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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 1, 2021 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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you good morning and welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: the prime minister warns that time is running out to prevent catastrophic global warming, as world leaders arrive in glasgow for the cop 26 climate change summit. a one minute to midnight moment and the clock is ticking. we have to get everybody to do more. good morning from glasgow, as 12 days of talks on the future of the planet get under way. we look at how climate change is damaging lives here and around the world — and ask what can we do to cut our emissions?
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with 120 leaders from around the world here now, can they really reach a deal? 17 people are taken to hospital after two trains collide in wiltshire. we'll be live there this morning, close to the scene of the crash. a night to remember for best friends freddie and hughie — their fundraising efforts win them a pride of britain award and a red carpet encounter with none other than hollywood a—lister sharon stone. you don't have to have a lot of good friends but you have to do have one. he is your one, isn't he? he would do anything for you as well, right? that's the way it goes. chelsea get the women's fa cup final they wanted. they'll play arsenal after the gunners beat brighton, as chelsea knock out the defending champions manchester city. good morning. we are looking at sunshine and blustery showers and less weight. it will be cooled by day, frost by night, something quieter coming our way midweek. i will have all the details later.
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it's monday 1st november. our main story this morning is the start of the cop 26 international climate change conference in glasgow. world leaders are facing calls for urgent action to tackle global warming. nina is in glasgow for us this morning. good morning, nina. good morning, nina. good morning, nina. good morning, dan and sally. it's one of those moments. the eyes of the world will be on scotland today, as world leaders gather here in glasgow for the cop 26 summit. the aim of the two—week event is to commit to measures to limit the rise in global temperatures and cut emissions. in his welcoming speech, prime minister borisjohnson will tell them that "the clock is ticking" and we must act today or it will be too late for the next generation — but as our political correspondent chris mason explains, there is mounting pressure for action rather than just words. the world arrives in glasgow today, or at least lots of its leaders do, with plenty saying now is the time
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there has to be action and plenty of it to minimise the impact of climate change. this is very, very urgent, notjust for our country, for the whole world. if i had to give a comparison i would say it's a one minute to midnight moment and the clock is ticking. we have to get everybody to do more. and they need to make further commitments, they need to make further commitments on how we're going to move away from coal, fossilfuel burning, how we're going to move away from using hydrocarbon cars, how were going to plant millions of trees if not a trillion trees around the world, protect the world's biodiversity and above all how we're going to get the whole of the developing world to buy into this. so what is cop 26? cop stands for conference of the parties and was set up by the united nations
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to tackle climate change. the first one, cop 1, took place in 1995. this is the 26th. nearly 200 countries are being asked to submit plans to cut their emissions and around 25,000 delegates are expected to turn up in glasgow. the prime minister has been sounding pretty gloomy about the prospect of getting a meaningful agreement from the summit. are rich countries willing to do enough themselves and are they willing to help poorer countries tackle climate change? the prime minister and the prince of wales will welcome world leaders to glasgow later. with prince charles saying this is the last chance saloon. the sound bite we will regularly hear is trying to keep 1.5 alive, keeping global average temperatures no more than 1.5 degrees warmer than preindustrial times to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.
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it's widely accepted achieving that will be very difficult. some think it's already too late. chris mason, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is also here in glasgow. morning, adam. the prime minister talking about actions not words. as the host nation, will there be pressure on the uk to lead from the front, can we expect any new announcements? £31 front, can we expect any new announcements?— front, can we expect any new announcements? . ., , announcements? of course there will be pressure — announcements? of course there will be pressure because _ announcements? of course there will be pressure because countries - announcements? of course there will be pressure because countries that i be pressure because countries that host these climate conferences have a reputation after them so for example denmark did one a few years ago that went quite badly whereas france did one that went well so there is pressure but also, as i've been learning about this process, it is not like your normal summit when it is all on your house but it is
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all on the 107 27 countries and organisations that are here doing these —— 197 countries. so it is not all britain's responsibility. what struck me in the last few days is how gloomy the prime minister has been sounding, he is normally upbeat but he sounds miserable about all this and i think that is because so far countries have not made commitments to cut their carbon emissions bite enough to hit that crucial targets of limiting the increase in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees by the middle of the century. that could change starting today because we will have more than 100 prime ministers and presidents here on the point of these conferences is it's notjust the rich countries that produce lots of emissions, you get poorer countries that are already feeling the effects of climate change and some developing countries are starting to emit a lot of carbon themselves and
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that can be quite a combustible mix that can be quite a combustible mix that can be quite a combustible mix that can either lead to a bust up for a breakthrough. also the uk has already pre—agreed some side agreements to come out of conversations so it already looks like things are going quite well and to give you a sense of how big it is, it's all and to give you a sense of how big it is, it's alland i to give you a sense of how big it is, it's all and i are at the same event it would take me about 25 minutes to walk to where you are. so you are notjust being lazy saying you are notjust being lazy saying you will not come over? any you are notjust being lazy saying you will not come over? any time, it would 'ust you will not come over? any time, it would just take _ you will not come over? any time, it would just take me _ you will not come over? any time, it would just take me a _ you will not come over? any time, it would just take me a while _ you will not come over? any time, it would just take me a while to - would just take me a while to get there. would 'ust take me a while to get there. ., , . ~ ., there. you will be back in time for our next there. you will be back in time for your next link. _ there. you will be back in time for your next link. we _ there. you will be back in time for your next link. we have _ there. you will be back in time for your next link. we have about - there. you will be back in time for your next link. we have about 120j your next link. we have about 120 world leaders all coming here from their own perspectives, it is whether they can make an agreement, lots of scepticism about whether an agreement can be reached but not trying isjust agreement can be reached but not trying is just not an option.
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let's bring you some other news. rail accident investigators are examining the scene of a collision between two trains in salisbury, which left 17 people needing hospital treatment. officials say the line could be closed for some time while inquiries continue. jon kay reports. one mile from the centre of salisbury. it was here, just before 7pm last night, that a great western railways train hit an object inside the fisherton tunnel. it's believed part of the train derailed, knocking out the signalling. a few minutes later, a south western train, travelling from london to devon, collided with the first. just this massive impact and i fell across the table and then the table came off the wall, i ended up underneath another table. there was just suddenly a lot ofjostling, possessions being thrown around. i think a few people went forward and hit their heads. firefighters have carried out a thorough search i of the train carriages i and we've assisted with the evacuation of - approximately 100 people. we do not believe there i were any further casualties
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on board the train and we can confirm there are _ no fatalities. the more seriously injured passengers were taken to nearby hospitals. as well as one of the drivers who had to be freed from their train. the walking wounded were treated at a church close to the crash site. i could tell that some people were a little bit shaken and some obviously had some minor injuries and i think probably theyjust appreciated a space to be able to pause, really, and to reflect on what had happened to them. after the initial emergency response, things will now move to the investigation phase. the question, what caused this sequence of events? what caused these trains to collide? and how will they be removed from the tunnel? one possibility is that heavy rain might have caused some kind of slippage onto the track. serious questions remain. but the overriding sense here is relief. this could've been much, much worse. jon kay, bbc news, salisbury.
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our reporter andrew plant is near the scene of the collision for us this morning. andrew, what's the latest? iimagine the i imagine the investigation continues.— i imagine the investigation continues. ., , ., , continues. lots of people here in salisbury still _ continues. lots of people here in salisbury still out _ continues. lots of people here in salisbury still out trick _ continues. lots of people here in salisbury still out trick or - salisbury still out trick or treating last night when they heard what he described as a massive bank about 5:45pm and the cause of that is still visible. i will step out of the way so you can zoom in. in terms of what you just heard, one of those trains travelling from portsmouth towards bristol when something coated to derail, it hit something and took out some of the signalling around it and then six or seven minutes later another train travelling from london to a in devon collided with capturing, passengers describing the shaking, waiting in
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the dark for emergency services to arrive. we know about 100 people were evacuated and we think around 70 people are still in hospital, one of those people the driver of one of those trains but we are wondering what caused those trains to derail in the first place, was at our weather or at trade, and we hope that the investigation will give us more information about what happened last night. meanwhile, travel has been significantly disrupted across britain, following a weekend of strong winds and heavy rain. there were reports of a tornado in northamptonshire, and hundreds of people were unable to travel by train from london to glasgow for the first day of the climate conference, after overhead power lines were damaged. frankie mccamley has the details. passengers and trains brought to a standstill at euston station yesterday, all services suspended as rail networks warned people not to travel. many here trying to get to
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glasgow for the cop 26 climate summit. others are simply trying to get home. summit. others are simply trying to net home. ., . , , summit. others are simply trying to net home. ., ., , , , get home. fortunately my son lives in london so _ get home. fortunately my son lives in london so we _ get home. fortunately my son lives in london so we will _ get home. fortunately my son lives in london so we will stay _ get home. fortunately my son lives in london so we will stay at - get home. fortunately my son lives in london so we will stay at his - in london so we will stay at his house but if it wasn't for that i don't know what we would do. i left m house don't know what we would do. i left my house 13 — don't know what we would do. i left my house 13 hours _ don't know what we would do. i left my house 13 hours ago _ don't know what we would do. i left my house 13 hours ago in south—west london. _ my house 13 hours ago in south—west london. i'm — my house 13 hours ago in south—west london, i'm going to edinburgh for one last _ london, i'm going to edinburgh for one last trainjourney london, i'm going to edinburgh for one last train journey to glasgow. total_ one last train journey to glasgow. total travel, ten hours, eight hours on trains, _ total travel, ten hours, eight hours on trains, twice _ total travel, ten hours, eight hours on trains, twice i— total travel, ten hours, eight hours on trains, twice i left _ total travel, ten hours, eight hours on trains, twice i left london - on trains, twice i left london euston— on trains, twice i left london euston and _ on trains, twice i left london euston and twice _ on trains, twice i left london euston and twice arrived - on trains, twice i left londonl euston and twice arrived back on trains, twice i left london - euston and twice arrived back so ten hours _ euston and twice arrived back so ten hours travelling _ euston and twice arrived back so ten hours travelling and _ euston and twice arrived back so ten hours travelling and eight _ euston and twice arrived back so ten hours travelling and eight hours - euston and twice arrived back so ten hours travelling and eight hours on i hours travelling and eight hours on a train _ hours travelling and eight hours on a train to— hours travelling and eight hours on a train to gel— hours travelling and eight hours on a train to get nowhere. _ hours travelling and eight hours on a train to get nowhere. find- hours travelling and eight hours on a train to get nowhere.— a train to get nowhere. and this is the reason — a train to get nowhere. and this is the reason for _ a train to get nowhere. and this is the reason for this _ a train to get nowhere. and this is the reason for this option, - a train to get nowhere. and this is the reason for this option, strong | the reason for this option, strong winds battering parts of the country including northampton outside richard osborne's house. the trees to the left were _ richard osborne's house. the trees to the left were blowing _ richard osborne's house. the trees to the left were blowing right, - to the left were blowing right, leaves were spending in the air and forjust a brief moment i wasn't sure if i had woken up, it didn't seem real. sure if i had woken up, it didn't seem real-— sure if i had woken up, it didn't seem real. . _ ., , ., ., seem real. nearby hill was added to
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the mix, seem real. nearby hill was added to the mix. calling _ seem real. nearby hill was added to the mix, calling off— seem real. nearby hill was added to the mix, calling off this _ seem real. nearby hill was added to the mix, calling off this old - seem real. nearby hill was added to the mix, calling off this old boy - the mix, calling off this old boy rugby match to the storms leaving around 15,000 people without power. the trees were torn down on the althorp estate, owner earl spencer sharing this video said no animals were hurt. others blocked roads around the country with police reporting multiple incidents and more than 200 emergency calls. the bbc presenter reverend richard coles tweeted this picture of a tree outside st mary's church that was hit by what he described as a tornado. , , ., , ., tornado. this is a straight line when damage _ tornado. this is a straight line when damage were _ tornado. this is a straight line when damage were heavy - tornado. this is a straight line i when damage were heavy bursts tornado. this is a straight line - when damage were heavy bursts of rain bring down heavy winds from higher up in the atmosphere and that causes the damage. i wouldn't rule it a couple of brief tornadoes but most places probably didn't see a tornado, just very strong winds for a few minutes as that came through this morning. a few minutes as that came through this morning-— this morning. many are pointing out the rna, severe _ this morning. many are pointing out the rna, severe weather _ this morning. many are pointing out| the rna, severe weather preventing travel to a climate conference. ——
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the irony. britain and france remain at loggerheads about post—brexit fishing rights, as attention now turns to the ongoing enforcement of the northern ireland protocol. vice—president of the european commission maros sefcovic said he's concerned the uk is on "a path of confrontation" while cabinet office minister lord frost says the european union is behaving "without regard" to the huge sensitivities in northern ireland. tributes have been paid to a paddleboarder who died after getting into difficulty in a river in pembrokshire over the weekend. paul o'dwyer was described as "the life and soul of the party" who devoted much of his time to charities. two other women in his excursion group also lost their lives and another is critically ill in hospital. police said the river was high and fast after heavy rain and have urged other paddleboarders to ensure they understand the weather and water conditions. we have been talking already this morning about the after affects of serious weather problems can a lot of rain arrived and we can go to carol now. what is the forecast like
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for today? fortoday? todayit for today? today it is unsettled, rain and showers and windy conditions especially in the north and west but as we go through the week were looking at sunshine and blustery showers, a quarter spelt mid week, it will be chilly by day and some of us will have some frost and fog so we have heavy and persistent rain across the north of scotland, rain moving across northern ireland and northern england into north wales and tending to fragment and then for most it's a day of sunshine and showers, strongest winds in the north and west will ease today but continue across northern scotland and by the end of the day on some of the hills we will see some wintry showers. these are our temperatures, 9-14 , the showers. these are our temperatures, 9—11; , the average for this time of year is 9—12. this evening and overnight there will still be some showers, windy across the far north
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were some clear skies and temperatures falling away in rural areas parts of england and wales in south—east scotland could be cool enough especially in sheltered areas to see at touch of frost. tomorrow a lot of dry weather, not as windy, still some showers especially across the north and west and some of those again will be a wintry but mainly just on higher ground. no heatwave in prospect tomorrow, a temperature range just on higher ground. no heatwave in prospect tomorrow, a temperature range of just on higher ground. no heatwave in prospect tomorrow, a temperature range of 9—13. thank you for that, carol. we will see you through the morning. here on breakfast we've been following the story of two best friends, hughie and freddie, they are brilliant, aren't they? they are brilliant, aren't they? they are brilliant, aren't they? they are such great lads. they've raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for the royal manchester children's hospital, who are treating hughie for leukaemia. this weekend, the 11—year—olds were given a pride of britain award for their fundraising and spent saturday night rubbing shoulders
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with the stars on the red carpet, asjosh parry reports. a night like no other, to celebrate a friendship like no other. last year, freddie had a simple idea. to run two kilometres a day for 50 days. the goal, £1000 for the royal manchester children's hospital where hughie is being treated for leukaemia. that's absolutely amazing, thank you to everybody that's donated. 100 kilometres and more than £200,000 later, it's time for them to swap the running track for the red carpet. it's such an honour to be here. and just knowing that people wanted us to be the winners of this award, it's so great. and freddie is the main reason for that.
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now, is there any celebrities that you have spotted that you might like to interview on bbc breakfast? yes. so what's happening? we are hughie and freddie from bbc breakfast. 0k, good, good, great. i am very excited to be here, i this is our first pride of britain awards, this is your first awards, as well, isn't it? _ so we are in it together. very nervous but it should be good, very excited. - i think we're sat near each other as well, aren't we? i that's very exciting. we'll enjoy the whole thing. we'll be able to whisper to each . other in the ad breaks or whatever, i don't know what we are allowed to do, i have never been here. i it's very exciting. is this your first time - hosting for bbc breakfast? it's very cool, you're doing a good job so far, i think. _ you look cute, you look very cute. how's everything, good? we are hughie and freddie from bbc breakfast. - are you? i heard you guys are getting an award today. are you? oh, that's so cool. can i shake your hand? yes. it is a great honour to meet you,
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and it's a privilege to meet you. you're a good person. and you're a good person. and you are lucky to have a good friend like that. it's everything to have a good friend, isn't it? yes. you know, you don't have to have a lot of good friends, but you have to have one. yes. he is your one, isn't he? do you two know who that was? kind of. sharon stone is like, a megastar a—lister, speaking to her is a big deal. a night to celebrate ordinary people doing extraordinary things. but this year feels more special than most as it's the first time since the pandemic began that winners have been able to mingle with the celebs and stars on the red carpet. it's truly wonderful, but last year's winners, who of course didn't have an event, they're all here tonight. so it's sort of extra special, extra, extra,
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extra special celebration. and some of the winners tonight are very, very familiar with bbc breakfast viewers, in particular hughie and freddie. yeah, i've seen them, they're just behind me on the red carpet. they are hilarious. they are a scream, hughie and freddie, an absolute scream. i think ant and dec should be a little bit worried. i genuinely think they should! they have a great future, those two, don't they? but in the year when we needed it most, it was the story of friendship that really stole the show. josh parry, bbc news. what a night to remember they had. they are brilliant, aren't they? they are brilliant, aren't they? they won the pride of manchester awards and then went on to win the pride of britain awards and i went to give them their manchester award
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and met their whole family and the whole family are so proud of them. i'm proud of them and i don't even know them, the pair of them are gorgeous and wasn't sharon stone print with them? i love the fact that just print with them? i love the fact thatjust didn't know but then if you are 11 white would you know who sharon stone is? maybe when they are older. the daily mirror pride of britain awards will air on itv on the 11th november, at 8pm. let's take a look at today's papers. the guardian leads on the climate summit in glasgow and the prime minister's warning to other world leaders — "we are one minute to midnight". the telegraph has a column from the european commission vice—president, who's urging the uk not to "embark on a path of confrontation", as tensions mount over northern ireland and post—brexit fishing rights. the metro leads with the train crash which happened in a tunnel near salisbury yesterday. the paper says that dozens of passengers had a "miraculous escape" after two trains collided.
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and the sun's lead story is that simon cowell is stepping back from television in order to spend more time with his family. time now for our strictly de—brief. we don't know how many more weeks we will be doing this but it's my favourite moment! if you don't know, sally was there on saturday, i invited you along, you are on the top table. i thought it was a mistake _ you are on the top table. i thought it was a mistake when _ you are on the top table. i thought it was a mistake when they - you are on the top table. i thought it was a mistake when they said i it was a mistake when they said table number one.— it was a mistake when they said table number one. sally went with claire, table number one. sally went with claire. one — table number one. sally went with claire. one of— table number one. sally went with claire, one of our— table number one. sally went with claire, one of our producers - table number one. sally went with claire, one of our producers on - table number one. sally went with l claire, one of our producers on bbc breakfast so what was it like? it breakfast so what was it like? it was mad, quite scary, they looked after us so well but we were next to the judges can next to craig, after us so well but we were next to thejudges can next to craig, i after us so well but we were next to the judges can next to craig, i was chatting to him about his fantastic costume and to beat so close to where it was brilliant. we were very
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proud. i where it was brilliant. we were very roud. . ., , where it was brilliant. we were very roud. _, , i. where it was brilliant. we were very roud. , , ., proud. i could see you smiling all the way through. _ proud. i could see you smiling all the way through. i _ proud. i could see you smiling all the way through. i kept - proud. i could see you smiling all the way through. i kept thinking l proud. i could see you smiling all| the way through. i kept thinking is the way through. i kept thinking is the camera _ the way through. i kept thinking is the camera on _ the way through. i kept thinking is the camera on me? _ the way through. i kept thinking is the camera on me? keep- the way through. i kept thinking is the camera on me? keep smiling. | the way through. i kept thinking is - the camera on me? keep smiling. you never know— the camera on me? keep smiling. you never know when _ the camera on me? keep smiling. you never know when you're _ the camera on me? keep smiling. you never know when you're on _ the camera on me? keep smiling. you never know when you're on that - the camera on me? keep smiling. you never know when you're on that table | never know when you're on that table because there is constantly camera. you did so well, the jive because there is constantly camera. you did so well, thejive is not easy f. you did so well, the “ive is not eas f. , , . ., , you did so well, the “ive is not eas f. ,, ., ., easy f. especially if you are not 8-foot tall _ easy f. especially if you are not 8-foot tall but _ easy f. especially if you are not 8-foot tall but we _ easy f. especially if you are not 8-foot tall but we decided - easy f. especially if you are not 8-foot tall but we decided to i 8—foot tall but we decided to embrace the full... i was going to say lobster tradition, embrace the full... i was going to say lobstertradition, i embrace the full... i was going to say lobster tradition, i don't know if it's a tradition but we went for ed and nadiya is so clever. i know you love her to bits. she ed and nadiya is so clever. i know you love her to bits.— you love her to bits. she was so fabulous with _ you love her to bits. she was so fabulous with us, _ you love her to bits. she was so fabulous with us, she _ you love her to bits. she was so fabulous with us, she looked i you love her to bits. she was so i fabulous with us, she looked after us so well and she looks after you really well because ijive us so well and she looks after you really well because i jive for a tall person cannot be easy. there is a lot of leg — tall person cannot be easy. there is a lot of leg there _ tall person cannot be easy. there is a lot of leg there and _ tall person cannot be easy. there is a lot of leg there and i _ tall person cannot be easy. there is a lot of leg there and i was - tall person cannot be easy. there is a lot of leg there and i was really i a lot of leg there and i was really happy with it. thejudges a lot of leg there and i was really happy with it. the judges asked a lot of leg there and i was really happy with it. thejudges asked me to go for it and they said you have to go for it and they said you have to believe in yourself and i'm at
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that point where i have zero expectation and just enjoying myself and go for it. i expectation and 'ust en'oying myself and go for uh and go for it. i could tell you were en'o in: and go for it. i could tell you were enjoying it. _ and go for it. i could tell you were enjoying it. every _ and go for it. i could tell you were enjoying it, every week _ and go for it. i could tell you were enjoying it, every week you - and go for it. i could tell you were enjoying it, every week you come | and go for it. i could tell you were i enjoying it, every week you come out with more and more confidence, every week. it’s with more and more confidence, every week. �* , ., ., with more and more confidence, every week. �*, ., ., ., ,~ with more and more confidence, every week. �*, ., ., ., , �*, week. it's down to nadiya, she's brilliant. when _ week. it's down to nadiya, she's brilliant. when you're _ week. it's down to nadiya, she's brilliant. when you're with i week. it's down to nadiya, she's i brilliant. when you're with somebody as good as that, she loves dancing so much and it is rubbing off on me a bit. lots of people did ask me about what lobsters have to do with halloween, we don't celebrate halloween, we don't celebrate halloween in our house house i have to say thank you to strictly because they enabled me to be part of that programme without doing halloween and our kids would normally go to light party on halloween weekend and i couldn't go on that programme and beat like a disingenuous dad, anybody who has children talk to their children about what they can and cannot do and what they do things and i cannot go on there and
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say do as i do —— do as i say but not as i do so that is where the lobsters came from, strictly embraced it and glad we made it through to another weight. did through to another weight. d c everyone notice at the end when you are going towards the judges you did are going towards the judges you did a lobster roll. i are going towards the 'udges you did a lobster roll.— a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do ou fan a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do you fancy a _ a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do you fancy a roll. _ a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do you fancy a roll, and _ a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do you fancy a roll, and off _ a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do you fancy a roll, and off we - a lobster roll. i said to nadiya, do you fancy a roll, and off we went. you fancy a roll, and off we went although i went slightly ask you there. i had to rein myself in. there you are, sally! i there. i had to rein myself in. there you are, sally! i thought you had hit the — there you are, sally! i thought you had hit the deck. _ there you are, sally! i thought you had hit the deck. obviously - there you are, sally! i thought you had hit the deck. obviously we i there you are, sally! i thought you had hit the deck. obviously we are | had hit the deck. obviously we are talkin: had hit the deck. obviously we are talking about _ had hit the deck. obviously we are talking about our _ had hit the deck. obviously we are talking about our routine - had hit the deck. obviously we are talking about our routine but i had hit the deck. obviously we are talking about our routine but rose | talking about our routine but rose and giovanni, to be in the room... this was magical, there was so much about this that special. the song, that ed sheeran song was fabulous. beautifully choreographed by
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giovanni and she isjust doing so much for representation, especially for deaf people and those who are hard of hearing but my dad is deaf and i know how hard it is to dance when you can hear the music and she is incredible. her characterisation, i think steps, how giovanni works with her because as he walked towards her and he is shouting numbers at her so she can read his lips and she never misses a beat. when you watch it at home, they make it look so easy you don't realise all the things they go through to make it look so easy, there was a moment in the room where everyone is told don't clap along, she is feeling the rhythm through the floor. �* , ., . ., , feeling the rhythm through the floor. �* i. . ., , , , floor. and if you clap it interrupts to beat she _ floor. and if you clap it interrupts to beat she hears _ floor. and if you clap it interrupts to beat she hears through - floor. and if you clap it interrupts to beat she hears through the i floor. and if you clap it interrupts i to beat she hears through the floor from the live band. find to beat she hears through the floor from the live band.— from the live band. and the dance was 'ust from the live band. and the dance was just incredible _ from the live band. and the dance wasjust incredible and _ from the live band. and the dance wasjust incredible and so - was just incredible and so deserving. i wasjust incredible and so deserving-— wasjust incredible and so deserving.
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wasjust incredible and so deservina. ., ., ~ ., deserving. i voted for her! i know i am in it deserving. ! voted for her! i know i am in it but— deserving. i voted for her! i know i am in it but i _ deserving. i voted for her! i know i am in it but ijust _ deserving. ! voted for her! i know i am in it but i just think— deserving. i voted for her! i know i am in it but i just think she - deserving. i voted for her! i know i am in it but i just think she is i am in it but ijust think she is amazing, i really hope she goes on to win it because she is one of the nicest people i have met i spoke to her brother, herfamily nicest people i have met i spoke to her brother, her family come every week and i said i hope you are proud of her and he sort of teared up a bit because she has worked so hard to get to that position, notjust on strictly but as an actor and for them to get 40, that is the earliest 40 ever in the competition. she was manic. 40 ever in the competition. she was magic- thanks _ 40 ever in the competition. she was magic. thanks for _ 40 ever in the competition. she was magic. thanks for watching, - 40 ever in the competition. she was magic. thanks for watching, thanks | magic. thanks for watching, thanks for the support- _ magic. thanks for watching, thanks for the support. more _ magic. thanks for watching, thanks for the support. more strictly i magic. thanks for watching, thanks for the support. more strictly chat i for the support. more strictly chat later but now _ for the support. more strictly chat later but now it's _ for the support. more strictly chat later but now it's time _ for the support. more strictly chat later but now it's time to - for the support. more strictly chat later but now it's time to get i for the support. more strictly chat later but now it's time to get the l later but now it's time to get the news, travel and where you are. good morning from bbc london. a teenager has been arrested after walls near to a synagogue in camden were sprayed with swastikas. a 16—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of "religiously aggravated criminal damage".
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the met said other swastikas have been sprayed on walls in the surrounding area and they're investigating whether the same person is responsible. the boss of eurostar says the price of transport must reflect carbon emissions if governments want people to choose trains over flying. jacques damas said that airlines were able to undercut rail because they faced lower costs and did not have to pay for the cost of the carbon they emit. but by encouraging travellers to take the train, instead of flying, it could cut global emissions. there are calls for the mayor to release the funding needed for urgent repairs to the pool at crystal palace national sports centre. it's helped to develop some of the country's top divers. but it's been shut for more than a year and a half after structural issues were found. it means some are now commuting around the country to find other facilities. we were travelling to tunbridge wells, all the way down to south end on a sundays. it's really hard to stay competitive when you can't
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train as much as the other people you're doing it against. ese? train as much as the other people you're doing it against.— you're doing it against. vby has a dream, you're doing it against. vby has a dream. and _ you're doing it against. vby has a dream, and obviously, _ you're doing it against. vby has a dream, and obviously, time i you're doing it against. vby has a dream, and obviously, time is i dream, and obviously, time is siipping — dream, and obviously, time is slipping and it feels like we have come _ slipping and it feels like we have come 18— slipping and it feels like we have come 18 months without a diving pool here, _ come 18 months without a diving pool here, it _ come 18 months without a diving pool here, it is _ come 18 months without a diving pool here, it is taking its toll. the mayor told us — further assessments are being carried out to find out the costs in order to repair and reopen the pool for those who want to use it. let's have a look at the travel. hammersmith and city line is part suspended between liverpool street and barking, because of a signal failure. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the first part of this week although always the chance still of a few showers around today. it's another very windy morning, starting off at seven or eight celsius. still a very brisk westerly, south—westerly wind blowing. that wind will ease down somewhat as we head through the afternoon so much lighter winds by then. some decent spells of sunshine
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around as well, and lots of places will stay completely dry or with the chance of one or two showers coming through on that breeze. temperatures just slightly down over yesterday, peaking at 12 or 13 celsius. now as we head through this evening and overnight, then it's going to be a rather cold one. there will be lots of clear skies around and temperatures could in some spots drop as low as perhaps three to five celsius into tomorrow morning. lighter winds. and then on tuesday, it looks mostly dry again, there will be lots of sunshine around, north—westerly wind taking hold. and the air will feel a bit chillier. it's the same again on wednesday with more of a northerly wind, still very light, lots of sunshine and staying dry, then a very calm day on thursday. it turns milder and more unsettled towards the end of the week. that's all for now, we'll be back in half an hour. now back to dan and sally.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning. we'll be joined by former manchester united and france captain, patrice evra as he publishes his autobiography, looking back at his life and career. we catch up with breakfast favourites, 11—year—olds hughie and freddie. they've been chatting to stars on the red carpet, after being honoured with a pride of britain award for their charity fundraising. and after making it through a spooktacular halloween week, we'll be checking in with my strictly co—stars sara and aliaj just before eight this morning. back to our top story now. on the first working day of the international climate change conference in glasgow, the prime minister will warn delegates of the need to "act now" in a speech later today. nina's there for us this morning.
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good morning. who else can we expect to hear from today? good morning. who else can we expect to hearfrom today? good good morning. who else can we expect to hear from today?— to hear from today? good morning. the sun is about _ to hear from today? good morning. the sun is about to _ to hear from today? good morning. the sun is about to come _ to hear from today? good morning. the sun is about to come up - to hear from today? good morning. the sun is about to come up on i the sun is about to come up on glasgow behind me. and i would love to lee use a nice metaphor about a new dawn about the future of the planet but unfortunately that will be tricky because we have 120 world leaders from all around the world, 25,000 delegates, all agreeing we have to halt the rising temperatures in order to have to halt the rising temperatures in orderto minimise have to halt the rising temperatures in order to minimise the up coming globally. there is less optimism about making that work. every nation is coming at things from a different angle, they have different priorities, so can it make a difference? we are already feeling the impact of climate change here in the impact of climate change here in the uk. our science correspondent victoria gill has been finding out. over the years, we've witnessed and reported the impacts of climate change around the world. we've seen deforestation on a vast scale contribute to carbon emissions. and you no longer have to travel
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to the deserts to see the impact of global temperature rise. the effects of climate change are playing out everywhere. we've been here 20 years, we've got a beautiful home, and just look at it. but while its impact can be painfully dramatic, the process that brings coaches together to tackle the issue the process that brings countries together to tackle the issue can be painfully slow. there have been moments of triumph, though, in this long negotiation. at the cop in 2015 in paris, 196 countries signed a global treaty agreeing to limit global warming to well below two celsius and to aim for 1.5. that's the threshold scientists agree beyond which the most dangerous impacts of global warming play out. so now it comes down to here in glasgow. to keep that 1.5 celsius target alive, emissions need to halve within the next decade, and to reach net zero, where the world is taking out as much carbon from the atmosphere as it's putting into it, by the middle of the century. so the 200 countries being represented here at cop26 are being asked for their specific
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plans to meet that goal. the success of this conference will be based partly on countries' willingness to outdo each other when it comes to emission reduction. the uk's net zero strategy has been widely praised. the government has promised to fully decarbonise our electricity supply by 2035, and to phase out the sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2030. but some countries have much more ambitious goals. costa rica, a country that has committed to phasing up out fossil fuels completely, is urging richer nations to do more. the fact that costa rica is small country with limited resources, and yet has been able to put forward very ambitious plans. if we are doing it, you countries that are larger than us, larger economies, better resources, there is no excuse, you have to do it too. there's a great deal of work to do here. countries' current pledges have us on a path towards a 2.7 degrees temperature increase by the end of the century. if negotiations over
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the next two weeks can't get that down significantly, we'll be facing a very uncertain future. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. victoria is with me now. very completed, everyone has their own agenda. what good outcome in the next fortnight look like, and how possible is it?— possible is it? there's a lot of nervousness _ possible is it? there's a lot of nervousness at _ possible is it? there's a lot of nervousness at the _ possible is it? there's a lot of nervousness at the start i possible is it? there's a lot of nervousness at the start of i possible is it? there's a lot of. nervousness at the start of this that we will not get to a good outcome because there are so many challenges in the way. how much to people in that room trust each other, is the politics getting in the way, we have heard the fishing row between france and uk, political divisions are playing into this. everything that is happening over there is a process which needs to get to a consensus. a good outcome would be a declaration where everyone has come to the table and brought their best game terms of the strategy about cutting their own emissions, and richer countries
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crucially paying up to help poorer countries that have done the least to cause climate change and adapt and change their own economies as well. so there will be some sort of decoration, we hope, that says that we have achieved this and we will commit to come back and do even better in the next few years so we can keep attending that curve downwards and keep global temperature rise as low as possible. but you don't expect one of those big moments like paris. people who might be thinking, if i look at china, they haven't even peaked in emissions, india are still planning to mine i7% more coal, what's the point enemy insulating the attic or buying an electric car, why should i bother, it's to late? it’s buying an electric car, why should i bother, it's to late?— bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to net bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to get into — bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to get into the. — bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to get into the, who _ bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to get into the, who is _ bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to get into the, who is to - bother, it's to late? it's dangerous to get into the, who is to blame. l to get into the, who is to blame. this is a which started in the last decade or the last few decades 7 mcrae this is not a process which started in the last decade. this has been since the last industrial
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revolution we invented that. carbon dioxide sticks in the embassy for a century and as it builds up, it gets worse and worse. —— in the atmosphere. this is something that all of those richer nations, including us, we can bring that strategy to change our own economies and create the best technologies and really start us on a curve to changing the world. who would have thought in the uk we would be talking about phasing out petrol and diesel cars7 and it's happening, we have set a date for it. this impacts on all of our lives. everybody can do their bit. we will hopefully have cleaner air as a side result of that. ., . . that. end on a high, we have the diplomatic— that. end on a high, we have the diplomatic duty _ that. end on a high, we have the diplomatic duty to _ that. end on a high, we have the diplomatic duty to lead - that. end on a high, we have the diplomatic duty to lead from - that. end on a high, we have the diplomatic duty to lead from the | diplomatic duty to lead from the front, what is happening which can give us some hope? we front, what is happening which can give us some hope?— front, what is happening which can give us some hope? we have got here, there has been — give us some hope? we have got here, there has been a _ give us some hope? we have got here, there has been a delay _ give us some hope? we have got here, there has been a delay because - give us some hope? we have got here, there has been a delay because of- there has been a delay because of there has been a delay because of the pandemic. one of the things to end on a note of positivity, because there is so much at stake here...
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please! w there is so much at stake here... please! .. ., ., ., please! the fact that we have got here despite _ please! the fact that we have got here despite the _ please! the fact that we have got here despite the pandemic - please! the fact that we have got here despite the pandemic and i please! the fact that we have got. here despite the pandemic and the fact we have had a big clause in everyone's economic forward journey. the former governor of the bank of england said, this is the moment to control all to delete and say, we can start again. to coin phrase, we can start again. to coin phrase, we can build back better, we can build our economy is cleaner and greener. we need to lead from the front. thank you. prime minister boris johnson was very keen to secure this glasgow so what will he announce to make a difference? would you say you're now an environmentalist, mrjohnson? i've always been a passionate lover of the natural world. but it was only really on becoming prime minister, seeing the, you know, the upward spike in temperature change. there is absolutely no doubt about it, we have to fix this thing.
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i also think it's the way people wants to go. the big change in all this is, it's not what governments think any more, it's not what the corporations think, it's what their think. it's not what the corporations think, it's what their punters think. and the people watching, they want to change, and they want us to grip this thing. and on the subject of change, we're all thinking about our own carbon footprint. what is, what is the, what is thejohnson household doing... yeah, i know! obviously, i've totally abolished commuting since i live above my place of work. but what i used to do is, i used to cycle absolutely everywhere. what about beef, for example? look, i, i, ithink that... i've got to probably stop eating a lot of everything, a lot less, i've got to stop, i've got to start eating a lot less of all kinds of things. on the big issue, the cop26 of it, it isn't brexit that in the long
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term you're going to be remembered. you're going to be remembered for the deal that you bring back from glasgow because that is the one that's going to affect the climate that we all endure or live in for decades, centuries, thousands of years, possibly. that is the tragedy of it. look, i don't think people realise the difference between 1.5, getting it, restraining it to 1.5 degrees, the difference between 1.5 degrees and two degrees is the difference between losing 70% of the world's coral reef at 1.5 degrees and losing all of it at two degrees. that is an appalling prospect. not to mention desertification, storms, heatwave. all that. and the consequences, to say nothing of the natural disaster, the consequences for humanity, are enormous. but a couple of weeks before the conference starts, you go on holiday in marbella. is that world leadership? well, i think that on the issue
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of short—haulflights, the... we've got to do things to, i know that people object to what we did with, with the budget, but actually we're increasing the taxation on long haul flights which account for 96% of the emissions. you reduced it on domestic short—haulflights. ones that there are alternatives for. and increased it on long haul flights, so you did nothing. you did nothing. it's very difficult. i mean, i hearyou, but it's very difficult. but the point is, you are asking developing nations to make really tough decisions about their future. yes. and at the same time, and you're saying you want to turn aspiration into action, aspiration into action. you're not delivering action on short—haulflights in britain, are you? with great respect, everybody knows that it's the uk that's out in front. when i was a kid, 80%
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of our power came from coal. when i was mayor of london it was a0%, it's now i%. let's talk about coal. that's an amazing, that's an amazing... i know everybody asks you this question. but you're going to china, you're going to india, you're going to developing words saying, phase out coal. at the same time, as not ruling out a new coal mine in britain, a new coal mine in britain. we started the industrial revolution, we should... i just gave you the statistics. but why don't you just say, we're not going to open... i've just given you the statistics, we have no... the chinese will say, we can't take this guy seriously. well, sorry, what absolutely everybody finds absolutely incontrovertible is the progress the uk has already made. i'm sorry to bang on about the coal. but the point is it makes you look... it makes you look a little bit weaselly, not answering the coal question. because they're going to go and you're talking about coal. sorry, i have answered the coal question. directly, directly. let me say to you directly. yes or no on the coal mine, you personally, what do you reckon? i'm not in favour of more coal, let's be absolutely clear,
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but it's not a decision for me, it's a decision for local planning authorities. one last thought, you're about to go to glasgow. how confident are you about the outcome? i've told you, i think it's in the balance. i think that we've had a decent outcome at the g20 so far. but everybody�*s got a lot more to do. and the stakes are incredibly high. justin rowlatt reporting there. we heard from the prime minister talking about the delicate diplomatic differences, and they will have a huge impact on what comes out of the conference. you can probably hear, the wind is quite strong here in glasgow this morning. the clyde is going to rapid rate this morning. it is pretty chilly out there. let's check in with our climate queen, carol, for a look at the weather. i was going to say, that is the
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weather forecast! i was going to say, that is the weatherforecast! i'm i was going to say, that is the weather forecast! i'm starting with a beautiful picture taken this weekend in northumberland, the northern lights, many of us across parts of northern scotland and northern england got the chance to see them. i will bring you more photos through the course of this morning. as we head into the first week of november, we are looking at sunshine in blustery showers. it will be cool at times through the course of the day, but some frost and fog for some of us. the low pressure that brought all of the wet and windy weather yesterday is pulling away, but you can see from the isobars around glasgow and in western part of scotland through the irish sea, we have gusty winds. windy everywhere and there is quite a lot of rain and quite a few showers. some of them have been thundery through the course of this morning as well. we will hang on to the rain across the far north of scotland for much of the day, windy especially in the north. come south, back into something brighter. some glimmers of sunshine and summer showers. northern ireland and adjacent areas to the north sea
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coast, windy, a band of rain sinking south into northern england and wales. we will see some beautiful sunrises this morning in the south but also beautiful showers. some have the potential to be thundery. as the second hand of rain sinks south, it will start to wake up, we hang onto another band of rain and then a day of sunshine and showers. winds easy for most except for the north of scotland. 9014 degrees, about average. —— temperatures 9—14 , about average about average. —— temperatures 9—14, about average for about average. —— temperatures 9—14 , about average for the about average. —— temperatures 9—14, about average for the time of year. this evening and overnight, clear skies and showers, windy and the far north with some rain. where we remain dry in the sheltered part of healing and wales and south—east scotland, it will be cool enough for a touch of frost. tomorrow, a day of sunshine and showers. you can see shower almost anywhere. it will still feel quite chilly as well.
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these are the temperatures, nine to 13 degrees but not as windy. into wednesday, another day of sunshine and showers. also a keen northerly wind. this is when it is going to feel quite cool if you are out and about. there will be a fair bit of sunshine. but note how the damages are coming down. barely if any figures in the north getting into double figures. seven to nine degrees. furthersouth, up to 12 double figures. seven to nine degrees. further south, up to 12 or 13 degrees. for some, degrees. further south, up to 12 or 13 degrees. forsome, may degrees. further south, up to 12 or 13 degrees. for some, may round about average orjust 13 degrees. for some, may round about average or just a little 13 degrees. for some, may round about average orjust a little bit above. on thursday, an area of high pressure in the atlantic tries to grow in, so it will bring a lot of settled weather. cloud coming in from the north—west, slowly slipping south. and a few showers around the east and south coast. and once again it is going to feel chilly. temperatures, eight to 12 degrees.
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this time last week, temperatures were above average by day and by night but it is not going to be the case this week. so you will notice the difference if you are out and about. that picture at the start was gorgeous. that picture at the start was gorgeous— that picture at the start was ”oreous. h , ., that picture at the start was orreous. �*, , ., gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you aaain. but gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you again- but the _ gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you again. but the credit _ gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you again. but the credit on _ gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you again. but the credit on as - gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you again. but the credit on as well - gorgeous. pleasure, let's show you again. but the credit on as well for| again. but the credit on as well for daniel munk. again. but the credit on as well for daniel munk— again. but the credit on as well for daniel munk. that isn't too far away from our daniel munk. that isn't too far away from your neck— daniel munk. that isn't too far away from your neck of— daniel munk. that isn't too far away from your neck of the _ daniel munk. that isn't too far away from your neck of the woods, - daniel munk. that isn't too far away from your neck of the woods, is - daniel munk. that isn't too far away from your neck of the woods, is it? | from your neck of the woods, is it? i'm a bit further north, i can tell from your accent! i i'm a bit further north, i can tell from your accent!— i'm a bit further north, i can tell from your accent! i thought it said that picture _ from your accent! i thought it said that picture was _ from your accent! i thought it said that picture was in _ from your accent! i thought it said that picture was in scotland, - from your accent! i thought it said that picture was in scotland, i - from your accent! i thought it said that picture was in scotland, i can j that picture was in scotland, i can see it in northumberland, apologies! it is only 27! —— ten to seven! ihla it is only 27! -- ten to seven! no notice, it is only 27! -- ten to seven! no notice. don't _ it is only 27! —— ten to seven! no notice, don't worry, it's fine. it is only 27! -- ten to seven! no notice, don't worry, it's fine. i. notice, don't worry, it's fine. i will not bother you with that, never mind _ will not bother you with that, never mind. ~ ., �* , �* will not bother you with that, never mind. ~ ., h�* , will not bother you with that, never mind. �*,~ ,, mind. women's fa cup semifinals yesterday- —
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mind. women's fa cup semifinals yesterday. chelsea _ mind. women's fa cup semifinals yesterday. chelsea are _ mind. women's fa cup semifinals yesterday. chelsea are through i mind. women's fa cup semifinals | yesterday. chelsea are through and will face arsenal, the two inform teams. chelsea women beat manchester city's with it. the injuries are mounting up for manchester city's women, they are on the third or fourth choice keeper. that women, they are on the third or fourth choice keeper.— women, they are on the third or fourth choice keeper. at the cutaway shot was just — fourth choice keeper. at the cutaway shot wasiust in _ fourth choice keeper. at the cutaway shot wasjust in the _ fourth choice keeper. at the cutaway shot wasjust in the stands. - fourth choice keeper. at the cutaway shot wasjust in the stands. there i shot was 'ust in the stands. there were shot wasjust in the stands. there were probably _ shot wasjust in the stands. there were probably a — shot wasjust in the stands. there were probably a few— shot wasjust in the stands. there were probably a few that - shot wasjust in the stands. there were probably a few that she - shot wasjust in the stands. there were probably a few that she perhaps thought she should have kept out. take nothing away from chelsea, a final in—store which is a bit of a repeat we saw from the opening day of the season. it will be an all in one —— all london fa cup final. this year's women's fa cup is nearly as old as some fans, but after delays due to the pandemic, the trophy is in touching distance for chelsea. erin cuthbert�*s opener was within reach of karima taieb. it didn't mean she could stop it. manchester city's third choice keeper got hands
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on chelsea's second as well. halloween of all days was turning into a nightmare. city's array of injured stars were helpless as the defending champions managed to block their own path to wembley. chelsea will be heading there for the first time in three years. beth england made sure of that. and that's their ticket to wembley well and truly booked. our mentality was superb today. our pressing, our counter pressing. i thought how we created chances was so efficient. our results were better, really pleased with the performance. so who would chelsea meet? it took the 14 time winners a little longer than they would have liked to break brighton, a little all arsenal needed as kim prodded home. resistance thereon in was futile. and it's 2—0. england striker beth mead and her international captain leah williamson were on target. arsenal on their way to wembley as well. a december date forfans of all ages to look forward to.
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ben croucher, bbc news. talking of enjoying their football, that is exactly what west ham fans are doing at the moment. fresh from knocking manchester city out of the league cup, they beat ten—man aston villa 4—1 to strengthen their grip on fourth spot in the premier league. two goals came in the last ten minutes. seems a long time ago things weren't working out for david moyes at manchester united. we've done enough today, i'm thrilled at winning 4—1 but i think the performances can be better. i've told the players i think they can play much better. but we've played ten games this season, we are in a decent league position at the moment, so their effort, what they've done at the moment is fantastic. they've been so good. so we've got to keep it going. very different story for norwich, bottom of the table, they lost to leeds 2—1, who move out of the bottom three. rodrigo getting the winner at carrow road. if ever there was a lesson in the realties of being a top flight manager, tottenham's nuno espirito santo is it, facing the sack afterjust 17 games in charge.
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the club's chairman daniel levy held talks about his future yesterday after saturday's 3—0 defeat to manchester united at home. it can be a lonely place standing on the touchline when things aren't going your way. great of course when you're winning, rangers thrashing motherwell 6—1, to extend their lead in the scottish premiership. fashion sakala scored a hat—trick, on a rare start for him, the victory leaving rangers four points clear at the top ahead of rivals celtic. and that means it's high fives instead of the head shakes for their manager steven gerrard, who said his players were "an inch away" from perfection. now, england's women celebrated their biggest ever win over world champions new zealand and in doing so finished the day as the world's number one ranked team. 43—12 it finished in exeter as they ran in seven tries, the last from player—of—the—match zoe harrison. the black ferns were meant to be hosting the world cup this month,
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pushed back because of covid, and reminded here of the challenge ahead if they're to retain their title. the sides meet again next weekend. we know in ourselves what we can do when we're firing. and i think we showed at times some real excellence, some real clinicalness. obviously, we'll celebrate that win. like you say, it's the highest points scored over new zealand that we've ever had. and you've got to enjoy these moments. two years ago we lost to new zealand, four years ago, we lost in the world cup final. so, you know, these moments are very precious. england will look to contiue their brilliant run. they face sri lanka in the t—20 world cup this afternoon having won all three of their opening matches. india's hopes of making the semi—finals hang by a thread after they lost to new zealand by eight wickets. india could only muster 110 runs from their 20 overs, a total the black caps overhauled with more than five overs remaining. that's a second crushing defeat
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for the pre—tournament favourites, who must beat afghanistan on wednesday to have any chance of making the semi—finals. and that will be a big ask, with afghanistan looking strong — they're second in their group after thrashing namibia by 62 runs. that's two wins out of three for them. the top two in each group go through. england are looking good, it has to be said. they will want to notch up another win later, that will be the plan for eoin morgan 's side. aha, big plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big da of plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big day of sport- _ plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big day of sport. well, _ plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big day of sport. well, you _ plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big day of sport. well, you need - plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big day of sport. well, you need to i plan for eoin morgan 's side. a big i day of sport. well, you need to take our mind day of sport. well, you need to take your mind off— day of sport. well, you need to take your mind off things. _ day of sport. well, you need to take your mind off things. when - day of sport. well, you need to take your mind off things. when the i day of sport. well, you need to take | your mind off things. when the ryder cu was on your mind off things. when the ryder cup was on we _ your mind off things. when the ryder cup was on we just _ your mind off things. when the ryder cup was on we just watched - your mind off things. when the ryder cup was on we just watched it - your mind off things. when the ryder cup was on we just watched it and i cup was on we just watched it and did a bit of dancing. did cup was on we just watched it and did a bit of dancing.— did a bit of dancing. did you have it on our did a bit of dancing. did you have it on your phone _ did a bit of dancing. did you have it on your phone bollywood i did a bit of dancing. did you have i it on your phone bollywood dance? 90 it on your phone bollywood dance? ®© seconds it on your phone bollywood dance? seconds and it on your phone bollywood dance? 961 seconds and then... it on your phone bollywood dance? 90 seconds and then... you _ it on your phone bollywood dance? 90 seconds and then... you have - it on your phone bollywood dance? 90 seconds and then... you have got i it on your phone bollywood dance? 90 seconds and then... you have got to l seconds and then... you have got to concentrate- — seconds and then... you have got to concentrate. thank _ seconds and then... you have got to concentrate. thank you _ seconds and then... you have got to concentrate. thank you very - seconds and then... you have got to concentrate. thank you very much. i
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music producer naughty boy has worked with some of the world's biggest artists. but for the last five years, he's beenjuggling his career with caring for his mum who has dementia. after learning how to cook when his mum became too ill, he's developed a passion for working in the kitchen as our reporter alice bhandhukravi has been finding out. # i'm covering my ears like a kid # it was number one all over the world, the first of many hits for music producer shahid khan. but now he's turned his hand to cooking after an idea which came to him during the first lockdown. welcome to naughty boy kitchen. thank you. today, alice, ifeel like you're in a shepherd's pie mood. for the last five years, shahid has been a carerfor his mum, who suffered a stroke and now has dementia. chilli cheese toastie, and curry goat roti. i started cooking when my mum stopped cooking. after mum's stroke five years ago, mum hasn't cooked since then. so in hindsight, i think it was a coping mechanism. because i'm a producer, i make music, you know, that's still my main thing.
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but i think it was a coping mechanism, me knowing that i might never get to eat mum's food again. so i'm going to make the most of this time living with her and learn from her how she used to cook and then start cooking that for her. the experience of living with someone with dementia has led shahid to become an ambassador for dementia uk, with part of the proceeds of the pop—up kitchen going to the charity. during the first lockdown, it was intense for everyone but living with someone who has dementia, it was a bit more intense. and i personally reached out to the dementia uk helpline during the first lockdown because i was struggling. some of my family were abroad, they were stuck there. my dad was in pakistan and he was unable to come back. i'm grateful that i have a live—in carer. i wouldn't be able to do this if it was just me or my mum orjust me, mum and sister. i have so much respect for carers and what they do. shahid says, though, caring for his mum has taken centre stage and though he's spending a lot of time preparing delicious meals,
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he's still very much in the music business. i've got my next album coming out in february next year, it's called heartland. and i think it's a good representation of the last three years. that report was from alice bhandhukravi. the time is five to six. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a teenager has been arrested after walls near to a synagogue in camden were sprayed with swastikas. a 16—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of "religiously aggravated criminal damage". the met said other swastikas have been sprayed on walls in the surrounding area and they're investigating whether the same person is responsible. the boss of eurostar says the price of transport must reflect carbon emissions if governments want people
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to choose trains over flying. jacques damas said that airlines were able to undercut rail because they faced lower costs and did not have to pay for the cost of the carbon they emit. but by encouraging travellers to take the train, instead of flying, it could cut global emissions. there are calls for the mayor to release the funding needed for urgent repairs to the pool at crystal palace national sports centre. it's helped to develop some of the country's top divers. but it's been shut for more than a year and a half after structural issues were found. it means some are now commuting around the country to find other facilities. we were travelling to tunbridge wells, all the way down to southend on sundays. it's really hard to stay competitive when you can't train as much as the other people you're doing it against. the mayor told us further assessments are being carried out to find out the costs in order to repair and reopen the pool for those who want to use it.
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if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl are looking. hammersmith and city line is partly suspended between liverpool street and barking and there are minor delays on the circle line. south western services out of waterloo to basingstoke via exeter are severely disrupted because of a derailment at salisbury yesterday. lets get the weather. hello, good morning. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the first part of this week although always the chance still of a few showers around today. it's another very windy morning, starting off at seven or eight celsius. still a very brisk westerly, south—westerly wind blowing. that wind will ease down somewhat as we head through the afternoon so much lighter winds by then. some decent spells of sunshine around as well, and lots of places will stay completely dry or with the chance of one or two showers coming through on that breeze. temperatures just slightly down over yesterday, peaking at 12 or 13 celsius.
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now as we head through this evening and overnight, then it's going to be a rather cold one. there will be lots of clear skies around and temperatures could in some spots drop as low as perhaps three to five celsius into tomorrow morning. lighter winds. and then on tuesday, it looks mostly dry again, there will be lots of sunshine around, north—westerly wind taking hold. and the air will feel a bit chillier. it's the same again on wednesday with more of a northerly wind, still very light, lots of sunshine and staying dry, then a very calm day on thursday. it turns milder and more unsettled towards the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. there is plenty more on our website. we will see you soon.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: the prime minister warns that time is running out to prevent catastrophic global warming, as world leaders arrive in glasgow for the cop 26 climate change summit. a one minute to midnight moment and the clock is ticking. good morning from glasgow, as 12 days of talks on the future of the planet get under way we'll be reporting from the front line of climate change — the homes on the western isles that
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find themselves below sea level. 17 people are taken to hospital after two trains collide in wiltshire. we're live there this morning. good morning. the weather this week looks and settled for some, sunshine and blustery showers, windy especially in the west, cooler than last week and for some by night we will see some frost and patchy fog. i will have all the details in about ten minutes. it's monday 1st november. our main story this morning is the start of the cop 26 international climate change conference in glasgow. world leaders are facing calls for urgent action to tackle global warming — nina is in glasgow for us this morning. good morning, nina. yes, good morning. there is a growing sense of expectation and pressure over a windy glasgow this
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morning. the eyes of the world will be on scotland today, as world leaders gather here in glasgow for the cop 26 summit. the aim of the two—week event is to commit to measures to limit the rise in global temperatures and cut emissions. in his welcoming speech, prime minister borisjohnson will tell them that "the clock is ticking" and we must act today or it will be too late for the next generation — but as our political correspondent chris mason explains, there is mounting pressure for action rather than just words. the world arrives in glasgow today, or at least lots of its leaders do, with plenty saying now is the time there has to be action, and plenty of it, to minimise the impact of climate change. this is very, very urgent, notjust for our country, for the whole world. if i had to give a comparison i would say it's a one minute to midnight moment and the clock is ticking. we have to get everybody to do more. and they need to make further commitments,
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they need to make further commitments on how we're going to move away from coal, fossilfuel burning, how we're going to move away from using hydrocarbon cars, how we're going to plant millions of trees if not a trillion trees around the world, protect the world's biodiversity and above all how we're going to get the whole of the developing world to buy into this. so what is cop 267 cop stands for conference of the parties and was set up by the united nations to tackle climate change. the first one, cop 1, took place in 1995. this is the 26th. nearly 200 countries are being asked to submit plans to cut their emissions and around 25,000 delegates are expected to turn up in glasgow. the prime minister has been sounding pretty gloomy about the prospect of getting a meaningful agreement from this summit. are rich countries willing
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to do enough themselves and are they willing to help poorer countries tackle climate change? borisjohnson and the prince of wales will welcome world leaders to glasgow later, with prince charles saying this is the last chance saloon. the sound bite we will regularly hear is trying to keep 1.5 alive, keeping global average temperatures no more than 1.5 degrees warmer than preindustrial times to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. it's widely accepted achieving that will be very difficult. some think it's already too late. chris mason, bbc news. just to set the scene for you, behind me over there, that green building is called the blue zone and thatis building is called the blue zone and that is were those world leaders
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will be meeting. the official talks will be meeting. the official talks will happen there later but a lot of this is about those chaps and corridors come conversations between representatives from around the world and that is where there is hope that progress will be made. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is also here in glasgow. he will beat ear wigging in the blue zone. there is pressure on every nation to stick to their own targets but especially the prime minister wanted this to happen, do we expect anything new from him today? $5 anything new from him today? is world leaders arrive and spend the next few days talking about climate change we will get a series of announcements that are nearly agreed between them and they are side announcements to the stuff being discussed at the climate conference because that's all about delivering the paris climate change agreement so already this morning you have the
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prime minister sank because the uk's spending on international aid, he has pledged for that to go back up to 0.7% of national income in the next few years, that means in theory the uk could have an extra one billion pounds to help other countries move away from coal power to greener energy or help countries feeling the effects of climate change to adapt but he has been sounding pretty gloomy and you know to start from somebody famous for being a bouncy optimist and i think the reason he is so gloomy is because the pledges countries have made until now to cut their carbon emissions over the next decade and “p emissions over the next decade and up until 2050 or 26 date are not enough to help the world reach that goal of limiting increases in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees. that could change from today because veterans of these conferences so the
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point of them as they bring together rich countries who produce a lot of greenhouse gases, poor countries who are feeling the effects of climate change and countries that are growing in wealth who were increasing carbon emissions and if you put that altogether it's a unique opportunity to either have a massive breakthrough were quite a big bust up. we have nearly two weeks to find out.— big bust up. we have nearly two weeks to find out. let's hope it's the former- _ weeks to find out. let's hope it's the former. as _ weeks to find out. let's hope it's the former. as adam _ weeks to find out. let's hope it's the former. as adam said, i the former. as adam said, international relations will be important so what will the foreign secretary say about working with countries like china? we will be talking to nina later. plenty to come from glasgow and other news as well. rail accident investigators are examining the scene of a collision between two trains in salisbury, which left 17
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people needing hospital treatment. officials say the line will remain closed today, while inquiries continue. jon kay reports. one mile from the centre of salisbury. it was here, just before 7pm last night, that a great western railways train hit an object inside the fisherton tunnel. it's believed part of the train derailed, knocking out the signalling. a few minutes later, a south western train, travelling from london to devon, collided with the first. just this massive impact and i fell across the table and then the table came off the wall, i ended up underneath another table. there was just suddenly a lot ofjostling, possessions being thrown around. i think a few people went forward and hit their heads. firefighters have carried out a thorough search i of the train carriages i and we've assisted with the evacuation of - approximately 100 people. we do not believe there i were any further casualties on board the train and we can confirm there are _ no fatalities. the more seriously injured passengers were taken to nearby hospitals. as well as one of the drivers
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who had to be freed from their train. the walking wounded were treated at a church close to the crash site. i could tell that some people were a little bit shaken and some obviously had some minor injuries and i think probably theyjust appreciated a space to be able to pause, really, and to reflect on what had happened to them. after the initial emergency response, things will now move to the investigation phase. the question, what caused this sequence of events? what caused these trains to collide? and how will they be removed from the tunnel? one possibility is that heavy rain might have caused some kind of slippage onto the track. serious questions remain. but the overriding sense here is relief. this could've been much, much worse. jon kay, bbc news, salisbury. our reporter andrew plant is near the scene of the collision for us this morning. andrew, what's the latest?
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lots of people here in salisbury were still out trick last night when they heard what they described as a massive bang about 6:45pm and the source of that is still behind us. i will step out of the way so we can zoom in but we heard one train going from portsmouth to bristol when it hit something, we don't know what but that partially derailed that train and took out some signalling and that meant another train coming along six or seven knots later from london to holler in devon collided with the first train. —— to hollington. 17 people in hospital, the driver of one of those trains but the question of what caused that first train to derail, was at the weather or a landslide or part of a
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tree or something else, we still don't know the answer but hopefully as the investigation continues we will find out more answers. andrew plant, thank you. meanwhile, travel has been significantly disrupted across britain, following a weekend of strong winds and heavy rain. there were reports of a tornado in northamptonshire, and hundreds of people were unable to travel by train from london to glasgow, for the first day of the climate conference, after overhead power lines were damaged. frankie mccamley has the details. passengers and trains brought to a standstill at euston station yesterday, all services suspended as rail networks warned people not to travel. many here trying to get to glasgow for the cop 26 climate summit. others are simply trying to get home. fortunately my son lives in london so we we'll go and stay at his house but if it wasn't for that, i don't know what we would do. i left my house 13 hours ago in south—west london. i'm going to edinburgh for one last
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train journey to glasgow. hoping to get to my airbnb by 10:30pm. total travel, ten hours, eight hours on trains, l twice i left london euston and twice arrived back, so ten hours- travelling and eight hoursl on a train to get nowhere. and this is the reason for the disruption — strong winds battering parts of the country including here in northampton outside richard osborne's house. the trees to the right were blowing left, the trees to the left were blowing right, leaves were spinning in the air and forjust a brief moment i wasn't sure if i had woken up, it didn't seem real. nearby, hail was added to the mix, calling off this old boys' rugby match, the storms leaving around 15,000 people without power. trees were torn down on the althorp estate. owner earl spencer, sharing this video, said fortunately no animals were hurt. others blocked roads around the country with police reporting multiple incidents and more than 200 emergency calls.
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the bbc presenter reverend richard coles tweeted this picture of a tree outside st mary's church that was hit by what he described as a tornado. this is what we call straight line wind damage where heavy bursts of rain bring down heavy winds from higher up in the atmosphere and that causes the damage. i wouldn't rule out a couple of brief tornadoes but most places probably didn't see a tornado, just very strong winds for a few minutes as that came through this morning. many are pointing out the irony — severe weather preventing travel to a climate conference. lots of problems with the weather over the weekend. carol can explain what's happening today and for the next few days. good morning, carol. forsome of next few days. good morning, carol. for some of us it's a quarter start to the day as you can see from this weather
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watcher picture taken in santelli ike but there are still a fair bit of rain and showers in the forecast and it still windy especially in the north and west end with exposure. we have a sinking south from northern england into the middens and also through north wales, that will fragment through the day and we have more persistent rain across the far north of scotland. that will continue to the day but in between we see a return to sunshine and showers but some of those could be heavy and thundery with a bit of hail. temperatures 9—14 , average for the beginning of november is 9-13 for the beginning of november is 9—13 or 14 depending on where you are. this evening and overnight we will have showers, still rain across the far north of scotland, winds will have eased but not in the far north and where we see clear skies for longest you could wake up to a touch of frost so it will be a
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chilly start to tomorrow, again a day of sunshine and showers, winds will not be a strong but by the end of the day we could see some wintry showers on the tops of the hills in the far north of scotland and temperatures i get no where near the values of last week, temperatures i get no where near the values of last week, 9—12 . thanks, carol. compulsory vaccination for all nhs staff in england could soon be introduced, but health leaders are warning against imposing a deadline too soon. the government says it's "leaning towards" making jabs a condition of nhs employment in england, but the group that represents hospital trusts have suggested a deadline of april next year, to avoid losing staff during the busy winter period. let's take a look at the figures. data from october shows that more than 90% of nhs staff have had their first dose and 89% have had their second dose. and more than two and a half million jabs have been given to nhs workers. but it's believed around 100,000 employees are yet
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to receive a single dose. gp dr sarahjarvis believes that if mandatory vaccination is introduced, the timing will be crucial. the doctor in me says that of course it's the duty of everybody who works front line in the nhs with people who are sick to protect them as best they can and we know that vaccinations reduce your chance of passing the virus on. 93% of people in the nhs have been vaccinated. the problem we've got is that if we bring in mandatory vaccination at the same time as we are really struggling with winter pressures and we have 93,000 job vacancies in the nhs as it is, it mightjust push the nhs over the edge in terms of not having enough staff. doctor sarah jarvis there. the chief executive of nhs providers, chris hopson, joins us now. thanks for talking to us on bbc breakfast. i know it's a very complex picture that you have been
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explaining on social media overnight so my first question is where you nhs trust stand on this issue of mandatory vaccinations for staff? it is a complex issue and that's reflected in the fight when we talk to senior leaders about what they thought of mandating around two thirds were in favour but a third were against and the bit that everyone agrees on is that there are two risks to manage and a lot of people are talking aboutjust one risk and there is clearly a risk of cross infection in terms of nhs staff infecting patients and other staff infecting patients and other staff and we need to do all we can to stop that but the second risk is if we lose large numbers of unvaccinated staff, especially over winter, that constitutes a risk to patient safety so what we are saying is if the government goes for a mandating of all nhs staff, we need to acknowledge that both of those risks exist and we need to do all we
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can to manage both of them. mira; can to manage both of them. why do ou think can to manage both of them. why do you think there _ can to manage both of them. why do you think there is _ can to manage both of them. why do you think there is such _ can to manage both of them. why do you think there is such a _ can to manage both of them. why do you think there is such a difference i you think there is such a difference of opinion between trusts? you say two thirds to a third. i of opinion between trusts? you say two thirds to a third.— two thirds to a third. i wouldn't describe it _ two thirds to a third. i wouldn't describe it as _ two thirds to a third. i wouldn't describe it as a _ two thirds to a third. i wouldn't describe it as a massive - two thirds to a third. i wouldn't i describe it as a massive difference of opinion, people are worried about the balance of these risks and it reflects the complexity of the issue. we know as the nhs we have a responsibility to our patients to ensure we protect them as much as possible, as the gp was saying in the clip, but we also have a responsibility to ensure we provide is best a quality of care and other service to anybody who needs it and i think trust leaders, but i was third, are nervous about the fact that if we lose large numbers of staff over the winter period, our ability to provide that care is compromised and we have seen lots of theseissues compromised and we have seen lots of these issues in relation to covid, it is thrown up some difficult and
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complex balances to strike and this is another we need to be careful that there are two risks here. what that there are two risks here. what are ou that there are two risks here. what are you hearing _ that there are two risks here. what are you hearing about _ that there are two risks here. what are you hearing about the reasons people have if they work in the nhs for not having the vaccine? just people have if they work in the nhs for not having the vaccine?- for not having the vaccine? just to sa , for for not having the vaccine? just to say. for people — for not having the vaccine? just to say, for people like _ for not having the vaccine? just to say, for people like me _ for not having the vaccine? just to say, for people like me who i for not having the vaccine? just to say, for people like me who have | say, for people like me who have been very happily and rapidly and gratefully double vaccinated, sometimes it's a little bit difficult to understand the reasons why some people are saying they don't want to be vaccinated but the reality is there are a number of people saying that. if you look at the staff groups in terms of demographics of the groups where we have the word take up, two obvious groups are women who are thinking about having children relatively quickly and our colleagues from black communities, those are two groups where we have the worst levels of take—up and we now there has been significant disinformation spread about the risks. if you
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listen to the experts they are really clear, which is these vaccines are safe and the risks of either passing on or catching covid yourself if you are not vaccinated far outweigh any very small residual risks that come in terms of taking the vaccine so it's very clear, people should get double vaccinated, but the reality is there are a number of staff who for a number of different reasons are saying they are vaccine hesitant. we have been working incredibly hard as trust leaders over the last few months to have patient support of encouraging conversations with those staff and what we had been doing is driving up the percentage of staff who are double vaccinated and one thing we are seeing today is please can we ensure we don't have too quick a deadline so we can carry on that process and crucially can get
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through winter. can process and crucially can get through winter.— process and crucially can get through winter. can you talk me throurh through winter. can you talk me through why _ through winter. can you talk me through why it _ through winter. can you talk me through why it is _ through winter. can you talk me through why it is important i through winter. can you talk me through why it is important that| through winter. can you talk me i through why it is important that the nhs is given this run—up of time in order to say if it is mandated, to say everyone needs to have a double vaccine, so i'm thinking about the care industry, they were talking about that last spring and that is coming in the middle of november, why is it important to have this run—up of time now? you why is it important to have this run-up of time now?— why is it important to have this run-up of time now? you are right to oint to run-up of time now? you are right to point to the — run-up of time now? you are right to point to the social _ run-up of time now? you are right to point to the social care _ run-up of time now? you are right to point to the social care industry i run-up of time now? you are right to point to the social care industry so i point to the social care industry so in mid june the government announced it would move towards a nation of staff vaccination and a deadline they sat was mid november so there was a five—month run—up and what we are saying in the nhs is we need that length of run—up as well and there are two reasons. the first is i think if we do it carefully and with careful thought, introducing a mandatory vaccination deadlines provides a potentially helpful
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prompt to go back around those staff who are still vaccine hesitant but we just need the time to do that so that's one reason for having a decent run—up at it. the second would be we now under chief medical officer has said this, we have a very difficult winter coming up and we know the nhs will be absolutely at full stretch so it makes sense to set the deadline once that winter period has passed and we know that january, february, often early march is very busy so that's why we are saying the timing of the deadline being april 2022 is a sensible time and that then matches what has happened in terms of the social care industry and you just need to see the problem social care providers are reporting and saying they are struggling in terms of staff potentially leaving just at a point when they need them and some of our nhs staff are now having to help out
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in cornwall, helping out in the social care sector to ensure we can discharge people from hospital so we need to be careful about how we manage both these risks. ichris manage both these risks. chris ho son, manage both these risks. chris hopson, chief— manage both these risks. chris hopson, chief executive - manage both these risks. chris hopson, chief executive of i manage both these risks. chris hopson, chief executive of nhs providers, thank you. in a year where most conversations have centred around whether or not you've been jabbed and whether it was with pfizer, astrazeneca or moderna, it's perhaps not surprising that the word of the year has been chosen as 'vax'. the publisher behind the award said the shorthand for vaccine had "injected itself into the bloodstream of the english language". let's take a look back at some of the words or expressions that have made the grade over the last few years. we're all very familiar now with crouching in front of the phone trying to get that pefect shot. cast your minds back to 2013. the word of the year then was 'selfie', with research suggesting use of the word had
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increased by 17,000% in that year. that doesn't even seem like that long ago. first heard in an episode of the political satire the thick of it — the word omnishables was chosen in 2012. the global financial crisis led to "credit crunch" coming out on top in 2008. thanks to the rise in popularity of the comedy programme the catherine tate show, 2006 saw the word "bovvered" take the crown. and in a similar vein, the term "chav" won the award back in 2004. our next guest, i would never describe her as that word. susie dentjoins us now. i always enjoyed chatting to you about word of the year. what do you make of this one? i think it's an excellent choice because last year we were talking about vaccines and in 2020 it was vaccine trials and vaccine makers and what we tend to do with language
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is create a shorthand because we are talking about something all the time we put a face on that as well so we talking about being double faxed, we were talking about anti—vaxxers, they have come to the fore this year and by september of this year vax itself was 72 times more frequent than last year and that is how we choose so when a word spikes in frequency that is when it becomes a candidate. ~ . , frequency that is when it becomes a candidate. ~ ., , ., frequency that is when it becomes a candidate. ~ ., , ,, candidate. was there more pressure on the word — candidate. was there more pressure on the word this _ candidate. was there more pressure on the word this year _ candidate. was there more pressure on the word this year because i candidate. was there more pressure on the word this year because there | on the word this year because there wasn't one last year, there were so many new words we were using that could have come into play for this year? ii could have come into play for this ear? . , could have come into play for this ear? ., , ., ., , ., ., year? if there was going to beat one word from last _ year? if there was going to beat one word from last year _ year? if there was going to beat one word from last year it _ year? if there was going to beat one word from last year it would - word from last year it would probably have been unprecedented but they decided it was an unprecedented year so they would choose ones that spike on the graphs. this year it was in some ways an easier choice,
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sad that we have to be talking about this what was fascinating for me was the history because vaccine itself goes back to that lutton fought cao because edward jenner discovered a cure for smallpox after he noticed derry maids did not get smallpox so often and quite soon after that by 1812 you started to get mention of anti—vaxxers, he talked about the assailing him in that press so it goes back a long way but vax itself, that shorthand, has spiked tremendously and you will find that globally as well so this is clearly a global picture and they are looking at the word of the year and lots of parts of the world and vax it seemed the obvious choice. i’m it seemed the obvious choice. i'm disappointed that next slide please doesn't feature because that is the
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phrase i have heard repeated so many times. we talked about that global pack up, suppose a few of the words this year are associated with what we have all been through, is it about usage or do they take into account social media and in print and spoken language as well? yes. and spoken language as well? yes, this is the brilliant _ and spoken language as well? yes this is the brilliant thing about being at lexicographer, you sit in front of places you might think are boring but they are full of written language and spoken language using social media, scholarlyjournals, tabloid newspapers, they get fed into a billion word databases and we can track to seek which words are bubbling under and which are rising to the fore and that's how you can chat the frequency of something and how quickly it is taking off so it's a fascinating picture and a fascinating job, a fascinating picture and a fascinatingjob, i a fascinating picture and a fascinating job, i recommend it to anyone. i fascinating 'ob, i recommend it to an one. ., , ., fascinating 'ob, i recommend it to an one. ., anyone. i love it when you post your word of the — anyone. i love it when you post your word of the day _ anyone. i love it when you post your word of the day or _ anyone. i love it when you post your word of the day or you _ anyone. i love it when you post your
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word of the day or you post - anyone. i love it when you post your word of the day or you post a - anyone. i love it when you post your word of the day or you post a clever| word of the day or you post a clever word of the day or you post a clever word connected slightly to news events. we are talking a lot this morning about cop 26 and the climate change conference in glasgow. is there a word for a gathering of global leaders at a time of crisis? i think what i tweeted recently was you would hope that everyone attending the summit would be unanimous and that comes from the latin for of one mind, rather than story which goes back to the latin for pass or donkey, which means united in stupidity, —— product than unasinous. which means a stupid result. i unasinous. which means a stupid result. ., result. i need to say congratulations i result. i need to say congratulations to i result. i need to say i congratulations to you, result. i need to say - congratulations to you, sadly, because last week you might have seen that sally is the new permanent
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presenter of this programme taking overfrom presenter of this programme taking over from the ways. it presenter of this programme taking over from the ways.— over from the ways. it was a bit overwhelming. _ over from the ways. it was a bit overwhelming, when _ over from the ways. it was a bit overwhelming, when the i over from the ways. it was a bit overwhelming, when the newsl over from the ways. it was a bit i overwhelming, when the news was announced on wednesday word got out, thank you to everyone who sent me messages, i am trying to get back to as many as i can but everybody was so nice, i could not believe it. many people are happy for you, it must be aware that you had been doing thejob must be aware that you had been doing the job without knowing whether you permanently have the job. there are so many people who work here who think you were brilliant and i am so happy to get a chance to sit next to you for hopefully many years to get a chance to sit next to you for hopefully many years together so congratulations.- many years together so congratulations. many years together so conrratulations. �*, ., ., ., ., congratulations. it's a real honour and all the _ congratulations. it's a real honour and all the women _ congratulations. it's a real honour and all the women who _ congratulations. it's a real honour and all the women who have i congratulations. it's a real honour and all the women who have sat l congratulations. it's a real honour. and all the women who have sat here before me have been brilliant but thank you to that brilliant team on the other side of the world who have helped me get here. find the other side of the world who have helped me get here.— helped me get here. and are now tellin: us helped me get here. and are now telling us to _ helped me get here. and are now telling us to move _ helped me get here. and are now telling us to move on! _ helped me get here. and are now telling us to move on! let's i helped me get here. and are now telling us to move on! let's get i telling us to move on! let's get some news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london. a teenager has been arrested after walls near to a synagogue in camden were sprayed with swastikas. a 16—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of "religiously aggravated criminal damage". the met said other swastikas have been sprayed on walls in the surrounding area and they're investigating whether the same person is responsible. euston train station faced major disruptions yesterday due to a tree falling on the tracks. it caused delays for passengers and trains in and out of the station, including many who were travelling to glasgow for the cop26. those with tickets who couldn't travel on sunday are allowed to use them on today's services. there are calls for the mayor to release the funding needed for urgent repairs to the pool at crystal palace national sports centre. it's helped to develop some of the country's top divers. but it's been shut for more than a year and a half after structural issues were found.
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it means some are now commuting around the country to find other facilities. we were travelling to tunbridge wells, all the way down to southend on sundays. it's really hard to stay competitive when you can't train as much as the other people you're doing it against. the mayor told us further assessments are being carried out to find out the costs in order to repair and reopen the pool for those who want to use it. if you are heading out on public transport, this is how tfl services are looking. so far so good, good service on the tube this morning. just the hammersmith and city line which has severe delays at the moment. the cycle lane minor delays. the trains, southwestern services out of waterloo to exeter via basingstoke severely disrupted, because of the derailment at salisbury. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the first part of this week although always the chance still of a few showers around today. it's another very windy morning, starting off at seven or eight celsius. still a very brisk westerly, south—westerly wind blowing. that wind will ease down somewhat as we head through the afternoon so much lighter winds by then. some decent spells of sunshine around as well, and lots of places will stay completely dry or with the chance of one or two showers coming through on that breeze. temperatures just slightly down over yesterday, peaking at 12 or 13 celsius. now as we head through this evening and overnight, then it's going to be a rather cold one. there will be lots of clear skies around and temperatures could in some spots drop as low as perhaps three to five celsius into tomorrow morning. lighter winds. and then on tuesday, it looks mostly dry again, there will be lots of sunshine around, north—westerly wind taking hold. and the air will feel a bit chillier. it's the same again on wednesday
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with more of a northerly wind, still very light, lots of sunshine and staying dry, then a very calm day on thursday. it turns milder and more unsettled towards the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. newsroom in an hour. there is plenty more on our website. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. "if glasgow fails, then the whole thing fails." those are the words of the prime minister, as the major climate change conference gets underway in scotland. leaders from 200 countries are at the event, with international cooperation central to the negotiations. nina's in glasgow for us this morning and she'sjoined now by the foreign secretary. good morning. first of all, apologies if you can hear the rattling behind me, that is the wind
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blowing in glasgow over the river clyde, a very stormy morning ahead. let's talk to the foreign secretary liz truss. i want to start by asking a lot of people are thinking, 120 world leaders gathered together, what does a successful outcome look like from glasgow?— like from glasgow? well, this is more world _ like from glasgow? well, this is more world leaders _ like from glasgow? well, this is more world leaders than - like from glasgow? well, this is more world leaders than we i like from glasgow? well, this is| more world leaders than we have like from glasgow? well, this is i more world leaders than we have ever had at any event in the uk before so it's a huge opportunity for the uk to really make a difference on tackle ill climate change. what we want to see those world leaders follow through on the commitments they have made with specific details about how they are going to reach those climate change targets, and there will be intense negotiations taking place over the next two weeks to make that happen. find taking place over the next two weeks to make that happen.— to make that happen. and did we all need to be here? _ to make that happen. and did we all need to be here? over— to make that happen. and did we all need to be here? over the - to make that happen. and did we all need to be here? over the past i to make that happen. and did we all need to be here? over the past 18 i need to be here? over the past 18 months, one thing we have learned is that we can live in isolation and be productive in isolation. an estimated 400 private planes have
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been making their way to glasgow. the scottish labour party have called it a rank climate hypocrisy to take those means, mile by mile, emitting lots of carbon. mas to take those means, mile by mile, emitting lots of carbon.— emitting lots of carbon. was it necessary? — emitting lots of carbon. was it necessary? i— emitting lots of carbon. was it necessary? i think— emitting lots of carbon. was it necessary? i think everybody i emitting lots of carbon. was it i necessary? i think everybody who emitting lots of carbon. was it - necessary? i think everybody who has ever done a xenical knows that they are useful for something that when you are in crunch negotiations you do need to meet people in person. —— people who has ever done a zoom call. world leaders have to make tough decisions about what is going on in their own countries, they are going to have to commit to things they didn't necessarily want to when they didn't necessarily want to when they arrived at the conference so thatis they arrived at the conference so that is important that we do have people face—to—face so these negotiations can take place and we can make a real difference. as the prime minister said, it's touch and go whether we will be able to achieve what we need to achieve, whether we will be able to stick to 1.5, keeping temperature rises
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within that range. that's going to require some really tough negotiation so i think it is fantastic that we have got over 120 world leaders who have been prepared to come to glasgow to have these talks. ii to come to glasgow to have these talks. , ., , ., , talks. if it is about being face-to-face, _ talks. if it is about being face-to-face, though, i talks. if it is about being i face-to-face, though, you will talks. if it is about being - face-to-face, though, you will not face—to—face, though, you will not be face—to—face with xi jinping, or vladimir putin. two of the biggest nations when it comes to the climate crisis. how useful is it without them here?— crisis. how useful is it without them here? well, both of those delegates. _ them here? well, both of those delegates, both _ them here? well, both of those delegates, both of— them here? well, both of those delegates, both of those - them here? well, both of those | delegates, both of those leaders them here? well, both of those i delegates, both of those leaders are sending a senior delegation to glasgow so there will be representation in person here in glasgow to go to the details of those negotiations. we have talked to both the prime minister, —— the prime minister has spoken to both vladimir putin and president xi and put pressure on them, because there needs to be global action to tackle climate change and those countries
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are high emitters of carbon dioxide. and if they do not stick to their pledges, this isn'tjust about reaching a deal here which is tricky in itself but then enforcing it, as foreign secretary, what sort of measures would you be willing to take into against nations that don't stick to their premises? 7 first take into against nations that don't stick to their premises? ?- stick to their premises? ? first of all we need _ stick to their premises? ? first of all we need to _ stick to their premises? ? first of all we need to get _ stick to their premises? ? first of all we need to get the _ stick to their premises? ? first of all we need to get the pledges i stick to their premises? ? first of| all we need to get the pledges and that's what these two weeks are about, about getting the commitments. that all the finance so we can help developing countries adapt climate change. —— first of all, the finance. also getting commitments on delivering the target and how people deliver those targets. there will also be discussions about the mechanism for monitoring what it's happening in terms of carbon emissions to make sure we have a fair system and a level playing field around the world. the first best option is getting all countries to agree to their targets but of course, in the future, if we are not able to do
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that, we need to look at alternative options. but let's start with the positive, let's start with getting the agreement in the first place. but doesn't there needs to be more support from developed nations? you can understand how india is saying, you industrialise the way ahead of us and you began emitting way ahead of us, it is our turn to get our population out of poverty and we need more support than is on the table. �* . , need more support than is on the table. �* ., , ., table. and we are putting more su ort table. and we are putting more support in- _ table. and we are putting more support in- the _ table. and we are putting more support in. the prime - table. and we are putting more support in. the prime minister| table. and we are putting more i support in. the prime minister has announced new climate finance money. what we want to make sure it is developed and developing countries have access to honest, clean, reliable finance to help them invest in the new generation of technology, whether that is a small modular nuclear reactors that we are producing here in derby, whether it is wind energy being produced in teesside, electric vehicles being produced in sunderland. this is an opportunity first of all to help the world become net to zero, but also to promote some fantastic british
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industry and bring morejobs to promote some fantastic british industry and bring more jobs to the uk. d0 industry and bring more 'obs to the uk. y ., , ., industry and bring more 'obs to the uk. , ., ., industry and bring more 'obs to the uk. do you understand that people look at the development _ uk. do you understand that people look at the development at - uk. do you understand that people. look at the development at teesside and sunderland and looked over to india where they mine 17% more coal, china has not peaked when it comes to its emissions? they will be thinking, what is the point in me putting insulation in my attic, moving to an electric vehicle, when china and india are way behind, i can't make a difference? everybody can't make a difference? everybody can make a — can't make a difference? everybody can make a difference. _ can't make a difference? everybody can make a difference. so - can't make a difference? everybody can make a difference. so what i can't make a difference? everybodyj can make a difference. so what this conference is all about is about countries moving forward, on their own trajectories, to improve what they are delivering. so for example i was in india very recently and i saw the new low—cost car being produced in india which means it will be affordable for around the world, a new electric low—cost car. but we have made positive progress.
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when we took on the climate change talks following paris, only 30% of the world's economy were covered by net zero commitments. we are now up to 80% thanks to the work of the uk. so i don't believe this counsel of despair. we can make this happen. of course this conference is touch and 90, course this conference is touch and go, there are some really difficult discussions to be had. but we need to lean into this and that's what we're doing as the uk.- we're doing as the uk. also, difficult discussions - we're doing as the uk. also, difficult discussions to i we're doing as the uk. also, difficult discussions to be i we're doing as the uk. also, | difficult discussions to be had we're doing as the uk. also, i difficult discussions to be had with france. we are in a stalemate situation, aren't we, in this situation, aren't we, in this situation overfishing situation, aren't we, in this situation over fishing licenses. situation, aren't we, in this situation overfishing licenses. the stakes are high for people using ports in france, traders on lorries going over to the continent. are you going over to the continent. are you going to break and give them what they want? going to break and give them what the want? ~ ., . ., , ., they want? well, france has made completely — they want? well, france has made completely unacceptable _ they want? well, france has made completely unacceptable threats. | completely unacceptable threats. first of all to our fishermen but also to the channel islands, in terms of their energy supply. and we need them to withdraw those threats.
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if they don't withdraw those threats, we are prepared to use the dispute resolution mechanism in the trade deal we signed with the eu to take action against the french. they have behaved unfairly. the fishing licences were awarded entirely in accordance with the trade deal we negotiated. and we now need them to withdraw those unreasonable threats they have made. i withdraw those unreasonable threats they have made-— they have made. i 'ust want to end b askinr they have made. i 'ust want to end by asking you — they have made. ijust want to end by asking you something _ they have made. ijust want to end by asking you something that i they have made. ijust want to end by asking you something that we i they have made. ijust want to end | by asking you something that we as consumers might be considering doing things that would make our life less pleasant. not importing as many things as before from china for example, or perhaps eating meat only two or three days a week. would you advise that we all begin to start doing that now?— advise that we all begin to start doinr that now? ~ ., ~ , ., doing that now? what i think is that first of all we _ doing that now? what i think is that first of all we need _ doing that now? what i think is that first of all we need to _ doing that now? what i think is that first of all we need to diversify i first of all we need to diversify our trade anyway. it's wrong to be dependent on just our trade anyway. it's wrong to be dependent onjust one our trade anyway. it's wrong to be dependent on just one country. we
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need to have options, in the united kingdom, that's why we are negotiating new deals with countries like india, areas like the trans partnership. so it's a good thing to have multiple places where our imports are coming from and our exports are going to. and what i want to see, and this is already happening, is the british farming industry becoming more climate friendly, so that we can see emissions reduced whilst still being able to reduce the fantastic products they produce. i don't support the idea that we need to completely change the way we are living. instead what we need to do is use modern technology, use new techniques to be able to do things in different ways, which are actually more pleasant. it is more pleasant to live in a country with lower air pollution, with more cycling, more opportunities, to enjoy the fresh air. and it can also be better at helping the environment as well. so i don't accept this idea
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that they are antithetical to each other. i that they are antithetical to each other. , ., ., , , other. i will let you go, liz truss, foreian other. i will let you go, liz truss, foreign secretary, _ other. i will let you go, liz truss, foreign secretary, because - other. i will let you go, liz truss, foreign secretary, because i'm i other. i will let you go, liz truss, i foreign secretary, because i'm sure you have a busy day. thank you for your time this morning. this target of 2050 seems so far away at the moment but this is about what's happening and what's tangible in communities where we live. your great—grandparents would probably great—grandpa rents would probably have great—grandparents would probably have seen a handful of heatwaves over the space of their lives, we have seen that many in the past few years alone and that has consequences. a small community in the outer hebrides is facing immediate risk from the effects of climate change and coastal erosion. now, children living on the uist islands have sent messages to world leaders in glasgow, hoping to be heard on the big stage. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon has more. on the edge of the atlantic, islands that seem in part as much water as they are land. experts say the uists are on the front line of climate change. and some of those who call this home are already adapting
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to their shifting landscape. as you can see, it's disappearing into the dune, it's getting built up. so you're having to move your fence further and further inland? yeah, basically. donald mcphee�*s croft has been in his family for generations. we seem to getting a lot more rain. very unpredictable. whereas back in my father's day, you could guarantee that you could have plenty of dry weather in august or september, but now it's very unpredictable. and that's not the only challenge facing these islands. they are so exposed to wet and stormy weather. climate change has the potential to have a profound impact on uist. a lot of the [and actually stands below the level of the sea from the chief tidal cycle. secondly, you have rising sea levels. thirdly, you have rising rainfall in winter. and you have the difficulty of a very low lying environment of getting rid of that water.
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the airport here provides a lifeline service to ireland is, service to islanders, £1 million has been spent on the latest work to protect the runway which ends just metres from the shore. the problem out here was, over the years, we are losing up to five metres at a time during a strong event of the dunes. so the solution we had was, the designers came up with a system called gabion baskets which means that you got mattresses and filled them with rock and then embedded them into the dunes. if this hadn't been done, what was the worst case scenario? worst case scenario was that it would have eaten into the end of the runway. this low—lying watery landscape is vulnerable to changes in our climate. predictions are that the sea level here could rise by as much as half a metre over the next few decades. at the island arts centre, a visual reminder of what the long—term effects could be. so the line represents a nominal level that the sea will rise to.
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the sea—level rise and predicted storm surge in the future. i hope that it does make people think about what we're doing, and that, you know, we need to make changes. whoa, what is this? and from the children here out taking care of the local beach, messages in english and gaelic of their hopes and fears are being sent to the climate summit in glasgow. what do you think about climate change? well, bad, because i'm a crofter myself. and we are losing our land and it's quite emotional. we need help now, because if we don't do this soon, it's going to, there's probably going to be no world left. speaks gaelic. stop sea levels rising, - we could be underwater soon. these small islands hoping for big commitments from world leaders to mitigate the worst that climate
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change might bring. lorna gordon, bbc news, on the uists in the outer hebrides. an important message from those children. ijust want an important message from those children. i just want you to an important message from those children. ijust want you to have a look behind me there. what you can see is the thinnest and crane, that is the last remaining remnant of glasgow's industrial heritage here on the river clyde. a big industrial area. nationally, that is the period that we are catching up from, when it comes to climate change. that's what leaders in that building you can see across from the crane, that is where 120 can see across from the crane, that is where120 or so leaders from across the world will be meeting. they will be making their purchase and discussing where they are up to when it comes to commitments already made and there is a hope, albeit a weak one, that by the end of the two weeks, they will have been some sort of global step forward when it comes
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to fighting climate change. on the river clyde this morning, you can see and you possibly also the morning, it's very windy, i'm at the point, carol, when my toes are getting cold! how is it looking across the rest of the uk! bless you, nina, but you are right, there are gusts of 30 miles an hour in glasgow. it's very windy especially in the north and west. a new working week and a new month and the forecast for this week is one of sunshine and blustery showers, cool by day, especially when you compare it to last week. and there will be some frost and fog around. we have also had some rain and we still do have some rain across northern scotland and northern ireland, northern ireland northern england, sinking into north wales and some showers have been and thundery as we have gone through the morning. the low pressure that brought the wet and windy weather yesterday is
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heading northwards, the isobars are squeezed which means it will be windy. the rent is only slowly easing to the day but remaining strong through the north of scotland. we will see the band of rain fragmenting elsewhere so sunshine and showers. wind and showers in scotland, south of that in northern england and northern ireland, sunshine and showers, blustery showers. the rest of england and wales is a similar story, sunshine and blustery showers. and these are the temperatures, ranging from nine in stornoway to 13 in st helier. through the evening and overnight to the showers will continue, the winds will slowly ease but continue quite strong across the far north of scotland. where we have sheltered areas in england and wales and south—east scotland, temperatures will fall away so tomorrow morning we could be starting off with a touch of frost, that will be a bit of a shock to the system. tomorrow, lots of dry weather and sunshine, but still a good peppering of
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showers especially in the north and west. a few getting towards the east and they could be heavy and sundry with thundery withheld mixed in. —— heavy and thundery with hail mixed in. on wednesday, we have a northerly so it will feel colder, bringing showers to areas exposed to it. inland, a few showers but also a lot of dry weather and some sunshine as well. temperatures are slipping, not even in double figures in scotland and northern ireland. and just into double figures in northern ireland, england and wales but tempered a bit by the wind. in thursday, an area of high pressure in the atlantic starts to build into things become quite settled. still a northerly wind coming into the north sea so again, places like lincolnshire into norfolk, if you are exposed to that windy, you are likely to see some showers. for many of us we will not. temperatures,
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eight to 12 degrees. thank you very much, a busy few days of weather. a couple of the strictly stars coming your way. even their and we were there, it was an out of body experience that i was there! including the lobsters, we saw them, including the lobsters, we saw them, i loved the close and i loved the lobster roll. danjibed his i loved the close and i loved the lobster roll. dan jibed his way into week seven. let's remind ourselves of the action. tilly, how you can look so beautiful painted _ tilly, how you can look so beautiful painted green, i have no idea, darling, — painted green, i have no idea, darling, but you danced it really well, _ darling, but you danced it really well, congratulations.
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i have written a few things down here and they all basically say, perfect. i saw some lifts you haven't done before, _ i saw some lifts you haven't done before, i— i saw some lifts you haven't done before, i saw you dropping on the floor— before, i saw you dropping on the floor without fear. from this, you take _ floor without fear. from this, you take on_ floor without fear. from this, you take on a — floor without fear. from this, you take on a new grow and you keep on pushing _ take on a new grow and you keep on pushing so_ take on a new grow and you keep on pushing so keep challenging yourself. it pushing so keep challenging ourself. . , ., , ~ yourself. it was a little bit like watchin: yourself. it was a little bit like watching a _ yourself. it was a little bit like watching a horror _ yourself. it was a little bit like watching a horror film. - yourself. it was a little bit like watching a horror film. you i yourself. it was a little bit like i watching a horror film. you sort yourself. it was a little bit like - watching a horror film. you sort of want _ watching a horror film. you sort of want to _ watching a horror film. you sort of want to close _ watching a horror film. you sort of want to close your— watching a horror film. you sort of want to close your eyes _ watching a horror film. you sort of want to close your eyes to - watching a horror film. you sort of want to close your eyes to it, - want to close your eyes to it, dariing, _ want to close your eyes to it, dariing, but _ want to close your eyes to it, darling, but then _ want to close your eyes to it, darling, but then you - want to close your eyes to it, darling, but then you can't i want to close your eyes to it, . darling, but then you can't wait want to close your eyes to it, - darling, but then you can't wait to see what's— darling, but then you can't wait to see what's going _ darling, but then you can't wait to see what's going to _ darling, but then you can't wait to see what's going to happen - darling, but then you can't wait to see what's going to happen next, | darling, but then you can't wait to - see what's going to happen next, and thars— see what's going to happen next, and that's what— see what's going to happen next, and that's what i— see what's going to happen next, and that's what i love _ see what's going to happen next, and that's what i love about _ see what's going to happen next, and that's what i love about you, - see what's going to happen next, and that's what i love about you, you - that's what i love about you, you are very. — that's what i love about you, you are very. very— that's what i love about you, you are very, very entertaining. - i love it! you are very, very entertaining.—
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i love it! you are very, very entertaining. i love it! you are very, very entertainina. ., ., ., ., entertaining. you have got to cover for our entertaining. you have got to cover for your technical— entertaining. you have got to cover for your technicalfaults. _ entertaining. you have got to cover for your technical faults. i - entertaining. you have got to cover for your technical faults. i have - for your technical faults. i have got to say, i love this couple, sara and aljaz were on the bottom of the leaderboards but they escaped the dance—off because they are so popular! good morning to the pair of you! popular! good morning to the pair of ou! ~ ~ . ~ popular! good morning to the pair of ou! » . ., ~ ., popular! good morning to the pair of ou! ~ ~ . ~ ., , , you! oh, mr walker, i have missed ou! she you! oh, mr walker, i have missed you! she loves— you! oh, mr walker, i have missed you! she loves you! _ you! oh, mr walker, i have missed you! she loves you! you _ you! oh, mr walker, i have missed you! she loves you! you revealed l you! she loves you! you revealed esterda you! she loves you! you revealed yesterday that — you! she loves you! you revealed yesterday that you _ you! she loves you! you revealed yesterday that you are _ you! she loves you! you revealed yesterday that you are dancing i you! she loves you! you revealed yesterday that you are dancing to j yesterday that you are dancing to dolly parton's 95 this week. let's look at saturday night. i was saying to sally, you are the only couple who have been bottom and top of the leader board this series, so what was the weekend like a 's up and down that leader board like a yo—yo. let's hope the quickstep is good this week — let's hope the quickstep is good this week. | let's hope the quickstep is good this week. ., ., ., ,~' let's hope the quickstep is good this week. ., ., ., ~ ., this week. i have to ask you, al'az, took me to — this week. i have to ask you, al'az, took me to the fi this week. i have to ask you, al'az, took me to the outfit, i this week. i have to ask you, al'az, took me to the outfit, what i this week. i have to ask you, aljaz, took me to the outfit, what was - this week. i have to ask you, aljaz, | took me to the outfit, what was the inspiration? took me to the outfit, what was the insniration?— took me to the outfit, what was the inspiration?_ thank| inspiration? sally en'oyed it. thank ou so inspiration? sally en'oyed it. thank you so much h inspiration? sally en'oyed it. thank you so much for— inspiration? sally enjoyed it. thank you so much for mentioning - inspiration? sally enjoyed it. thank you so much for mentioning the - you so much for mentioning the outfit _ you so much for mentioning the outfit there _ you so much for mentioning the outfit. there was _ you so much for mentioning the outfit. there was not _ you so much for mentioning the outfit. there was not much - you so much for mentioning the outfit. there was not much of l you so much for mentioning the|
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outfit. there was not much of it, you so much for mentioning the i outfit. there was not much of it, it was a _ outfit. there was not much of it, it was a niesh— outfit. there was not much of it, it was a mesh shirt _ outfit. there was not much of it, it was a mesh shirt with _ outfit. there was not much of it, it was a mesh shirt with a _ outfit. there was not much of it, it was a mesh shirt with a couple - outfit. there was not much of it, it was a mesh shirt with a couple of. was a mesh shirt with a couple of harnesses — was a mesh shirt with a couple of harnesses. sadly, _ was a mesh shirt with a couple of harnesses. sadly, i'm _ was a mesh shirt with a couple of harnesses. sadly, i'm going - was a mesh shirt with a couple of harnesses. sadly, i'm going to i was a mesh shirt with a couple of. harnesses. sadly, i'm going to stop you there. — harnesses. sadly, i'm going to stop you there, speaking _ harnesses. sadly, i'm going to stop you there, speaking of— harnesses. sadly, i'm going to stop you there, speaking of the - harnesses. sadly, i'm going to stop you there, speaking of the outfit, l you there, speaking of the outfit, sara and — you there, speaking of the outfit, sara and i— you there, speaking of the outfit, sara and i have _ you there, speaking of the outfit, sara and i have prepared - you there, speaking of the outfit, i sara and i have prepared something speciai _ sara and i have prepared something s-ecial. ~ ., ., ., sara and i have prepared something special-_ this - sara and i have prepared something special._ this is i special. what do you have? this is 'ust a special. what do you have? this is just a normal— special. what do you have? this is just a normal sort _ special. what do you have? this is just a normal sort of... _ special. what do you have? this is just a normal sort of... this i special. what do you have? this is just a normal sort of... this is i just a normal sort of... this is 'ust just a normal sort of... this is just monday _ just a normal sort of... this is just monday morning - just a normal sort of... this isj just monday morning training. just a normal sort of... this is. just monday morning training. i just a normal sort of... this is i just monday morning training. i have already— just monday morning training. i have already spelt my breakfast on you. thank— already spelt my breakfast on you. thank you — already spelt my breakfast on you. thank you so much for you! can! thank you so much for you! can i 'ust sa , thank you so much for you! can i just say. dan _ thank you so much for you! can i just say, dan didn't _ thank you so much for you! can i just say, dan didn't know- thank you so much for you! can i just say, dan didn't know that i thank you so much for you! can! just say, dan didn't know that was coming! ! just say, dan didn't know that was comino! ., ., , ., just say, dan didn't know that was comino! ., . , ., , .,, just say, dan didn't know that was comino! ., . , ., , ., coming! i would have put a stop to it! i love you _ coming! i would have put a stop to it! i love you too _ coming! i would have put a stop to it! i love you too as _ coming! i would have put a stop to it! i love you too as well, - coming! i would have put a stop to it! i love you too as well, because | it! i love you too as well, because there is only partnerships on the show this year, and i don't want to embarrass you, aljaz, but sara really likes working with you because you are kind and look after you. did you know that you are going to get on so well from day one? i have watched the show for years and he's always _ have watched the show for years and he's always been my favourite. and from _ he's always been my favourite. and from first _ he's always been my favourite. and from first second the i step in the
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building. — from first second the i step in the building. i— from first second the i step in the building, i told everybody, from first second the i step in the building, itold everybody, i from first second the i step in the building, i told everybody, i was like. _ building, i told everybody, i was like. you — building, i told everybody, i was like, you are going to make sure i'm inaiiaz. _ like, you are going to make sure i'm in aljaz. you — like, you are going to make sure i'm in aljaz, you can make that happen? who do— in aljaz, you can make that happen? who do i_ in aljaz, you can make that happen? who do i need to speak to sort that out? _ who do i need to speak to sort that out? and _ who do i need to speak to sort that out? and thankfully they listened. thank— out? and thankfully they listened. thank god — out? and thankfully they listened. thank god they did! i out? and thankfully they listened. thank god they did!— thank god they did! i have to say, i'm slightly _ thank god they did! i have to say, i'm slightly distracted _ thank god they did! i have to say, i'm slightly distracted by - thank god they did! i have to say, i'm slightly distracted by the i i'm slightly distracted by the t—shirts but i'm going to talk about you for a little bit more! the churches are really impressed with your technique at the moment, you must be working incredibly hard at that. == must be working incredibly hard at that. , ., must be working incredibly hard at that. , . , , , that. -- the 'udges are impressed. we reall that. -- the judges are impressed. we really are- _ that. -- the judges are impressed. we really are. the _ that. -- the judges are impressed. we really are. the thing _ that. -- the judges are impressed. we really are. the thing for - that. -- the judges are impressed. we really are. the thing for me i that. -- the judges are impressed. we really are. the thing for me is, | we really are. the thing for me is, i we really are. the thing for me is, lalways— we really are. the thing for me is, i always want to enjoy the why. so the rumba — i always want to enjoy the why. so the rumba a — i always want to enjoy the why. so the rumba a couple of weeks ago, i said. _ the rumba a couple of weeks ago, i said. if— the rumba a couple of weeks ago, i said. ifthere— the rumba a couple of weeks ago, i said, if there was a gcse in rumba, i said, if there was a gcse in rumba, i could _ said, if there was a gcse in rumba, i could have — said, if there was a gcse in rumba, i could have taken it. i don'tjust want _ i could have taken it. i don'tjust want to— i could have taken it. i don'tjust want to know what we do with the steps. _ want to know what we do with the steps. i _ want to know what we do with the steps, i want to know why your body is doing _ steps, i want to know why your body is doing what it is supposed to do it. is doing what it is supposed to do it the _ is doing what it is supposed to do it. the quickstep is new and i will be getting — it. the quickstep is new and i will be getting some pointers from you, dan. be getting some pointers from you, dan we _ be getting some pointers from you, dan. we have started this morning. we generally start at 6am sol dan. we have started this morning. we generally start at 6am so i am a good _ we generally start at 6am so i am a good way— we generally start at 6am so i am a good way in. — we generally start at 6am so i am a good way in, so we have stopped for a cup _ good way in, so we have stopped for a cup of— good way in, so we have stopped for a cup of coffee and had a chat. we are trying — a cup of coffee and had a chat. we are trying to — a cup of coffee and had a chat. we are trying to get the steps nailed
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so we _ are trying to get the steps nailed so we can— are trying to get the steps nailed so we can have the rest of the week to work— so we can have the rest of the week to work on— so we can have the rest of the week to work on technique. | so we can have the rest of the week to work on technique.— to work on technique. i have to ask about saturday _ to work on technique. i have to ask about saturday night, _ to work on technique. i have to ask about saturday night, that - to work on technique. i have to ask about saturday night, that thing i to work on technique. i have to ask about saturday night, that thing at| about saturday night, that thing at the end of the programme, on sunday, it's so nervy with the red lights. i heard your scream forjoy when you guys managed to get through without going into the dance—off. were you worried at point after what the judges said and the scores? yeah, i'm re judges said and the scores? yeah, i'm pretty sure _ judges said and the scores? yeah, i'm pretty sure you _ judges said and the scores? yeah, i'm pretty sure you could - judges said and the scores? yeah, i'm pretty sure you could hear- judges said and the scores? yeah, i'm pretty sure you could hear my| i'm pretty sure you could hear my scream _ i'm pretty sure you could hear my scream from _ i'm pretty sure you could hear my scream from elstree _ i'm pretty sure you could hear my scream from elstree to _ i'm pretty sure you could hear my scream from elstree to salford! . i'm pretty sure you could hear my scream from elstree to salford! i i scream from elstree to salford! i was relieved _ scream from elstree to salford! i was relieved beyond _ scream from elstree to salford! i was relieved beyond words, i scream from elstree to salford! i i was relieved beyond words, because i was relieved beyond words, because i was really— was relieved beyond words, because i was really shocked _ was relieved beyond words, because i was really shocked on _ was relieved beyond words, because i was really shocked on saturday- was really shocked on saturday night. — was really shocked on saturday night. after— was really shocked on saturday night, after the _ was really shocked on saturday night, after the scores - was really shocked on saturday night, after the scores and i was really shocked on saturday night, after the scores and the| night, after the scores and the comments. _ night, after the scores and the comments, and _ night, after the scores and the comments, and then- night, after the scores and the comments, and then you i night, after the scores and the comments, and then you can. night, after the scores and the i comments, and then you can only night, after the scores and the - comments, and then you can only hope that the _ comments, and then you can only hope that the people — comments, and then you can only hope that the people at — comments, and then you can only hope that the people at home _ comments, and then you can only hope that the people at home enjoyed - comments, and then you can only hope that the people at home enjoyed it. i that the people at home enjoyed it. and i_ that the people at home enjoyed it. and i was— that the people at home enjoyed it. and i was so— that the people at home enjoyed it. and i was so chuffed _ that the people at home enjoyed it. and i was so chuffed when - that the people at home enjoyed it. and i was so chuffed when i- that the people at home enjoyed it. and i was so chuffed when i heard i and i was so chuffed when i heard our names — and i was so chuffed when i heard our names i_ and i was so chuffed when i heard our names. i probably— and i was so chuffed when i heard our names. i probably am - and i was so chuffed when i heard our names. i probably am every. and i was so chuffed when i heard i our names. i probably am every week as you _ our names. i probably am every week as you can— our names. i probably am every week as you can see! — our names. i probably am every week as you can see! but— our names. i probably am every week as you can see! but especially- our names. i probably am every week as you can see! but especially this i as you can see! but especially this week. _ as you can see! but especially this week. i_ as you can see! but especially this week. iloved— as you can see! but especially this week, i loved our— as you can see! but especially this week, i loved our dance. - as you can see! but especially this week, i loved our dance. it- as you can see! but especially this week, i loved our dance. it was. as you can see! but especially this i week, i loved our dance. it was made with love _ week, i loved our dance. it was made with love and — week, i loved our dance. it was made with love and i— week, i loved our dance. it was made with love and i really _ week, i loved our dance. it was made with love and i really am _ week, i loved our dance. it was made with love and i really am so _ week, i loved our dance. it was made with love and i really am so pleased i with love and i really am so pleased that the _ with love and i really am so pleased that the people _ with love and i really am so pleased that the people at _ with love and i really am so pleased that the people at home _ with love and i really am so pleased that the people at home enjoyed i with love and i really am so pleased
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that the people at home enjoyed it. j that the people at home enjoyed it. it's that the people at home enjoyed it. it's a _ that the people at home enjoyed it. it's a good — that the people at home enjoyed it. it's a good job— that the people at home enjoyed it. it's a good job that _ that the people at home enjoyed it. it's a good job that they— that the people at home enjoyed it. it's a good job that they enjoyed i it's a good job that they enjoyed it! as _ it's a good job that they enjoyed it! as long as they enjoyed it, we loved _ it! as long as they enjoyed it, we loved it — it! as long as they enjoyed it, we loved it. saturday was nervy, i tell you what — loved it. saturday was nervy, i tell you what. the relief last night, i think— you what. the relief last night, i think you — you what. the relief last night, i think you could see it on both of our faces — think you could see it on both of our faces-— our faces. one of the things i noticed on — our faces. one of the things i noticed on saturday - our faces. one of the things i noticed on saturday is - our faces. one of the things i noticed on saturday is how i our faces. one of the things i - noticed on saturday is how important is that the music that you choose is. you have got a classic this week, the dolly parton classic. that is so suited to you. i week, the dolly parton classic. that is so suited to you.— is so suited to you. i absolutely love it. i said _ is so suited to you. i absolutely love it. i said to _ is so suited to you. i absolutely love it. i said to us, _ is so suited to you. i absolutely love it. i said to us, we - is so suited to you. i absolutely love it. i said to us, we are i is so suited to you. i absolutely i love it. i said to us, we are doing no -- _ love it. i said to us, we are doing no -- dolly— love it. i said to us, we are doing no —— dolly parton, nine to five, i was _ no —— dolly parton, nine to five, i was like. — no —— dolly parton, nine to five, i was like. the _ no —— dolly parton, nine to five, i was like, the irony, if only we started — was like, the irony, if only we started at— was like, the irony, if only we started at 9am! it should be five till nine! — started at 9am! it should be five till nine! l— started at 9am! it should be five till nine! . . started at 9am! it should be five till nine! . , ., till nine! i was extending about the hotel club that _ till nine! i was extending about the hotel club that we _ till nine! i was extending about the hotel club that we have, _ till nine! i was extending about the hotel club that we have, a - till nine! i was extending about the hotel club that we have, a few i till nine! i was extending about the hotel club that we have, a few of i till nine! i was extending about the | hotel club that we have, a few of us stay in the home —— same hotel on a friday night, adam, judi, your and mine, and judi was the founder member of hotel club. somebody has
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to leave every week but she has been such a bundle of fun and laughs for the whole time in the programme. filth. the whole time in the programme. oh, that close—knit group that we have -ot that close—knit group that we have got is _ that close—knit group that we have got is unreal and judi was such a central— got is unreal and judi was such a central part of that. and i was so pleased — central part of that. and i was so pleased that she got to come back this week— pleased that she got to come back this week and do that dance. i know she had _ this week and do that dance. i know she had been struggling all week, and it— she had been struggling all week, and itiust — she had been struggling all week, and itjust gave her a little bit of closure — and itjust gave her a little bit of closure i— and itjust gave her a little bit of closure. i was distraught to see her and adam — closure. i was distraught to see her and adam in — closure. i was distraught to see her and adam in the bottom two, either way one _ and adam in the bottom two, either way one of— and adam in the bottom two, either way one of my best friend is going home _ way one of my best friend is going home we — way one of my best friend is going home. we were texting this morning saying. _ home. we were texting this morning saying. it's— home. we were texting this morning saying, it'sjust not going to be the same — saying, it'sjust not going to be the same this weekend. we haven't aot the same this weekend. we haven't not a the same this weekend. we haven't got a long. — the same this weekend. we haven't got a long. i — the same this weekend. we haven't got a long. i need _ the same this weekend. we haven't got a long, i need to _ the same this weekend. we haven't got a long, i need to know- the same this weekend. we haven't got a long, i need to know who i the same this weekend. we haven't got a long, i need to know who you | got a long, i need to know who you think is going to take home the glitterball trophy.— think is going to take home the glitterball trophy. rose! after this weekend, i have _ glitterball trophy. rose! after this weekend, i have to _ glitterball trophy. rose! after this weekend, i have to say _ glitterball trophy. rose! after this weekend, i have to say rose, but before _ weekend, i have to say rose, but before that — weekend, i have to say rose, but before that rhys was a big favourite. | before that rhys was a big favourite.— before that rhys was a big favourite. ~ , ., ., favourite. i think he is good dancer. come _ favourite. i think he is good dancer. come on, - favourite. i think he is good dancer. come on, aljaz. i favourite. i think he is good | dancer. come on, aljaz. i've favourite. i think he is good i dancer. come on, aljaz. i've even dancer. come on, al'az. i've even not the dancer. come on, al'az. i've even got the picture _ dancer. come on, al'az. i've even got the picture on! ii dancer. come on, aljaz. i've even got the picture on! i mean, i dancer. come on, aljaz. i've even got the picture on! i mean, how. got the picture on! i mean, how obvious— got the picture on! i mean, how obvious is— got the picture on! i mean, how
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obvious is that? _ got the picture on! i mean, how obvious is that? dan _ got the picture on! i mean, how obvious is that?— got the picture on! i mean, how| obvious is that?_ it's got the picture on! i mean, how. obvious is that?_ it's a obvious is that? dan walker. it's a rhetorical question. _ obvious is that? dan walker. it's a rhetorical question. if— obvious is that? dan walker. it's a rhetorical question. if you - obvious is that? dan walker. it's a rhetorical question. if you keep i obvious is that? dan walker. it's a rhetorical question. if you keep up performances _ rhetorical question. if you keep up performances like _ rhetorical question. if you keep up performances like the _ rhetorical question. if you keep up performances like the lobster- performances like the lobster performance, that glitterball is yours — performance, that glitterball is ours. . ., performance, that glitterball is ours. ., yours. we love you too! en'oy your quickstep. — yours. we love you too! en'oy your quickstep. fl yours. we love you too! en'oy your quickstep. you h yours. we love you too! en'oy your quickstep, see you lateri yours. we love you too! en'oy your quickstep, see you later ini yours. we love you too! enjoy your quickstep, see you later in the i quickstep, see you later in the week. . ., . quickstep, see you later in the week. , ., . quickstep, see you later in the week-_ hel quickstep, see you later in the. week-_ he is week. keep dancing, dan! he is tenuinel week. keep dancing, dan! he is genuinely nice. _ week. keep dancing, dan! he is genuinely nice. 8am _ week. keep dancing, dan! he is genuinely nice. 8am and - week. keep dancing, dan! he is genuinely nice. 8am and that i week. keep dancing, dan! he is. genuinely nice. 8am and that much enert ! genuinely nice. 8am and that much energy! he's— genuinely nice. 8am and that much energy! he's such _ genuinely nice. 8am and that much energy! he's such a _ genuinely nice. 8am and that much energy! he's such a great - genuinely nice. 8am and that much energy! he's such a great help i genuinely nice. 8am and that much energy! he's such a great help to l energy! he's such a great help to all the other— energy! he's such a great help to all the other blokes _ energy! he's such a great help to all the other blokes in _ energy! he's such a great help to all the other blokes in the - all the other blokes in the competition, with little tips, taking you to one side and say, try this this week. i'm so glad that sara has him because they are brilliant together. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning and welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: the prime minister warns that time is running out to prevent catastrophic global warming, as world leaders arrive in glasgow for the cop 26 climate change summit. a one minute to midnight moment and the clock is ticking. good morning from glasgow, as 12 days of talks on the future of the planet get under way. we planet get under way. look at how climate change
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damaging we look at how climate change is damaging lives here and around the world and what we can do to cut our emissions, and with 120 leaders here now, can they really reach a deal? 17 people are taken to hospital after two trains collide in wiltshire. we're live there this morning. a night to rememberfor best friends freddie and hughie — their fundraising efforts win them a pride of britain award and a red carpet encounter with none other than hollywood a—lister sharon stone. you don't have to have a lot of good friends but you have to do have one. he's your one, isn't he? he'd do anything for you too, right? yeah. that's the way it goes. the forecast for this week is different from last week, it will be cooler, were looking at sunshine and blustery showers and for some by night there will be fog and frost. i will have the details later. it's monday ist november. our main story this morning
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is the start of the cop 26 international climate change conference in glasgow. world leaders are facing calls for urgent action to tackle global warming. nina is in glasgow for us this morning. good morning, nina. good morning, nina. good morning. hopes are high at the moment, ambitions are high and the stakes are very high. the eyes of the world will be on scotland today, as world leaders gather here in glasgow for the cop 26 summit. the aim of the two—week event is to commit to measures to limit the rise in global temperatures and cut emissions. in his welcoming speech, prime minister borisjohnson will tell delegates that "the clock is ticking" and we must act today or it will be too late for the next generation. but as our political correspondent chris mason explains, there is mounting pressure for action rather than just words. the world arrives in glasgow today, or at least lots of its leaders do, with plenty saying now is the time there has to be action,
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and plenty of it, to minimise the impact of climate change. this is very, very urgent, notjust for our country, for the whole world. if i had to give a comparison i would say it's a one minute to midnight moment and the clock is ticking. we have to get everybody to do more. and they need to make further commitments, they need to make further commitments on how we're going to move away from coal, fossilfuel burning, how we're going to move away from using hydrocarbon cars, how we're going to plant millions of trees if not a trillion trees around the world, protect the world's biodiversity and above all how we're going to get the whole of the developing world to buy into this. so what is cop 26? cop stands for conference of the parties and was set up by the united nations to tackle climate change. the first one, cop i, took place in 1995.
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this is the 26th. nearly 200 countries are being asked to submit plans to cut their emissions and around 25,000 delegates are expected to turn up in glasgow. the prime minister has been sounding pretty gloomy about the prospect of getting a meaningful agreement from this summit. are rich countries willing to do enough themselves and are they willing to help poorer countries tackle climate change? borisjohnson and the prince of wales will welcome world leaders to glasgow later, with prince charles saying this is the last chance saloon. the sound bite we will regularly hear is trying to keep i.5 alive, keeping global average temperatures no more than 1.5 degrees warmer than preindustrial times to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. it's widely accepted achieving that will be very difficult.
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some think it's already too late. chris mason, bbc news. we have just been watching police and security bobbing along the river clyde behind me. you can probably see how choppy it is and across the water that is the blue zone were more than 100 world leaders will work, the hope that there official talks will make progress but also the informal chats leaders will have between them and adam fleming has the ear on the ground. earlier we spoke with the foreign secretary, liz truss, and said it did 400 private planes have to come in here and she said meeting face—to—face is integralfor a moment and she said meeting face—to—face is integral for a moment like this. and she said meeting face—to—face is integralfor a moment like this. can we expect anything to come out of it? ~ we expect anything to come out of it? . y ., ., ~ we expect anything to come out of it? ,., ., ~ ., we expect anything to come out of it? .,~ we expect anything to come out of it? ., ~ .,, ., we expect anything to come out of
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it? when you talk to people who have been to these — it? when you talk to people who have been to these conferences _ it? when you talk to people who have been to these conferences they i it? when you talk to people who have been to these conferences they say i been to these conferences they say it is unique because you get the big wealthy countries that are responsible for lots of carbon emissions that are causing climate change, lots of it less wealthy countries that are feeling the effects of climate change now and then the developing countries that are becoming richer and pumping out more carbon emissions and that is quite a combustible mix that can either lead to a big breakthrough or a big bust up and because there is still quite a lot to play for and it's quite unpredictable and we are just at the start of two weeks of negotiations, one hand you can get the prime minister at sounding very gloomy about what's happening last night but on the other hand the foreign secretary liz truss sounding more optimistic on bbc breakfast this morning. when we took on the climate change talks following paris,
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only 30% of the world's economy were covered by net zero commitments. we are now up to 80% thanks to the work of the uk. so i don't believe this counsel of despair. we can make this happen. of course this conference is touch and go, there are some really difficult discussions to be had. but we need to lean into this and that's what we're doing as the uk. and things are already starting to happen, we have the uk saying because they will put their spending on international aid back up over the next four years to what it was they could be an extra £1 billion available to give to other countries to help them with the green transition from the uk, we will also get prime minister narendra modi of india, he will be making an update on india's contributions to the fight against climate change this afternoon and there are announcements on various issues over the next few days that will give a real sense of momentum at the start of this conference but before it begins the prime minister has the
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job of standing outside the conference venue and fist pumping more than 100 prime ministers and presidents before things can really get under way. presidents before things can really get under way-— get under way. hand gel at the read ! get under way. hand gel at the ready! thank — get under way. hand gel at the ready! thank you, _ get under way. hand gel at the ready! thank you, adam. - get under way. hand gel at the ready! thank you, adam. as i get under way. hand gel at the - ready! thank you, adam. as adam was sent this up for every nation to come forward with its own plan and in some ways marking its own homework about when that comes to low and you are criticised, aim too high and you may not meet the targets. we will be talking to nicola sturgeon about that in half an hour. rail accident investigators are examining the scene of a collision between two trains in salisbury, which left 17 people needing hospital treatment. officials say the line will remain closed today, while inquiries continue. some passengers on board told us what happened during at the moment of impact. just this massive impact and i fell across the table and then the table came off the wall, i ended up underneath another table. there was just suddenly a lot ofjostling, possessions being thrown around.
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i think a few people went forward and hit their heads. our reporter andrew plant is near the scene of the collision for us this morning. andrew, what's the latest? lots of people living near here in salisbury were still out trick or treating it last night when they heard what they described as a massive bank about 6:45pm, you can see the trains are still where they finished up last night. we know one of those trains was from portsmouth to bristol going when it hit some think that courted to partially derail and take out something link nearby and that's why another train coming six or seven minutes later it did not know where it was there it it, that was going from london to honiton. about 100 people were evacuated from those trains, 17 are still in hospital including the
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driver of one train and now the investigation is under way to find what caused that train to derail, hopefully we will find out more about that as the investigation continues. thank you, that is andrew plant near the scene of that collision. meanwhile, travel has been significantly disrupted across britain, following a weekend of strong winds and heavy rain. there were scenes of chaos at london's euston station yesterday, after severe delays caused by a fallen tree and damage to overhead power lines. it meant hundreds of people were unable to travel by train from london to glasgow, for the first day of the climate conference. we can talk now to the safety and engineering officerfor network rail, martin frobisher. tha nkfully thankfully you've managed to get to glasgow, you might be based in glasgow. good to talk to you. give us an idea, the disruption caused by
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the services yesterday, especially london euston to glasgow, what is going on and what is being done to solve that? . , going on and what is being done to solve that? ., , ,., , ., going on and what is being done to solve that?— solve that? really sorry for the dela s to solve that? really sorry for the delays to passengers _ solve that? really sorry for the l delays to passengers yesterday, there was a huge amount of disruption on the line caused by intense wind that is blunt lots of debris onto the overhead power lines. if you would days earlier we had a huge amount of rainfall in cumbria and scotland and the effects of climate change are on us so a vast and to work is being done to strengthen the sea defences and improve the embankments built by the victorians 100 years ago can lots to do but climate change is really on us. �* , , , .., , do but climate change is really on us. 2 , , us. it's interesting because many --eole us. it's interesting because many peeple travel _ us. it's interesting because many peeple travel by _ us. it's interesting because many people travel by train _ us. it's interesting because many people travel by train regularly, i j people travel by train regularly, i go from sheffield to london quite a bit and you go through valleys on that train line and of our trees on both sides. is that something we need to look at in terms of clearing
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those or doing something around those or doing something around those lines because of one of those comes down that is huge disruption? there is lots we need to do about the vegetation and other things that can get blown onto the line in a storm can also dots we need do to improve biodiversity so it isn't just about clearing trees, we have been working hard to improve the biodiversity of the line side so we have satellite imagery of the landslide we used to grade the habitats and making sure the railway works well operationally, there is a massive amount of work we are doing. there is talk about what's happening in salisbury this morning. obviously there is an investigation ongoing, there is an investigation ongoing, the train that subsequently hit the first time which we understand was six or seven minutes behind why that trent not note other train had been involved in an accident? it trent not note other train had been involved in an accident?— trent not note other train had been involved in an accident? it would be wron: to involved in an accident? it would be wrong to speculate _ involved in an accident? it would be wrong to speculate at _ involved in an accident? it would be wrong to speculate at this _ involved in an accident? it would be wrong to speculate at this early -
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wrong to speculate at this early stage, we are obviously very relieved that no one was seriously injured and we know that because of the relatively low speed of the incident, but the passengers had a terribly scary experience and we are very sorry for that. to date we have the rail accident investigation branch on site, beginning a very detailed investigation, they are very thorough and they will get to the bottom of what happened. that helps us learn and we will improve from it and that is why the railway is so safe, we have 100 years of learning from incidents and make sure we will follow that up so rail accident investigation will begin the investigation and once they have finished their work they will hand over to our teams, they will then remove the damaged rolling stock and begin to prepare the track and we cannot handle that back for use. i cannot handle that back for use. i assume there is a radio transmission and the driver of that train should
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have been able to say he was in trouble and warn others.- have been able to say he was in trouble and warn others. there is a radio system _ trouble and warn others. there is a radio system in _ trouble and warn others. there is a radio system in the _ trouble and warn others. there is a radio system in the camps - trouble and warn others. there is a radio system in the camps that - trouble and warn others. there is a radio system in the camps that can| radio system in the camps that can put out a broadcast but in terms of what happened last night, we don't know and we are working with the rail accident investigation branch to get to the bottom of it. find rail accident investigation branch to get to the bottom of it. and for --eole to get to the bottom of it. and for people experiencing _ to get to the bottom of it. and for people experiencing disruption . people experiencing disruption today, what will happen today? trains out of king's cross are back to normal, the line is open from euston and we have done repair work but rolling stock and train crew were hugely displaced so there will be residual delays this morning at salisbury obviously we have the line blocked that so anyone travelling in the salisbury area, do check before you travel because there is disruption and changes to the service. �* ,, . ., service. appreciate your time, marton, thank _ service. appreciate your time, marton, thank you _ service. appreciate your time, marton, thank you for - service. appreciate your time, marton, thank you for talking | service. appreciate your time, i marton, thank you for talking to service. appreciate your time, -
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marton, thank you for talking to us. we've been talking this morning about the travel disruptions across britain yesterday, caused by strong winds and heavy rain. in northamptonshire there were reports of a possible tornado, causing damage and widespread disruption, with residents advised to stay at home. people were sharing images on social media of the debris left behind — wow! i know, look at that. trees down, waltzed down, fences down, my garden furniture literally went flying across the whole garden so a nightmare for a lot of people and causing lots of travel disruption. it's not a date for a gazebo, is it? incredible pictures, what is happening out there today? it's still quite windy and that tornado has not been confirmed as a tornado yet. some of us are starting off with beautiful blue skies in lincolnshire and for some a quiet start but for others there is heavy
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rain and showers so we have heavy and persistent rain across the north of scotland rain sinking south into the midland and lincolnshire, this will fragment and for many it will be a day of sunshine and blustery showers. strong winds in the north and west these links except across the north of scotland where they will prevail and temperatures between nine and 1a degrees. tonight there will be clear skies, still some showers, wet and windy across the north of scotland and where we have those clear skies in chartered parts of england, wales, temperatures could fall lorena for a touch of frost. that will be a shock touch of frost. that will be a shock to the system tomorrow, when temperatures were much higher. a cold start, we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine tomorrow can still some showers, winds will ease comfort by the end of the day we could see wintry showers on the hills in scotland and temperatures of 9-12 .
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thank you for that update, carol. we will see you again in about 25 minutes. here on breakfast we've been following the story of two best friends — hughie and freddie, who've raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for the royal manchester children's hospital, who are treating hughie for leukaemia. this weekend, the 11—year—olds were given a pride of britain award for their fundraising and spent saturday night rubbing shoulders with the stars on the red carpet, asjosh parry reports. all right? a night like no other, to celebrate a friendship like no other. last year, freddie had a simple idea. to run two kilometres a day for 50 days. the goal — £1000 for the royal manchester children's hospital where hughie is being treated for leukaemia.
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that's absolutely amazing. thank you to everybody that's donated. 100 kilometres and more than £200,000 later, it's time for them to swap the running track for the red carpet. it's such an honour to be here. and just knowing that people wanted us to be the winners of this award, it's so great. and freddie is the main reason for that. now, is there any celebrities that you have spotted that you might like to interview on bbc breakfast? yes. so what's happening? we are hughie and freddie from bbc breakfast. 0k, good, good, great. i'm very excited to be here. this is our first pride of britain awards. this is your first awards, as well, isn't it? so we're in it together. very nervous but it should be good, very excited. i think we're sat near each other as well, aren't we? that's very exciting.
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we'll enjoy the whole thing. we'll be able to whisper to each other in the ad breaks or whatever, i don't know what we're allowed to do, i've never been here. it's very exciting. is this your first time hosting for bbc breakfast? yeah. it's very cool, you're doing a good job so far, i think. you look cute, you look very cute. how's everything, good? we are hughie and freddie from bbc breakfast. are you? i heard you guys are getting an award today. are you? oh, that's so cool. can i shake your hand? yes. it is a great honour to meet you, and it's a privilege to meet you. you're a good person. and you're a good person. and you are lucky to have a good friend like that. it's everything to have a good friend, isn't it? yes. you know, you don't have to have a lot of good friends, but you have to have one. yes. he is your one, isn't he? do you two know who that was? kind of. sharon stone is like, a megastar a—lister, speaking to her is a big deal. a night to celebrate ordinary people
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doing extraordinary things. but this year feels more special than most as it's the first time since the pandemic began that winners have been able to mingle with the celebs and stars on the red carpet. it's truly wonderful, but last year's winners, who of course didn't have an event, they're all here tonight. so it's sort of extra special, extra, extra, extra special celebration. and some of the winners tonight are very, very familiar with bbc breakfast viewers, in particular hughie and freddie. yeah, i've seen them, they're just behind me on the red carpet. they are hilarious. they are a scream, hughie and freddie, an absolute scream. i think ant and dec should be a little bit worried. i genuinely think they should! they have a great future, those two, don't they? story of friendship that really stole the show.
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josh parry, bbc news. well done, lads. and well done, josh. hughie and freddie also won a pride of manchester award earlier this year. actor and presenter kym marsh hosted that ceremony and was also shejoins us now. also there on saturday night. those two boys, you smile watching them come luke wright when you hear their story, they are such an inspiration. they are, i was so pleased they had won the main award because like you said i gave them their pride of manchester award and they are so inspiring, two of them, what they have been through and it shows you about true friendship and what they have done for the hospital is outstanding.—
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have done for the hospital is outstanding. have done for the hospital is outstandina. ., �* , outstanding. one thing that's so ureat outstanding. one thing that's so great about _ outstanding. one thing that's so great about them _ outstanding. one thing that's so great about them is _ outstanding. one thing that's so great about them is what - outstanding. one thing that's so great about them is what they i outstanding. one thing that's so i great about them is what they set out to do is quite a simple thank and one thing for a simple thing like running two kilometres a day turns out to beat something incredible and life changing for many people. it incredible and life changing for many people-— incredible and life changing for man --eole. ., , , , ., many people. it does, they started out doinu many people. it does, they started out doing this _ many people. it does, they started out doing thisjust _ many people. it does, they started out doing thisjust the _ many people. it does, they started out doing thisjust the maybe - many people. it does, they started out doing thisjust the maybe i - many people. it does, they started out doing thisjust the maybe i will| out doing this just the maybe i will run a few kilometres and maybe we can get some slush puppies and it has turned into hundreds of thousands of pounds and it's making a real difference to pearly children and it's really important. the pride of britain awards _ and it's really important. the pride of britain awards is _ and it's really important. the pride of britain awards is one _ and it's really important. the pride of britain awards is one of - and it's really important. the pride of britain awards is one of those i of britain awards is one of those nights where there are so many stories out there come at a time when on the new sometimes we focus on the dark stuff at nights like that you think there are so many amazing people quietly doing amazing things in corners of the country. it's one of the reasons i loved being there and there are so many good people in the world and all we tend to hear about is negative
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things and there are so many great people doing great things quietly so a night like that is brilliant because we all get to come together and celebrate ordinary people doing extraordinary things and that's really important. bind extraordinary things and that's really important.— extraordinary things and that's really important. and hughie and freddie weren't _ really important. and hughie and freddie weren't the _ really important. and hughie and freddie weren't the only - really important. and hughie and| freddie weren't the only winners, really important. and hughie and - freddie weren't the only winners, we got blind date from the vt thatjosh put together some of the incredible stories. how on earth did the judges go through all the stories and pick winners? it must be almost impossible. i winners? it must be almost impossible-— winners? it must be almost impossible. winners? it must be almost imossible. ., ., impossible. i have sat on the panel several times _ impossible. i have sat on the panel several times and _ impossible. i have sat on the panel several times and it's _ impossible. i have sat on the panel several times and it's really - impossible. i have sat on the panel several times and it's really hard, i several times and it's really hard, we end up being split, there are lots of people saying this person or this dispersing from it so difficult because you want to give everyone an award and you cannot, but it is really difficult. it's hard to choose between one and the other but hopefully everyone will end up winning at some point because if
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they don't win this year, maybe they will get that next year, that so you have to look at it. it’s will get that next year, that so you have to look at it.— have to look at it. it's always love to seak have to look at it. it's always love to speak to _ have to look at it. it's always love to speak to you — have to look at it. it's always love to speak to you on _ have to look at it. it's always love to speak to you on the _ have to look at it. it's always love | to speak to you on the programme because occasionally we spoke to you when you were doing morning life and a lot of our viewers will note you got married recently so congratulations. it must have been a lovely day. it congratulations. it must have been a lovel da . . , congratulations. it must have been a lovel da . ., ., , , lovely day. it was one of the best da s of lovely day. it was one of the best days of my _ lovely day. it was one of the best days of my life. _ lovely day. it was one of the best days of my life, the _ lovely day. it was one of the best days of my life, the sun - lovely day. it was one of the best days of my life, the sun shone i lovely day. it was one of the best| days of my life, the sun shone for us and we woke up and it was raining and we thought, oh, no! then at the time got near to the wedding, the sun came out so we were blessed with that and we had a wonderful day. find that and we had a wonderful day. and how are you — that and we had a wonderful day. and how are you doing? i know you have taken a step back from morning live to look after yourself. how are you? i'm getting there. it's important we speak about mental health and i have
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had a bad speak about mental health and i have had a had run of it recently since my dad was diagnosed with cancer in march and then everything got on top of me and it was time for me to take a step back and look after myself and say i need some help and it takes a lot to admit that and i'm hoping that in talking about it, it will encourage other people to do the same so i'm not quite right yet but i'm getting there, i'm on the right path. but i'm getting there, i'm on the right path-— but i'm getting there, i'm on the riaht ath. �* , ., , right path. and it shows where the conversation _ right path. and it shows where the conversation is _ right path. and it shows where the conversation is because _ right path. and it shows where the conversation is because maybe - right path. and it shows where the conversation is because maybe a l conversation is because maybe a couple of years ago, i don't want to put words in your mouth but maybe you wouldn't have been so open about what you were having difficulty and had to take a step back? it’s what you were having difficulty and had to take a step back? it's funny, mental health _ had to take a step back? it's funny, mental health is _ had to take a step back? it's funny, mental health is a _ had to take a step back? it's funny, mental health is a thing _ had to take a step back? it's funny, mental health is a thing that - mental health is a thing that everyone seems to feel embarrassed talking about it, people don't want to discuss it, because on the face of it you seem fine and everyone goes everything is fine, it's not something you can see and it almost
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feels like people feel if they have to keep quiet about it and i'm hoping that now, i think the pandemic certainly, i have seen recently a lot of people coming out and speaking about how their mental health has been affected. i'm hoping the pandemic has encouraged people to go i'm not ok, i will say i'm not all right and i think it's been important it's been quite a big year for that, important it's been quite a big year forthat, people important it's been quite a big year for that, people speaking out about it. , ., , , , , ., for that, people speaking out about it. kym, honestly, we wish you all the very best- _ it. kym, honestly, we wish you all the very best- i — it. kym, honestly, we wish you all the very best. i salute _ it. kym, honestly, we wish you all the very best. i salute you - it. kym, honestly, we wish you all the very best. i salute you for- the very best. i salute you for being so honest and it's great to hear that conversation continuing. thank you. we should say that kym was part of those pride of britain awards and you can see them. the daily mirror pride of britain awards are on itv on thursday, at 8pm. the daily miller birthmark and you
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will see freddie and kuwait in all their glory. i like the idea of the daily miller, i like the idea of the daily miller, i might subscribe. coming up in the next half hour, we'll be joined by the former manchester united and france captain, patrice evra, as he publishes his autobiography, looking back at his life and career. talking about being open and honest really honest about some of the things he has been through and if you follow him on social media, you will know he is a super there. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a teenager has been arrested after walls near to a synagogue in camden were sprayed with swastikas. a 16—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of "religiously aggravated criminal damage". the met said other swastikas have been sprayed on walls in the surrounding area and they're investigating whether the same person is responsible.
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thousands of travellers were left stranded at euston station last night because a tree fell on train tracks. there was serious disruption for passengers, many of whom were travelling to glasgow for the cop26. those with tickets who couldn't travel on sunday are allowed to use them on today's services. there are calls for the mayor to release the funding needed for urgent repairs to the pool at crystal palace national sports centre. it's helped to develop some of the country's top divers. but it's been shut for more than a year and a half after structural issues were found. it means some are now commuting around the country to find other facilities. we were travelling to tunbridge wells, all the way down to southend on sundays. it's really hard to stay competitive when you can't train as much as the other people you're doing it against. the mayor told us further assessments are being carried out to find out the costs in order to repair and reopen the pool for those who want to use it. if you are heading out on public
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transport, this is how tfl services are looking. so far so good, good service on the tube this morning. just the hammersmith and city line which has severe delays at the moment. severe delays also own the london overground. the trains, southwestern services out of waterloo to exeter via basingstoke severely disrupted, because of the derailment at salisbury. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the first part of this week although always the chance still of a few showers around today. it's another very windy morning, starting off at seven or eight celsius. still a very brisk westerly, south—westerly wind blowing. that wind will ease down somewhat as we head through the afternoon so much lighter winds by then. some decent spells of sunshine around as well, and lots of places will stay completely dry or with the chance of one or two showers coming
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through on that breeze. temperatures just slightly down over yesterday, peaking at 12 or 13 celsius. now as we head through this evening and overnight, then it's going to be a rather cold one. there will be lots of clear skies around and temperatures could in some spots drop as low as perhaps three to five celsius into tomorrow morning. lighter winds. and then on tuesday, it looks mostly dry again, there will be lots of sunshine around, north—westerly wind taking hold. and the air will feel a bit chillier. it's the same again on wednesday with more of a northerly wind, still very light, lots of sunshine and staying dry, then a very calm day on thursday. it turns milder and more unsettled towards the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and sally nugent. morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store with sara cox and rav wilding. sorry, i said sara because of sara davies being here earlier! coming up on morning live, sara and i are here in the hot seats today and throughout this week gethin's live in glasgow, at the biggest climate event of the decade where world leaders are meeting to try and agree a plan to save the planet. what's happening today, gethin? it is so windy, i have had to shalter— it is so windy, i have had to shelter hy— it is so windy, i have had to shelter by a _ it is so windy, i have had to shelter by a building. - it is so windy, i have had to shelter by a building. it - it is so windy, i have had to shelter by a building. it alll shelter by a building. it all started _ shelter by a building. it all started yesterday, - shelter by a building. it all started yesterday, the - shelter by a building. it all. started yesterday, the world shelter by a building. it all- started yesterday, the world leaders will be _ started yesterday, the world leaders will be arriving — started yesterday, the world leaders will be arriving today, _ started yesterday, the world leaders will be arriving today, boris - will be arriving today, boris johnson, _ will be arriving today, boris johnson, joe _ will be arriving today, boris johnson, joe biden- will be arriving today, boris johnson, joe biden and - will be arriving today, boris - johnson, joe biden and emmanuel matron, _ johnson, joe biden and emmanuel macron, alongside _ johnson, joe biden and emmanuel macron, alongside people - johnson, joe biden and emmanuel macron, alongside people like - johnson, joe biden and emmanuel. macron, alongside people like greta thunberg _ macron, alongside people like greta thunberg and — macron, alongside people like greta thunberg and sir— macron, alongside people like greta thunberg and sir david _ macron, alongside people like greta i thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i thunberg and sir david attenborough.
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so i am _ thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i am in _ thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i am in good — thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i am in good company— thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i am in good company and - thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i am in good company and i- thunberg and sir david attenborough. so i am in good company and i look. so i am in good company and i look forward _ so i am in good company and i look forward to— so i am in good company and i look forward to telling _ so i am in good company and i look forward to telling you _ so i am in good company and i look forward to telling you what - so i am in good company and i look forward to telling you what is - forward to telling you what is coming — forward to telling you what is coming up _ forward to telling you what is coming up when _ forward to telling you what is coming up when i _ forward to telling you what is coming up when i speak- forward to telling you what is coming up when i speak to l forward to telling you what is i coming up when i speak to you forward to telling you what is - coming up when i speak to you later. i coming up when i speak to you later. i look— coming up when i speak to you later. i look forward — coming up when i speak to you later. i look forward to _ coming up when i speak to you later. i look forward to the _ coming up when i speak to you later. i look forward to the three _ coming up when i speak to you later. i look forward to the three second i i look forward to the three second delay! _ i look forward to the three second delay! it _ i look forward to the three second delay! it looks freezing there! air pollution will be a big talking point at the conference and it's a trigger for the lung condition that affects 8 million in the uk. dr xand explains why more people are suffering from asthma than ever and has news of an exciting treatment breakthrough. plus a staggering 30,000 tonnes of recyclable bathroom items end up in landfill every year. jacquijoseph explains the simple things you can do to make your bathrooms greener and save money while you're at it. also today, you need 6 to 8 glasses of water every day to stay hydrated, dr punam finds out if tea and coffee count towards that and why milk could be better for you than water. and for the 11th year running — he's back on the road again with a new team of inspirational young people. we'll be live with matt baker and the team as they set off on this year's rickshaw challenge for children in need. see you at 9.15am.
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thank you, i look forward to the three second delay when you speak to as well! ,., ., ., . three second delay when you speak to as well! , ., . _ three second delay when you speak to aswell! ., . ,, as well! good dance, by way, dan! sor , as well! good dance, by way, dan! sorry. thank— as well! good dance, by way, dan! sorry. thank you. _ as well! good dance, by way, dan! sorry, thank you, sarah, _ as well! good dance, by way, dan! sorry, thank you, sarah, sorry - as well! good dance, by way, dan! | sorry, thank you, sarah, sorry that my small brain can't cope with it! more on our main story now. as the international climate conference in glasgow gets underway, the scottish government has pledged to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2045, five years before the uk—wide target. first minister nicola sturgeon has also called for "credible action, not face saving—slogans" from world leaders. nina's in glasgow for us this morning. what happening this morning, nina? good morning. it is all starting to warm up, no pun intended, because it is a serious business, the warming of the planet, hope of limiting the climate change to 1.5 degrees. these
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are live pictures of the un secretary general antonio guterres arriving. lots of handshakes will be happening like this, lots of formal deliveries of speeches by lots of informal chitchat as well and that's what it is all about. 120 world leaders and 200 nations represented. they will all have to be open and clear about what their plans are when it comes to limiting emissions and when it comes to their own specific targets. nicola sturgeon will be there and she joins us there, good morning. when we arrived yesterday, one of the first things i noticed was the roads were so busy and the private planes circling, what sort of message does all of those private planes send out? i
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those private planes send out? i understand that that perhaps sends a bit of a mixed message. there is a balance that the united nations has to done. —— has to say. we need to look each other in the eye and we can make more progress then than it ever was online, this is what happened last year and had to be postponed because of covid. when you have world leaders you need very high security for understandable reasons, there are a lot of carbon emissions associated. what i would say is, given all of the travel required to get here, it even further increases the pressure on the shoulders of world leaders to make sure it is worth it and make sure what comes out of this summit is very clear, concerted action that keeps the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees alive, and sees the world finally deliver on the commitment to climate finance so that developed countries who have done so much to cause climate change actually give money to developing
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countries who have done the least sick because it but are living with the starkest consequences, —— who have done the least to cause it but are living with the starkest consequences. i don't think success is guaranteed and it is in the balance that failure should not be an option because if we fail, my generation of leaders will be finding it very difficult to look the next generation in the eye. iliiufith the next generation in the eye. with that in mind, _ the next generation in the eye. with that in mind, you _ the next generation in the eye. with that in mind, you talked about credible action over a face—saving slogan is that when it comes to your own record, you have missed targets on emissions for two years running. when it comes to providing electricity through renewable energy, that has not been met, and other targets have been missed. is that what credible action looks like? ~ , ., ., , that what credible action looks like? . , ., ., , ., like? well, yeah, and let me put all ofthat like? well, yeah, and let me put all of that into — like? well, yeah, and let me put all of that into context. _ like? well, yeah, and let me put all of that into context. before - like? well, yeah, and let me put all of that into context. before i - like? well, yeah, and let me put all of that into context. before i do - of that into context. before i do that, i don't think scotland does not have further work to do but electricity generation, 97% of all
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of the electricity we consume in scotland comes from renewable sources, way ahead of most other countries across the world. yes, we have marginally missed the very stretching annual targets that we set ourselves over the past three years, we are legally required to publish catch up plans and over perform in future years but a bit of context is important. we have already halved our emissions, which makes us halfway on the journey to get a zero, and we have the carbonised faster than any g20 —— we have had decarbonisation faster than any other cheek 20 country. the question is, is the barfor world leadership high enough and i don't think it is yet. even those of us ahead of the game in this cannot rest on our laurels or be complacent, we have much more to do. that's why we set the target of cutting emissions by 75% by 2030, net zero x 2045. we have people today saying that our 2030 target is
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overambitious. i would today saying that our 2030 target is overambitious. iwould rather today saying that our 2030 target is overambitious. i would rather be overambitious. i would rather be overambitious than under ambitious. because we have all got to step up and to what is required. ! because we have all got to step up and to what is required.— and to what is required. i would like to ask _ and to what is required. i would like to ask you _ and to what is required. i would like to ask you how _ and to what is required. i would like to ask you how you - and to what is required. i would like to ask you how you make i and to what is required. i would i like to ask you how you make that practicable, president biden in the us has tried to punish businesses for emitting too much carbon but that has been blocked politically. you are facing something similar here in terms of, trying to reduce the amount of tonnes of greenhouse gases that are emitted by buses for example, you want to change 2500 of them but you need to city leaders to get involved for that to happen. it is going through consultation in aberdeen, glasgow and edinburgh. you can make the promises but if they are not agreed to locally, can you make sure it happens?— make sure it happens? that's the challenge. _ make sure it happens? that's the challenge, isn't _ make sure it happens? that's the challenge, isn't it? _ make sure it happens? that's the challenge, isn't it? we _ make sure it happens? that's the challenge, isn't it? we have - make sure it happens? that's the challenge, isn't it? we have got i make sure it happens? that's the i challenge, isn't it? we have got to work together. can i perhaps take on some of the language that was used there. this isn't about punishing anybody. if we don't do these things, life on this planet is going
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to be unrecognisable and we all lose, businesses will not be able to trade and make profits, parts of the world to uninhabitable even in countries like ours, the extreme weather that we already see what is going to get worse, this is not about punishing people, this is frankly about saving the planet for future generations. we work closely with councils, let's not forget we have, as i said, already halved our emissions, which shows that we can do this. and we have got to up the scale of ambition so we are investing hugely right now in bus infrastructure, moving to low carbon buses. also making bus travel free for young people to promote the use of public transport. we are looking at decarbonisation of train travel and air travel, looking at innovation to reduce emissions from air travel and aviation. heating in homes is a big challenge, we have just announced very ambitious plans backed by investment to decarbonise homes and other public buildings.
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this isn't easy for any country but it is inescapable so we had to get our act together and do these things. will we fail to meet target at times? all of us will particularly if the target are as stretching as they need to be. but rather that position than not having the scale of ambition in the first place and that is the challenge for this summit. can we up the scale of ambition sufficiently to come out of this conference with a real and realistic belief that liberty global will be to 1.5 degrees is possible? —— that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees is possible. the consequences of not doing it is a stocks and lots of might have got to be focused over the next few days in glasgow. be focused over the next few days in glasuow. , . glasgow. there is an inherent contradiction _ glasgow. there is an inherent contradiction not _ glasgow. there is an inherent contradiction notjust - glasgow. there is an inherent contradiction notjust in - glasgow. there is an inherent i contradiction notjust in scotland but many nations that you are reliant for the economy on fossil fuels, 5% of the gdp and thousands ofjobs, you are reliant on it so
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how do you square the circle? we have not how do you square the circle? - have got to move away from it and move away as quickly as possible but, yes, we have got to do it in a way that doesn't leave individuals and communities on the scrap piece. i grew up in scotland in the 70s and 80s and saw the consequence of taking away the industry, we cannot do that again, we need to build the alternative industry for people to have jobs. alternative industry for people to havejobs. we need to alternative industry for people to have jobs. we need to eliminate our reliance on fossil fuels and we need to accelerate that. for a country like scotland where the oil and gas sector is a big part of the economy, thatis sector is a big part of the economy, that is one of the really difficult issues. every country has its difficult issues. but if we only address the easy issues and shy away from the tough issues, we aren't going to do what is required. i have said very clearly it isn't a comfortable message, not always a message for easy hearing some people, we have got to move away
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from oil and gas in scotland and that raises big questions about whether there should be any exploration for new oil and gas, tough issues for a country like as but it issues that none of us can afford to shy away from.- but it issues that none of us can afford to shy away from. thank you for guest, nicola _ afford to shy away from. thank you for guest, nicola sturgeon, - for guest, nicola sturgeon, scotland's first minister, thank you forjoining us. this is about individual countries making their own pledges. the first minister saying it's ok to aim high and not meeting the targets, that is better than aiming low. there are consequences to the targets if they are not met. we are feeling the impact of climate change across the world as our science correspondent has been finding out. over the years, we've witnessed and reported the impacts of climate change around the world. we've seen deforestation on a vast scale contribute to carbon emissions. and you no longer have to travel to the deserts to see the impact of global temperature rise. the effects of climate change
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are playing out everywhere. we've been here 20 years, we've got a beautiful home, and just look at it. but while its impact can be painfully dramatic, the process that brings countries together to tackle the issue can be painfully slow. there have been moments of triumph, though, in this long negotiation. at the cop in 2015 in paris, 196 countries signed a global treaty agreeing to limit global warming to well below two celsius and to aim for 1.5. that's the threshold scientists agree beyond which the most dangerous impacts of global warming play out. so now it comes down to here in glasgow. to keep that 1.5 celsius target alive, emissions need to halve within the next decade, and to reach net zero, where the world is taking out as much carbon from the atmosphere as it's putting into it, by the middle of the century. so the 200 countries being represented here at cop26 are being asked for their specific plans to meet that goal. the success of this conference
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will be based partly on countries' willingness to outdo each other when it comes to emission reduction. the uk's net zero strategy has been widely praised. the government has promised to fully decarbonise our electricity supply by 2035, and to phase out the sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2030. but some countries have much more ambitious goals. costa rica, a country that has committed to phasing out fossil fuels completely, is urging richer nations to do more. the fact that costa rica is a small country with limited resources, and yet has been able to put forward very ambitious plans. if we are doing it, you countries that are larger than us, larger economies, better resources, there is no excuse, you have to do it too. there's a great deal of work to do here. countries' current pledges have us on a path towards a 2.7 degrees temperature increase by the end of the century. if negotiations over the next two weeks can't nudge that down significantly, we'll be facing a very
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uncertain future. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. victoria joins us now. so much uncertainty, so many nations coming at it from different perspectives and different ambitions, their own priorities. what does success look like this time in two weeks and how likely is it? it’s like this time in two weeks and how like! is it? 2 ,., ., like this time in two weeks and how like! is it? 2 ., ., likely is it? it's so hard to say, because it's — likely is it? it's so hard to say, because it's such _ likely is it? it's so hard to say, because it's such a _ likely is it? it's so hard to say, | because it's such a complicated process. i think maybe our viewers might be under the impression that we have finally come together in glasgow in this one particular event thatis glasgow in this one particular event that is going to tackle this issue is head of the first time. this is a decade—long process. the un framework convention on climate change, the signatories came together first change, the signatories came togetherfirst in 1995, change, the signatories came together first in 1995, and change, the signatories came togetherfirst in 1995, and it change, the signatories came together first in 1995, and it set off on this long process of negotiation which continues on the 26th conference, cop, just across the river clyde. really what we need
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is for every single country to come with their best, they're a game about how they are going to reduce emissions in the next decade i get to the critical target of net to zero x 2050 which is what we need to do to keep temperature rises as low as possible. flan do to keep temperature rises as low as possible-— as possible. can you see why there is despondency _ as possible. can you see why there is despondency from _ as possible. can you see why there is despondency from our _ as possible. can you see why there is despondency from our viewers? | as possible. can you see why there i is despondency from our viewers? we have had some messages saying that china's a game doesn't match ours and the same for india. i'm thinking about insulating and recycling more, why bother when the biggest emitters are not bothering to come this far? there are numerous answers to the question. essentially, if everyone does not come to the table and to treat it as a global issue that the whole process falls over. the un process of negotiation which will hopefully get us out of this mess or at least limit the global temperature increase which is already happening, we are already on already happening, we are already on a world average 1.1 degrees hotter thanit a world average 1.1 degrees hotter than it was in preindustrial times.
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we need to be in it together but historically we have as richer nations and nations that profited hugely from the industrial revolution, we have across to bear in this. carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere for at least a century. this is something which hasjust been happening over recent decades when china and india had been wrapping up emissions. this is something we have a historical responsibilty for, —— ramping up emissions. we have to lead from the front because we are taking the presidency of this important event. so diplomatically, should we hold our hands up and say to india and china, we started this, we should be supporting you more? i china, we started this, we should be supporting you more?— supporting you more? i think that is the case. supporting you more? i think that is the case- it's _ supporting you more? i think that is the case. it's basically _ supporting you more? i think that is the case. it's basically almost i supporting you more? i think that is the case. it's basically almost a i the case. it's basically almost a process of peer pressure, this whole system is based on everybody being willing to outdo each other. that's built into the mechanism that hopefully will build on that moment of triumph in paris. we are still to
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set out how we are going to get to how we will get to what was agreed in paris to reduce temperature increases to the 1.5 degrees target. we need to show willing and come to the table otherwise the whole process will not work. we the table otherwise the whole process will not work. we should be ho eful process will not work. we should be hopeful that — process will not work. we should be hopeful that the _ process will not work. we should be hopeful that the diplomacy - process will not work. we should be hopeful that the diplomacy will i process will not work. we should be | hopeful that the diplomacy will work but i will say that there are things happening in technology that can make this happen. iwho happening in technology that can make this happen.— happening in technology that can make this happen. who would have thouuht make this happen. who would have thought that _ make this happen. who would have thought that we _ make this happen. who would have thought that we will _ make this happen. who would have thought that we will be _ make this happen. who would have thought that we will be talking i thought that we will be talking about phasing out petrol and diesel cars at this stage, and it's happening. renewable energy is getting cheaper and it's more sustainable to follow this path. 50 sustainable to follow this path. so don't give up yes. don't _ sustainable to follow this path. so don't give up yes. don't get i don't give up yes. don't get despondent! _ don't give up yes. don't get despondent! thank - don't give up yes. don't get despondent! thank you, i don't give up yes. don't get i despondent! thank you, victoria. carroll will _ despondent! thank you, victoria. carroll will bring _ despondent! thank you, victoria. carroll will bring you _ despondent! thank you, victoria. carroll will bring you the - despondent! thank you, victoria. carroll will bring you the weather| carroll will bring you the weather in a moment but borisjohnson was meeting with the un secretary general, they will begin welcoming world leaders, 120 of them coming, they are leaders of 200 late —— 200
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nations represented at 25,000 delegates here. the very complicated question is, what would it all mean? borisjohnson is on the stage there, he wanted this to happen, he was keen for the uk to host this conference. the pressure will be on him to lead from the front. that's almost eight from us here in glasgow, —— that'll a visit from glasgow, —— that'll a visit from glasgow, we can see the brakes in the cloud, when things settle later on it will be a beautiful sunny morning here in glasgow. you could be right, sunshine and showers, the winds will slowly ease except for the final. the weather is different from last week because it
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will be colder. frost and fog for some by night. this area of low pressure brought the heavy rain and strong winds yesterday. moving northwards but one look at the isobars tells you that it is windy so neither is right when she says it is windy around glasgow. —— nino is right. heavy rain pushing south will fragment across parts of england and wales and thundery showers in the south—east. one of our weather watchers managed to catch one of those this morning, a big flash of lightning. through the day, this band of rain will fragment as it pushes southwards. already, sunshine and showers, but we will still hang onto some heavy rain and strong winds across the far north of scotland. in between the showers, there will be some sunshine, and the forecast for showers are fairly hit and miss, not all of us will catch one. you might catch the odd one with thunder and lightning and hail embedded in there. generally our temperatures today are going to be
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from nine to 14 as a top temperature. through the league and overnight, we hang onto some showers, some clear skies, the winds will ease except for across the north of scotland where we will hang onto some strong winds as well. in sheltered part of england, wales and south—east, touch inner —— cull enough a touch of frost. a sunny one once again, still a fair few showers packing into the north and west. a few travelling towards the east go some heavy and thundery again with some heavy and thundery again with some hail in there. temperature is between nine and 12 degrees. by the end of the afternoon, some of the showers will be wintry on the hills in northern scotland. into wednesday, a straight northerly, so all areas exposed to that northerly wind are producing some showers. some of them getting hit wind are producing some showers. some of them getting bit further inland but there will be dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine. it is a
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day for your coats. on thursday, high—pressure in from the atlantic so that settle things down quite nicely. have a northerly wind coming down from the north sea so places like lincolnshire into norfolk, you are prone to some showers as is kent. there will be a lot of dry weather and a weak system coming in from the north—west will introduce a bit more in the way of cloud. temperatures seven to 11 or 12 degrees. as we head into friday, we will hang on to the area of high pressure. still fairly settled conditions and a few showers but as we head into saturday and sunday, things such as to —— change and we see a return to wet and windy conditions. he's played alongside some of manchester united's greatest legends and led the team during one of their most successful eras — but patrice evra had
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to fight his way to the top. in his new autobiography, patrice talks about his rise to success, from growing up as one of 24 siblings, to battling the stigma attached to his upbringing and race. let's remind ourselves of what he achieved in his career. patrice joins us in the studio now.
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what a glittering career. delighted to have been able to join us. what a glittering career. delighted to have been able tojoin us. we what a glittering career. delighted to have been able to join us. we are going to talk to about football but when i was reading your book, i was struck by the fact that you start this brilliant book by talking about something you haven't spoken about for the vast majority of your life. you are were sexually abused when you are quite young. how hard a decision was it to talk about this and decide to put it in the book? it and decide to put it in the book? it was really difficult, it was something that i didn't share even with my own mother orfather, brothers and sisters. it's just, like, i've got a new woman and she is my everything and she may be open emotionally. i think for all of the kids who have been abused, they shouldn't think they are a week or feel shame. shouldn't think they are a week or feelshame. it
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shouldn't think they are a week or feel shame. it wasn't about myself, it was about i wanted to help other kids out there to come out. you will feel much better because i live with that, there heavy things in my chest. and it was difficult because even when people are saying, patrice, you are a good person, because i thought, no, because the police came to me when i was 24 and asked, where you sexually abuse, and i said no. so i asked, where you sexually abuse, and isaid no. so i had asked, where you sexually abuse, and i said no. so i had those regrets. so i want those kids to not think they are weak and don't listen to people, and if they trust someone, they need to come out and talk. it is easy to say, you need to be brave, butjust do it and you will feel much better. it’s brave, butjust do it and you will feel much better. it's fascinating to hear you _ feel much better. it's fascinating to hear you talk _ feel much better. it's fascinating to hear you talk about _ feel much better. it's fascinating to hear you talk about this. i feel much better. it's fascinating to hear you talk about this. he i feel much better. it's fascinating i to hear you talk about this. he was saying that he started to write the book and actually, this section of
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the book, you only added in right at the book, you only added in right at the very end. when you did that, did you know that it would feel like it was taking the pressure off of you, and how much better you would feel for talking about it? because clearly you seem like a man who has had a weight taken away from him. exactly, when i decided to talk about it, like i said, my woman had done a lot to open myself emotionally. we finished the book two years ago and i didn't talk about it. but three months before the book was released, i said, we need to add something really important. so i was ready, i was ready. but i feel proud, about myself, you know, because finally, i will help other people to come out. because i'm sure out there, there are many kids being abused. you just have the feeling, like, you can't talk. and you just feel shame about
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yourself. and it's difficult to explain because now i'm like, why did i wait so long? for me, my biggest challenge was to tell my mother. that was my biggest challenge. telling the world was, i feel happy because i'm helping other kids but telling my mum, was... haifa kids but telling my mum, was... how did ou do kids but telling my mum, was... how did you do that? _ kids but telling my mum, was... how did you do that? to _ kids but telling my mum, was... how did you do that? to be _ kids but telling my mum, was... how did you do that? to be fair, _ kids but telling my mum, was... how did you do that? to be fair, almost i did you do that? to be fair, almost riaht did you do that? to be fair, almost right now. — did you do that? to be fair, almost right now. i — did you do that? to be fair, almost right now, i couldn't... _ did you do that? to be fair, almost right now, i couldn't... it _ did you do that? to be fair, almost right now, i couldn't. .. it must i right now, i couldn't... it must have almost — right now, i couldn't... it must have almost been _ right now, i couldn't... it must have almost been impossible. | right now, i couldn't. .. it must. have almost been impossible. it right now, i couldn't. .. it must - have almost been impossible. it was, i was have almost been impossible. it was, i was shaking. — have almost been impossible. it was, i was shaking. i _ have almost been impossible. it was, i was shaking, i travelled _ have almost been impossible. it was, i was shaking, i travelled to - have almost been impossible. it was, i was shaking, i travelled to paris i i was shaking, i travelled to paris and met her in person and when i told her she was devastated. she was crying. it was hard because i kept saying, i'm sorry, she was, don't ever say sorry to anyone. i can't believe you have stated so many years without saying it to me. but she was really angry, she was, this man is still alive, can you sue him? i was like, mother, it better i didn't say this to you before because you would have killed this matter you would have ended up in
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jail and i would not have had the same education. —— you would have killed this man. sometimes it is destiny. but i know how she feels, if my son told me something like that when he was 40 years old, i would be devastated, to feel like my life was a waste. molar would be devastated, to feel like my life was a waste.— life was a waste. now that it is out there and you _ life was a waste. now that it is out there and you feel— life was a waste. now that it is out there and you feel like _ life was a waste. now that it is out there and you feel like your - life was a waste. now that it is out there and you feel like your family| there and you feel like your family knows, is it a relief and you are happy that you have spoken about it but is there regret that it is out there? ., ., ., ., , , there? no, not regret at all because it isn't for me- _ there? no, not regret at all because it isn't for me. doesn't _ there? no, not regret at all because it isn't for me. doesn't matter, i it isn't for me. doesn't matter, it's other people. i feel blessed every day, ifeel lucky. but i know i want to help other human beings. so for me, it will never be a regret. actually, my mum, when i said, like, in my book, committee member, she said, it shouldn't, it's private. but i said, it's not about me, it's about the kids. my brothers and sisters said, i can't believe you put it out this. but i had to
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say, i didn't do this about your brother, i only regret that ijust didn't say it earlier. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh live in glasgow where world leaders are gathering for the cop26 climate summit. as it begins, borisjohnson warns humanity has run down the clock on climate change and says urgent action is needed. very, very urgent. notjust for our country, for the whole world. and if i had to give a comparison, i would say it was a one minute to midnight moment. and the clock is ticking. un scientists warn that extreme weather events are the new normal — and the past seven years are on course to be the hottest on record. but china — one of the world's biggest polluters — will not attend the summit in glasgow — president xi

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