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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 1, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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today at six we're in glasgow where the climate summit has opened with a barrage of warnings about the cost of failure. more than a hundred world leaders swept into glasgow amid massive security in the biggest summit ever hosted in the uk. boris johnson told fellow leaders he wanted countries to end the use of coal, to phase out petrol engines, and reverse deforestation. the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets _ the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets and — the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets and the higher the price when _ it gets and the higher the price when we — it gets and the higher the price when we eventually forced by catastrophe to act. when we eventually forced by catastrophe to act. if you're here today, you know what climate change is doing to us. you don't need my pain, or my tears, to know that we're in a crisis.
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enough of burning and i drilling our way deeper, we are digging our own graves. we'll be looking at the challenge ahead, for the hundreds of negotiators in glasgow searching for consensus. also on the programme... the driver of one of two trains involved in a collision near salisbury, suffers "life—changing" injuries. several others were hurt. you're in the black and you are just looking around, seeing if everyone is ok and can'tjust help but feel like what is going to happen? what is going to happen next? the chief executive of barclays resigns after an inquiry into links with the sex offender, jeffrey epstein. helps it away... and jos buttler�*s big hitting makes it four wins out of four for england, at the t—20 world cup. and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... following the sacking of manager
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nuno esp rito santo, tottenham look to the former chelsea boss antonio conte. good evening from glasgow, where world leaders have attended the opening ceremony of the global climate summit. those present are charged with taking momentous decisions to save the planet from a climate disaster. they heard a series of powerful appeals for action and warnings of the very high cost of failure. this cop26 conference is widely seen as the last chance to agree the measures needed. borisjohnson, who's hosting the summit, said humanity had "long since run down the clock on climate
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change, it was now one minute to midnight". the prime minister of barbados mia mottley warned that "following a path of greed and selfishness" would lead to destruction. and the un chief antonio guterres said countries were digging their own graves by failing to act on climate change. among the goals being discussed are ending the use of coal, phasing out petrol—powered cars and reversing the process of deforestation. our first report on events in glasgow is by our political editor laura kuenssberg. welcome to glasgow. thousands have made the trip from their countries. the journey, made the trip from their countries. thejourney, more the made the trip from their countries. the journey, more the shivering arrival, straight forward. their hope is that the queues and the wait will be worth it. this could affect everyone's home, but the well�*s
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political leaders did not pay is quite the same ordeal, arriving on a united nations blue, not red, carpet. to hearfirst the prime minister's big, serious moment on the world stage.— minister's big, serious moment on the world stage. humanity has long since run down _ the world stage. humanity has long since run down the _ the world stage. humanity has long since run down the clock— the world stage. humanity has long since run down the clock on - the world stage. humanity has long since run down the clock on climatej since run down the clock on climate change, it is one minute to midnight on that doomsday clock and we need to act now. the on that doomsday clock and we need to act now. ., , ., ,., ., to act now. the leaders of some of the biggest — to act now. the leaders of some of the biggest polluters, _ to act now. the leaders of some of the biggest polluters, china, - to act now. the leaders of some of| the biggest polluters, china, russia and turkey, have not shown, keeping much more than a social distance. the anger and the impatience of the world will be uncontainable unless we make this cop26 in glasgow at the moment when we get real about climate change. they will not forgive us. they will know that glasgow was the historic turning point when history fails to turn. the platform also for those people whose way of life is at grave risk right now.
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whose way of life is at grave risk riaht now. ., whose way of life is at grave risk riaht now. . , , , ., ~ right now. the earth is speaking. she tells us _ right now. the earth is speaking. she tells us that _ right now. the earth is speaking. she tells us that we _ right now. the earth is speaking. she tells us that we have - right now. the earth is speaking. she tells us that we have no - right now. the earth is speaking. | she tells us that we have no more time _ she tells us that we have no more time. , .,, she tells us that we have no more time. , , ., ., time. the uk is the host to a rainbow of— time. the uk is the host to a rainbow of nearly _ time. the uk is the host to a rainbow of nearly 200 - time. the uk is the host to a i rainbow of nearly 200 countries time. the uk is the host to a - rainbow of nearly 200 countries and wants them all to promise to cut their own carbon emissions and the wealthier to corporate more towards the $100 billion pot to help poorer countries go green. but what are the chances but do you think they are finally given as the urgency it needs? 1 finally given as the urgency it needs? ., , finally given as the urgency it needs? . , u, finally given as the urgency it needs? . , _, ., finally given as the urgency it needs? . , ., , needs? i really could not sit in that room _ needs? i really could not sit in that room and _ needs? i really could not sit in that room and not _ needs? i really could not sit in that room and not feel - needs? i really could not sit in that room and not feel it. - needs? i really could not sit in that room and not feel it. we l needs? i really could not sit in i that room and not feel it. we are optimistic _ that room and not feel it. we are optimistic i— that room and not feel it. we are optimistic. i have _ that room and not feel it. we are optimistic. i have to _ that room and not feel it. we are optimistic. i have to do _ that room and not feel it. we are optimistic. i have to do my - that room and not feel it. we are. optimistic. i have to do my speech now _ optimistic. i have to do my speech now. , ., ., , , ., now. there is a real sense of purpose. _ now. there is a real sense of purpose. but _ now. there is a real sense of purpose, but all _ now. there is a real sense of purpose, but all the - now. there is a real sense ofj purpose, but all the leaders, president biden included, must be aware it will be a long fortnight. simply not every leader is as enthusiastic as the west with wealthier populations. some of the mega economies are moving far slower than the uk would like. the indian prime minister promised today he would balance carbon emissions with absorbing those gases 20 years later
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than borisjohnson once net zero, only by 2070. but the mood in glasgow is darkening towards those who are dragging their feet. glasgow is darkening towards those who are dragging theirfeet. in glasgow is darkening towards those who are dragging their feet. in two who are dragging their feet. in two generations' _ who are dragging their feet. in two generations' time _ who are dragging their feet. in two generations' time they _ who are dragging their feet. in two generations' time they will - who are dragging their feet. in two generations' time they will be - generations' time they will be remembered for this fortnight. they could have been brilliant and everything else they have done and they will be cursed if they don't get this right. they will be cursed if they don't get this right-— they will be cursed if they don't get this right. that is interesting, ou use get this right. that is interesting, you use the _ get this right. that is interesting, you use the phrase _ get this right. that is interesting, you use the phrase occurs, - get this right. that is interesting, you use the phrase occurs, for. you use the phrase occurs, for somebody in your position of authority it is a very strong word. it was consciously a strong word. people will speak of them in far stronger terms than we speak today of the politicians of the 30s, the politicians who ignored what was happening in nazi germany, because this will kill people all around the world for generations and we will have no means of averting it. he later apologised for making the
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comparison to the nazi genocide. number ten stepped around commenting on the nature of those claims, but said there is no doubt about the seriousness of the climate challenge and have no doubt that every lever of every kind of british power is being pulled at least this week for an agreement. three generations of the royalfamily will an agreement. three generations of the royal family will be visible in one way or another. the attention justified by what many here see as an emergency. it is only day one of the discussion, it is already taken more than two decades, but the consequences of glasgow's conversation will be felt far longer than that. conversation will be felt far longer than that. there are some very specific climate targets to be discussed in the coming 12 days. the main goal, and by far the most important according to the experts, is to keep the rise in global warming to 1.5 degrees to avert the worst effects of climate change. so far, the rise in temperature has already reached at least 1.1 degrees above the average level
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of the pre—industrial period. the problem is that even if current pledges are honoured, the world is still on course for a hugely damaging increase of 2.7 degrees by the end of the century. our science editor david shukman looks at what the negotiators need to achieve in the days ahead. the world is heating up and despite all the talk about climate change we are still heading for catastrophic temperatures, so this is a chance to pick a safer course. but these giant conferences, bringing together thousands of people, over the past 25 years have always been challenging. this is the 10th that i've been to. it's amazing that despite the pandemic, so many people have managed to get here. the rule is to be masked up whenever you are moving around. the main focus for all the delegates who are here actually happens in giant meeting halls through there, that is where
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they have got to tackle the toughest question. what matters most is emissions of the gas is heating the planet. they are heading in the wrong direction. projected to rise by 16% by 2030, just as the science couldn't be clearer that they need to fall by 16% over that time. the fear is this is rebounding on us. it is time to say enough. enough of brutalising biodiversity, enough of killing ourselves with carbon, enough of treating nature like a toilet, enough of burning and drilling and mining our way deeper. we are digging our own graves. powerful words but with nearly 200 countries represented here, there are so many different agendas, that is why progress is usually slow. if you are sitting down,
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you can take your mask off and it is often in places like this that small, informal groups of negotiators will get together to try to crank the hardest questions like getting aid to the poorest nations who are hit hardest by climate change. i've seen for myself how droughts and other extremes of weather can devastate the nations least able to cope. there was a promise of assistance more than a decade ago but it still hasn't been fulfilled. the faith in the international process, it becomes a little weaker, there is a lot of distrust, there is a lot of unhappiness because we keep saying everybody has to do this together but some have more responsibility than others. and while the talks are under way, the countries show off what they are doing for climate change and the hope is to encourage practical steps. like phasing out coal, the dirtiest of the fossil fuels, and pushing the spread
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of cleaner, electric vehicles. and that is the message from sir david attenborough, that humans can be the greatest problem solvers. in my lifetime, i have witnessed a terrible decline. in yours, you could and should witness a wonderful recovery. that desperate hope, ladies and gentlemen, is why the world is looking to you and why you are here. thank you. applause a call to action well received but what matters now is how the governments of the world actually respond. let's try to work out where we stand after the end of this first formal day. david shukman is inside the summit centre. we have had india and
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china saying things today as well. what has that amounted to? well. what has that amounted to? well, certainly the _ what has that amounted to? well, certainly the announcement - what has that amounted to? well, certainly the announcement by - what has that amounted to? .m certainly the announcement by india has got a lot of people talking because for years india, one of the world's big polluters, has resisted any commitment on this agenda, saying it is a developing country and should not have to give those kind of promises. but now we have had them say they want to produce half their power from renewable sources by 2030 and to be net zero by 2070. that is clearly far later than most other countries and far too late in terms of the climate science, but it does show a new level of political engagement which has been widely welcomed. by contrast, president xijinping of china has stuck to his original position when they will be decarbonising, shifting the blame on to the west and saying the burden of tackling climate change should be carried by the countries that industrialised first. meanwhile, the
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small island nations who fear their future existence because of the rise in sea levels driven by higher temperatures, are so fed up and impatient with the foot dragging in this process they are considering going to a un tribunal to try to win compensation from the richest nations for the mess that everybody has got into. there is a mountain to climb still in terms of tackling this problem.— climb still in terms of tackling this roblem. ., , ., this problem. david, many thanks. david shukman, our _ this problem. david, many thanks. david shukman, our science - this problem. david, many thanks. | david shukman, our science editor. david shukman, our science editor. david is in one part of the conference arena, just across the river clyde from bbc scotland. in another part of the arena we can join laura kuenssberg. we heard the prime minister was very clear in spelling out what he saw as the dangers. what are they telling you about levels of optimism or pessimism around the outcomes? downing street's view for some months as they have been working up to this is it is not impossible that they will be able to achieve that 1.5 target that you explained a few
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minutes ago. that is their headline ambition, to try credibly at the end of this fortnight to say, yes, it is still potentially in touching distance and countries gathering here at this huge event have been able to do enough to keep the prospect of that limiting the rise in temperatures to the level of 1.5. but they have also believe, as they do today, that it will be extremely difficult to get there. this is about big politics, big cash, big international diplomacy and rivalries as well. it also depends on what you define success as being. it may well be this week, and i think it is very likely, that there will be a real sprinkling of other kinds of specific announcements, whether that is vague promises about planting millions more trees around the world, or more promises new kinds of technology coming forward in different parts of the world, so just as we will keep a close eye on presidents and prime ministers wandering through this vast complex,
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we will be wise to keep a close eye on all of the individual announcements coming out over this next fortnight. it is a huge day here, the opening of everything, but it is only day one.— it is only day one. indeed, many thanks, it is only day one. indeed, many thanks. laura — it is only day one. indeed, many thanks, laura kuenssberg - it is only day one. indeed, many thanks, laura kuenssberg in - it is only day one. indeed, many thanks, laura kuenssberg in the conference centre. many thanks. the driver of one of two trains involved in a collision last night near salisbury, in wiltshire, has suffered injuries believed to be "life—changing". an investigation is under way into the cause of the crash, which injured several other people. the collision happened at fisherton tunnel in salisbury, around 7'clock in the evening. the line will remain closed for the next three days, affecting services linking cardiff and bristol, with the south coast. jon kay, has the latest, and a warning — his report contains some flashing images. questions tonight at the fisherton tunnel. these two trains were travelling into salisbury in the same direction
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but somehow collided and ended up side by side. it mostly hurts in my shoulder, up here, that is where the major sprain is... cameron was on board, heading home from a halloween party, about to get off when suddenly... this most awful noise which i now know was the two trains hitting each other, violently being thrown about as the train kind of... they collided and my train started going at an angle. there's this huge rush of fire and sparks. it was quite scary seeing people with blood on their face or blood on their masks and clothes. we were in darkness and there is just panic. through the window, cameron took this picture of the other train crashed alongside. so you are waiting in the dark, what is that wait like? time just stretches out and out and out and it was only when we heard someone had spotted the blue lights on the bridge that is not far from the tunnel that there was any idea that help was coming.
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to start with, it was thought the great western railways train had derailed after hitting something in the tunnel and that the second southwestern train had then crashed into it but this evening british transport police said they have not found any evidence that the first train struck an object. this is now a major investigation. there were almost 100 people on board the two trains, around 30 of them were treated for minor injuries. unfortunately, the driver of the train was more seriously injured and his injuries are believed to be life changing. he remains in hospital in a stable condition this morning. investigators are trying to establish whether the driver of the first train managed to press the alarm to warn other trains through the signalling system. when you see pictures of the scene in daylight now, what do you make of what happened? i think daylight brings about
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the seriousness of the situation. it kind of reinforces that we kind of got really, really lucky in that this wasn't something so much worse. it could be days before the tunnel entrance is cleared and services can resume. while it is nearly 2a hours now since the crash happened here and cameron told me he will never ever forget those moments stuck in the carriage in the dark injured, knowing that two trains had already collided and knowing that a third train was due to enter the tunnel any moment. like him, people round here are thinking of those injured tonight and also are extremely grateful that nobody was killed. thank you. the foreign secretary, liz truss, says the uk won't "roll over," in a row with france
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on post—brexit fishing rights. paris has threatened to block it's ports to british boats from tomorrow, if french vessels aren't given more permits to fish in british waters. but ms truss says the number issued is "entirely in accordance" with agreements. our political correspondent, damian grammaticas, has more details. storm clouds threatening. it is all quiet for now injersey, calm in the harbour, but there is just hours until the french deadline and fishermen here are already finding themselves tangled in this dispute. for decades, natalie porritt�*s family have exported the catch made here, selling it in france, but she has just been notified that from tomorrow she should stay away from the port. we have never seen the industry stop, bar covid. i think we had two or three weeks where we didn't export into european markets, but for a0 plus years we have worked well with our french neighbours and ifeel saddened that this day has arrived. all sides were locked in meetings today but it comes down tojersey�*s authorities deciding which boats get
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permission to fish in its waters. we won't succumb to political threats or rhetoric or anecdote. it is clear. at least ten days fishing in any one of the last three years show that you have done that and you are entitled to a license. what is extraordinary is that this is a dispute aboutjust a few dozen fishing licenses and it is threatening the relationship between the uk and france. france says it is entitled to them under the terms of its trade deal with the uk, the uk that those boats can't prove they should have access to british and jersey waters. france's prime minister, jean castex, in a letter to the eu last week, urged action under the trade deal, saying the eu must show it is absolutely determined to ensure the uk fully respects the agreement. at the climate summit, clenched fists from the french
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president and prime minister. this was a friendly greeting but on this issue both sides have been digging in. emanuel macron has said it is the uk that must shift, the uk that france must back down. they have behaved unfairly. the fishing licences were awarded entirely in accordance with the trade deal we negotiated and we now need them to withdraw those unreasonable threats that they have made. and with both sides now threatening to take action, this is a dispute getting ever harder to unknot. damian grammaticas, bbc news. the barclays chief executive, jes staley, has resigned, after an inquiry into his links with the sex offender jeffrey epstein. the city watchdog and the bank of england have been looking into whether mr staley�*s relationship with the late financier was closer than first thought. barclays says it's been made aware of the conclusions of the investigation. and mr staley�*s intention
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to contest the findings. our business editor, simonjack is here. what did the raised boot regulators fine? previously he worked forjp where geoffrey xp was an important client. he insists it was a purely professional relationship. when the charges againstjeffrey epstein emerged, barclays bank board asked him to give an account of what that relationship was like. he insisted it was purely professional and findings say the volume and tone of e—mails between the two men suggest, as you say, that that relationship was close than thought. what it did not find was there was no evidence that mr staley was new party to any of the activities mr epstein was convicted. he intends to contest the findings of this report. he took it upon himself to try to track down a
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whistle—blower for which he was fined. he was on a yellow card of sorts. the bank and mr staley both thought that he couldn't continue to when the bank whilst he is in open dispute with the regulator. this came completely out of the blue and i am told that mr staley today is shellshocked, angry and upset. mani; shellshocked, angry and upset. many thanks. the queen has been pictured driving in the grounds of windsor castle, the first time she's been seen in public since being told by her doctors to rest for two weeks. she was photographed in a headscarf and sunglasses behind the wheel of a green jaguar estate car. the palace says doctors have told the queen she could continue to undertake light, desk—based duties, including some virtual audiences, but not to undertake any official visits. the price of diesel has hit a new record high. the motoring organisation the rac says the average price across the uk was nearly £1.48 yesterday,
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surpassing the record set in 2012. tottenham have sacked their head coach, nuno espirito santo, afterjust 17 games in charge. he won the premier league manager of the month award for august, but spurs have lost five of their last seven games, including saurday�*s 3—0 home defeat, to manchester united. england's cricketers are on the brink of the semi finals at the t—20 world cup, after their fourth win of the tournament. an outstanding performance from jos buttler, helped them an outstanding performance from jos buttler helped them maintain their perfect record after beating sri lanka. here'sjoe wilson. england's invincible batters. where is this going? oh, there. it's a world cup and sri lanka were desperate to win this match. here's another. oh, that's out. early wickets made spirits soar in those seats. who's left? well, jos butler. nobody hits a cricket ball better. he paced this innings. by the time he'd finished,
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england's total was 163. sri lanka's shock, how did they get that for? facing the last ball, butler needed a 6 to reach his personal hundred. he's enjoying a fantastic tournament. it is so hard to make it look that easy. but sri lanka have their big hitters too, wanindu hasaranga kept the chase on. england's fastest bowler tymal mills went off, he's had wretched luck with injuries. sri lanka still hunting. jos butler had the ball. what? watch this run out. sri lanka soon 137 all out. jos butler, just perfect. joe wilson, bbc news. now, let's return now to our top story, the climate summit cop26, and to huw in glasgow. many thanks. welcome back to the banks of the river clyde in glasgow where the cop26 climate summit is taking place.
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this global event has brought around 25,000 delegates to scotland's biggest city and it's certainly caused plenty of disruption here. but it's also an opportunity for glasgow to demonstrate its own efforts to reduce carbon emissions with a target of net zero by 2030. our scotland editor sarah smith has the story. water tight security, road closures and congestion, may be a small price to pay for a climate agreement glasgow's name. electric buses are running around the city. visitors get a full virtual reality glimpse of what you green glasgow could look like. this is the largest electric vehicle charging hub in the uk. with the capacity to power a small town or 150 fully electric buses. total cost of ownership _ or 150 fully electric buses. total cost of ownership now - or 150 fully electric buses. total cost of ownership now is - or 150 fully electric buses. total cost of ownership now is at - or 150 fully electric buses. total cost of ownership now is at a i or 150 fully electric buses. trrtal cost of ownership now is at a point where it is level with diesel or may be going slightly lower than diesel. it means we can start moving to
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electric vehicles and we can then keep fares as low as we can for customers. keep fares as low as we can for customers— keep fares as low as we can for customers. , ., , , _,, keep fares as low as we can for customers. , ., , , ' customers. this whole setup cost £9 million. customers. this whole setup cost £9 million- 7596 — customers. this whole setup cost £9 million. 7596 of — customers. this whole setup cost £9 million. 7596 of the _ customers. this whole setup cost £9 million. 7596 of the cosmic _ customers. this whole setup cost £9 million. 7596 of the cosmic by - customers. this whole setup cost £9 million. 7596 of the cosmic by the - million. 75% of the cosmic by the government. scotland is aiming to get a net 05 years before the rest of the uk by 2045. cop26 provides glasgow, the whole of scotland in fact, with an opportunity to showcase its green credentials but it also brings increased scrutiny. the scottish government has missed its climate targets for each of the last three years. increased investment in transport is a major plank in its catch—up plan. iligiith investment in transport is a ma'or plank in its catch-up pumi plank in its catch-up plan. with a scrub u - , plank in its catch-up plan. with a scrub up. we _ plank in its catch-up plan. with a scrub up, we will— plank in its catch-up plan. with a scrub up, we will be _ plank in its catch-up plan. with a scrub up, we will be perfect. - plank in its catch-up plan. with a i scrub up, we will be perfect. buying and sellin: scrub up, we will be perfect. buying and selling second-hand _ scrub up, we will be perfect. buying and selling second-hand goods - scrub up, we will be perfect. buying and selling second-hand goods is i and selling second—hand goods is nothing new, quite literally, but can significantly reduce your carbon footprint. this children's shop is one part of glasgow's efforts to be one part of glasgow's efforts to be one of the well�*s for cities with a circular economy, that is one that eliminates waste by reusing products and materials. 1 eliminates waste by reusing products and materials-—
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and materials. i think in the past, even operations _ and materials. i think in the past, even operations like _ and materials. i think in the past, even operations like this, - and materials. i think in the past, even operations like this, we - and materials. i think in the past, even operations like this, we talk| even operations like this, we talk about locals goods and the quality and choice of stuff we have got and maybe we've been scared of talking about the environmental impact. we didn't want to seem too green or hippie but people now know that is a conversation. hippie but people now know that is a conversation-— conversation. charity workers nurturing _ conversation. charity workers nurturing parts _ conversation. charity workers nurturing parts of _ conversation. charity workers nurturing parts of glasgow's i conversation. charity workers - nurturing parts of glasgow's open woodland demand cop26 succeeds. i woodland demand cop26 succeeds. i hope it will. it has to. a must do. if it hope it will. it has to. a must do. if it doesn't. _ hope it will. it has to. a must do. if it doesn't, we have the right to be incredibly angry. i if it doesn't, we have the right to be incredibly angry.— be incredibly angry. i have more faith in the _ be incredibly angry. i have more faith in the grassroots _ be incredibly angry. i have more faith in the grassroots things i be incredibly angry. i have more | faith in the grassroots things that are happening in glasgow and around the world than i do in the copper system. the world than i do in the copper sstem. , ., �*, the world than i do in the copper sstem. ., �*, ., the world than i do in the copper s stem. ., h ., ., , system. glasgow's own environment is bein: tested system. glasgow's own environment is being tested now _ system. glasgow's own environment is being tested now with _ system. glasgow's own environment is being tested now with a _ system. glasgow's own environment is being tested now with a bin _ system. glasgow's own environment is being tested now with a bin worker- being tested now with a bin worker strike. piles of rubbish are not what anyone wants this summit remembered for. later this evening
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on bbc one, there is a chance to hearfrom an audience on bbc one, there is a chance to hear from an audience of young people and what they think. here's kirsty wark. we are here at cop26 in glasgow with a young audience from all over the world. they are going to be putting four international political figures on the spot about everything from coal mining to electric cars. dojoin us, that is at 10:30pm on bbc one. looking ahead to the debate later on. let's have a look at the weather now. hello. more rainbows and white rabbits on show today. a showery first day of the month after an october which was notjust wetter and warmer than average with the met office saying the average temperature of about 1.4 degrees above what we expect in the normal long—term october average. if you have been out and about today, you will notice it has turned colder. more of that to come. low pressure that brought the stormy weekend is pulling away, there are showers of following but overall it is drier,
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the air turning to a northerly flow, lowering temperatures. there are still showers this evening across many western parts of the uk going into the night but some will trickle towards parts of yorkshire and the midlands as the night goes on. many places looking dry, clear and with the wind easing further, particularly across parts of wales, southern and eastern england, this is where we will have a colder night to come, temperatures falling close to come, temperatures falling close to freezing, especially in rural areas, for a touch of frost going into the morning. it is going to be a chilly start to the day tomorrow. many will start with blue sky and sunshine, showers from the word go, though, in northern scotland, some heavy with the risk of hail and thunder, some will push further south during the day, the chance of a shower in northern ireland, increasing showers towards wales and western parts of england. when the light about blustery with the showers in northern scotland. yes, it is feeling cold out there, with temperatures across the uk mainly in the range of nine to 12 celsius. it
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