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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 2, 2021 4:00am-4:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. i'm david eades. our top stories: world leaders at the climate summit in glasgow promise to end deforestation by 2030 — a pledge that's being welcomed by the united nations. is absolutely a dream come true, we're so excited, it's such an accomplishment, in the game changer and i think people don't realise without this, without. deforestation and restoring the world's forest, we cannot avert catastrophic climate change. it follows an opening day in which india's prime minister, narendra modi, pledged for his country to become carbon neutral by the year 2070. emergency teams in nigeria work
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through the night to find dozens of people feared trapped in the rubble of a collapsed apartment block. the us supreme court hears arguments in the controversial texas abortion case, with at least one legal challenge likely to be allowed to move forward. in one of the first substantial deals to be announced at the climate summit in glasgow, world leaders have agreed to end deforestation by 2030. around 100 countries are signing up to the pledge — among them brazil, canada, russia and indonesia which is the largest exporter of palm oil, which has led to a dramatic removal of forestry in the country. the commitment will cover 85% of the world's forests. the full details are due to be announced by borisjohnson on tuesday.
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charles mcneill is the senior advisor on forest and climate at the un environment programme, who is in glasgow. he gave me his reaction to the announcement. it is electrifying. so exciting. i arrived here at 2am in glasgow and got the news, just as you said, 100 leaders representing 85% of the world's forests, $12 billion in public funds and another $7 billion in private funds in provisions for empowering indigenous peoples, the public—private, the public sector, the private sector, it is actually a dream come true and we are so excited.
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it is such an accomplishment. it is a game changer and i think what people don't realise is that without this, without stopping deforestation and restoring the world's forests, we cannot avert catastrophic climate change. it is essential and this is a breakthrough. among the signatories it includes president bolsonaro of brazil and we know how much criticism he has coming for there must, nonetheless, be at the back of your mind the anxiety as to how genuine these commitments will prove to be. absolutely. but now that it is in the public domain it is up to the leaders to deliver, it is up to the public to put the political pressure to ensure that we keep our commitments. it is up there, it is now a done deal, 100 leaders, 85% of forest, something that is historic and we have not seen this kind of breakthrough in a generation. i think there is also a reference to 30 of the world's biggest companies buying into this process and the whole idea of any trade with anyone who is involved in deforestation would become such a black market that they simply cannot happen. i presume that is where the power of momentum, particularly in the private sector, can come into its own. absolutely. and it is up to consumers
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to put pressure on companies and the companies to get further commitments. it is an essential component. we need both distant political decision—makers to take these steps and we also need the private sector to come along as well. that is what is so exciting about this announcement. it brings the public in the private sector together. there was always going to be a danger of getting carried away by moments like this. it is very early in the summer but, nonetheless, as we have said, borisjohnson will call it a landmark agreement. what does something like this do for people like yourself, for negotiators and advisers who have come to the summit wondering whether or not there will be momentum or not? as i said it isjust so surprising and so delightful, so important. i could not imagine a more positive beginning to the conference and a more auspicious beginning.
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this is a big piece of the agenda, one quarter of the problem. and data shows that simply by protecting and restoring forest we can get one third of the way towards meeting paris goals. so it is extremely encouraging. it is, i don't know, it is like christmas. 0ur holiday all wrapped into one. it could not be more exciting. let's hope it is a christmas that survived the test of time as well. exactly. further work is needed to ensure that these amendments are made real and that is essential. the announcement on deforestation follows an opening day in which president biden spoke of the millions ofjobs that can be created through new technologies to reduce carbon emissions. india's prime minister, narendra modi, told the conference that his country aims to become carbon neutral by the year 2070. it's the first time india has announced a net zero target. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has more.
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a red london bus. electric, of course. with the skirl of scottish pipes. the royals on the steps. the prime minister, the host. a full on uk display. the leaders of the world, the guests here to be addressed by the 95—year—old monarch, even if not in person. she's seen plenty of their type before. it has sometimes been observed that what leaders do for their people today is government and politics, but what they do for the people of tomorrow, that is statesmanship. i, for one, hope that this conference will be one of those rare occasions where everyone will have a chance to rise above the politics of the moment and achieve true statesmanship. it is the hope of many, the legacy of this summit, written in history books yet to be printed, will describe you as the leaders who did not pass up the opportunity. we, none of us, will live forever. but we are doing this not for ourselves but for our children and our children's children, and those who will follow in their footsteps.
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but there's the glittering reception in a glasgow landmark, then the other conference. thousands have made the trip from their own countries. their hope that this morning's queues and their shivering arrival will be worth it. the first serious moment at this vital conference, borisjohnson�*s big moment on the world stage. humanity has long since run down the clock on climate change, it is one minute to midnight on that doomsday clock and we need to act now.
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the leaders of some of the biggest polluters, china, russia, and turkey, haven't shown, keeping much more than a social distance. the anger and the impatience of the world will be uncontainable unless we make this cop26 in glasgow the moment when we get real about climate change. they will not forgive us. they will know that glasgow was the historic turning point when history failed to turn. the platform also for those people whose way of life is at grave risk right now... the earth is speaking. she tells us that we have no more time. the uk is the host to a rainbow of nearly 200 countries and wants them all to promise to cut their own carbon
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emissions and the wealthier to cough up more towards the $100 billion pot to help poorer countries go green. there is a real sense of purpose here, but it will be a long fortnight as president biden and the other leaders must be all too aware. and not all of them are as enthusiastic as the west with wealthier populations. whether brazil... ..with some new promises today... ..or a slower approach from the indian prime minister, who says his mega—economy will balance carbon emissions with absorbing greenhouse gases by 2070. 2070... 20 years later than borisjohnson wants. but the mood in glasgow is perhaps darkening towards those who are dragging their feet. in two generations�* time they will be remembered for this fortnight. they could have been brilliant in everything else they have done and they will be cursed if they don't get this right. that is interesting, you use the phrase "cursed." for somebody in your position of authority it's a very strong word.
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it was consciously a strong word. people will speak of them in far stronger terms than we speak today of the politicians of the �*30s, of the politicians who ignored what was happening in nazi germany, because this will kill people all around the world for generations and we will have no means of averting it. he later apologised for making the comparison to the nazi genocide. number 10 stepped around commenting on the nature of those claims, but said there's no doubt about the seriousness of the climate challenge. it's only day one of a discussion that's already taken more than two decades, but the consequences of glasgow's conversation will be felt far longer than that. that's come back to that announcement made by india's prime minister that the
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country, which is one of the most polluting in the world, will cut emissions to net zero x 2070. that does certainly miss a key goal which is to aim for mid century or 2050 ideally. we have the founder of one of india's largest environmental charities, and here is her reaction. i think it is very ambitious because it is notjust about a date, it is also about who is making it, and that is india. with such a huge number of people who are poor and such a huge impact that we are already facing from climate change, whether it is cyclones or all types of other disturbances, so i think it's a very, it's quite ambitious, and unlike you, i am quite optimistic and i am quite delighted that we are even making this.
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sorry to interrupt, china produces something like 23% of co2 emissions, india 7%, china is aiming for a net zero x 2060, so what is it that makes it such a long lead time for india? i think we have to remember what india's history as as well because we are our country that until 70 years, 75 years ago was completely drained of its wealth, and now we are building back so you can't ignore the history from which india emerges in strengthens itself, so our challenge is to look and find property, notjust poverty in a way economists mean it but energy poverty, gender gaps, all of those things, with a history of draining all of our wealth in a postcolonial era, and also on the other hand fighting climate change, so i think in fact, it is the responsibility and prime minister modi says so and he says we have to commit to climate finance and he has a number there of $1 trillion, so i think it is quite ambitious for a country that finds itself in such an extraordinarily difficult situation and such an extraordinary difficult history. presumably part of the argument
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would also be that of the richer countries still can't find a way to committed $100 million per yearfrom 2020 onwards, in terms of helping countries like india to bring in that private investment, then what can they expect? of course, that's a very valid point, and it kind of shows, we have seen in the last few years how little they have contributed, in fact it's countries like india that are contributing to world stability by sending out vaccines and so on, and on the other hand i think the richer countries, they not only need to put out the money and put their money whether commitments are, but also dramatically reduce their own carbon emissions, and this is not the time to pull each other down, but it is also a time to remind the wealthy countries that it is payback time. many of them have passed that have drained wealth from other countries and now it is time to pay back, so it's not
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just risk to rich country's money going out there, it is returning at. thank you very much indeed for your perspective, the figure is 2070 the for net zero in india, and that is the first time they have made such a commitment. i should add... do go to our website for more climate coverage and reporting from cop 26. there's a live page with the latest news as it breaks in glasgow as well as videos, the bbc�*s reality check and interactive features where you can see how climate change is affecting you and how you're affecting the climate. go to bbc.com/news.
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stay with us on bbc world news, still to come: the world news, still to come: latest on the rescue eff the latest on the rescue effort in nigeria where a building has collapsed. the israeli prime minister, yitzhak rabin, the architect of the middle east peace process, has been assassinated. a 27—year—old jewish man has been arrested and an extremistjewish organisation has claimed responsibility for the killing. at polling booths throughout the country, they voted on a historic day for australia. as the results came in, it was clear — the monarchy would survive. of the american hostages, there was no sign — - they are being held somewhere inside the compound — - and student leaders have threatened that, should i the americans attempt. rescue, they will all die. this mission has surpassed all expectations. voyager one is now the most distant man—made object
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anywhere in the universe, and itjust seems to keep on going. tonight, we prove once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: world leaders at the climate summit in glasgow promise to end deforestation by 2030, in a pledge that covers 85% of the world's forests. it follows an opening day in which india's prime minister, narendra modi, pledged for his country to become carbon neutral by the year 2070. it by the year 2070. is a first target for india.
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the united states supreme court has been hearing arguments about a law in the state of texas that has virtually ended abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. justices heard two challenges to the law, which bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy and allows citizens to sue anyone involved in the process. abortion rights groups have argued that the architects of the texas law wrote it this way to deliberately avoid federal oversight. jessica levinson is a professor of law at loyola marymount university in los angeles. shejoins us now. thank you very much indeed. there is some reporting suggesting that the justices, from what they have heard, showing a willingness to rule against this texas senate bill. what is your view? i agree. we heard three hours of oral arguments and it was a very long morning at the supreme court and, as you said,
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there were two cases. 0ne asked whether abortion providers could sue state officials to try and stop texas's restrictive of portion law. the other asked whether the federal government, the department of justice in this case could sue the state of texas to stop this law. so they overarching question here was not is the law in texas constitutional law not constitutional, it was who can sue and be sued to do after three hours i think i heard at least five, which is what we need, five from nine, at least five of the supreme court justices saying that i think the abortion providers in this case should be able to sue the state officials to try and stop the slaughter dig it is very complex and we understand that in the justices are going over this extremely carefully. from our this extremely carefully. from your perspective _ this extremely carefully. from your perspective it _ this extremely carefully. from your perspective it is - this extremely carefully. from your perspective it is also - your perspective it is also somewhat urgent. how confident are you that there will be an outcome soon? i
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are you that there will be an outcome soon?— are you that there will be an outcome soon? i think there will be an — outcome soon? i think there will be an outcome - outcome soon? i think there will be an outcome on - outcome soon? i think there will be an outcome on this i will be an outcome on this threshold question of who gets to sue and be sued very soon because our supreme court set oral arguments and decided to hear this case basically ten days ago and that is absolutely unheard of. these things usually take months, if not years. this is the fastest timeline since the 2000 election and the bush versus gore litigation. i expect we will hear something within the next few weeks but, again, the answer will only be can this lawsuit go ahead not is this lawsuit go ahead not is this law constitutional?- lawsuit go ahead not is this law constitutional? and if the law constitutional? and if the law can go — law constitutional? and if the law can go forward, - law constitutional? and if the law can go forward, what - law constitutional? and if the law can go forward, what do | law constitutional? and if the i law can go forward, what do you think that means in terms of the country as a whole? it think that means in terms of the country as a whole? if the court decides _ the country as a whole? if the court decides with _ the country as a whole? if the court decides with texas - the country as a whole? if the court decides with texas than | court decides with texas than the suit cannot go forward. if they side with the abortion providers in the suit can go forward what i think it means is that the supreme court
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realises that they do not want to allow other states to do what texas did and i don't mean in respect to abortion, i mean in respect to abortion, i mean in respect to any constitutional right where a state passes a law, let's say it was a right to bear arms, to have guns. let's say a democrat state like california said, you know what, nobody is allowed to own guns in california but were, as a state we are not going to a force that. instead it will be a private citizen who enforces that. so it will be a private citizen who enforces that.- it will be a private citizen who enforces that. so in a this more about — who enforces that. so in a this more about the _ more about the constitutionality than it is about the actual subject matter? about the actual sub'ect matteni about the actual sub'ect matter? ., ~ , , matter? no. ithink this is really about _ matter? no. ithink this is really about whether - matter? no. ithink this is really about whether or i matter? no. i think this is| really about whether or not matter? no. i think this is i really about whether or not a state can basically outsource who will enforce it and therefore try and deprive the federaljudge of being able to review these types of laws. we will wait and _ review these types of laws. we will wait and see. thank you very much, jessica levenson.
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emergency teams in nigeria are working through the night in the search for survivors of a lagos apartment block that collapsed while under construction. dozens of people are feared trapped in the rubble. suzanne kianpour reports. a nightmare in the nigerian city of lagos after a 21—floor luxury residential building, under construction, comes crashing down. indistinct. people were inside. indistinct. plenty of people inside. a number of people are dead, with a rescue mission for the workers trapped inside ongoing. we tried to remove them. they have been in there up till now. nothing we can do. indistinct. scenes of chaos and anger at what locals see as a slow response and unanswered
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questions as to why a building, where the cheapest unit was selling for $1.2 million, could fall apart. we have been working here since last year, but nobody can say what happened. we are just yelling. everything just collapsing. but they are in the other building. they say there are more than 50 people inside there. since more than one hour we have been calling 111, they have not answered us since. and people are still inside there. subpar materials, negligence, and skirting construction regulations have made building collapses more common in lagos, and other parts nigeria, africa's populist country. local authorities say it is too early to determine the cause of the tragedy, and have vowed to make the results of a public inquiry into the matter public. suzanne kianpour, bbc news.
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let's get some of the day's other news. a new york real—estate heir who was sentenced to life in prison last month has been charged with murdering his wife nearly forty years ago. robert durst has previously denied killing his first wife kathleen in a row at their home. he was jailed for life without parole by a court in los angeles for murdering herfriend. prosecutors in that trial claimed he killed susan berman because she was about to reveal details about his wife's death. the authorities in costa rica say they've seized a shipment of more than 2.5 tonnes of cocaine. nearly 2600 packages of the drug were found in a container in the coastal city of limon. they were all hidden inside backpacks. local officials believe the consignment was going to be sent to europe. it's thought to have travelled through colombia before reaching costa rica. the chief executive of barclays bank, jes staley, has stepped down following an investigation into his links with the convicted sex offender and billionaire financier jeffrey epstein.
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barclays — one of the world's biggest banks — said it had received preliminary findings, which mr staley would contest. epstein died in his jail cell in august 2019. aaron t peck, considered the father of american cognitive therapy has died at the age of 100. the latest statistics from the un and johns hopkins university show more than five million people have now lost their lives to covid—19. it comes almost twenty months since the pandemic began. vaccines have slowed the deaths in many countries, but the un has again urged richer countries to share more of their doses to prevent more deaths in poorer countries.
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we issued a message from the secretary general on the 5 million deaths worldwide due to covid—19 and he stressed it is notjust covid—19 and he stressed it is not just a covid—19 and he stressed it is notjust a number on a page that represents lives ended by a mirthless virus that knows no borders. the secretary general called it a global shame that while wealthy countries are rolling out a third dose of vaccine, only 5% of people in africa are fully vaccinated. he also noted that 5 million should stand as a clear warning that we cannot let our guard down. we're still more deaths with overcrowded hospitals and exhausted healthcare workers. we also see the risk of new variants are spreading claiming more lives. he wants to call on world leaders to support the vaccination strategy launched with the world health organization last year. time now to bring _ organization last year. time now to bring you _ organization last year. time | now to bring you up-to-date organization last year. time i now to bring you up-to-date on now to bring you up—to—date on our top story on one of the first substantial deals to be announced at the climate summit in glasgow, world leaders have agreed to and deforestation by
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2030, around 100 countries are signing up to that pledge, among them brazil, canada, russia and indonesia. hello. after a warm and wet october the stormy final weekend has a different flavour to our weather now that we are into november. low pressure is moving away, around and there are still showers but overall it is looking drier. now with a developing northerly breeze coming into the uk and it's chilly now, but it is turning colder still in the next couple of days. here's what's on the agenda for the rest of the week. we've established as low pressure moves away, drier, the air around it turning colder. some sunny spells, yes, a chance of showers mainly coastal areas. 0vernight fog and frost, both of those in some spots as tuesday begins, especially across parts of england where the coldest areas here getting close to freezing at the day begins. showers from the word go in northern scotland, and some of these can be heavy maybe with hail and thunder.
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and some will push further south across scotland during the day and increasing a chance of catching a shower in northern ireland across parts of wales for the western side of england. much of central and eastern england will state largely dry. many places will see sunny spells and temperatures across the uk nine to 12 celsius. the wind continuing to ease. and with those light winds overnight and into wednesday that's a recipe for some mist and fog patches, especially across parts of england and wales. and again a recipe for seeing temperatures close to freezing, especially in the countryside for a touch of frost as wednesday starts. so on wednesday, then, again many places going to stay dry. you can see the showers around to begin with and mainly affecting coastal areas. if you running through northern ireland, some into northern scotland. this patch along the north sea coast mayjust push further inland across england during the day with that wind direction. and a colderfeeling day on wednesday with more places topping out in just single figures for the top temperature. as we go from wednesday to thursday, a high—pressure trying to nudge in from the west and with that wind direction also killing
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off many of the showers across western parts of the uk. we will continue to see them especially along some north sea coast on thursday. a stronger northerly breeze, more of the wind—chill around on thursday. and there is a change developing in northwest scotland, thicker clouds and some outbreaks of rain starting to move in. a weather system that will bring some rain to parts of scotland, and northern ireland going into saturday and then pushing a little bit further south as the weekend goes on. and that's your latest forecast for the week ahead.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: world leaders at the climate summit in glasgow have agreed to end deforestation by 2030. around 100 countries are signing up to the pledge, including brazil, canada, russia and indonesia which is the largest
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exporter of palm oil, which has led to a dramatic removal of forestry in the country. it follows an opening day in which india's prime minister, narendra modi, told the conference that his country aims to become carbon neutral by the year 2070. it's the first time that india, which is the world's fourth biggest emitter of carbon dioxide, has announced a net zero target. emergency teams in nigeria are working through the night to find dozens of people who are feared trapped in the rubble of a collapsed apartment block in lagos. the building was under construction at the time. now on bbc news it's hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk i'm stephen sackur. kosovo has enjoyed independent statehood for 13 years,

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