george eustice. thank you for spending a bit of time with us today. i am sure you have heard and probably watched what the queen has had to say. ijust wonder how much of a difference does that make while world leaders are discussing the huge issues in glasgow today? i discussing the huge issues in glasgow today?— discussing the huge issues in glasgow today? discussing the huge issues in glasaow toda ? ,, :, , glasgow today? i think it was a very owerful glasgow today? i think it was a very powerful opening — glasgow today? i think it was a very powerful opening to _ glasgow today? i think it was a very powerful opening to this _ glasgow today? i think it was a very powerful opening to this from i glasgow today? i think it was a very powerful opening to this from the i powerful opening to this from the queen, a powerful message. obviously we have two really important weeks ahead of us. these things tend to go right to the end and no doubt on the 12th of november there will be lots of discussions on the final shape of the agreement. today we have some really important progress on forests. over100 really important progress on forests. over 100 countries have now committed to halt the loss of forests by 2030 and plenty of commitments on finance to underpin
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that. this is a very encouraging first step but a lot more to achieve in the next couple of weeks. i will! in the next couple of weeks. i will seak to in the next couple of weeks. i will speak to you _ in the next couple of weeks. i will speak to you about _ in the next couple of weeks. i will speak to you about deforestation in a moment. listening to what the protesters outside the conference are saying. people like greta tandberg. i don't want to ask specifically about that but the lack of faith in leaders. what is being said inside the conference room is just words. how do you respond to the lack of hope that what is decided he will make decisive change? if decided he will make decisive chance? :, :, decided he will make decisive chanle? ., :, ., . ~' decided he will make decisive chance? :, :, :, : ,, , change? if we want to tackle this challen . e change? if we want to tackle this challenge we _ change? if we want to tackle this challenge we do _ change? if we want to tackle this challenge we do have _ change? if we want to tackle this challenge we do have to - change? if we want to tackle this challenge we do have to have i change? if we want to tackle this i challenge we do have to have hope, faith and work together on this, otherwise it is just a message of despair. the important thing is this is a really big challenge for the whole world. we now have economies
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representing 90% of global economic activity committed to net to zero by the end of the century. we now have got countries representing 85% of the world's forest committed to halting the loss of forestry by 2030. a big step forward. we have countries not only making commitments on net zero but what they will reduce carbon by by 2030. they will have to make policy decisions right now to get there and they are doing so. we have to have confidence. this is a big challenge, a global challenge and we all have to work together to achieve it and get carbon reductions but i think governments are committed and rising to the challenge. flan governments are committed and rising to the challenge.— to the challenge. can i talk about india? to the challenge. can i talk about lndia? they _ to the challenge. can i talk about india? they have _ to the challenge. can i talk about india? they have pledged - to the challenge. can i talk about india? they have pledged to i to the challenge. can i talk about india? they have pledged to get| india? they have pledged to get carbon neutrality by 2070, 20 years after the plan from cup 26. decisions like that undermines the
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significance of the conference. —— from cop26. brute significance of the conference. -- from cop26-— significance of the conference. -- from cop26. ~ :, ::, :, from cop26. we have committed to net zero x 2050- — from cop26. we have committed to net zero x 2050- if — from cop26. we have committed to net zero x 2050. if we _ from cop26. we have committed to net zero x 2050. if we won _ from cop26. we have committed to net zero x 2050. if we won all _ from cop26. we have committed to net zero x 2050. if we won all countries i zero x 2050. if we won all countries to do that, obviously, we wed. it is important to recognise when countries like india make a really important step forward. every country has its own challenges. every country to make a credible pledge has to work out how quickly it thinks it can get there and what policies it needs to implement to get it there. 2050 is a long way away, sounds a long way away but there will be staging posts on the way to that, not least through commitments for 2030, the reductions they will make another staging post along the way. we they will make another staging post along the way-— they will make another staging post alon: the wa . ~ :, :, along the way. we had from the prime minister on the _ along the way. we had from the prime minister on the programme _ along the way. we had from the prime j minister on the programme yesterday, speaking to one of our correspondence, just in roll—out, and he was talking about the issue getting serious on climate change.
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—— justin. the getting serious on climate change. ——justin. the prime minister said the decision about a coalmine is out of his hands and will be taken by the local authority. a strange decision. when it comes to the bone cynic but you say it is not our decision. can you understand some of theissues decision. can you understand some of the issues around that when the prime minister says we need to make a change when this needs to happen? and someone says, not my responsibility. —— and someone says, what about this and the prime minister replies, not my responsibility. brute minister replies, not my responsibility. we explicitly committed _ responsibility. we explicitly committed to _ responsibility. we explicitly committed to phase - responsibility. we explicitly committed to phase out i responsibility. we explicitlyl committed to phase out coal responsibility. we explicitly i committed to phase out coal fired power stations by 202a. there have been instances like this in cumbria where the plan was to have poll for the manufacture of steel, which is slightly different because you do need some coal for that. no one has perfected a different technology. in the event that decision had been
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called in by the secretary of state. we do have a very important legal approach in this country where planning decisions are taken locally. important we respect that. what you can expect from government is national policy. we will be phasing out coal fired is national policy. we will be phasing out coalfired power stations by 2024 and is a really big commitment. we are asking other countries here at cop26 to make a similar commitment. you mentioned ou are similar commitment. you mentioned you are sometimes _ similar commitment. you mentioned you are sometimes working - similar commitment. you mentioned you are sometimes working with - you are sometimes working with governments who are making different decisions to the ones you are trying to make. with, they are custodians of the world's largest rainforest. how can you trust them when deforestation last year reached a 12 year high under president bell scenario? it is about signing up to something and trying to make it look good, but what is happening on the ground? i good, but what is happening on the round? , ., , ~' good, but what is happening on the round? , ., , ~ , ., ground? i personally think we should be really positive _
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ground? i personally think we should be really positive when _ ground? i personally think we should be really positive when countries - be really positive when countries agreed to this. i be really positive when countries agreed to this.— agreed to this. i am trying to be ositive agreed to this. i am trying to be positive and _ agreed to this. i am trying to be positive and i — agreed to this. i am trying to be positive and i am _ agreed to this. i am trying to be positive and i am looking - agreed to this. i am trying to be positive and i am looking at - positive and i am looking at the facts after there was more removal of trees than has been in the last 12 years in brazil. the of trees than has been in the last 12 years in brazil.— 12 years in brazil. the last time there was _ 12 years in brazil. the last time there was an — 12 years in brazil. the last time there was an attempt - 12 years in brazil. the last time there was an attempt to - 12 years in brazil. the last time | there was an attempt to getting 12 years in brazil. the last time - there was an attempt to getting such a commitment on forest, brazil did not take part, neither did russia, nor china but this time round we got over 100 countries, including russia, which has the biggest virus, including countries like canada as well and crucially also brazil. they had engaged with us on this agenda. it is a big step for them to commit to no net loss of forests around the world by 2030. a really important signal. we are working with them and others on approaches to get more sustainability and supply chain so forest risk products like palm oil cloth and linked to deforestation, countries like the uk and the us, we
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want them to pay more attention to where the goods are coming from so they are not driving illegal deforestation. a really big step forward we should welcome. i also want to talk— forward we should welcome. i also want to talk about _ forward we should welcome. i also want to talk about what _ forward we should welcome. i also want to talk about what is - forward we should welcome. i also want to talk about what is happening over fishing with regards to the french government. how close are we to coming to an arrangement to suit both sides? we to coming to an arrangement to suit both sides?— both sides? we obviously had an arrangement _ both sides? we obviously had an arrangement almost _ both sides? we obviously had an arrangement almost a _ both sides? we obviously had an arrangement almost a year- both sides? we obviously had an arrangement almost a year ago. | both sides? we obviously had an i arrangement almost a year ago. at the end of last year we concluded the end of last year we concluded the trade and cooperation agreement which provided for french vessels and eu vessels to get access to our waters if they had a track record of fishing. 1700 such licences have been issued. we welcome that france has now been clear it will not implement some of the threats it made last wednesday. we had constructive talks yesterday where we made clear if there are additional vessels that have got evidence and they can bring that new evidence and they can bring that new evidence forward but we will consider it and there will be new
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discussions on thursday. we very much welcome the fact that france has decided not to go ahead with its threats and will continue to have those constructive discussions. fire those constructive discussions. are we down to — those constructive discussions. are we down to boat by boat checks at the moment? at we down to boat by boat checks at the moment?— we down to boat by boat checks at the moment? �* ., ., , . the moment? at the moment no such thin has the moment? at the moment no such thing has been _ the moment? at the moment no such thing has been implemented. - the moment? at the moment no such thing has been implemented. france | thing has been implemented. france had threatened to do that and also threaten they would not allow vessels to land threaten they would not allow vessels to [and their catch in french ports and they might be difficult at the border. they have now been clear they were not implement any of those threats and thatis implement any of those threats and that is a very welcome step forward. we understand there is a british crew in le havre and the boat is in compound at the moment. are you confident they will be able to sail back soon? i confident they will be able to sail back soon?— confident they will be able to sail back soon? , ., ., , back soon? i understand there was some administrative _ back soon? i understand there was some administrative confusion - back soon? i understand there was l some administrative confusion about whether or not it was on the less. it was originally on the left to fish there. we think because it changed its engine it was taken off
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the list and there had been confusion over that. this is something we will need to resolve. i understand that although the captain of the vessel has been asked to come back, i do not the vessel is being held at the moment. {line back, i do not the vessel is being held at the moment.— back, i do not the vessel is being held at the moment. one issue we are talkin: held at the moment. one issue we are talking about — held at the moment. one issue we are talking about this _ held at the moment. one issue we are talking about this morning _ held at the moment. one issue we are talking about this morning is _ held at the moment. one issue we are talking about this morning is wet - talking about this morning is wet wipes and the use of plastic in wet wipes and the use of plastic in wet wipes in this country. plastic waste is causing all sorts of issues. wet wipes are behind a staggering statistic and 93% of all blockages in the uk. one mp is trying to get a ban on plastic in the use of wet wipes every year. ids ban on plastic in the use of wet wipes every year.— ban on plastic in the use of wet wipes every year. do you support that? we have _ wipes every year. do you support that? we have issued _ wipes every year. do you support that? we have issued a - wipes every year. do you support i that? we have issued a consultation looking precisely at that. you are right. wet wipes, because people do not understand it, they flush them down toilets, they are associated with the vast majority of blockages we are seeing in our sewage system. that birds often have wet wipes as the source of the problem. there are
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more sustainable materials that can be used, biodegradable materials. we are having a consultation about whether or not we can bring forward measures to restrict the type of materials that are used. haifa measures to restrict the type of materials that are used. how come ou are materials that are used. how come you are not — materials that are used. how come you are not in _ materials that are used. how come you are not in glasgow? _ materials that are used. how come you are not in glasgow? i- materials that are used. how come l you are not in glasgow? i understand you are not in glasgow? i understand you are not in glasgow? i understand you are very busy. as environment secretary, should you be there today? i secretary, should you be there toda ? ., ., ., ., ., today? i am going to glasgow later this week. there _ today? i am going to glasgow later this week. there is _ today? i am going to glasgow later this week. there is a _ today? i am going to glasgow later this week. there is a big _ today? i am going to glasgow later this week. there is a big session i today? i am going to glasgow later| this week. there is a big session on saturday on nature. it is a two—week event. we share it at between us. the prime minister is opening. the first two days is around the leaders, focusing on the leaders summit. the prime minister will lead work on forests, the forest and land work on forests, the forest and [and event he will be hosting later in the week i will be going up and leading on the agenda around nature. we are sharing it up between us, different cabinet members and the prime minister, for obvious reasons, has been opening the proceedings.
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appreciate your time. thank you for being with us this morning. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped outside doors, it is a chilly start to the date of that widely temperatures hovering around freezing. forsome widely temperatures hovering around freezing. for some up to eight degrees. there is some frost and mist and fog pockets. all of that should left. we are looking at a day of sunshine and showers. some of the shower should be heavy and thundery with hail. you will notice it is not just code to start the day, it will be cold per se. when the mist and fog lifts, we are looking at dry weather. a fair bit of sunshine but also showers. they will continue in the north of scotland where there will be cloud today. in the west will be cloud today. in the west will be cloud today. in the west will be showers which will go to the youthful to plenty of showers in the
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channel islands as well. these represent the average wind speed. not as windy as yesterday but more other breeze in the north—west of scotland. laterwe other breeze in the north—west of scotland. later we will see the bridge pick—up along the north coast of ireland temperatures nine in the north to highs of 12 as we slip further south. this evening and overnight a week whether front moving southwards taking cloud and showers southwards. as it does so there will be clear skies. some of there will be clear skies. some of the showers will be wintry. on the tops of the hills, 800 metres or so. in the countryside they will be lower and for some of us there will be thrust around but at the other thing is there will be mist and fog patches forming once again. in the midlands and into the south—east of england. the mist and fog had lived quite readily, as should the frost.
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as the week whether front sinks south, more cloud across england than today. a fair few showers. you can catch a shower almost anywhere. the northerly wind will accentuate the cold feet. it will blow in showers along the coasts. some of them will make it inland as well. temperatures ranging from eight in the north to 12, 13 in the south. if you are exposed to the northerly wind, it will feel a lot cooler than the temperatures suggest. into thursday, a ridge of high pressure trying to build in. things will be a little bit more settled. still pretty chilly. i have a new one for you today, you can add to your long list of achievements that you are now their warm up act for ed sheeran. you know my tune is perfect. are you going to sing it for us, carol? no! sally says, don't
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let you sing. that is harsh, isn't it? you can sit back and enjoy the next bit. exhausted after his last tour in 2019, ed sheeran thought about stepping back from music and went through, what he calls, a quarter life crisis. well, a lot�*s changed since then. he's been on a health kick, sponsored his boyhood football club, and he's become a dad. now he's back with a brand new album. let's take a listen. # and tonight had something wonderful. # my bad habits lead to late nights ending alone. # conversations with a stranger i barely know. # swearing this will be the last but it probably won't. # i've got nothing left to lose, or use, or do my bad... # i love it when you do it like that. # when you're close up, give me the shivers. # baby, you want to dance till the sunlight cracks. # when they say the party's over,
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then we'll bring it right back. # baby, you are so hot you make me shiver with fire you've got. # this thing has started i don't want it to stop. # you know you make me shiver. # i know time may change the way you think of us. # i remember the way you were, you were the first full stop. # love that will never leave. # baby, you will never be lost on me.# and ed joins us now, from home of course, carol's favourite pop star. she does like brian adams slightly more. that's fine, i like him as well. hagar that's fine, i like him as well. how are ou that's fine, i like him as well. how are you doing? _ that's fine, i like him as well. how are you doing? how— that's fine, i like him as well. how are you doing? how is _ that's fine, i like him as well. how are you doing? how is your health at the moment?— the moment? today is actually the da , six b the moment? today is actually the day. six b and _ the moment? today is actually the day, six b and yesterday _ the moment? today is actually the day, six b and yesterday i - the moment? today is actually the day, six b and yesterday i was - the moment? today is actually the | day, six b and yesterday i was given the all clear and today is the day i
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am released to the world again. hagar am released to the world again. how has it affected _ am released to the world again. how has it affected the album coming out? he must have had lead to plans to be out places and playing. what have you been doing instead? you haven't been _ have you been doing instead? wi, haven't been silent. my pre—recorded so much over the last four months, whether it be stuff for radio one, radio two, so much pre—stuff anyway. the anything is we had to actually cancel was a big gig on saturday, which we can reschedule. it wasn't... i will typically be more catastrophic than it was but there has been a lot of stuff going on. i am hitting the ground running today when i leave. you am hitting the ground running today when i leave-— when i leave. you have been performing _ when i leave. you have been performing for _ when i leave. you have been performing for fans - when i leave. you have been performing for fans on - when i leave. you have been - performing for fans on instagram. we performing forfans on instagram. we are showing one of those videos at the moment. some famous fans jumping in as well. when you have the likes of other famous people wanting to be
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involved, what you do? thea;r of other famous people wanting to be involved, what you do?— involved, what you do? they wanted me to do instagram _ involved, what you do? they wanted me to do instagram calls. _ involved, what you do? they wanted me to do instagram calls. i - involved, what you do? they wanted me to do instagram calls. i don't - me to do instagram calls. i don't know, that isn't me. i'm not like, hey, famous friend. i only found out that afterwards. from my manager. it is less. to go on and play some songs. i really enjoyed it. i don't really engage that much on social media anymore. being locked—in on album release, ishould probably media anymore. being locked—in on album release, i should probably do something on instagram. it has forced your _ something on instagram. it has forced your hand _ something on instagram. it has forced your hand a _ something on instagram. it has forced your hand a little - something on instagram. it has forced your hand a little bit - something on instagram. it has i forced your hand a little bit having to be famous friends with people. i can understand that might be a little bit when she at times. in terms of the album, this album, a lot has happened in your life since the last one. you are a completely different person. i love that you
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said you had a quarter life crisis. what happened? it is kind of the title of the album. it is the end of a question and start of the answer. your 20s are so much questioning and finding things out. do i like this? do i like that? i hit 30 and in a six month period became a dad and lost a close friend of mine. there's those things made me feel like an aduu those things made me feel like an adult for the first time. i never had true adult feelings or responsibilities like that. i am not a born again, like my life has changed, it isjust a born again, like my life has changed, it is just responsibilities have shifted. life is a bit different. i have shifted. life is a bit different.— have shifted. life is a bit different. ., ., , different. i imagine that is reflected _ different. i imagine that is reflected in _ different. i imagine that is reflected in the _ different. i imagine that is reflected in the way - different. i imagine that is reflected in the way you i different. i imagine that is i reflected in the way you write songs, the lyrics to come up with now because there are different priorities in your life. you definitely _ priorities in your life. you definitely tap _ priorities in your life. you definitely tap into - priorities in your life. you definitely tap into a - priorities in your life. moi. definitely tap into a different
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emotion. i think marriage is a different love and first dating. it is still excitement just different love and first dating. it is still excitementjust a different feeling. being a father is a different emotion than being in love, it is still a different... i don't really know how to explain it. i wanted to tap him on the album to will the things i felt over the last four years and put it down in one body of work, which i think i have done. , ., body of work, which i think i have done. , ,, . ., done. tell us about ipswich town. he has sponsored _ done. tell us about ipswich town. he has sponsored ban, _ done. tell us about ipswich town. he has sponsored ban, haven't - done. tell us about ipswich town. he has sponsored ban, haven't you? - done. tell us about ipswich town. he| has sponsored ban, haven't you? tell it how it came about and why they are so important to you? ? is you have sponsored them. i are so important to you? ? is you have sponsored them.— are so important to you? ? is you have sponsored them. i am a local bo . i have sponsored them. i am a local boy- i have — have sponsored them. i am a local boy. i have been _ have sponsored them. i am a local boy. i have been in _ have sponsored them. i am a local boy. i have been in suffolk - have sponsored them. i am a local boy. i have been in suffolk prettyl boy. i have been in suffolk pretty much my whole life. i moved back here as soon as i could. my wife is from suffolk, all of my best friends are from suffolk. i am very much rooted in the community here. i got
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asked. my hometown, framlingham, the under” asked. my hometown, framlingham, the under 11 girls needed a sponsorfor their kit. i did that. when i did that, i thought, their kit. i did that. when i did that, ithought, what their kit. i did that. when i did that, i thought, what should they have on their kit? i thought when i did that, what would ipswich have on their kit? ipswich had a betting company at moment and i would bet fans would like something more home—grown. local companies used to sponsor the football kit and then betting companies came in and started to sponsor football kit. i askedif started to sponsor football kit. i asked if i could sponsor the kit. thankfully all went well. they are doing all right this season. it was a rocky but should be going well. i think that is important about staying grounded. looking through some of their stance is known about how many records he had sold and how popular you are around the world.
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you have these famous bands like justin bieber and lewis capaldi dialling in when you do your gigs. how important i'll friends that knew you before you were ed sheeran the global superstar and how important are they in keeping you grounded. notjust friends are they in keeping you grounded. not just friends who are they in keeping you grounded. notjust friends who knew me before. someone would listen to a song and say, that is not very good but i tell you the truth. that is sometimes not what you need someone to be openly brash. i think it is just friends that know me. i have a mate who is a singer songwriter. you should only really have about five really close friends that know you well. i would say they are the ones that are not necessarily keep me
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grounded but normality. you plug into a conversation at dinner and it is not like who is touring or who is making this record, it is not industry chat committees chat amongst friends. i have a friend who is a graphic designer. he might come to dinner and talk a little bit about graphic design but then get into other interests. it is about having a mate you do not talk about work with the whole time. i remember it very clearly. it was about two o'clock in the morning after a gig. i had to ask you, i got a bit of stick this money because i posted yesterday about your song, shivers will start you know rose danced to it on saturday. honestly, it was the most amazing... the music and the
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dancing together were so incredible. did you know you had written a perfect tango song? h0. did you know you had written a perfect tango song?— did you know you had written a erfect tanuo son: ? ., ., ~ perfect tango song? no, no. whenever i have people — perfect tango song? no, no. whenever i have people dance _ perfect tango song? no, no. whenever i have people dance to _ perfect tango song? no, no. whenever i have people dance to my _ perfect tango song? no, no. whenever i have people dance to my songs - perfect tango song? no, no. whenever i have people dance to my songs on . i have people dance to my songs on strictly, it is often perfect. i got hit up a couple of days before because i know they were training for it. it was a pleasant surprise. i thought she did wonderfully and i think she will win. bill i thought she did wonderfully and i think she will win.— think she will win. all the other ros on think she will win. all the other pros on the _ think she will win. all the other pros on the programme, - think she will win. all the other pros on the programme, i - think she will win. all the other pros on the programme, i am l think she will win. all the other. pros on the programme, i am on think she will win. all the other - pros on the programme, i am on there with nadia, he was watching you this money because she loves you. all the others were watching it thinking, this is amazing. the new gave the message as well. she is incredible to watch, rose, isn't she? i learned how to dance _ to watch, rose, isn't she? i learned how to dance for _ to watch, rose, isn't she? i learned how to dance for thinking _ to watch, rose, isn't she? i learned how to dance for thinking out - to watch, rose, isn't she? i learnedj how to dance for thinking out loud. it is a really difficult skill to
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master. notjust about it is a really difficult skill to master. not just about the it is a really difficult skill to master. notjust about the moves but your facial expression, master. notjust about the moves but yourfacial expression, being upright at the right point. she is absolutely nailing it, really nailing it. i absolutely nailing it, really nailing it— absolutely nailing it, really nailin: it. ., ., ., ., nailing it. i have to ask about rumours _ nailing it. i have to ask about rumours of — nailing it. i have to ask about rumours of a _ nailing it. i have to ask about rumours of a christmas - nailing it. i have to ask about| rumours of a christmas song. nailing it. i have to ask about - rumours of a christmas song. our now, rumours of a christmas song. our now. now. _ rumours of a christmas song. our now. now. saag- _ rumours of a christmas song. oi" now, now, saag. my manager is rumours of a christmas song. iii " now, now, saag. my manager is kind of like, not the grinch but he doesn't really like christmas songs or albums. doesn't really like christmas songs oralbums. he doesn't really like christmas songs or albums. he said doesn't really like christmas songs oralbums. he said he doesn't really like christmas songs or albums. he said he would have to belong gone. he really doesn't like songs with horns and saxophones on and he really doesn't like christmas. if he ever passed away in 50 years or whatever i was going to make a christmas album with loads of brass. it was christmas day. i had known john brass. it was christmas day. i had knownjohn for about brass. it was christmas day. i had known john for about ten years and knownjohn for about ten years and he known john for about ten years and he rings knownjohn for about ten years and he rings me a lot and we talk. he rang me on christmas day and said, we should do a christmas song. i
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remember thinking that maybe in a couple of years' time. that day i wrote a little chorus. when the time comes i will do that. the more i thought about it, i had that friend passed away and it made it so much more like tomorrow isn't promised, why am i waiting to do this? as soon as i got back from australia, i went to elton's and we wrote three christmas songs. one of them is coming at the beginning of december. when we wrote it i looked online. there must have been a million songs called merry christmas. there is not one called merry christmas. not out of the big ones. that comes at the beginning of december. we have a b—side called pull my christmas cracker, you will get more than a bang. cracker, you will get more than a bana. .,
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cracker, you will get more than a bani _ ., ,., cracker, you will get more than a bani, ., ., cracker, you will get more than a ban. ., ., ., cracker, you will get more than a bani. ., ., ., ., cracker, you will get more than a ban! _ ., ., ., ., y., ., bang. you said out and ran you on christmas — bang. you said out and ran you on christmas day. _ bang. you said out and ran you on christmas day. does _ bang. you said out and ran you on christmas day. does he _ bang. you said out and ran you on christmas day. does he always . bang. you said out and ran you on| christmas day. does he always ring you on christmas day? it is literally only _ you on christmas day? it is literally only him _ you on christmas day? it is literally only him that - you on christmas day? if 3 literally only him that rings me. he rings me forfive minutes literally only him that rings me. he rings me for five minutes every morning. i will show him my daughter and we will chat. sometimes it is 30 sometimes 30 minutes that without fail. people don't believe me when i say this. then when i hang out with dan, the call will come through. he is the best. we are filming a music video where we are parodying the classic english teams. i'm getting out and to dress up as a member of e 17 and we will have the snowman and it will be good. mi 17 and we will have the snowman and it will be good-— it will be good. all the best with the new album. _ it will be good. all the best with the new album. i'm _ it will be good. all the best with the new album. i'm glad - it will be good. all the best with the new album. i'm glad you - it will be good. all the best with | the new album. i'm glad you are coming out of the other side of covid as well.— coming out of the other side of covid as well. �* ., ., ., covid as well. banks for having me. in a bit.
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better than insight. i wonder if he has called him already. from social distancing to "hands, face, space," we've all had to learn a lot about covid over the last year and a half. professorjonathan van tam is one of those responsible for communicating that information. his colourful football analogies and tunnel metaphors have helped us better understand the covid situation. tomorrow morning, professorjonathan van tam will be with us to update us on the latest covid situation, as we head into winter, and we want to put your questions to him. whether you're worried about case numbers and what that could mean as we get closer to christmas, or the likelihood of the reintroduction of restrictions. or maybe you have a question about vaccines for teenagers, or booster jabs. whatever your question is, send it to us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or on twitter using the hashtag "askjvt." and rachel, you'll be putting those
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questions to him tomorrow? and i think it is a simulcast as and i think it is a simulcast as well. ., . , and i think it is a simulcast as well. ., ., , ., , ., and i think it is a simulcast as well. ., . , ., , ., , well. normally i am in the studio is downstairs. — well. normally i am in the studio is downstairs. l— well. normally i am in the studio is downstairs, i have _ well. normally i am in the studio is downstairs, i have nipped - well. normally i am in the studio is downstairs, i have nipped up - well. normally i am in the studio is downstairs, i have nipped up mid l downstairs, i have nipped up mid programme and i willjoin sally at 8:30am tomorrow morning and that we have already been talking about it and the questions are coming in. i think a lot of people think that other people think that the pandemic is over when the risk is real. and going into the winter talking about the pressures on the nhs, a real concern about low vaccination rates among some age groups, particularly the booster roll—out. i know that your audience will respond as well, the viewers will have lots to say about it. really looking forward to doing this tomorrow morning with you. do doing this tomorrow morning with ou. y ., doing this tomorrow morning with ou. ,., , ., ., doing this tomorrow morning with ou. i. ., ., doing this tomorrow morning with ou. ., ., ., you. do you have to get back for the eiiht you. do you have to get back for the eight o'clock— you. do you have to get back for the eight o'clock headlines? _ you. do you have to get back for the eight o'clock headlines? you - you. do you have to get back for the eight o'clock headlines? you have i eight o'clock headlines? you have missed them. _ eight o'clock headlines? you have missed them. i _ eight o'clock headlines? you have missed them. i have _ eight o'clock headlines? you have missed them. i have passed - eight o'clock headlines? you have missed them. i have passed it - eight o'clock headlines? you have missed them. i have passed it on| eight o'clock headlines? you have i missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell- _ missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell. and _ missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell. and i _ missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell. and i think- missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell. and i think it - missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell. and i think it was i missed them. i have passed it on to nicky campbell. and i think it was a j nicky campbell. and i think it was a bit harsh of ed sheeran to say rose was going to win! i bit harsh of ed sheeran to say rose was going to win!— was going to win! i am voting for her as well! _
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was going to win! i am voting for her as well! what _ was going to win! i am voting for her as well! what is _ was going to win! i am voting for her as well! what is harsh - was going to win! i am voting for her as well! what is harsh about | her as well! what is harsh about that? i'm really _ her as well! what is harsh about that? i'm really sorry. _ her as well! what is harsh about that? i'm really sorry. she - her as well! what is harsh about that? i'm really sorry. she is- that? i'm really sorry. she is really— that? i'm really sorry. she is really brilliant and amazing. and jonathan van tam will be with us answering your questions at 8:30am tomorrow morning. rachel and i will be here guiding you through everything. you rachel and i will be here guiding you through everything.- you through everything. you can s-rint you through everything. you can sprint back— you through everything. you can sprint back to — you through everything. you can sprint back to the _ you through everything. you can sprint back to the radio - you through everything. you can sprint back to the radio now, - you through everything. you can sprint back to the radio now, i i you through everything. you can i sprint back to the radio now, i wish we had a camera on you as he ran to the studio trying to get back! we have the headlines coming up a bit later than normal, sorry about that, we had a chat with ed sheeran about talking to eltonjohn every day!
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. the queen issues a rallying cry to world leaders gathering in glasgow appealing to them to 'rise above politics' to avert a climate disaster. we, none of us, will live forever. but we are doing this not for ourselves, but for our children and our children's children, and those who will follow in their footsteps. here in glasgow, world leaders are set to make an announcement to end and even begin reversing deforestation. but what else have they done to protect our future and that of the next generation? and how far are you willing to go to help save the planet? calls to suspend the rollout of smart motorways. mps say the government needs to prove they are safe. the scourge of wet wipes in our waterways and on our riverbanks and a campaign to ban the ones that contain plastics. jos buttler stars again
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at the t20 world cup. the first englishman to score a century in all thee formats, a century in all three formats, leaving them on the brink of spot in the semi finals. good morning. a chilly start to the day frosty as well, mist and fog patches, they will lift and foremost it will be a day of sunshine and showers and lighter winds than yesterday. all of details coming up later. it's tuesday the 2nd of november. the queen has urged world leaders to "rise above" politics and create a "safer, stabler future" for the planet. she was speaking ahead of the second day of climate talks in glasgow. in a video message she said: "the time for words has now moved to the time for action". nina is in glasgow for us. good morning, dan and sally. a much brighter morning here in glasgow,
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and hopefully a brighter atmosphere today because yesterday, there warnings were dark and dramatic. joe biden saying, none of us will escape it if we fail to seize this moment. the secretary general of the un saying, with fossil fuels, the secretary general of the un saying, with fossilfuels, we the secretary general of the un saying, with fossil fuels, we are digging our own graves. but it was perhaps that speech from the queen that was most powerful. she has been a moniker nearly seven decades, and in that time, she had dealt with thousands of world leaders. and he called on those gathered here today, to make sure that it counts. —— she called on those gathered here today. it has sometimes been observed that what leaders do for their people today is government and politics. but what they do for the people of tomorrow, that is statesmanship. i, for one, think that this conference will be one of those rare occasions where everyone will have the chance to rise above the politics of the moment and achieve true statesmanship.
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it is the hope of many that the legacy of this summit, written in history books yet to be printed, will describe you as the leaders who did not pass up the opportunity, and that you answer the call of those future generations. that you left this conference as a community of nations, with the determination, a desire, and a plan to address the impact of climate change. and to recognise the time of words has now moved to the time for action. of course, the benefits of such actions will not be there for all of us to enjoy today. we, none of us, will live forever. but we are doing is not for ourselves, but for our children and our children's children, and those who will follow in their footsteps.
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well, what about that, then? what about action over words? statesmanship over governance? adam fleming joins us now. that has been the main criticism of this whole thing, lots of talking but not a lot getting done. is that their or does it feel like things are starting to happen? dash—macro is that fair? there is definitely a big announcement today which has been welcomed by environmental campaigners and the people working on the policy have been quite surprised at how pleased environmental groups have been by it. the pledge is this, to stop deforestation and starts to reverse it by planting more trees and more greenery by 2030. and that will apply to countries that cover 85% of the world's forests. it will be backed up by £15 billion worth of government and private donors and companies as well. it will be accompanied by lots of other
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initiatives as well, and the issue is, that pledge was first made in 20 -- 2014 is, that pledge was first made in 20 —— 2014 so it would take 16 years to implement. in the meantime, countries like brazil may have cut down quite a lot of trees. here is how the government minister george eustace responded. last how the government minister george eustace responded.— eustace responded. last time there was an attempt _ eustace responded. last time there was an attempt at _ eustace responded. last time there was an attempt at getting - eustace responded. last time there was an attempt at getting such i eustace responded. last time there was an attempt at getting such an l was an attempt at getting such an commitment on forace, brazil, russia and china _ commitment on forace, brazil, russia and china did — commitment on forace, brazil, russia and china did not take part, only 40 countries _ and china did not take part, only 40 countries assigned. this time we have _ countries assigned. this time we have over— countries assigned. this time we have over 100, including russia which _ have over 100, including russia which has — have over 100, including russia which has the biggest forests, and bil which has the biggest forests, and big country like canada as well but crucially— big country like canada as well but crucially also brazil and they have really _ crucially also brazil and they have really engaged with us on that agenda — really engaged with us on that agenda. it is a big step to commit to no— agenda. it is a big step to commit to no net— agenda. it is a big step to commit to no net loss of forest around the world _ to no net loss of forest around the world by— to no net loss of forest around the world by 2030, a really important signah _ world by 2030, a really important siinal. �* . ., world by 2030, a really important siinal. n ., ., , ., world by 2030, a really important siinal. a ., ., , ., ., signal. action on trees was one of boris johnson's _ signal. action on trees was one of boris johnson's key _ signal. action on trees was one of boris johnson's key priorities i signal. action on trees was one of boris johnson's key priorities for l boris johnson's key priorities for this borisjohnson's key priorities for this summit, so he can take that
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off. the other three, the phasing out of petrol and diesel cars, the phasing out of coal power across the world, and also more finance for richer countries to less rich countries to help the green transition, they are very much a work in progress to put it mildly. one big thing i have learned this morning, when you go to get breakfast, they have got carbon counts on all of the dishes. croissants which are plant —based has a bigger carbon footprint than a bacon roll, who knew? haifa bacon roll, who knew? how interesting. _ bacon roll, who knew? how interesting, maybe - bacon roll, who knew? how interesting, maybe because of the avenues? how fascinating. —— perhaps of the other in use? world leaders will begin going home tomorrow and at that point the negotiators are such a step in. there will be big
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questions about how he has handled this as the host parameter, boris johnson. are there any more surprises to come from the british and scottish government? i will be talking to laura kuenssberg about that coming up. let's find out what carroll made of the ed sheeran interview. he doesn't mind that he — the ed sheeran interview. he doesn't mind that he is _ the ed sheeran interview. he doesn't mind that he is not _ the ed sheeran interview. he doesn't mind that he is not your— the ed sheeran interview. he doesn't mind that he is not your favourite. i mind that he is not your favourite. he is a big fan of brian adams as well! good for him! he has taste! i did listen to some of it, it was very interesting. good morning, it was a beautiful start to the day, and we are looking at sunshine and showers today. feeling quite cold. a cold start, mist and fog will lift, and then sunshine but there will be quite a few showers especially in the north and west. a few getting over towards the east. quite breezy
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across north—western areas and later on across the far north. inland, the average wind speed is not going to be that high. it will not be as windy as it was yesterday. temperatures, nine to 12 degrees. this evening and overnight under clear skies, this evening and overnight under clearskies, it this evening and overnight under clear skies, it will be another cold one. a week where the front seeking south, taking its cloud and showers with it. increasingly on the mountains we will see some wintry conditions. it will be colder than this in the countryside, and tomorrow there will be patchy mist and fog and frost in the midlands and fog and frost in the midlands and the south—east especially. that will lift, more cloud for england tomorrow, you could catch a shower of it anywhere. in the northern half of it anywhere. in the northern half of the country, sunshine but then we will have a straight northerly wind so it will feel cold. despite the temperatures that are about to pop up, ourtop tip temperatures that are about to pop up, our top tip it is likely to be ten or 12 degrees. add on the wind,
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and you will notice it, you will need your coat tomorrow. i'd even say that. i need my coat every day at the moment. i i'd even say that. i need my coat every day at the moment.- i'd even say that. i need my coat every day at the moment. i went home to eit the every day at the moment. i went home to get the became _ every day at the moment. i went home to get the became today. _ every day at the moment. i went home to get the became today. are - every day at the moment. i went home to get the became today. are you i to get the became today. are you going to wear it —— the big coat today. going to wear it -- the big coat toda . �* , ., ., going to wear it -- the big coat toda . �* i. ., ., ., going to wear it -- the big coat toda . �* ., ., ., ., today. are you going to wear it on the tell ? today. are you going to wear it on the telly? have _ today. are you going to wear it on the telly? have you _ today. are you going to wear it on the telly? have you seen - today. are you going to wear it on the telly? have you seen the i the telly? have you seen the weather? — the telly? have you seen the weather? i — the telly? have you seen the weather? i am _ the telly? have you seen the weather? i am going - the telly? have you seen the weather? i am going to i the telly? have you seen the weather? i am going to talk| the telly? have you seen the i weather? i am going to talk to matt baker about the rickshaw challenge so the big coat will be on! road safety campaigners say a new proposal to temporarily stop the rollout of smart motorways doesn't go far enough. mps from the transport select committee say their construction should be paused for 5 years, but critics have called for the hard shoulder to be permanently reinstalled on all major roads. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. marching through westminster yesterday. each coffin represents someone killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorway intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane without having to use more land.
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if the car breaks down in a live lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be built for years until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years worth of safety evidence on the network as currently exists. and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away, congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough
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for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the m1 smart motorway. our aim is to just get the hard shoulder back in every single instance. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they say to pause them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, then i can get them banned in the meantime. the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways. it admitted that improvements are not always being made as quickly as they could have in the past, but it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. we'rejoined now by meera naran whose 8—year—old son dev was killed on a smart motorway in 2018.
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good morning. lovely to see this money, you so much for coming in to talk to us about this. first of all, you are watching that peace with us, your reaction to this latest news? i welcome the report, i think it's a really pragmatic piece of work, i think it is well—rounded and there are a lot of recommendations that are a lot of recommendations that are really valuable going forward. you have spoken to the transport secretary last year, do you get the feeling that people are listening to your concerns and the consent of others? ., , ., others? from the department for transport. _ others? from the department for transport. yes. — others? from the department for transport, yes, absolutely. i others? from the department for transport, yes, absolutely. they| transport, yes, absolutely. they have been very open and listening from the start. i have been very open and listening from the start.— from the start. i know it is really, it's an awful— from the start. i know it is really, it's an awful thing _ from the start. i know it is really, it's an awful thing for— from the start. i know it is really, it's an awful thing for you - from the start. i know it is really, it's an awful thing for you to i from the start. i know it is really, it's an awful thing for you to have j it's an awful thing for you to have to talk about, butjust it's an awful thing for you to have to talk about, but just tell us what happened. 50. to talk about, but 'ust tell us what ha- iened. , to talk about, but 'ust tell us what ha . ened. , ., to talk about, but 'ust tell us what hai iened. , ., happened. so, my older son, he suffers from _ happened. so, my older son, he suffers from really _ happened. so, my older son, he suffers from really bad - happened. so, my older son, hej suffers from really bad epilepsy. and that wiki became very poorly and we to take him —— he became very poorly and we had taken to hospital
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and were told that he might not make it through the night. we called dev to see his brother. and on the way home, for unknown reasons, the car that dev was travelling in stopped. and dev didn't make it. but neil did pull through. i and dev didn't make it. but neil did pull through-— pull through. i know it is still incredibly — pull through. i know it is still incredibly hard _ pull through. i know it is still incredibly hard to _ pull through. i know it is still incredibly hard to talk - pull through. i know it is still incredibly hard to talk about, pull through. i know it is still i incredibly hard to talk about, and everybody watching will fully understand that. i often, we have spoken to on the programme before, and i the point you often make is that lots of people who have never been to the horror that you have been to the horror that you have been to the horror that you have been to just don't understand why smart motorways can be dangerous. is that something you feel there is greater awareness of now? absolutely, from two years ago, i don't think many people knew what smart motorways wear. it was only following dev�*s inquest that i think the majority know that smart motorways are. there are risks
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involved which is why i have been campaigning to make them safer. the report doesn't show those concerns, but it also highlights the concerns around hard shoulders as well. the report clearly says that hard shoulders are not as safe as people believe they are. so i think we really need to look at this as a whole, and look at both options going forward to see how we will mitigate risk and save a. let’s going forward to see how we will mitigate risk and save a. let's talk about those _ mitigate risk and save a. let's talk about those concerns. _ mitigate risk and save a. let's talk about those concerns. -- - mitigate risk and save a. let's talk about those concerns. -- and i mitigate risk and save a. let's talkj about those concerns. -- and save about those concerns. —— and save lives. what flew to success look like for you? —— what would success look like for you? like for you? -- what would success look like for you?— look like for you? zero deaths on our roads- _ look like for you? zero deaths on our roads. last _ look like for you? zero deaths on our roads. last year _ look like for you? zero deaths on our roads. last year during i look like for you? zero deaths on our roads. last year during the l our roads. last year during the pandemic nearly m00 people died on our roads. it isn'tjust one fatality, it is this an army of devastation for the family and it is not ok at all. whether we look at the technology of the road is, whether we look at education for drivers, which is so important
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because post—qualification, there is no education for drivers. you could have past 20 or 30 years ago and there is nothing after that and things change, road changes, cars and technology changes, so much changes as things go on. and there is a real need for multifactor approach towards this, and everyone needs to be involved, notjust one organisation, notjust the organisation, not just the government organisation, notjust the government and the drivers and not just car manufacturers, all of us put together have to work towards zero deaths. it's not acceptable to have any deaths, whether you have a conventional motor over the hard shoulder, which shows there have been fatalities, 27 between 2017 and 2019. smart motorways have deaths as well. it's not ok any more. we have to look at the picture and move forward. i have been saying this from day one, you cannot go back to the old system when there were
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fatalities on hard shoulders because we thought it was safe. we need to look at the bigger picture. ironically, smart motorway technology makes roads safer but the technology makes roads safer but the technology has to work which is what this document outlines, that we need to look at that technology, review it and go forward from there. you talked about _ it and go forward from there. you talked about no _ it and go forward from there. you talked about no deaths being acceptable at every death causes heartache of a loved one, but i suppose the grief must be deeper because you feel that dev�*s death was avoidable. because you feel that dev's death was avoidable.— because you feel that dev's death was avoidable. ~ , ., , ., was avoidable. most road deaths are preventable- — was avoidable. most road deaths are preventable. road _ was avoidable. most road deaths are preventable. road deaths _ was avoidable. most road deaths are preventable. road deaths are - preventable. road deaths are complex, there are so many factors involved and details involved. it isn'tjust involved and details involved. it isn't just the involved and details involved. it isn'tjust the roads, roads don't kill by themselves, cars don't kill by themselves, there are multiple factors that lead towards a catastrophic event. there may have been another situation where they may have walked out. but for me it is about the technology in cars.
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there is something called autonomous emergency braking where the car automatically breaks when there is a stationary object in front of it. technology like that would have saved dev. i'm looking at things which can and will make a difference and save lives. in which can and will make a difference and save lives.— and save lives. in terms of driving education. _ and save lives. in terms of driving education. you — and save lives. in terms of driving education, you mentioned - and save lives. in terms of driving l education, you mentioned someone and save lives. in terms of driving - education, you mentioned someone can pass their driving test and then pass their driving test and then pass drive for another five decades. what changes would you like to see? i would like to see ongoing learning. we have multiple generations on the right to have learned in different ways and have had different standards as time has gone on. i want to see a uniform approach but also supporting drivers in their own learning needs and what they need. in their own learning needs and what the need. , ., ., ~ ., , , they need. give a talking-to us this morninu. they need. give a talking-to us this morning- nice _ they need. give a talking-to us this morning. nice to _ they need. give a talking-to us this morning. nice to see _ they need. give a talking-to us this morning. nice to see you _ they need. give a talking-to us this morning. nice to see you on - they need. give a talking-to us this morning. nice to see you on the . morning. nice to see you on the sofa, i know we have —— thank you for talking to us this morning. nice to see you here, we have been
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talking over seen before. as we've been hearing this morning, the queen has called for unity as world leaders attend the cop 26 climate change conference in glasgow. it's the second full day of the summit today. nina's there for us. tomorrow the leaders will start going home. a lot more dramatic speeches yesterday but a lot more powerful was from the queen. let's talk to laura kuenssberg this morning. good to see you. what did you make of the words? they were perhaps more powerful and dramatic than what we have heard from in the past? than what we have heard from in the ast? . , , ., past? really personal as well, the queen is often _ past? really personal as well, the queen is often seen _ past? really personal as well, the queen is often seen as _ past? really personal as well, the queen is often seen as somebody| past? really personal as well, the - queen is often seen as somebody who can really draw world leaders is, she has that soft power. she talked
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about the pride in herfamily, her husband, herson about the pride in herfamily, her husband, her son and her grandson, charles and william, who have always made the environment something they cared about long before it was fashionable. the message which will have hit home is when she said, none of us will live forever, this is about choosing this moment to improve things for future generations. at the last big shindig like this, the g7 in cornwall when the sun was out, the queen did a photo call with them. and i cannot tell you, when it finished, how much they were all desperate to be seen next to her. president macron, angela merkel, they were practically asking the queen for a selfie. so that tells me that they really listen to the message from her. and we have seen three generations of the royalfamily, and that we have seen three generations of the royal family, and that shows we have seen three generations of the royalfamily, and that shows how much the uk top brass in all its
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different ways is trying to pull every lever different ways is trying to pull every [ever this week to take take serious action. every lever this week to take take serious action.— every lever this week to take take serious action. nearly seven decades as a monarch — serious action. nearly seven decades as a monarch that _ serious action. nearly seven decades as a monarch that she _ serious action. nearly seven decades as a monarch that she was _ serious action. nearly seven decades as a monarch that she was one - serious action. nearly seven decades as a monarch that she was one of. serious action. nearly seven decades| as a monarch that she was one of the many voices calling for action over words, is that happening? i many voices calling for action over words, is that happening?- many voices calling for action over words, is that happening? i think it will start you. _ words, is that happening? i think it will start you, whether— words, is that happening? i think it will start you, whether it _ words, is that happening? i think it will start you, whether it was - words, is that happening? i think it will start you, whether it was the i will start you, whether it was the announcement about deforestation that you have been talking about this morning, we have seen some big important moments, the indian leader came forward yesterday with the indian plan to reduce carbon over the next few decades. not as fast as the next few decades. not as fast as the uk government would like but still very important that it is on the table. some of the hullabaloo of the table. some of the hullabaloo of the first couple of days, the big ceremonial things will die down and then the negotiators get stuck in in those big massive rooms across the river and start to go line by line through some of the very completed agreements that they are going to try to achieve. i think at this stage, there is always a bit at the beginning of something, a bit of what greta thunberg would say, blah blah blah, from politicians and
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campaigners, people setting out their ambitions. this is going to be quite a long time and we should not get caught up in trying to judge on day two how it is going to heal on day two how it is going to heal on day 1a. 50 day two how it is going to heal on da 14, ., ., day 14. so far with that in mind, what will be _ day 14. so far with that in mind, what will be the _ day 14. so far with that in mind, what will be the perception - day 14. so far with that in mind, what will be the perception of. day 14. so far with that in mind, i what will be the perception of boris johnson and the uk is the host nation, are they setting the right tone and leading from the front? the uk is seen tone and leading from the front? tue: uk is seen as tone and leading from the front? tta: uk is seen as having a pretty advanced climate plan and having more ambitious targets, further ahead than many other countries here. there is a sense that they are now pulling out all of the stops to make this work. there have been some noises over the recent months about whether or not downing street had really engaged and paid enough attention. now we are here and in the run—up to it, that accusation has been answered. that said, of course, there are some things in domestic plans and you think, does that make sense? in the budget last week, they cut the amount of tax that you pay if you fly domestically, they froze fuel duty
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again, still a question about another oilfield in scotland or a cumbrian coalmine. in the big picture, a lot of people here this week would say that the uk is out in front of a lot of countries. there are a lot of countries here, nearly 200 of them. it is quite some gathering. if you are watching at home, you might think, what avail doing, why are there 25,000 people here? it's not a bad question. it's about trying to create a moment where you have got political pressure, pressure from activists and campaigners, to try and pull something altogether, a big patchwork that in decades to come, people will look back and think, glasgow was a moment that made a difference, ratherthan glasgow was a moment that made a difference, rather than a moment where world leaders had a chance to make a positive change and failed. absolutely right, notjust about make a positive change and failed. absolutely right, not just about the negotiations that take place in there, it's about how it reaches your home and your living room. the changes you are willing to make. jane the cabin has been to, where
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better, ——jane jane the cabin has been to, where better, —— jane mccubbin jane the cabin has been to, where better, ——jane mccubbin has been to copulate in preston. welcome to cop lane. climate activists of all ages recognise that our climate is in crisis. kids have never been more clued up about the challenge ahead. i would say, using more renewable types of energy, like water power, solar power and wind power. but what about the grown—ups? many of the most important grown—ups in the world are meeting in glasgow right now to find a plan to fix the problem. some, though, have decided not to attend. so, are we taking this issue seriously enough? in cop lane garage, they might not be talking about cop26, but they are talking about the environment. everyone who talks about changing their car or anything like that, they're always wanting to go electric. but there is a big issue, cost. right, so it's that they are talking about going electric,
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but they're not going electric? theyjust can't afford it. if it was cheaper, i'm sure it would accelerate. i think i'll be retired before we see it mainstream. the uk's plan is to ban the sale of diesel and petrol cars by 2030. over in the local chippy, andreas says he is a new green convert. as we said, we have to save this planet. and it's all inspired by one man. david attenborough is a hero. i've been watching all his programmes, and i have seen their wildlife, how they suffer. and it made me do this major changes, yes. even though it's costing me a lot of money. wooden folks cost three or four times more than the plastic forks. that's a big difference. it is, it is. but it is important to do it. in the vicarage, three generations are wrestling with the challenge, and not everyone is convinced they can make a difference. who is the eco warrior in this house?
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could it be me? it's grandad, is this accurate, grandad? it is. i like all the cardboard put in the cardboard box and the glass in the glass box. the heating off. at the moment, going forward, i think being able to care about the environment is a rich man's game. you need money to be able to show that you care. talking about insulating your house, using the right kind of energy, and all that, it costs money. in fact, only a fifth of uk emissions come from households and we are visiting another to hear a confession. a little bird has told me, you made him last night watch recycling videos on youtube to prep for the interview. yeah. we're not the best, are we? this is going to sound awful, but sometimes it is just, not laziness, just you're in a rush with life. what's in there, archie? can you recycle tinfoil, archie?
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no. - you can! what's this, mum? can you recycle cardboard, archie? no. you can recycle cardboard, archie! you've been outed. i have. we're going to do better, aren't we, archie? last week, borisjohnson said household recycling is not the answer to this crisis. but for so many, it is often the first step. so we've invited an expert over to explain other changes we all need to make to get emmissions right down. the biggest impact that your house has on climate change is from heating it. so things like, this radiator, and your hot water as well. so what kind of boiler do you have? it's a gas boiler. gas is a fossil fuel, it causes climate change when you burn it. and we need to switch to electric heating instead. can i have a look at your fridge? if you have to! the most problematic thing is actually your milk and your butter, and your meat. keeping animals, and
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particularly cows and sheep, burp and fart, methane. and that's actually a dangerous greenhouse gas. government advisers have suggested that we reduce meat and dairy consumption by about 20%. do you have a car? yes, it's diesel. that's what you're going to ask me! diesel is the worst for air pollution, i'm afraid. you'd want to think about getting an electric car. in fact, living without a car or going electric is the single most impactful decision we could make to individually help tackle this crisis. but professor willis says the one thing people really want from global leaders is a very clear message. the government is really nervous about talking to people about what needs to be done. and it's almost saying, oh, don't worry your pretty little heads about it, we'll sort it out for you. and that's, it's actually dishonest. and ineffective, because meanwhile, people are sitting there, thinking, i'm really worried about climate change but i feel quite powerless. paper in here.
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opening cop26 yesterday, borisjohnson said it would be children who willjudge leaders forfailing to act. david attenborough said, their future should be the impetus to turn tragedy into triumph. i think i definitely would like a clearer message for absolutely everything that we are supposed to do, and it to be very clear. as a nation, we are really good at sticking by rules. in doing what we are told. we are really good at that. but if it's just left to individuals? well, you'lljust do what you think is right, or not. and with the un say we are on track for a climate catastrophe, "or not" is not an option. jayne mccubbin, bbc news.
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from preston to glasgow and jane's piece showing that you are not alone when you are wondering about the small changes you want to make. but it is up to the leaders to make sure that this counts and to lead from the front, because to fail is not an option. thank you very much, nina has been live in glasgow all morning this morning. still to come on breakfast... he's taking part in his 11th rickshaw challenge to raise money for children in need. that is the dizzying sight of mac —— matt baker on his rickshaw! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. in ison earle. the family of a 22—year—old man with asthma who died in prison are calling for lessons to be learnt to prevent similar tragedies. nile dillon collapsed in his cell in march 2018 after struggling to breathe.
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prison officers took eight minutes to call an ambulance. an inquest into his death recorded an open verdict, but his parents say mistakes were made. being an asthmatic, during the first aid they gave him, during the cpr they gave him, nobody gave him oxygen. no—one gave him oxygen. a prison service spokesperson said their deepest sympathies are with mr dillon's family and friends, and they will consider the coroner's verdict and respond in due course. police have released images of a man they re looking for after two incidents of buses being set on fire in croydon. the top floor of the 154 was set alight last month. no—one was injured but the double decker was completely burnt out. there was also a small fire a few days before on another service going to morden. great northern, thameslink and southern are installing defibrillators at all of their train stations. it's the largest roll—out of heart restarters
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on the uk s rail network. they're fully automatic ? so anyone can use them. early cpr and defibrillation are said to double the chances of surviving a cardiac arrest. some of london's best known fireworks displays will not go ahead this year. hammersmith and fulham council said events in ravenscourt park and bishops park won't be held due to continuing high rates of covid. tower hamlets, hackney and croydon have also cancelled their annual bonfire night displays. travel now. this is how tfl services are looking. there are severe delays between barking and upminster eastbound. a good service on all other lines. on to the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it certainly is a chilly start to the day with clear skies and lighter winds last night. temperatures have dropped low enough for a frost. there is even a few pockets of air frost in some of the rural spots, too. a mist around to lift and clear this morning. that will do so slowly through the morning and it will turn into a fairly decent day of weather, too.
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with plenty of sunshine around, just feeling colder than it has been of late. the wind certainly a lot lighter, top temperatures of around 12 celsius. the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out but for the vast majority of us it will be a completely dry day. we keep those light winds overnight tonight and lots of long clear skies around as well. so there will be another frost into tomorrow morning along with some rather dense patches of mist and fog out there as well. so a murky start to the day. that mist and fog will lift and clear very slowly as we head through the morning. we draw in a northerly wind on wednesday, still fairly light, but it could throw us a few showers at times, also some sunny spells. many of our temperatures will struggle to get out of single figures, so feeling colder. not quite so chilly wednesday night into thursday. thursday, another calm, quiet day of weather. should stay dry. turning more unsettled but milder over the weekend. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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now though it's back to sally and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. morning live follows us on bbc one later. let's find out what's in store with rav and kimberley. coming up on morning live: it's one month since natasha's law was brought in. that's the law which hopes to protect the 2 million people in the uk with a food allergy and says shops and cafes selling pre—packed food on their premises must now display a label listing all ingredients, including major allergens. we caught up with trading standards. and it seems not everyone is taking it seriously, despite this putting customers at risk. plus, it's been dubbed the 'super cold,�* which is often confused for covid. if you're coming down with a cough or are sick of the sniffles, dr punam explains what will make you feel better, and whether cough remedies really do the trick.
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we had both had that, it is horrible, isn't it? also on the show, we've got the latest from the global climate change conference, cop26. gethin�*s live from glasgow, where last night there was a major security operation in force to prevent climate protesters interrupting a dinner attended by world leaders and the members of the royal family. plus, we've got a greener guide to keeping your home warm this winter. 0ur diy expert wayne perrey explains why a roll of cling film could keep draughts out, and save you money. saving money sounds good. and, he definitely proved himself in the paso doble on saturday night. we'll find out what rhys stephenson has up his sleeve for this weekend's strictly. and of course, he's back on the road for this year's rickshaw challenge. we'll catch up with matt baker as he teams up with another inspirational young rider to help him pedal across the country for children in need. i think he is getting ready to set off now. i think you are about to check—in with him. i hope it all going well. see you at 9:15am. the bbc children in need rickshaw challenge is back for its 11th year, and this time it's got a twist. matt baker and a team of inspirational young people will take on a relay—style ride,
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travelling through their hometowns and visiting places that mean something to them along the way. today, they're starting their second leg right here outside our studios in salford. dan's with them. morning, dan. we are here this morning because we have matt and rainbow with us. have a massive round of applause for teen rickshaw, raising money for children in need. i want to hear a bit more about rainbow and his inspirational story. they are off to liverpool today. it has started raining here in manchester. we will talk to them in the moment and some of those supporting children in need as well. sally mentioned, over £40 million raised. this is the story of this man and his incredible rickshaw so
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far. hiya. evening. car beeps. cheering. bye, bye, bye, bye. thank you. hopefully you can hear me. i think
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we had a few technical issues earlier on. matt baker, everybody, come on! ., , , earlier on. matt baker, everybody, comeon! ., , , , come on! day one yesterday. yes. those figures — come on! day one yesterday. yes. those figures are _ come on! day one yesterday. yes. those figures are staggering. - come on! day one yesterday. yes. those figures are staggering. this | those figures are staggering. this is the 11th year.— those figures are staggering. this is the 11th year. when i think about what has happened _ is the 11th year. when i think about what has happened since _ is the 11th year. when i think about what has happened since i - is the 11th year. when i think about what has happened since i left - what has happened since i left edinburgh castle, i did not know what would be at the bottom of the hill let alone what is happening here a decade later. it is the generosity of the british public that has got us here we are. what a difference the money has made to so many lives! rainbow included, and a phenomenal team we had this year. having a look round here, this is sally, helen and sarah, part of team rickshaw. they followed you all the way. rickshaw. they followed you all the wa . . ., way. their connection with me started through _ way. their connection with me started through strictly. - way. their connection with me started through strictly. they| started through strictly. they joined the rickshaw and they had
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been ever since. this is the thing, the support we have had over the years has been incredible, so uplifting for young riders as we go through towns and cities. everybody is out cheering. it has become a thing, the rickshaw for children in need. �* , ., thing, the rickshaw for children in need. �*, ., ., thing, the rickshaw for children in need. �*, . ., . ., need. let's have a chat with rainbow- — need. let's have a chat with rainbow. today _ need. let's have a chat with rainbow. today you - need. let's have a chat with rainbow. today you are - need. let's have a chat with | rainbow. today you are going need. let's have a chat with - rainbow. today you are going from manchester to liverpool. hour rainbow. today you are going from manchester to liverpool.— rainbow. today you are going from manchester to liverpool. how did you aet manchester to liverpool. how did you get involved? — manchester to liverpool. how did you get involved? i— manchester to liverpool. how did you get involved? i got _ manchester to liverpool. how did you get involved? i got involved - manchester to liverpool. how did you get involved? i got involved through i get involved? i got involved through british_ get involved? i got involved through british spine sports through a proiect — british spine sports through a proiect i _ british spine sports through a project i did basically giving blind and visually impaired people the possibility of needing an coaching sessions — possibility of needing an coaching sessions in sport. the project was able to— sessions in sport. the project was able to give — sessions in sport. the project was able to give me the opportunity to be able _ able to give me the opportunity to be able to— able to give me the opportunity to be able to lead and deliver sessions and also _ be able to lead and deliver sessions and also give me the skills and tools— and also give me the skills and tools i— and also give me the skills and tools i need to go out into the
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wider— tools i need to go out into the wider world. tools i need to go out into the widerworld. british tools i need to go out into the wider world. british blind sports has given— wider world. british blind sports has given me the opportunity by nominating me for the rickshaw challenge. i definitely think i am the challenge. ! definitely think i am the right— challenge. i definitely think i am the right fit and i hope i will make them _ the right fit and i hope i will make them proud. the right fit and i hope i will make them proud-— the right fit and i hope i will make them roud. ., ., ,, them proud. you are keen footballer as well. them proud. you are keen footballer as well- you — them proud. you are keen footballer as well- you play _ them proud. you are keen footballer as well. you play for _ them proud. you are keen footballer as well. you play for england's - as well. you play for england's lined team. t as well. you play for england's lined team-— as well. you play for england's lined team. , ._ ., ., lined team. i play for the england blind football _ lined team. i play for the england blind football team _ lined team. i play for the england blind football team and _ lined team. i play for the england blind football team and have - lined team. i play for the england | blind football team and have been playing _ blind football team and have been playing for them for two and a half years— playing for them for two and a half years now — playing for them for two and a half years now. it has been amazing. went to japan _ years now. it has been amazing. went to japan we _ years now. it has been amazing. went to japan. we had a tournament and i came _ to japan. we had a tournament and i came back— to japan. we had a tournament and i came back with silver. i went to the first majors — came back with silver. i went to the first majors in the euros. we came back— first majors in the euros. we came back with — first majors in the euros. we came back with a — first majors in the euros. we came back with a bronze. playing for england — back with a bronze. playing for england is something i am really passionate about and then a teacher i passionate about and then a teacher i want _ passionate about and then a teacher i want to— passionate about and then a teacher i want to come home with gold in the paralympics. —— in the future. definitely— paralympics. —— in the future. definitely a _ paralympics. —— in the future. definitely a lot of exciting things coming — definitely a lot of exciting things coming up as well. | definitely a lot of exciting things coming up as well.— coming up as well. i love that
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rainbow has _ coming up as well. i love that rainbow has big _ coming up as well. i love that rainbow has big hopes. - coming up as well. i love that rainbow has big hopes. he i coming up as well. i love that - rainbow has big hopes. he wants marcus rashford to watch his next game against germany. i think you will have a great chat with him along the way. will have a great chat with him along the way-— will have a great chat with him along the way. this recumbent basically means _ along the way. this recumbent basically means i _ along the way. this recumbent basically means i can - along the way. this recumbent basically means i can actually. along the way. this recumbent - basically means i can actually steer the rickshaw as we go. this has evolved over the years. mclaren has jumped on board i made it so adaptable for riders of different and varying abilities. we will sit back, enjoying the miles as we go. yesterday we got battered but that there were more rainbows than rainbow here, which was incredible. five days in all, finishing back up in edinburgh castle, which is the plan for friday. mt in edinburgh castle, which is the plan for friday-— in edinburgh castle, which is the plan for friday. all good. i need to know about _ plan for friday. all good. i need to know about logistical _ know about logistical practicalities. can you play music and of this? we practicalities. can you play music and of this?— practicalities. can you play music and of this? we said at the start, come with _ and of this? we said at the start, come with a _ and of this? we said at the start, come with a playlist. _ and of this? we said at the start, come with a playlist. what - and of this? we said at the start, come with a playlist. what do - and of this? we said at the start, | come with a playlist. what do you have on? different _
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come with a playlist. what do you have on? different genres - come with a playlist. what do you have on? different genres of- come with a playlist. what do you i have on? different genres of music, a lot of— have on? different genres of music, a lot of 90s, — have on? different genres of music, a lot of 90s, 90s dance, some rap, hip-hop _ a lot of 90s, 90s dance, some rap, hi--ho. ., a lot of 90s, 90s dance, some rap, hih-ho, ., ., �* a lot of 90s, 90s dance, some rap, hi--ho. ., ., ~ , ., hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk springsteen! — hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk springsteen! we _ hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk springsteen! we had _ hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk springsteen! we had mr- hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk springsteen! we had mr blue i hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk i springsteen! we had mr blue sky hip-hop. come on! a bit of risk - springsteen! we had mr blue sky on yesterday. in the small parts where it had stopped raining we were banging that out. we have over 13 to do today if that is all right with you. do today if that is all right with ou. ., , ., , do today if that is all right with ou. . ,., ,., you. that is all right. it is about beini you. that is all right. it is about being able _ you. that is all right. it is about being able to — you. that is all right. it is about being able to challenge - you. that is all right. it is about being able to challenge myself| you. that is all right. it is about. being able to challenge myself and dil being able to challenge myself and dig deep. that is what i have always done _ dig deep. that is what i have always done since — dig deep. that is what i have always done since losing my sight and having — done since losing my sight and having a — done since losing my sight and having a positivity to get the awareness out for the blind, visually— awareness out for the blind, visually impaired and disabled community and show i can do and i havent— community and show i can do and i haven't got— community and show i can do and i haven't got a — community and show i can do and i haven't got a disability, i have an ability _ haven't got a disability, i have an abili . �* , ., haven't got a disability, i have an abili .�* , haven't got a disability, i have an abili .�* , ability. bristol yesterday and liver - ool ability. bristol yesterday and liverpool today. _ ability. bristol yesterday and liverpool today. then - ability. bristol yesterday and liverpool today. then the i ability. bristol yesterday and l liverpool today. then the lake district and — liverpool today. then the lake district and up _ liverpool today. then the lake district and up in _ liverpool today. then the lake district and up in edinburgh . liverpool today. then the lake l
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district and up in edinburgh after that. $5 district and up in edinburgh after that. �* , , ., district and up in edinburgh after that. a ~ ., district and up in edinburgh after that. m 4' ., . that. as you know we will always su ort that. as you know we will always support you _ that. as you know we will always support you on _ that. as you know we will always support you on bbc _ that. as you know we will always support you on bbc breakfast. i that. as you know we will always i support you on bbc breakfast. have a fantastic day. you said you wanted marcus rashford to watch you the next game. sally is basically his best mate. if anyone can sort it out sally can. best mate. if anyone can sort it out sall can. ., ., , best mate. if anyone can sort it out sally can-— i- sally can. 27th of november. i really hope — sally can. 27th of november. i really hope it _ sally can. 27th of november. i really hope it goes _ sally can. 27th of november. i really hope it goes well- sally can. 27th of november. i really hope it goes well today. while you have been talking, the blue sky has come.— while you have been talking, the blue sky has come. thank you very much if you — blue sky has come. thank you very much if you had — blue sky has come. thank you very much if you had donated _ blue sky has come. thank you very much if you had donated already. i much if you had donated already. sally, i will come back and we will chat about marcus rashford. rainbow will sort you out, 0k. great to see all of you. the great rickshaw relay challenge airs on bbc one on 10th november. marcus rashford is quite busy at the moment but let's have a word and see what happens. moment but let's have a word and see what happens-—
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what happens. good morning, everybody- — what happens. good morning, everybody- i— what happens. good morning, everybody. i do _ what happens. good morning, everybody. i do not— what happens. good morning, everybody. i do not know i what happens. good morning, everybody. i do not know if i what happens. good morning, | everybody. i do not know if you what happens. good morning, i everybody. i do not know if you have been watching the cricket. jos buttler has been setting the world alight with his performances. he has become only the second english cricketer to score a century and all three formats of the game, that underlines how instrumental he has beenin underlines how instrumental he has been in getting england to where there are —— they are at the moment. good morning. he needed a six off the final ball of the innings to take him to his hundred against sri lanka and smashed it out of the ground. well worth a celebration. he was equally as impressive behind the stumps, with this brilliant run out, as england won by 26 runs. and you must be doing something right if you're getting recognition from the aussies. david warner, on the receiving end of buttler�*s brilliance when they played a few days ago, showing his appreciation. "seriously good knock, jos buttler, very well played, great to watch."
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you have to agree with him, don't you? captain eoin morgan described it as one of buttler�*s best ever performances in an england shirt and ben stokes agreed — "best in the world" he said. and heather knight, who was the first english cricketer to score 100 in test, 0d! and t20 match, said "seriously unbelievable, welcome to the hundred club in all formatsjos." worth pointing out she did get there before. it was a year ago. tottenham are expected to appoint antonio conte later this morning following the sacking of nuno espirito santo yesterday. they're in advanced negotiations with the former chelsea manager who won the premier league and fa cup in his time there. he was interviewed for the job back in the summer before talks broke down. nuno's former club wolves given a helping hand in their 2—1 victory over everton last night. this backpass from ben godfrey a gift for rauljimnenez, who stole in to score their second. victory moves them up to seventh. cameron norrie still has a chance
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of taking one of the two remaining spots at the season—ending atp tour finals. he beat federico delbonis in straight sets in his opening match of the paris masters and could join the world's best in turin with a decent run here. while the british number two dan evans is out, along with andy murray, who blew seven match points in his match against lucky loser dominic koepfer, the german taking the final set tie—break 11—9. he put in a lot of work for that. andy murray will be disappointed, seven match points. mas andy murray will be disappointed, seven match points.— andy murray will be disappointed, seven match points. was not his day. kee -s us seven match points. was not his day. keeps us entertained _ seven match points. was not his day. keeps us entertained with _ seven match points. was not his day. keeps us entertained with the - seven match points. was not his day. | keeps us entertained with the drama. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. dan was outside in his big coat but there were blue skies. sunshine and showers at the moment when you are
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right. a chilly start in salford and across many other parts of the country. we had beautiful blue skies and sunrises to enjoy first thing this morning. a lot of showers. you can see them peppering the north of scotland, some in the west and the south. inland we are looking at a lot of dry weather style as we get through the day we will see further showers develop. some could be heavy and sundry with hail, especially in the west. you know the drill was showers, not all of us will patch one. in the sunshine it will feel cool but it will be quite pleasant. like wins. the winds will pick up in the north—west and the north coast of ireland. temperature is about nine in the north to 12 in the south. this evening and overnight we will have clear skies. a weak weather front will sink southwards taking cloud and showers with it.
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the showers on higher ground in the north of scotland turning wintry. these are the overnight lows in towns and cities. some of us once again will wake up to some frost. patchy mist and fog in the midlands and south—east should lift quite readily tomorrow. tomorrow again a day of sunshine and showers. more shower across england. brisk northerly wind which will accentuate the cold feel. the top temperature will be only around 11, 12. thank you very much. he has made it back. a lovely weather report. i did not see any of it but i am sure it was brilliant. we have heard so much about that coat, it is nice to actually see it. i listen to you yesterday and you either be outside. thank you for the early warning. i
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jumped on the rickshaw! he's been the bullying headmistress in matilda the musical, the cheating husband in doctor foster, and now he's the loyal friend banquo in a new hollywood version of macbeth. it's safe to say bertie carvel is pretty versatile. in fact he's about to become the first actor to play two roles in the crown! first though, let's take a look at his new crime series, dalgliesh. ds masterson and i will be taking a witness statement from each of you. we'll also be requesting your fingerprints. until we know more we are treating this as an unexplained death. who was it who noticed the disinfectant was missing from the toilets? me. dakers needed to be sick after. so i took her to the toilets, and then we wanted to clean up. it's very important we find the missing bottle. please, sit down. there are officers searching the house, including bedrooms. maybe it was meant for fallon, the disinfectant.
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she was meant to be the patient today. nurse fallon was taken ill in the night. - she is on sister- bromford's ward in the private wing of the hospital. she was here this morning. they saw her walking away from the house. she can't have been. concentrate on your own recollection of events, nobody else's. no detail is too small. bertie carveljoins us now. thank you very much. i saw you outside. to keep us busy on this programme. we were saying well we were watching, is the right ? it is obsession the right word for crime dramas? taste obsession the right word for crime dramas? ~ ., .. �* , dramas? we love them. i can't help but think we — dramas? we love them. i can't help but think we need _ dramas? we love them. i can't help but think we need another. - dramas? we love them. i can't help but think we need another. pd i dramas? we love them. i can't help. but think we need another. pd james but think we need another. pdjames said people are obsessed with murder because the detective brings order
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out of chaos. i think the world are so chaotic you don't have to think too hard to see why that is appealing right now. something else, it actually offers a kind of safe frame in which to think about and mortality. maybe that is my own preoccupations at the moment but this man i have been playing and playing, dalglish, is somebody for whom, although hisjob is to look at death and spend time around people who have been hurt by death, in his own life he finds he cannot solve that problem and that is the tension at the heart of it really. he is that problem and that is the tension at the heart of it really.— at the heart of it really. he is not 'ust a at the heart of it really. he is not just a detective, _ at the heart of it really. he is not just a detective, he _ at the heart of it really. he is not just a detective, he is _ at the heart of it really. he is not just a detective, he is a - at the heart of it really. he is not just a detective, he is a poet. i at the heart of it really. he is not just a detective, he is a poet. he j just a detective, he is a poet. he is a poet. — just a detective, he is a poet. he is a poet. a _ just a detective, he is a poet. he: is a poet, a pellet who is not writing. for me, that is key. —— a pellet .he . he has been recently bereaved,
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lost his wife and child. he has the air of a psychoanalyst of leaving spaces into which people for themselves and that is his superpower. he has this foundry professional exterior. we join superpower. he has this foundry professional exterior. wejoin him in a year in his life when actually his ability to separate him, to detach his animations from the job have been blown apart because of the torpedo that is happening in his life. . , . . torpedo that is happening in his life. . ,. . ., torpedo that is happening in his life. ., ., , ., torpedo that is happening in his life. . ,. ., ., , ., life. fascinating to listen to you. you have obviously _ life. fascinating to listen to you. you have obviously thought i life. fascinating to listen to you. l you have obviously thought deeply about this characterisation. this is typical for a series like this? absolutely. everything i do. myjob is to take it all far too seriously and then come on to shows like this and then come on to shows like this and try not to sound like a complete...
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and try not to sound like a complete. . .— and try not to sound like a complete. . .- that| and try not to sound like a i complete. . .- that is the and try not to sound like a - complete. . .- that is the fun complete... careful. that is the fun of it. complete... careful. that is the fun of it- that — complete... careful. that is the fun of it- that is — complete... careful. that is the fun of it. that is how _ complete... careful. that is the fun of it. that is how you _ complete... careful. that is the fun of it. that is how you find _ complete... careful. that is the fun of it. that is how you find the i of it. that is how you find the character- — of it. that is how you find the character. spend _ of it. that is how you find the character. spend some i of it. that is how you find the character. spend some time| of it. that is how you find the i character. spend some time and someone's _ character. spend some time and someone's skin _ character. spend some time and someone's skin and _ character. spend some time and someone's skin and walk - character. spend some time and someone's skin and walk in i character. spend some time and i someone's skin and walk in someone's shoes, you start to feel their stuff. what i can talk about is the passion, the process. you tell people what you think character is. actually it should all be in their work. if it is not on the screen, it does not matter if i tell you what is going on. he is described on page one of the script as inscrutable. that implies hidden depths. you have got to hide them but they also had to be there, it has to be deep. in other words there is a mask that is really quite hard to penetrate. if there is nothing behind it is not satisfying. hence all of this thought about what is underneath
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that very well masked exterior that is myjob and why i love it. tt that very well masked exterior that is my job and why i love it.- is my “oh and why i love it. if that were is my job and why i love it. if that were not complicated _ is my job and why i love it. if that were not complicated enough, i is my job and why i love it. if that i were not complicated enough, let's talk about the hollywood film project, bank way. that is another level, isn't it? tell us about, banquo. level, isn't it? tell us about, baniuo. level, isn't it? tell us about, ibanque— level, isn't it? tell us about, banuo. . ., . , , banquo. there are not many people who iet banquo. there are not many people who net to banquo. there are not many people who get to make — banquo. there are not many people who get to make films _ banquo. there are not many people who get to make films more - banquo. there are not many people who get to make films more or- banquo. there are not many people who get to make films more or lessj who get to make films more or less entirely on their own terms. i am sure gill would not mean forcing because i am sure they had to fight very hard. i am sure they had to fight for every penny that they had to make the film. really to work with artist who have licensed to make the film they want to make is really extraordinary and not to feel you are pinned by commercial pressures and so on. it is an exquisite film, like old hollywood. we shot it on sound stages in la, it
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is in black and white on the academy ratio, which delivers these amazing towering close—ups. i watched it at the london film festival. if that does not give you a big head, i do not know what will. did does not give you a big head, i do not know what will.— does not give you a big head, i do not know what will. did you have a bi fan not know what will. did you have a big fan moments _ not know what will. did you have a big fan moments when _ not know what will. did you have a big fan moments when you - not know what will. did you have a big fan moments when you are i not know what will. did you have a i big fan moments when you are working with people like denzil washington? all the time. being on the telly, it doesn't get much better than that. the idea someone will get in from work, switch on the telly with a t and it is you they see. the idea that they will stay and not switch over. if someone is invested in going into a film where they are likely to stay. the same is true with the theatre can occasionally someone will walk out... on the telly you serve someone's attention and ifind it really telly you serve someone's attention and i find it really thrilling, telly you serve someone's attention and ifind it really thrilling, i cannot believe i am on the telly. let's talk about the telly to end
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all tallies, the crown. and i right in saying you are the only actor to play two characters. [30 in saying you are the only actor to play two characters.— play two characters. do not say it et, the play two characters. do not say it yet. they might _ play two characters. do not say it yet, they might sack— play two characters. do not say it yet, they might sack me! - play two characters. do not say it yet, they might sack me! i - play two characters. do not say it yet, they might sack me! i got i play two characters. do not say it| yet, they might sack me! i got an idea i might try to get myself in the back of as many of the shots as possible so the pub quiz would go, who is the only actor to play two characters in the crown. the smart person would say me but actually he played seven. i do not think i will come under as much scrutiny as my character and i will get off lightly. you do not know. ifeel the hand of history on my shoulder. itiigihen hand of history on my shoulder. when will we see that _ hand of history on my shoulder. when will we see that and _ hand of history on my shoulder. when will we see that and when _ hand of history on my shoulder. when will we see that and when are you filming it all? t will we see that and when are you filming it all?—
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will we see that and when are you filming it all? i am in now so start filmin: in filming it all? i am in now so start filming in the _ filming it all? i am in now so start filming in the middle _ filming it all? i am in now so start filming in the middle of— filming it all? i am in now so start| filming in the middle of november until early next year and then again the next year into 2023. so the next series is out, i think november next year, november2022. ilose series is out, i think november next year, november 2022. i lose track of the years. dalgliesh is on channel 5 this thursday and friday at 9pm. all the best with that and everything else as well. t all the best with that and everything else as well. i love to seak to everything else as well. i love to speak to busy — everything else as well. i love to speak to busy people. _ you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59am.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. i'm ben brown. world leaders at the un climate summit in glasgow have agreed their first major deal — a pledge to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030. brazil is one of the signatories to the deal — but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. (00v) i'm here in glasgow, with all the latest from this crucial climate change conference. i'm annita mcveigh. over the course of the day i will be talking to a huge number of people from around the uk and around the world.
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the uk environment secretary has welcomed what he calls a big

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