Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 1, 2021 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

5:00 pm
colleague news. we willjoin my colleague christian fraser shortly for continuing coverage of this vital climate summit in glasgow, cop 26. this is bbc news. i am christian fraser, live at the glasgow climate change summit. borisjohnson welcome to world leaders with a speech morning younger generations will remember if they don't act now. it remember if they don't act now. if we remember if they don't act now. it we fail, they will not forgive us. they will know that glasgow was the historic turning point when history failed to turn.— historic turning point when history failed to turn. president biden says the fi . ht failed to turn. president biden says the fight against _ failed to turn. president biden says the fight against global— failed to turn. president biden says the fight against global warming i failed to turn. president biden says the fight against global warming is| the fight against global warming is a moral imperative and an economic opportunity. but the chinese and russian leaders are not attending. you in a scientists say extreme weather events are the new normal.
5:01 pm
the secretary general warned we are killing ourselves with carbon. enough of burning and drilling and mining— enough of burning and drilling and mining are— enough of burning and drilling and mining are way deeper. we are digging— mining are way deeper. we are digging ourown mining are way deeper. we are digging our own graves. in mining are way deeper. we are digging our own graves.- mining are way deeper. we are digging our own graves. in the last few minutes. _ digging our own graves. in the last few minutes, the _ digging our own graves. in the last few minutes, the prime _ digging our own graves. in the last few minutes, the prime minister i digging our own graves. in the last| few minutes, the prime minister of india, has been addressing the conference. bi; india, has been addressing the conference.— india, has been addressing the conference. by 2070, india will achieve the _ conference. by 2070, india will achieve the target _ conference. by 2070, india will achieve the target of _ conference. by 2070, india will achieve the target of net - conference. by 2070, india will achieve the target of net zero l achieve the target of net zero emissions _ achieve the target of net zero emissions-— achieve the target of net zero emissions. ., , , , ., emissions. protesters questioning whether the _ emissions. protesters questioning whether the politicians... - emissions. protesters questioning whether the politicians... have . emissions. protesters questioning i whether the politicians... have been speaking out. you whether the politicians... have been speaking out-— whether the politicians... have been speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears — speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears to — speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears to know _ speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears to know that _ speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears to know that we're - speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears to know that we're in - speaking out. you don't need my pain or my tears to know that we're in a i or my tears to know that we're in a crisis. the real question is whether you have the political will to do the right thing.—
5:02 pm
you have the political will to do the right thing. we'll be looking at the right thing. we'll be looking at the main issues _ the right thing. we'll be looking at the main issues and _ the right thing. we'll be looking at the main issues and hearing - the right thing. we'll be looking at the main issues and hearing froml the main issues and hearing from politicians and i'll be speaking to the un's special envoy for the ocean. hello, a warm welcome back to glasgow. a crucial day at the cop26 summit. we've been hearing from narendra modi of india and scott morrison of australia. 120 heads of state here in total for the morrison of australia. 120 heads of state here in totalfor the opening of the negotiations. everyone gets essay at a cop summit. in the room behind me, we've had punchy speeches this afternoon from a number of the world leaders, particularly those from countries in the tropics. already suffering from the brunt of this climate change. you can hear and what they say the frustration,
5:03 pm
the exasperation at the slow pace of change, and also the intransigence of the biggest carbon emitters. these next 48 hours will show the direction of the summit. it is the technical teams in the back rooms that hammer out all the detail, but it's the leaders in the next 48 hours that mosque at the snail for the two weeks ahead of us. —— must set the scale. 0n—call, on cars, on cash on trees. here's our science correspondent rebecca morel. sweeping into glasgow, leaders from around the world, ready for make—or—break talks on the future of our planet. there to greet them, prime minister borisjohnson and un secretary general antonio gutteres, as one by one they arrive, fresh from the g20 talks in rome. it's a roll call of more than 100 world leaders. there is royalty, too — prince charles and the duchess
5:04 pm
of cornwall have arrived. he will speak in the opening ceremony. earlier, scottish first minister nicola sturgeon met climate activist greta thunberg. but there are some notable absences, too. china's president xijin ping and russia's vladimir putin won't be joining the talks. humanity has long since run down the clock on climate change. it's one minute to midnight on that doomsday clock, and we need to act now. so, what is cop26? cop stands for conference of the parties, and was set up by the un to try to tackle climate change. the first one toook place in 1995 and this is the 26th. nearly 200 countries have already submitted plans to cut their emissions, and around 25,000 delegates are expected to turn up in glasgow. this is going to be where the heart of the action is taking place over the next two weeks. the world leaders are already here, but only for the next couple of days. after that, negotiators take over.
5:05 pm
remember, every single country comes with a very different economy, very different problems, and a very different agenda. the enormous challenge is going to be getting them all to agree. so, what's up for discussion? the world has agreed to try and keep global temperatures to 1.5 degrees. if we go above that, we move into dangerous territory. a key aim of the talks will be to keep that 1.5 degrees target alive. money, of course, will also be a focus, too, providing $100 billion a year for developing countries. they're suffering the worst impacts of climate change, but they say richer nations are to blame. we can expect more loss, more damages within the caribbean region, pacific, as well as the indian ocean. in that case, we have to make sure that we take the necessary steps in order to get these large polluters to reduce their emissions. this was the scene outside the conference centre this morning,
5:06 pm
hundreds of delegates struggling to get in. after 30 years of these meetings, they say there have been enough delays and they want to get going with these talks. there's growing demand from protesters, too. the question is, can world leaders deliver what the planet needs? we'll find out in the next two weeks. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. the protester is still outside the conference and they've been showing their frustration. frustrations we've heard from smaller states behind me. we've also heard from president biden, who said the time to act is now if we want to preserve our world because my future. this is the decade — our world because my future. this is the decade that _ our world because my future. this is the decade that will— our world because my future. this is the decade that will determine - our world because my future. this is the decade that will determine the l the decade that will determine the answer. the science is clear. we only have a brief window left to raise our ambitions and to raise to meet the task. this is a decisive
5:07 pm
decade in which we have an opportunity to prove ourselves. we can keep the goal of limiting 1.5 celsius within our reach if we come together, if we commit to doing our part of each of our nations with determination and with ambition. that's what cop26 is all about. glasgow must be the kick—off of a decade of ambition and to preserve our shared future. the decade of ambition and to preserve our shared future.— our shared future. the largest emitters our shared future. the largest emitters are _ our shared future. the largest emitters are china, _ our shared future. the largest emitters are china, united - our shared future. the largest - emitters are china, united states, india and russia. narendra modi has been on stage. it's electricity relies heavily on coal. about 65% still comes from coal. until now, they have not announced a net zero
5:08 pm
target, but we have one. prime minister narendra modi said india will aim to be net zero x 2070. translation: . i would like to put forward five key points _ . i would like to put forward five key points to — . i would like to put forward five key points to stop _ . i would like to put forward five key points to stop this - . i would like to put forward five l key points to stop this challenge. it is key points to stop this challenge. it is a _ key points to stop this challenge. it is a gift— key points to stop this challenge. it is a gift of five elixirs. firstly, _ it is a gift of five elixirs. firstly, india will increase this nonfossii— firstly, india will increase this nonfossil energy capacity to 500 gigawatts by 2030. secondly, india will fuifii— gigawatts by 2030. secondly, india will fulfil 50% of its energy requirements from renewable energy sources _ requirements from renewable energy sources by— requirements from renewable energy sources by 2020. thirdly, between now and _ sources by 2020. thirdly, between now and 2030, india will reduce its praiected _ now and 2030, india will reduce its projected carbon emissions by1 biiiion— projected carbon emissions by1 billion tonnes by 2030. india will
5:09 pm
reduce _ billion tonnes by 2030. india will reduce the carbon intensity of its economy— reduce the carbon intensity of its economy by 45%. and fifthly, by 2070, _ economy by 45%. and fifthly, by 2070, india will achieve the target of net _ 2070, india will achieve the target of net zero — 2070, india will achieve the target of net zero emissions. these five eiixirs _ of net zero emissions. these five eiixirs wiii — of net zero emissions. these five elixirs will be an unprecedented contribution by india to its climate action _ contribution by india to its climate action. ., contribution by india to its climate action. . ., :: :: action. india, net zero x 2070, china by 2060. _ action. india, net zero x 2070, china by 2060, russia - action. india, net zero x 2070, china by 2060, russia by - action. india, net zero x 2070, | china by 2060, russia by 2060. action. india, net zero x 2070, - china by 2060, russia by 2060. is that enough? we'll discuss in a second. no part of the plan is more at risk than our ocean. rising sea levels, warming waters and ocean acidification pose a massive threat to marine ecosystems and to people who live in coastal areas. what's more, many of the impacts are
5:10 pm
irreversible in our lifetime. looks set to continue for generations. a global ocean rise approaching two metres of the century cannot be ruled out. ocean temperatures are rising too, more than 90% trapped by greenhouse gases, threatening fragile marine ecosystems from coral and planked into fish and whales. c02 and planked into fish and whales. co2 from burning fossil fuels makes oceans more acidic and poses further threats to marine life. with me is peter thompson, the un special envoy for the ocean. also i see around your neck, you are a grandfather of grace, mirabelle, poppy and rosie. maybe we should all be wearing one of these because that is what is that about, the future generations of. it! that about, the future generations of. �* ., , ., of. i'd tried to get this idea across that _ of. i'd tried to get this idea across that all _ of. i'd tried to get this idea
5:11 pm
across that all these - of. i'd tried to get this idea - across that all these delegates should be wearing introductory badges to say that they are a father or mother or grandparent because this is all about our kids and grandchildren's lives. not ours. we will continue going on the way we are, but they are being condemned to are, but they are being condemned to a world basically on fire, three degrees by the end of the century unless we change our ways rapidly. what have you brought with you? this ear is a what have you brought with you? this year is a joint — what have you brought with you? try 3 year is a joint venture of mine with the ocean race. it's called the nature's bet and it's going by yacht and came up here ijy it's going by yacht and came up here by bicycles, so is travelling sustainably. insider messages from presidents of various conferences to the next contrast to show that we're all connected on this. lost conference in china or climate change conference here in glasgow or this was done in marseilles at the
5:12 pm
conservation. it will end up at the un in lisbon. i conservation. it will end up at the un in lisbon-— conservation. it will end up at the un in lisbon. i imagine most of the messaue un in lisbon. i imagine most of the message and _ un in lisbon. i imagine most of the message and send _ un in lisbon. i imagine most of the message and send that _ un in lisbon. i imagine most of the message and send that to - un in lisbon. i imagine most of the message and send that to buy - un in lisbon. i imagine most of the message and send that to buy the i message and send that to buy the same. get on with it. is 2070 a net zero target that's just been announced by the prime editor of india, is that getting on with it? india, is that getting on with it? in my mind, everyone will make a solid commitment. we've made these commitments for 2030 and we hope everyone will meet them a lot sooner than that. this generation of kids will demand that whatever country they're living in because they won't let their leaders carry on with a slow pace. they want transformation and they want to fast. qo�*s slow pace. they want transformation and they want to fast.— and they want to fast. 90% of our world trade _ and they want to fast. 9096 of our world trade travelled _ and they want to fast. 9096 of our world trade travelled by _ and they want to fast. 9096 of our world trade travelled by ship. - and they want to fast. 9096 of our world trade travelled by ship. 696| and they want to fast. 9096 of our l world trade travelled by ship. 696 of world trade travelled by ship. 6% of our emissions come from shipping. it's the dirtiest fuel as well. what are you doing about that?- it's the dirtiest fuel as well. what are you doing about that? well, that was my first — are you doing about that? well, that was my first meeting _ are you doing about that? well, that was my first meeting this _ are you doing about that? well, that was my first meeting this morning, i was my first meeting this morning,
5:13 pm
beating with some of the world's leading shipping companies to talk about getting to zero —— meeting with. if you build a new ship, you're building a ship powdered by hydrogen. i'm confident we can get it by 2050. it's just a matter of investing and leadership. let’s it by 2050. it'sjust a matter of investing and leadership. let's talk about the acidification _ investing and leadership. let's talk about the acidification of _ investing and leadership. let's talk about the acidification of our - about the acidification of our oceans. i was reading a stat the other day that since the industrial revolution, we put 30% more carbon dioxide into the environment. we have more carbon dioxide in our environment now that we have had for 800,000 years. and it's already starting to show in the coral reefs, in the marine rife around where you come from. it in the marine rife around where you come from-— come from. it will affect anything that's based _ come from. it will affect anything that's based on _ come from. it will affect anything that's based on calcium. -
5:14 pm
come from. it will affect anything that's based on calcium. that's i that's based on calcium. that's what's happening. the ocean is acidifying in the fastest rate in history. i don't know... ended up writing to president sharma. at the glasgow cop, you have to take this into consideration because this is an existential matter. the into consideration because this is an existential matter.— into consideration because this is an existential matter. the world is onl as an existential matter. the world is only as healthy — an existential matter. the world is only as healthy as _ an existential matter. the world is only as healthy as its _ an existential matter. the world is only as healthy as its ocean. - an existential matter. the world is | only as healthy as its ocean. quite. the ocean's — health is miserably in decline. my great worry is that 50% of the oxygen is created by these little creatures that we don't even see, and if you pollute them and heat them up too much, what's their tipping point was white we talk an awful lot about the protection of the rain forest, but awful lot about the protection of the rain forest,— awful lot about the protection of the rain forest, but what about the kel and the rain forest, but what about the kelp and the _ the rain forest, but what about the kelp and the grasses _ the rain forest, but what about the kelp and the grasses in _ the rain forest, but what about the kelp and the grasses in the - the rain forest, but what about the kelp and the grasses in the sea? i kelp and the grasses in the sea? what percentage of the carbon dioxide are they sucking up? there's a hue dioxide are they sucking up? there's a huge percentage. _
5:15 pm
dioxide are they sucking up? there's a huge percentage. mangroves - dioxide are they sucking up? there's a huge percentage. mangroves in . a huge percentage. mangroves in kells —— kelp, four times the rate of their terrestrial cousins. there's a creature called pro chloro caucus. elephants and lions and zebras and things, but it's really the micro life on the planet which is what's important to us, and we discovered that with covid. pro chloro caucus, produces 20% of the oxygen pasta it was only discovered in the 1950s —— caucus. i'm asking for more investment in science. we understand these things because they are the future of our kids, and that's what we care about. you're doinu that's what we care about. you're doing them _ that's what we care about. you're doing them proud, _ that's what we care about. you're doing them proud, and _ that's what we care about. you're doing them proud, and my - that's what we care about. you're doing them proud, and my kids.
5:16 pm
that's what we care about. you're | doing them proud, and my kids as well. best of luck this week. peter thompson there, oprah ocean representative from the un. —— ocean representative. there was often a certain confusion around reductions and these targets. it's a stark warning. and these targets. it's a stark warninu. . . ., ., warning. our addiction to fossil fuels is pushing _ warning. our addiction to fossil fuels is pushing humanity - warning. our addiction to fossil fuels is pushing humanity to i warning. our addiction to fossil| fuels is pushing humanity to the brink _ fuels is pushing humanity to the brink we — fuels is pushing humanity to the brink. we face a stark choice. eilher— brink. we face a stark choice. either we _ brink. we face a stark choice. either we stop it or it stops us. and _ either we stop it or it stops us. and it's — either we stop it or it stops us. and it's time to say enough. enough of brutalising biodiversity. enough of brutalising biodiversity. enough of killing _ of brutalising biodiversity. enough of killing ourselves with carbon. enough — of killing ourselves with carbon. enough of— of killing ourselves with carbon. enough of treating nature like a toilet — enough of treating nature like a toilet. enough of burning and drilling — toilet. enough of burning and drilling and mining our way deeper. we are— drilling and mining our way deeper. we are digging our own graves. antonio — we are digging our own graves. antonio gutierrez. scott morrison
5:17 pm
has just spoken in the last hour and told us science and technology will solve the problems caused by chai climate change and. the challenge will be met — climate change and. the challenge will be met the _ climate change and. the challenge will be met the same _ climate change and. the challenge will be met the same way. - climate change and. the challenge will be met the same way. and - climate change and. the challenge will be met the same way. and it | will be met the same way. and it will be met the same way. and it will be _ will be met the same way. and it will be met— will be met the same way. and it will be met by— will be met the same way. and it will be met by those _ will be met the same way. and it will be met by those who - will be met the same way. and it will be met by those who franklyl will be met the same way. and it. will be met by those who frankly are largely— will be met by those who frankly are largely not _ will be met by those who frankly are largely not in— will be met by those who frankly are largely not in this _ will be met by those who frankly are largely not in this room. _ will be met by those who frankly are largely not in this room. it— will be met by those who frankly are largely not in this room. it will- will be met by those who frankly are largely not in this room. it will be i largely not in this room. it will be our scientists, _ largely not in this room. it will be our scientists, technologists, - our scientists, technologists, engineers, _ our scientists, technologists, engineers, entrepreneurs - our scientists, technologists, | engineers, entrepreneurs and our scientists, technologists, i engineers, entrepreneurs and i finances — engineers, entrepreneurs and i finances that _ engineers, entrepreneurs and i finances. that will— engineers, entrepreneurs and i finances. that will actually - engineers, entrepreneurs and i. finances. that will actually target the pat _ finances. that will actually target the pat to— finances. that will actually target the pat to net— finances. that will actually target the pat to net zero. _ finances. that will actually target the pat to net zero. as _ finances. that will actually target the pat to net zero. as leaders . finances. that will actually target j the pat to net zero. as leaders of governments _ the pat to net zero. as leaders of governments to _ the pat to net zero. as leaders of governments to back _ the pat to net zero. as leaders of governments to back them - the pat to net zero. as leaders of governments to back them in, i governments to back them in, technology— governments to back them in, technology will— governments to back them in, technology will have _ governments to back them in, technology will have the - governments to back them in, . technology will have the answers governments to back them in, - technology will have the answers to a decarbonise — technology will have the answers to a decarbonise economy, _ technology will have the answers to| a decarbonise economy, particularly overtime _ a decarbonise economy, particularly over time. achieving _ a decarbonise economy, particularly over time. achieving it— a decarbonise economy, particularly over time. achieving it in— a decarbonise economy, particularly over time. achieving it in a - a decarbonise economy, particularly over time. achieving it in a way- over time. achieving it in a way that— over time. achieving it in a way that does— over time. achieving it in a way that does not— over time. achieving it in a way that does not deny— over time. achieving it in a way that does not deny our- over time. achieving it in a way| that does not deny our citizens, especially— that does not deny our citizens, especially in _ that does not deny our citizens, especially in developing - that does not deny our citizens, especially in developing of- especially in developing of wannabes, _ especially in developing of wannabes, their— especially in developing ofl wannabes, their livelihoods especially in developing of- wannabes, their livelihoods or the opportunities _ wannabes, their livelihoods or the opportunities for— wannabes, their livelihoods or the opportunities for better— wannabes, their livelihoods or the opportunities for better quality. wannabes, their livelihoods or the opportunities for better quality of| opportunities for better quality of life. opportunities for better quality of life driving — opportunities for better quality of life. driving down _ opportunities for better quality of life. driving down the _ opportunities for better quality of life. driving down the cost - opportunities for better quality of life. driving down the cost of - life. driving down the cost of technology— life. driving down the cost of technology and _ life. driving down the cost of technology and enabling - life. driving down the cost of technology and enabling it. life. driving down the cost ofj technology and enabling it to life. driving down the cost of. technology and enabling it to be adopted — technology and enabling it to be
5:18 pm
adopted at — technology and enabling it to be adopted at scale _ technology and enabling it to be adopted at scale is _ technology and enabling it to be adopted at scale is that - technology and enabling it to be adopted at scale is that the - technology and enabling it to bej adopted at scale is that the core technology and enabling it to be i adopted at scale is that the core of the australian _ adopted at scale is that the core of the australian way— adopted at scale is that the core of the australian way to _ adopted at scale is that the core of the australian way to reach - adopted at scale is that the core of the australian way to reach our. the australian way to reach our target — the australian way to reach our target of — the australian way to reach our target of net _ the australian way to reach our target of net zero _ the australian way to reach our target of net zero emissions i the australian way to reach our target of net zero emissions by the australian way to reach our - target of net zero emissions by 2050 that we _ target of net zero emissions by 2050 that we are _ target of net zero emissions by 2050 that we are committing _ target of net zero emissions by 2050 that we are committing to _ target of net zero emissions by 2050 that we are committing to at - target of net zero emissions by 2050 that we are committing to at this - that we are committing to at this cop26 _ that we are committing to at this cop26. ., a, ,., cop26. scott morrison, the prime minister of _ cop26. scott morrison, the prime minister of australian. _ cop26. scott morrison, the prime minister of australian. there - cop26. scott morrison, the prime minister of australian. there are i minister of australian. there are 2.5 million christians in the world, not all of them practising, and so the faith hasn't awfully big role to play. the uk archbishop of canterbury has some very strong words about the gravity of the situation facing leaders here. he said failure to act would be akin to allowing a genocide. let's take a listen to that exchange.- allowing a genocide. let's take a listen to that exchange. people will seak of listen to that exchange. people will speak of them _ listen to that exchange. people will speak of them in _ listen to that exchange. people will speak of them in far _ listen to that exchange. people will speak of them in far stronger - listen to that exchange. people willj speak of them in far stronger terms than we speak today of the politicians of the �*30s, the politicians of the �*30s, the politicians who ignored what was
5:19 pm
happening in germany because this will kill people all around the world for generations, and we'll have no means of averting it. sen; have no means of averting it. very stron: have no means of averting it. very strong language- _ have no means of averting it. very strong language. failure _ have no means of averting it. very strong language. failure to act would be worse than people allowing genocides to happen? it will would be worse than people allowing genocides to happen?— genocides to happen? it will allow a aenocide genocides to happen? it will allow a genocide on — genocides to happen? it will allow a genocide on an _ genocides to happen? it will allow a genocide on an infinitely _ genocides to happen? it will allow a genocide on an infinitely greater- genocide on an infinitely greater scale. i'm not sure there's grades of genocide, but there's with, and this will be genocide indirectly by recklessness, negligence that will in the end come back to us or to our children and grandchildren. archbishop of canterbury, who has strong feelings about this. he has taken to twitter to apologise for the language you use.
5:20 pm
—— he used. so, sorry for the language, but the sentiment we do understand, he feels strongly that we need to make significant changes, as do the world leaders speaking behind us. rebecca morelle is here. you're still standing? just behind us. rebecca morelle is here. you're still standing?— you're still standing? just about. just you're still standing? just about. just about! _ you're still standing? just about. just about! it's _ you're still standing? just about. just about! it's only _ you're still standing? just about. just about! it's only day - you're still standing? just about. just about! it's only day one! - you're still standing? just about. | just about! it's only day one! let's talk about narendra modi. we had some further commitments from india, but perhaps not as far as many people would like a.— people would like a. it was interesting _ people would like a. it was interesting because - people would like a. it was interesting because every. people would like a. it was - interesting because every country had to submit what they would do to cut their emissions. india was one we were still waiting for, but we heard from narendra modi some of the plans they have, so they have things like getting their energy from 50% renewable sources by 2030, by
5:21 pm
reducing the carbon intensity of their economy by 45% by 2030. really letting go of their reliance on fossil fuels. letting go of their reliance on fossilfuels. the letting go of their reliance on fossil fuels. the thing we haven't had from india till now is when they were going net zero. they haven't put a date on it, but they said 2070. so we have a date, but it's late. scientists say if we want to keep this goal a life of 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels, we need to get our greenhouse gas emissions now to net zero x 2050. 2070 is late. ., . now to net zero x 2050. 2070 is late. . , ., , ., late. he made this at the podium, that they are _ late. he made this at the podium, that they are one _ late. he made this at the podium, that they are one point _ late. he made this at the podium, that they are one point to - late. he made this at the podium, that they are one point to 5 - late. he made this at the podium, that they are one point to 5 billionj that they are one point to 5 billion people. he's lifting of poverty. per capita, it's 5% of the emissions. they are one of the lowest in terms of the omissions they put out. it's incumbent on the rest of the world
5:22 pm
to put these green technologies into india. i know borisjohnson has put some well he behind that today. but it is about adaptation? this some well he behind that today. but it is about adaptation?— it is about adaptation? this is interesting — it is about adaptation? this is interesting because _ it is about adaptation? this is interesting because climate i it is about adaptation? this is - interesting because climate change hasn'tjust been happening in the last ten or 20 years, but india has started using a lot of fossil fuels. it's been going on since the industrial revolution, so there is this element that the richer nations got rich through industrialisation through using fossil fuels. you have other countries saying why should we do that? one of the challenges here is to help other countries with green technologies to actually achieve that. so, you're hearing that from countries like india and china, saying "you did it, why can't we do it?" india though is the fourth biggest emitter. when you look at it per head, india does have
5:23 pm
such a big population. it's china, us, eu and then india. what happens in india is really important globally in terms of whether this is a success or not.— a success or not. let's talk about those on the _ a success or not. let's talk about those on the fringes _ a success or not. let's talk about those on the fringes of _ a success or not. let's talk about those on the fringes of the - a success or not. let's talk about i those on the fringes of the summit, the young global climate activists who have been urging leaders to do better. let's have a listen to one of them. ., ., ., ,., of them. you all have the power here toda to of them. you all have the power here today to be — of them. you all have the power here today to be better, _ of them. you all have the power here today to be better, to _ of them. you all have the power here today to be better, to remember - of them. you all have the power herej today to be better, to remember that in your— today to be better, to remember that in your meeting rooms and drafting documents, are more thanjust black and white _ documents, are more thanjust black and white objects. to remember that in your— and white objects. to remember that in your words, you wield the weapons that can _ in your words, you wield the weapons that can save — in your words, you wield the weapons that can save us orcelis out. i don't — that can save us orcelis out. i don't need _ that can save us orcelis out. i don't need to remind you of the reality— don't need to remind you of the reality of— don't need to remind you of the reality of vulnerable communities —— or sell— reality of vulnerable communities —— or sell us— reality of vulnerable communities —— or sell us out — reality of vulnerable communities —— or sell us out. if you are here today. — or sell us out. if you are here today. you _ or sell us out. if you are here today, you know what climate change is doing _ today, you know what climate change is doing to _ today, you know what climate change is doing to us. you don't need my pain— is doing to us. you don't need my pain or— is doing to us. you don't need my pain or my—
5:24 pm
is doing to us. you don't need my pain or my tears to know that we're in a crisis — pain or my tears to know that we're in a crisis the _ pain or my tears to know that we're in a crisis. the real question is, whether— in a crisis. the real question is, whether you _ in a crisis. the real question is, whether you have the political will to do— whether you have the political will to do the — whether you have the political will to do the right thing, to wield the i’ili'it to do the right thing, to wield the right words and to follow it up with long—overdue action. my right words and to follow it up with long-overdue action.— right words and to follow it up with long-overdue action. my father, the treat long-overdue action. my father, the great chief. — long-overdue action. my father, the great chief, taught _ long-overdue action. my father, the great chief, taught me _ long-overdue action. my father, the great chief, taught me that - long-overdue action. my father, the great chief, taught me that we - long-overdue action. my father, thej great chief, taught me that we must listen _ great chief, taught me that we must listen to— great chief, taught me that we must listen to the — great chief, taught me that we must listen to the stars, _ great chief, taught me that we must listen to the stars, the _ great chief, taught me that we must listen to the stars, the moon, - great chief, taught me that we must listen to the stars, the moon, the l listen to the stars, the moon, the wind, _ listen to the stars, the moon, the wind, the — listen to the stars, the moon, the wind, the animals— listen to the stars, the moon, the wind, the animals and _ listen to the stars, the moon, the wind, the animals and the - listen to the stars, the moon, the wind, the animals and the trees. i listen to the stars, the moon, the i wind, the animals and the trees. the climate _ wind, the animals and the trees. the climate is _ wind, the animals and the trees. the climate is warming, _ wind, the animals and the trees. the climate is warming, the _ wind, the animals and the trees. the climate is warming, the rivers - wind, the animals and the trees. the climate is warming, the rivers are . climate is warming, the rivers are dying _ climate is warming, the rivers are dying and — climate is warming, the rivers are dying and our— climate is warming, the rivers are dying and our plants _ climate is warming, the rivers are dying and our plants don't - climate is warming, the rivers are dying and our plants don't flowerl dying and our plants don't flower like they— dying and our plants don't flower like they did _ dying and our plants don't flower like they did before. _ dying and our plants don't flower like they did before. the - dying and our plants don't flower like they did before. the earth i dying and our plants don't flower like they did before. the earth isj like they did before. the earth is speaking — like they did before. the earth is speaking she _ like they did before. the earth is speaking. she tells _ like they did before. the earth is speaking. she tells us _ like they did before. the earth is speaking. she tells us that - like they did before. the earth is speaking. she tells us that we i like they did before. the earth is i speaking. she tells us that we have no more _ speaking. she tells us that we have no more time _ speaking. she tells us that we have no more time. it's— speaking. she tells us that we have no more time-— no more time. it's real and it's immediate _ no more time. it's real and it's immediate for _ no more time. it's real and it's immediate for these _ no more time. it's real and it's immediate for these people. i no more time. it's real and it's - immediate for these people. that's what the youth _ immediate for these people. that's what the youth voice _ immediate for these people. that's what the youth voice has _ immediate for these people. that's what the youth voice has been - what the youth voice has been growing stronger and stronger. led by none other than greta thunberg,
5:25 pm
who is accused world leaders of too much blah blah blah. it's been interesting seeing this grow. i think this confidence, there's never been so much pressure for the outside world. the voice for action is growing stronger and louder. you this desire feels like this is a make or break moment for climate change. make or break moment for climate chance. . make or break moment for climate chane. , ., , make or break moment for climate chance. .,, i. make or break moment for climate chance. .,, , change. good to see you, rebecca. one of the — change. good to see you, rebecca. one of the campaigners _ change. good to see you, rebecca. one of the campaigners said - change. good to see you, rebecca. one of the campaigners said they i one of the campaigners said they really didn't want to fudge out of this because if there's nothing that came out of it, it empowers them and gets people more angry and that's what they feed on. debate whether that's the right way forward, but some people very impassioned about it. we'll be live with special programming here throughout the summit on bbc world news. we have a special edition of global questions and a young audience at that
5:26 pm
conference from all over the world. they will be putting their questions to leaders. stay with us. good evening. october 2021 has been both warmer and wetter than average. it certainly ended on a very wet note and windy one, as well — and that same area of low pressure has brought a lot of showers along spells of rain and brisk winds during the day today. but it's moving out of the way and we change our wind direction to a northwesterly, and we will notice a distinct chill in the air. still plenty of showers though to come through this evening, some heavy with hail and thunder
5:27 pm
as you can see, and still a brisk wind blowing across the north of scotland. but gradually through the night, the showers do tend to ease somewhat, the skies clearing and winds easing in the south, so a touch of frost in rural parts of england and wales, and even some fog here come the morning. and at this time of year, november time, the fog will linger throughout the rush hour, in fact, throughout much of the morning. otherwise, once it goes, we should see more sunshine around for those areas that have been pretty wet through the day today, like north wales and parts of northern england. not as wet and windy across northern scotland, but still plenty of showers blowing in here, and any of the showers that materialise through the day could be heavy and hail with thunder — nowhere is exempt, but the further east you are, the fewer showers there will be. but despite temperatures being on par with those of today, because of the change in wind direction, i think there will be a bit of a chill in the air, 8—12 celsius. then through tomorrow night, those showers keep coming, that northerly wind with us. but inland, away from those showers, it will be cold again — a touch of frost, a colder night for scotland and northern ireland,
5:28 pm
as well, i think, and probably more fog around wednesday morning with the lighter wind regime. and that fog could lingerfor some right the way through the morning, certainly a risk of a hazard on the road through the rush hour, still a chilly day with showers pestering the west coast, the east coast, and northern scotland, but some good spells of sunshine inland away from those showers. but still, just enough breeze to keep carrying them southward through the night, wednesday to thursday — again, another chilly night, more widely frost in the north, as you can see, perhaps not as much of those onshore winds and showers into southern and eastern areas. and perhaps it's here where we will see most of those showers then through the day on thursday — because further north and west, we are starting to bring more cloud backend, the atlantic influence, if you like, the onset once again of some milder air. initiallyjust some cloud and patchy rain, as you can see here on friday, but it will turn more unsettled with time over the weekend again.
5:29 pm
5:30 pm
hello, this is bbc news. i'mjane i'm jane hill. the headlines... bagpipes play world leaders are gathered in glasgow for the cop26 climate summit. at the opening ceremony, borisjohnson warned that younger generations will remember if leaders don't act now. if we fail, they will not forgive us. they will know that glasgow was the historic turning point when history failed to turn. india, the world's third—biggest greenhouse gas emitter, pledges a net zero target for 2070 — but that's 20 years later than the target set by borisjohnson. all this comes as un scientists warn that extreme weather events are the new normal,
5:31 pm
and the past seven years are on course to be the hottest on record. in other news: a train driver is said to have life—changing injuries after yesterday's collision between two trains near salisbury in wiltshire. the uk says it's prepared to take legal action against france in relation to the ongoing row about post—brexit fishing rights, tottenham have sacked their manager, nuno espirito santo, after only four months in charge. more on that story later and more in the sports news, as well. let's return now to cop26, the un climate conference that has got under way in glasgow. around 120 heads of state are attending the 12 days of talks that centre around limiting the impact of climate change.
5:32 pm
speaking earlier, sir david attenborough said that the motivation to rescue our planet shouldn't be "fear", but "hope". you'll make the stability we all depend on is breaking. this you'll make the stability we all depend on is breaking. this story is one of inequality, _ depend on is breaking. this story is one of inequality, as _ depend on is breaking. this story is one of inequality, as well— depend on is breaking. this story is one of inequality, as well as - one of inequality, as well as instability. today, those who have done the least to cause this problem are being the hardest hit. ultimately all of us will feel the impact, some of which are now unavoidable. is this how our story is due to end? a tale of the smartest species doomed by that all too human characteristic of failing too human characteristic of failing to see the bigger picture in pursuit of short—term goals? perhaps the fact that the people most affected by climate change are no longer some
5:33 pm
imagined future generation, but young people alive today. perhaps that will give us the impetus we need to rewrite our story. to turn this tragedy into a triumph. we are, after all, the greatest problem solvers to have ever existed on earth. we now understand this problem. we know how to stop the number pricing and put it in reverse. we must have carbon emissions, stop them this decade. we must recapture billions of tonnes of carbon from the air. we must fix our sights on keeping 1.5 degrees within reach. a new industrial revolution, powered by millions of sustainable innovations, it is essential — and
5:34 pm
is indeed already beginning. we will all share in the benefits. daeid all share in the benefits. david attenborough _ all share in the benefits. david attenborough speaking - all share in the benefits. david attenborough speaking in - all share in the benefits. david attenborough speaking in glasgow. as we've been hearing, boris johnson has called on countries to end the use of coal, phase out petrol—powered cars, and reverse deforestation — and said world leaders need to move from "aspiration to action" in order to slow global warming. earlier, he spoke to our climate editor, justin rowlatt. would you say you are now an environmentalist, mrjohnson? i've always been a passionate lover of the natural world, but it was only really on becoming prime minister, seeing the, er, the upward spike in the temperature change. there's absolutely no doubt about it. we have to fix this thing. we're all thinking about our own carbon footprint. what is the... laughter what is the johnson household doing?
5:35 pm
go on! obviously, i've totally abolished commuting since i, i live above my place of work. but what i used to do is, i used to cycle absolutely everywhere. on the big issue, the cop26 summit, it isn't brexit that in the long term you're going to be remembered for. you're going to be remembered for the deal that you bring back from glasgow, because that is the one that's going to affect the climate that we all endure or live in for decades, centuries, thousands of years, possibly. that is the tragedy of it. i don't think people realise that the difference between 1.5, restraining it to 1.5 degrees, increasing 1.5 degrees and two degrees, is the difference between losing 70% of the world's coral reefs at 1.5 degrees and losing all of them at two degrees. that is an appalling prospect. everybody knows that it's the uk that's out in front. when i was a kid, 80% of our power came from coal. when i was mayor of
5:36 pm
london, it was 40%. it's now 1%. let's talk about coal. that's an amazing... let's talk about coal, and i know everybody asks you this question, but you're going to china, you're going to india, you're going to the developing world, saying, "phase out coal at the same time as not ruling out world, saying, "phase out coal" at the same time as not ruling out a new coal mine in britain — a new coal mine in britain! we started the industrial revolution, we should close the mines. i've just given you the statistics, before you have... ah, but why don't you just say we're not going to open them? i've just given you the statistics. why don't we be clear on the coalmine? the chinese will say, "we can't take this guy seriously." well, sorry, but what absolutely everybody finds incontrovertible is the progress the uk has already made. no, i'm sorry to bang on about the coal, but the point is, you can't... you know, it makes you look... makes you look a little bit weaselly, not answering the coal question, because they're going to go and you're talking about coal. sorry, i've answered the coal question. directly.
5:37 pm
and let me tell you directly, we are yes or no on the coalmine? what do you reckon? i'm not in favour of more coal, let's be absolutely clear, but it's not a decision for me. it's a decision for local planning authorities. you are about to go to glasgow, how confident are you about the outcome? i have told you, i think it is in the balance, i think that we have had a decent outcome at the g20 so far but everybody has got a lot more to do. that was the prime ministers speaking before the cup 26 claimant. and you can keep up to date with everything that's going on at the cop26 on our website, that's bbc.co.uk/news. -- cop26 —— co p26 conference. a train driver is said to have "life—changing" injuries after yesterday's accident near salisbury in wiltshire. two trains collided yesterday evening. passengers were thrown from their seats and 14 were treated in hospital.
5:38 pm
travellers are being warned that the line may be shut for some days. andrew plant reports from the scene. twisted off their tracks and lying side—by—side, still blocking this tunnel on the edge of salisbury. the two passenger trains collided — one already partially derailed, the other on the same line coming up seven minutes behind. there were around 100 passengers on board, badly shaken but most able to walk to safety. suddenly there was this horrible noise and itjust started to tilt and fall over, and we all fell over in the carriage. there was this massive impact and i fell across the table and then the table came off the wall and ended up underneath another table. there was suddenly a lot ofjostling, possessionsl being thrown around. i think a few people went forward and hit their heads. _
5:39 pm
more than a dozen people were taken to hospital, including one train driver who had to be cut free. it's not yet clear what caused the first train to partially derail or why the second train wasn't given an emergency stop signal, but continued apparently unaware a stationary train was waiting along the line. i'm very thankful there were no fatalities. there were some injuries to customers and our driver so they have all been looked after, our customes, we are giving support to those affected and today our focus is on working with the british transport police and the investigating authorities to find out what's happened here. there are warning systems in place that should have alerted the approaching train long before any collision occurred. network rail say this line could be out of action for several days while investigators try to work out exactly what went wrong. andrew plant, bbc news, in salisbury.
5:40 pm
a court has been told that a man who admitted killing two women in 1987 also abused female corpses in two hospital morgues. 67—year—old david fuller has admitted killing wendy knell and caroline pierce, in kent, more than 30 years ago. but he denies murder, on the grounds of diminished responsibility. the court heard that the sexual offences took place in the mortuaries of the kent and sussex hospital and the tunbridge wells hospital in pembury, which replaced it. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds explains. wendy knell and caroline pierce were young women who lived in bedsits in tunbridge wells in the 1980s. and this case has taken more than 30 years to come to court. david fuller is accused of murdering both of them. wendy knell�*s body was found in her bedsit. caroline pierce's body was found in a drainage ditch in romney marsh,
5:41 pm
about 40 miles away. now david fuller, as i said, is accused of murdering them, but he has admitted killing both young women. he has said that he did so because he was suffering from a mental condition, which amounted to him not being responsible for what he was doing, an argument of diminished responsibility. opening the case this morning, the prosecutor said there was a different and clear explanation for the defendant's behaviour — he said that mr fuller had a desire for sexual gratification through the observation and identification of vulnerable women. gaining control of them and then indulging his depraved sexual predilections in relation to them. he said that that behaviour linked him with caroline and wendy's deaths. we also heard, in evidence that the jury was told would be difficult for them to hear during this trial, that david fuller
5:42 pm
worked at two hospitals, the kent and sussex and the tunbridge wells hospital at pembrey, which replaced it. he had access to the mortuary. the jury was told that david fuller had sexually abused the dead bodies of women being stored in the mortuary. also, in other submissions to the jury, the prosecution said that there was strong dna evidence linking david fuller with both with both wendy's death and caroline's death, and a fingerprint in blood which matched david. we just wejust had a we just had a statement from the two train companies involved in network rail, just worth giving you a few
5:43 pm
more details i think because they are talking amongst other things about considerable disruption as a result of that train collision. first, a word about one of the train drivers, because we have been hearing in the last few hours that one of the train drivers was, it would seem, quite badly hurt. this statement says, "we are thankful that the majority of customers and colleagues have been able to go home safely, but unfortunately it has become clear that one of the drivers sustained a more serious injury and continues to be treated in hospital. everyone and the railway family is wishing him a swift recovery." they go on to talk about the disruption and they say, "the relevant authorities are still in there very early stages of their investigations, and it's likely the trains will need to remain on—site for some time, and the line will stay closed for at least a few days. " so if you live or work in the
5:44 pm
area, you might know this affects two services, southwest trains and great western trains. so this statement makes the point that southwestern is unable to run any services in or out of salisbury. there is a limited bus replacement services but we are asking customers to avoid all but essential travel in the area. great western, gw r, is unable to call between the stations between salisbury and ramsey. buses will replace trains, but passengers are advised to check the websites. there is considerable disruption and it will last for at least a few days — so a considerable warning about train travel there from southwestern and great western.
5:45 pm
the boss of barclays, jess staley, has stepped down over an investigation by uk regulators into alleged links with the disgraced financier and sex offender, jeffrey epstein. a statement from the bank said it should be noted that "the investigation makes no findings that mr staley saw, or was aware of, any of mr epstein's alleged crimes". epstein was first convicted and jailed for six offences in 2008, then arrested again in 2019, and died in his cell two months later. mr staley has said that his relationship with epstein ended in late 2015. rescuers in nigeria are searching for survivors after a high—rise building collapsed in the financial capital, lagos. the block of flats, more than 20 storeys high,
5:46 pm
was under construction, and there are fears that up to 100 workers may have been inside. it isn't clear what brought the building down, but construction safety standards in nigeria are notoriously lax. covid boosterjabs are available from today in england without needing an appointment. people in the priority groups can turn up at walk—in centres across the country — but must have had their second dose at least six months ago. people eligible for a boosterjab include anyone aged 50 and over. nhs england say more than six million people have already had a boosterjab or a third dose. thailand is removing almost all quarantine requirements for foreign visitors from dozens of countries as it tries to revive its tourism industry. visitors from 60 countries, which are considered low—risk, will now be allowed to enter without restrictions — as long as they can prove
5:47 pm
they have been vaccinated. —— fully vaccinated. the foreign secretary, liz truss, has told the bbc that the uk is prepared to take legal action against the eu because of the row with france about fishing rights. ms truss said the french had behaved unfairly, and the uk would not roll over in the face of unwarranted threats. here's what she said earlier. france has made completely unacceptable threats to our fishermen and to the channel islands in terms of their energy supply, and we need them to withdraw those threats. if they do not withdraw those threats, we are prepared to use the dispute resolution mechanism in the trade deal we signed with the eu to take action against the french. they have behaved unfairly. the fishing licences were awarded entirely in accordance with the trade deal we negotiated, and we need them to withdraw those
5:48 pm
unreasonable threats they have made. the queen has been photographed out driving, near windsor castle after being instructed by doctors to only undertake "desk—based duties" for two weeks. the 95—year—old monarch is seen here driving a green estate car. the images are said to have been taken this morning, and show her majesty wearing a signature headscarf and a pair of sunglasses. the queen had planned to be in glasgow for the cop26 summit but was advised by doctors to rest. the premier league club tottenham hotspur have sacked their manager nuno espirito santo — afterjust four months in charge. it follows a string of bad results, culminating in a 3—0 home defeat to manchester united, at which the manager was booed by fans.
5:49 pm
well we can speak now to lee mcqueen from the last word on spurs podcast. he joins us from oxford. not really a surprise after that threshing. it not really a surprise after that threshing-— not really a surprise after that threshin. ., , ., ., , ., , threshing. it was a thrashing, as well, threshing. it was a thrashing, as well. eight _ threshing. it was a thrashing, as well, eight years _ threshing. it was a thrashing, as well, eight years ago _ threshing. it was a thrashing, as well, eight years ago we - threshing. it was a thrashing, as well, eight years ago we got - well, eight years ago we got absently thrashed by liverpool at home and we didn't have a shot or target most sadly the same happened on saturday, not one shot on target when you have world—class players — and there was only one way that was going to go. initially took longer thanit going to go. initially took longer than it might, to be fair, but he's now been sacked and we are looking for another manager again. in for another manager again. in speculation it will be antonio kant ? is that we speculation it will be antonio kant? is that we think speculation it will be antonio kant ? is that we think it's headed, what are your thoughts about him? it looks to be that way. i'm flabbergasted that we were going
5:50 pm
back in, the reports were coming out of the club back in the summer that he turned us down, we rejected him because we couldn't fulfil his ambitions, so they must�*ve been a big u—turn from the board because he would definitely need assurances of money to be spent injanuary, and there must�*ve been that u—turn. so it looks like it will be antonio kant. i think that he is the current champion, if you like, of serie a, enter milan won the last serie a, enter milan won the last serie a, enter milan won the last serie a campaign and he was the manager, he's number three with juventus and also on the title with chelsea, as well. he's an impressive current manager, current champion, and maybe that's what tottenham hotspur need. that's what all of as fans are crying out for, a plan and direction of where we need to go and what we can achieve. i am hearing
5:51 pm
reports that it'll be an 18 month contract which, in itself, is strange but maybe that's for both parties, if you like, make sure that they don't run age on their assurances that shirley he will need. ~ ., ., ,, ~' assurances that shirley he will need. ~ ., ., ,, , need. what do you think could be said to result _ need. what do you think could be said to result in _ need. what do you think could be said to result in a _ need. what do you think could be said to result in a u-turn - need. what do you think could be said to result in a u-turn in - need. what do you think could be said to result in a u-turn in suchl said to result in a u—turn in such a small amount of time? said to result in a u-turn in such a small amount of time?— said to result in a u-turn in such a small amount of time? money talks certainl in small amount of time? money talks certainly in football, _ small amount of time? money talks certainly in football, so _ small amount of time? money talks certainly in football, so it _ certainly in football, so it expected to be money. not necessarily on the wages, i think they've been able to pay his demands. but i think it's about on playing staff. the january transfer window is not far out, we've got to be able to start investing in the squad even further than we have done up squad even further than we have done up till this point, and he's a winner, a champion, but he also spends a lot of money. he's got a
5:52 pm
lot of money at enter milan and chelsea, and i think that's what he'll expect at tottenham hotspur. whether or not that happens remains to be seen. as a spurs fan, all i'm looking for is consistency in our football club and a direction where we can go. but if we get antonio kant on the line, it'll be a massive, massive statement for leaving the board.— massive, massive statement for leaving the board. maybe we'll be talkin: leaving the board. maybe we'll be talking again _ leaving the board. maybe we'll be talking again when _ leaving the board. maybe we'll be talking again when we _ leaving the board. maybe we'll be talking again when we know- leaving the board. maybe we'll be talking again when we know for. leaving the board. maybe we'll be i talking again when we know for sure. thanks so much, all the best, lee mcqueen from the podcast last word on spurs. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport center, here's sarah. a brilliant performance from jos buttler helped england secure their fourth win from four. to all but seal their spot in the semi—finals.
5:53 pm
england are in action at the t20 men's world cup right now, taking on sri lanka in sharjah. their opponents won the toss and elected to bowl. and england were wobbling early on. jason roy bowled for nine in the second over before dawid malan and jonny bairstow lost their wickets in quick succession to put england in a tricky position at 35 for three — but up stepped, jos buttler, magnificent showing from him, 101 not out — to guide england to 163 from their 20 overs. in reply, sri lanka are currently 50 for three in the eighth over. so that's wrapped up, england play south africa next on saturday. tottenham are in advanced negotiations with former chelsea boss antonio conte about becoming their new manager. the club sacked nuno espirito santo this morning, afterjust four months in charge. conte was due to hold face—to—face talks in london today, with an announcement possible as early as tomorrow.
5:54 pm
chairman daniel levy and managing director fabio paratici are moving quickly to secure a new manager for spurs, who lie eight in the table, afterjust two wins in the last seven league games. conte left inter milan in may after winning the serie a title. here's how spurs fans have been reacting to the news. should've got rid of pochettino. it should've backed them up 100%, unfortunately the chairman didn't back them up. unfortunately the chairman didn't back them op— unfortunately the chairman didn't back them u. ., ., , , back them up. needed to go. deftly needed to go. _ back them up. needed to go. deftly needed to go, his _ back them up. needed to go. deftly needed to go, his tactics _ back them up. needed to go. deftly needed to go, his tactics and - needed to go, his tactics and everything, especially against manchester united, were awful. a lot of the _ manchester united, were awful. a lot of the players don't look like they're — of the players don't look like they're playing for him anymore. once _ they're playing for him anymore. once you — they're playing for him anymore. once you lose your dressing room, your days — once you lose your dressing room, your days are numbered. he has to lo. your days are numbered. he has to co. �* your days are numbered. he has to .o_ �* ., , your days are numbered. he has to co. �* . , ., �* , your days are numbered. he has to co. �* ., , ., �* , , your days are numbered. he has to go. i'm really gone he's 'ust glad he's go. i'm really gone he's 'ust glad has gone. i go. i'm really gone he's 'ust glad he's gone, actually, i go. i'm really gone he'sjust glad he's gone, actually, because i go. i'm really gone he'sjust glad he's gone, actually, because hel he's gone, actually, because he played — he's gone, actually, because he played a — he's gone, actually, because he played a really _ he's gone, actually, because he played a really boring _ he's gone, actually, because he played a really boring game i he's gone, actually, because he played a really boring game of. played a really boring game of football — played a really boring game of football. but _ played a really boring game of football. but now— played a really boring game of football. but now he's - played a really boring game of football. but now he's gone, i played a really boring game of. football. but now he's gone, we can start playing — football. but now he's gone, we can start playing fantastic _ football. but now he's gone, we can start playing fantastic football - start playing fantastic football that tottenham _ start playing fantastic football that tottenham love - start playing fantastic football that tottenham love and i start playing fantastic football that tottenham love and what start playing fantastic football i that tottenham love and what the fans want — that tottenham love and what the fans want go— that tottenham love and what the fans want. 60 to _ that tottenham love and what the fans want. 60 to auto _ that tottenham love and what the fans want. 60 to auto mechanic. that tottenham love and what the | fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— that tottenham love and what the i fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— go tottenham! _
5:55 pm
fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— go tottenham! you'll— fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— go tottenham! you'll make _ fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— go tottenham! you'll make we _ fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— go tottenham! you'll make we can do i fans want. 60 to auto mechanic —— go tottenham! you'll make we can do iti tottenham! you'll make we can do it with with _ tottenham! you'll make we can do it with with better— tottenham! you'll make we can do it with with better content. _ gareth bale could win his 100th wales cap after being named in the squad for world cup qualifiers against belarus and belgium. the real madrid man hasn't played since september because of hamstring tear. he's the all—time top scorer for the men's team, and would follow team—mate chris gunter in reaching the milestone — he currently has 99 caps. his return would be a huge boost to wales as they look to secure second spot in their group. he's been a tremendous servant to our company over the years, and he deserves all the plaudits he gets for being a phenomenal servant for whales. but we've proven we can still win games of football without the captain on the team. and that's good for football and the squad we've got. so it takes a little bit of pressure off them, as well. cameron norrie's hopes of reaching
5:56 pm
the atp finals later this month are still alive after beating federico delbonis at the paris masters. the british number one, who's seeded tenth at this tournament, beat the argentine in straight sets in just over an hour. it wasn't an easy finish though as he endured a 27—shot rally before securing the 100th atp tour win of his career. but there was disappointment for british number two dan evans though. he was beaten in three sets by alexander bublik of kazakhstan, who's 12 places below him in the world rankings. andy murray received a wildcard into the tournament and plays lucky loser dominik koepfer later. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc. c0. uk/sport. good evening. low pressure responsible for all the wet and windy whether in recent days. you can see it circulating here, still plenty of showers, strong winds in the north and the west, but
5:57 pm
elsewhere are a few showers around, sharp showers do this evening, but they tend to fade away and lend overnight, allowing tipsters to tumble, some mist and fog and southern areas and a touch of frost in rural parts of england and wales. so much colder to start is we wake up so much colder to start is we wake up on tuesday morning, a little bit of fog around, perhaps for the midlands and southern areas will be slow to clear this time of year. otherwise it's a day of sunny spells of showers, the majority of those falling in northern and western areas brought in on this notably chilly northwesterly breeze. lighter thanit chilly northwesterly breeze. lighter than it has been, but because of the change in wind direction, we will all notice a chill in the air despite some sunshine for the day ahead tomorrow. and it stays chilli through wednesday as well, another day of sunny spells and scattered showers, perhaps a little bit drier towards the end of the week.
5:58 pm
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
today at six we're in glasgow where the climate summit has opened with a barrage of warnings about the cost of failure. more than a hundred world leaders swept into glasgow amid massive security in the biggest summit ever hosted in the uk. boris johnson told fellow leaders he wanted countries to end the use of coal, to phase out petrol engines, and reverse deforestation. the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets _ the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets and — the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets and the higher the price when _ it gets and the higher the price when we — it gets and the higher the price when we eventually forced by catastrophe to act. when we eventually forced by catastrophe to act. if you're here today, you know what climate change is doing to us. you don't need my pain, or my tears, to know that we're in a crisis. enough of burning and i
6:01 pm
drilling our way deeper,

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on