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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 31, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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tonight at 10:00, we're in glasgow, as 12 days of talks on the future of the planet get underway. the cop 26 summit is widely seen as the world's last chance to prevent irreversible damage from climate change. earlier, leaders of the world's richest nations were meeting in rome where the climate challenge was spelled out clearly. there are no compelling excuses for our procrastination. not only have we acknowledged the problem, we're already seeing first—hand the devastation change causes. first—hand the devastation climate change causes. bangladesh is one of the many countries suffering the effects of climate change. we report on the challenges faced in one village. also tonight...
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up to a dozen people are injured after two trains collide in wiltshire. and, the tent city of migrants camped outside a un building in libya, desperate for help. we have a special report. good evening from glasgow where the long—awaited climate summit, cop 26, has opened today. world leaders, prominent scientists and advisers are ready for 12 days of discussion with one principal aim — to get the world to commit to reduce carbon emissions and avoid a climate catastrophe. already today, there's been a taste of the problems ahead. the world's richest nations — the 620 — met in rome, where leaders were accused
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of failing to make the necessary commitments. borisjohnson admitted the pledges were "too vague" and "not enough". the united nations secretary—general said the time for "diplomatic niceties" was over, and that the summit here in glasgow was the "last hope". we start tonight with our political editor laura kuenssberg on events in rome. a roman sunday stroll. a stylish canine seems the perfect accessory among the ancient alleys. what conflicts, what epic political struggles have these streets seen? history round every corner. then spot 15 of the most powerful leaders in the world taking in the sights. a coin in the famous fountain to guarantee a wish, but it might take more than tradition to stop the uk and france pulling away. 0thers watch on as the two allies are stuck in a spat over fishing rights in channel waters.
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even borisjohnson wanted italy to inspire progress ahead of the cop climate meeting getting under way at home. there are no compelling excuses for our procrastination. not only have we acknowledged the problem, we are already seeing first—hand the devastation climate change causes. the science is clear, that we need to act now. what chance do you really think you have of making progress with 200 countries in glasgow when you haven't made enough progress with 20 countries here, and you don't seem able to sort out the question of a few dozen fishing permits with one of your closest allies, with the french? i think that the chances of progress in glasgow are exactly as i said, laura. i think they depend on the will, the courage, the leadership of everybody in the room. 0n fish, i've got to tell you the position is unchanged. i must say i was puzzled to read a letter from the french prime minister explicitly
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asking for britain to be punished for leaving the eu. number ten says it's all up to france to fix and withdraw their threats, but president macron claims it's down to the uk to grant more permits. borisjohnson loves france, he said, but if the uk continues to act like this there will be retaliation. the irritation on both sides of the channel shows no signs of fading, and for borisjohnson, a rumbling row with an important ally like france is not exactly helpfuljust when he is trying to achieve a far wider, grander aim, persuading all of his counterparts from right around the world that slowing down the changes to the climate is a non—negotiable whose time has come. it's not easy, though. some countries don't want to move as fast. the russians questioning the uk ambition for countries to absorb as much carbon as they emit by 2050. why do you believe 2050
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is some magic figure? i want an answer, because you are asking the question, being convinced that 2050 is non—negotiable. but the prime minister has regal backing, and for the heir to the throne, it's been a moment long in the making. now, after i suppose very nearly 50 years of trying to raise awareness of the growing climate and environmental crisis, i'm at last sensing a change in attitudes. cop 26 begins in glasgow tomorrow, quite literally it is the last—chance saloon. as the diplomatic caravan moves from rome's streets to scottish streets, borisjohnson still has a lot of arm twisting to do. do you like roma? i love rome. hope may spring eternal, reality does not. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, rome. here in glasgow no—one
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is underestimating the challenge facing the delegates over the coming days. and to confirm the urgent need for action the world meteorological organisation has just published its annual global climate report, stating that the past seven years have been the hottest on record with far—reaching repercussions for current and future generations. and in tomorrow's formal opening ceremony, the prince of wales will tell delegates here that "a vast military—style campaign" is needed worldwide to deal with global warming. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has more details. a gloomy start to proceedings in glasgow, but there are high hopes for a sunnier outcome. in a socially distanced conference centre, a reminder we're still in a time of covid, as alok sharma formally takes the reins for what some say is the last chance to save the planet. floods, cyclones, wildfires, record temperatures — we know that our shared planet
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is changing for the worse. and we can only address that together through this international system. the world meteorological 0rganisation warned today that these extremes are the new normal. but it's developing countries who are suffering the most, and they say the onus should be on richer nations. malawi, like many countries that are developing, have been at the receiving end of climate change issues, pretty much brought by those developed nations who continue to emit so much carbon. central to these talks is a vital number — 1.5 degrees. if temperatures go above this, we move into dangerous territory. the world, though, is already 1.1 degrees above preindustrial levels, and we are seeing the impacts of that right now. but even if every country does what it's promising, we're on course for 2.7 degrees
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by the end of the century. activists are demanding more action now, led by greta thunberg, mobbed as she arrived in glasgow, but she says there's still hope. if we can't keep the global average temperature rise to below 1.5, then we do 1.6, then 1.7 and so on. we can always prevent things from getting worse. it's never too late to do as much as we can. as the meeting gets under way, protesters say the time to tackle climate change is now. but after nearly three decades of talks, there are questions over how much can be achieved. with world leaders soon to arrive, all eyes will be on whether cop 26 will succeed. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. let's spell out what negotiators here in glasgow need — or at least hope — to achieve by the end of next week. more ambitious targets to cut emissions are vital. that means more action to limit global warming
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to a maximum of 1.5 degrees. reducing the use of coal is essential — it's the most polluting fossil fuel. but many countries are still very dependent on it. the effects of climate change are already clear so countries and communities need more help to adapt to the new reality. that help will mean money, but how much will richer countries give to those nations worst affected by the effects of climate change? bangladesh is among the hardest hit, so our science editor david shukman takes a look at the needs ofjust one village in the southern region. in a village on the coast of bangladesh, people are using mud to try to hold back the sea. it's all they've got. the rising level of the ocean means they are getting flooded more often. and we saw the same villagers struggling in the same way, back in 2009.
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the people who have done least to cause climate change suffering the most from it. if the forecasts of climate scientists are right and the sea rises even more, maybe by a metre by the end of the century, how on earth are these millions of people going to cope? with life so precarious, this community has long been desperate for international help. that's why this woman wanted to share her story at the climate summit in copenhagen 12 years ago. she told me she was pleased to be there and believed that world leaders would do something. they didn't. now her life is tougher than ever. extreme weather is striking more often, and there's still very little assistance. translation: we have no idea what we can do. - if people can help us, then something can change. we don't have the money to move to other places. i have nothing that i can
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give to my children. along some stretches of coast, there are now rows of sandbags to try to keep the sea at bay. a new school provides shelter during cyclones. but fresh water is harder to find. most supplies are contaminated by the rising sea. more than a decade ago, developing countries were given a promise that by now they'd be getting $100 billion a year in climate aid. here we are at the glasgow summit, and that promise still hasn't been fulfilled. the 100 billion was just a promise that has not been kept, and its importance is that leaders who made the promise are not keeping their promise and therefore, these leaders have no credibility. back in bangladesh, she says she doesn't want her children and grandchildren to suffer more than she has. but they are facing a hotter
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and more hostile climate, so there's real pressure for the talks in glasgow to get somewhere. david shukman, bbc news. no global plan to tackle climate change can work without the cooperation of china and the united states. china is responsible for more than a quarter of the world's total emissions of greenhouse gases. next on the list is the us. so let's talk about the us and china. our north america editor jon sopel is in rome — where that g20 was meeting — but first to beijing, and our correspondent there, stephen mcdonell. the chinese president isn't coming to glasgow, and there's no clarity on how china will meet its emissions targets? xijinping hasn't been xi jinping hasn't been anywhere xijinping hasn't been anywhere in nearly two years. as far as we can tell the chinese leader has not
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visited a single country since the outbreak of the coronavirus in wuhan and the thinking is it is because they didn't want him to catch covid. so i would not view this as a snub that he is not turning up in person. the chinese government does want to be part of global climate talks, partly because it has no choice. the country is already facing the immediate effects of climate change in terms of disastrous weather events, but also because it feels it has something of a good story to tell. that may seem unusual because it is the biggest contributor to the problem in terms of carbon emissions, but it is also the biggest contributor to the solution with huge wind farms. even though it has been building more and more coal—fired power stations to replace, it says, the clapped—out power stations it has been relying on, beijing is saying that within four years it will reach peak coal—fired power and from then on
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the situation will improve. we will just have to see what else the chinese government has to say about all this in the coming days.— all this in the coming days. stephen mcdonell, thank _ all this in the coming days. stephen mcdonell, thank you. _ jon sopel is in rome. borisjohnson admitted the outcome of the g20 in his view was not enough and president biden is now pointing the finger of blame. he president biden is now pointing the finger of blame.— finger of blame. he is trying to oint the finger of blame. he is trying to point the finger _ finger of blame. he is trying to point the finger of _ finger of blame. he is trying to point the finger of blame - finger of blame. he is trying to point the finger of blame at - finger of blame. he is trying to i point the finger of blame at china and russia, but looking at the situation in the united states, yes, joe biden wants to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on tackling climate change but he can't get it through the senate where there is a 50-50 through the senate where there is a 50—50 split and one of his democratic senators from west virginia where cole is king doesn't want anything to do with it, so he is stuck. he is not providing the leadership he hoped to be able to. let's not get too granular about us politics, let's go with a wider lens, it's notjustjoe biden. political leaders have been in rome who will be in glasgow next week have their own national assemblies,
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parliaments and senates to deal with where they might not be able to get legislation through. then you have public opinion as well that might be sympathetic broadly but would worry about some of the aspects of what this could do to the cost of living. so you have politics and electoral cycles, which worked on short—term expediency, and climate change, which needs long—term solutions, and that might explain why limited progress will be made next week. very interesting, thank you tojon sopel in rome, and stephen mcdonell in beijing. we'll be back in glasgow a little later, but now let's join clive. british transport police say a number of people have been injured, after a crash involving two trains in wiltshire this evening. it happened near salisbury, around 7 o'clock, when a train carriage was reportedly derailed after hitting an object on the line, knocking out all signalling in the area. it was then hit by a second train.
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our correspondent jon kay is close to the scene in salisbury. bring us up to date with the latest. what we have managed to establish is that this started at around 6:50pm this evening when a train travelling, a great western service travelling, a great western service travelling from portsmouth towards bristol hit something, collided with something inside the fish at an tunnel, about 200 metres from where we are now. this is as close as we can get at the moment. what it it and why it hit it is unclear at the moment but the train partly derailed, knocking out signalling in the surrounding area. a few minutes later, a second passenger train with lots of people on board, a south—western train travelling from london to deafen hit the first train. passengers described what happened. —— london to devon. they describe darkness, flashing lights, juggfing describe darkness, flashing lights, juggling and noises, and then calm and silence as people waited in the
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dark for emergency services to turn up. they declared this a serious incident and we understand around 12 people are injured and were brought to a church hall for treatment. some have been taken to hospital and we understand the driver of one of the trains was more seriously injured but british transport police have confirmed in the last few minutes that nobody has been killed. now an investigation to work out what has happened, wasn't related to the weather, there have been landslips on the tracks in some parts of the country today. but also now an operation to try to clear one train from inside the tunnel and one from just outside. jam from inside the tunnel and one from just outside-— just outside. jon kay live near salisbury. _ just outside. jon kay live near salisbury, thank _ just outside. jon kay live near salisbury, thank you. - three people have died and another is in a critical condition in hospital, after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a river in wales. five people were rescued from the water uninjured. severe rain had led to turbulent conditions on the river cleddau and police have begun an investigation.
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the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were just over 38,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average there were 40,580 new cases reported per day in the last week. there were 7a deaths — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 157 related deaths were recorded every day. libya is the main hub for migrants and refugees hoping to cross from africa to europe, via the mediterranean, and thousands were detained at the beginning of the month in a crackdown by the libyan authorities. but detention centres are dangerously overcrowded, with migrants living in appalling conditions. and after a recent mass breakout, guards shot dead six people. many of those who did escape are now living on the streets, outside a united nations compound. our international correspondent, orla guerin, reports now from the capital tripoli, and a warning, her report contains some distressing images.
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consigned to the cold hard ground. many who dream of reaching europe. as the sun rises, some stir awake among the piles of rubbish, discarded as they seem to be. trying to face another day of hunger and worry. gunshots they fled here in terror. guards opening fire during this mass escape from a packed detention centre. within minutes, six migrants lay dead. , ., , dead. maybe i will leave, maybe i will die. dead. maybe i will leave, maybe i willdie- they— dead. maybe i will leave, maybe i will die. they kill _ dead. maybe i will leave, maybe i will die. they kill people, - dead. maybe i will leave, maybe i will die. they kill people, they - will die. they kill people, they shoot like this, they should. living here is dying. escaping from shooting is dying. it's all the same. �* .
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shooting is dying. it's all the same. ~ ., ., ., , , same. after a month on the streets here, rashid is _ same. after a month on the streets here, rashid is between _ same. after a month on the streets here, rashid is between life - same. after a month on the streets here, rashid is between life and . here, rashid is between life and death. he is from war—torn darfur four. he is disabled. and he is getting sicker by the day. they are camped out on the doorstep of the united nations, outside a community centre run by the un refugee agency, an obvious place to look for support. we refugee agency, an obvious place to look for support-— look for support. we have gathered here in front _ look for support. we have gathered here in front of _ look for support. we have gathered here in front of the _ look for support. we have gathered here in front of the united - look for support. we have gathered here in front of the united nationsl here in front of the united nations office needing help. but until today we haven't got any response. h0 office needing help. but untiltoday we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help _ we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help at _ we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help at all, _ we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help at all, no _ we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help at all, no food, - we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help at all, no food, no - at all? no help at all, no food, no medical assistance. _ at all? no help at all, no food, no medical assistance. not _ at all? no help at all, no food, no medical assistance. not even - at all? no help at all, no food, no i medical assistance. not even water to drink. so we are struggling. the messares to drink. so we are struggling. the messages here are so clear, we need help, we need evacuation, get us out of libya. people here say they feel
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abandoned by the united nations and by the world. they tell us they have been left to fend for themselves, trying to survive on the streets. this looks very, very bad for the unhcr, these people on your doorstep and on the street. it unhcr, these people on your doorstep and on the street.— and on the street. it looks very bad and on the street. it looks very bad and it is very _ and on the street. it looks very bad and it is very bad _ and on the street. it looks very bad and it is very bad for _ and on the street. it looks very bad and it is very bad for them, - and on the street. it looks very bad and it is very bad for them, so - and on the street. it looks very bad and it is very bad for them, so it's i and it is very bad for them, so it's important for us to continue to make assistance available to them. we have provided emergency cash to many of them, food parcels to many of them. not in front of the cdc, because it's not a safe place, that has to be understood. that's why we have provided assistance in other locations where we can provide access, orderand locations where we can provide access, order and safety and security for these refugees will stop there was no security for abdullah, who is from sudan and has burns on most of his body. he is abdullah, who is from sudan and has burns on most of his body.— burns on most of his body. he is now bein: burns on most of his body. he is now being cared — burns on most of his body. he is now being cared for— burns on most of his body. he is now being cared for in _ burns on most of his body. he is now being cared for in hospital _ burns on most of his body. he is now being cared for in hospital in - being cared for in hospital in tripoli. he was held by smugglers in southern libya. they couldn't —— when he couldn't pay what they demand it, they doused him in petrol
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and set him alight. many are drawn here by the hope of crossing the mediterranean to a better life, but there is suffering and danger long before they reach the sea. orla guerin, bbc news, tripoli. arsenal will play chelsea in the delayed women's fa cup final. kim little scored the first of their goals, in a 3—0 win over brighton. chelsea knocked out the holders manchester city. the latter stages of the cup were postponed from last season, due to the covid pandemic. the final is at wembley in december. now, let's return to huw in glasgow. a last word from glasgow tonight on the eve of the formal opening ceremony, so let'sjoin our science editor david shukman inside the arena. you have spoken to lots of people today. what's your assessment of the prospects for meaningful progress in the days ahead?—
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the days ahead? bluntly, the world is headin: the days ahead? bluntly, the world is heading in _ the days ahead? bluntly, the world is heading in the _ the days ahead? bluntly, the world is heading in the wrong _ the days ahead? bluntly, the world is heading in the wrong direction. l is heading in the wrong direction. if you add up all the promises different countries have made to tackle climate change, we are still on course for dangerous rises in temperature with a long list of really damaging consequences of the kind we saw in my report from bangladesh. it is why the un is so worried, so many others are so worried. one big concern is an apparent disconnect between what global leaders are saying about climate change and what they are actually doing, which raises a very difficult question for the coming fortnight. there are hopes that political will will bring about a change. i bumped into the chair of the conference, alok sharma, who said he was always optimistic, but frankly he needs to be. i have to report that things do not look promising at this stage. brute report that things do not look promising at this stage. we will talk aaain promising at this stage. we will talk again tomorrow. _ promising at this stage. we will talk again tomorrow. many - promising at this stage. we will. talk again tomorrow. many thanks, science editor david shukman inside the summitarena. that's it for tonight. there's more coverage of the summit on the bbc news channel. we'll be following events as they unfold tomorrow.
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but now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are.
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hello, this is bbc news. more on our breaking news — two trains have collided between salisbury and andover, leaving several people injured. these are the latest pictures we have received from the scene. british police say no one was killed in the train crash. the rail accident investigations branch also tweeted to say it is deploying inspectors to the site of the collision. passengers who were on the train have been talking to the bbc about what happened. we were just pulling into salisbury station and the train felt a bitjuddery.
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ijust stood up to put my coat on and put phone in my pocket and then there was this massive impact and i fell across the table and then the table came off the wall, i ended up underneath another table. but they've smashed the windows so we've got out the windows. so, we're safe now but it was really scary. everything went black and there were red flashes and everything, people started to panic but nobody was seriously injured. that i know of. certainly in my carriage, a couple of minor injuries but other than that. question from off camera, inaudible. probably in the front carriage or the second carriage. question from off camera, inaudible. i wouldn't be surprised if we just slipped off the rails, either leaves or wet rails, i don't know. there was just siddenly a lot ofjostling, possessions being thrown around.
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i think a few people went forward and hit their heads, things like that. you just don't know for a couple of seconds what's happening. our correspondent, jon kay, is close to the scene. police are still there, jon? police are still there, jon? there's a big emergency — police are still there, jon? there's a big emergency service _ police are still there, jon? there's a big emergency service response| a big emergency service response here tonight. it was declared a major incident within minutes and still turn notjust police but fire and rescue services, the coastguard helicopter was involved. other emergency 999 responses here too because this has been a big incident. let me talk you through what we know so far. just before 7pm of the first of these trains, great western train that was travelling from portsmouth towards bristol was approaching salisbury station and
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hit something in the fisherton tunnel, about 200 metres microphone where we are at the moment, this is as close as we can get safely tonight due to the operation going on at the scene itself the train itself deal rails inside the tunnel, we understand it knocked out the signalling. everything went dark and we have spoken to passengers that there were noises, the flashes and bangs and then silence as they waited, and then, because the signalling had been knocked out, another train, a south western train that was heading from london to honiton, in devon, heading towards a south west, then hit the first train at the entrance to that tunnel. that's in this massive emergency response came. weight understand at least 50 foreign rescue teams were here, and then the walking wanted were brought to a church hall near here. around 12 people were injured, we understand, they were taken from
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here, we have seen at least one of the stretcher and taken to hospital. the most seriously injured as the driver of one of the two trains, who was trapped in a cab for a while and it took a while for him or her to be rescued. but the news we have heard tonight from british transport police is that nobody has been killed in a incident, no deaths involved, so that's some consolation for people as they wait for further detail. and what i detail is going to be, we're not entirely sure how this has happened is. we know to be, we're not entirely sure how this has happened. we know there have been incidents up and down the country due to heavy rainfall with landslips and lines getting blocked, so was weather a factor? possibly, and lines getting blocked, so was weathera factor? possibly, did something happening at the entrance of the tunnel, possibly. that will be investigated by teams who are now beginning their work, that can be quite a long process. in the short to medium—term, they have to clear that tunnel, and that is a complex operation too, getting this two
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trains apart, investigated and then removed, one from inside and one from the mouth of the tunnel. so expect a lot of work going on here in terms of investigation and physically in terms of that rescue and recovery operation in the next few and days. and recovery operation in the next few and days-— and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers, the journalist and author shyama perera, and olivia utley, assistant comment editor at the daily telegraph. that's coming up after the headlines. time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there. trying to make plans for your monday morning? well, here is what to expect. it is going to be a case of sunny spells and blustery showers. i think it will also feel just that little bit cooler as a wind direction is changing to a north—westerly. so, showers from the word go across scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and north wales, and some of these showers will be pushed steadily southwards by the strength of the wind direction into the afternoon. temperatures down on the
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last couple of days. highs of 944 degrees.

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