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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 31, 2021 5:00pm-5:31pm GMT

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today at five: we're in glasgow, where the biggest summit meeting ever held in the uk is already under way. the summit is widely seen as the last chance to save the planet from irreversible damage caused by climate change. earlier the leaders of the world's richest nations were meeting in rome, where the climate challenge was spelled out clearly. as it is literally the last chance of them. we must now translate fine words into finer actions. also on the programme: three people have died and another is in a critical condition after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a welsh river. chelsea cruised to victory against
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manchester city to reach the final of the women's fa cup. good evening from glasgow, where the biggest summit of world leaders ever hosted in the united kingdom has opened today. the stakes could not be higher — as the prince of wales said earlier this meeting is the last chance to save the planet from irreversible damage caused by climate change. leaders from the world's wealthiest countries, including borisjohnson, have been attending the 620 summit in rome and they're now on their way to glasgow to join their colleagues at cop26. first our political editor laura kuenssberg reports on the day's events in italy. a roman sunday stroll, a stylish dog
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seems the perfect accessory among the ancient alleys. what conflicts, what epic political struggle lives have these streets seen? history around every corner. then spot 15 of the most powerful leaders in the world taking on the site. the coin in the famous fountain to guarantee a wish, but it might take more than tradition to stop the uk and france pulling away. others watch on as the two allies are stuck in a spat over fishing rights in channel waters. even borisjohnson wanted italy to inspire progress ahead of the kop 26 climate meeting getting under way at home. iii climate meeting getting under way at home. ., �* w climate meeting getting under way at home. ., �* ., ., , home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement — home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement will _ home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement will be _ home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement will be looked _ home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement will be looked at - home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement will be looked at in - home. if we don't act now, the paris agreement will be looked at in the l agreement will be looked at in the future not as the moment humanity opened its eyes to the problem but the moment we flinched and turned away.
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the moment we flinched and turned awa . ~ . the moment we flinched and turned awa , ~ ., . ., . the moment we flinched and turned awa. . . ., the moment we flinched and turned awa. ., . .. the moment we flinched and turned awa. “ the moment we flinched and turned awa. ., away. what chance do you think you reall have away. what chance do you think you really have of— away. what chance do you think you really have of making _ away. what chance do you think you really have of making progress - away. what chance do you think you really have of making progress with| really have of making progress with 200 countries in glasgow when you haven't made enough progress with 20 countries here and you don't seem able to sort out the question of a few dozen fishing permits with one of your closest allies, with the french? �* ., ., of your closest allies, with the french? �* . ., ., french? and we had a wide-ranging and frank discussion, _ french? and we had a wide-ranging and frank discussion, as _ french? and we had a wide-ranging and frank discussion, as you - french? and we had a wide-ranging and frank discussion, as you would l and frank discussion, as you would expect, between long—standing friends and very close allies. downing street even contradicted his claim that both countries had agreed to sort it out. for number ten, it is up to france to back down on its threats to disrupt trade across the channel. the view from his presidential palaces that both countries had agreed to take mysterious sounding measures to resolve the spat. the irritation on both sides of the channel shows no signs of fading, and for boris johnson, a rumbling row with an important ally like france is not exactly helpfuljust important ally like france is not exactly helpful just when important ally like france is not exactly helpfuljust when he is trying to achieve a far wider persuading all his counterparts
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around the world that slowing down the changes to the climate is a non—negotiable whose time has come. it's not easy, though, some countries don't want to move as fast, the russians questioning the uk ambition for countries to absorb as much carbon as they admit by 2050. ~ , ., _, as much carbon as they admit by 2050- , ., _, , as much carbon as they admit by 2050. ~ , ., y., , i: i: as much carbon as they admit by 2050.~ , , i: i: , 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic— 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure _ 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure? _ 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure? i _ 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure? i want - 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure? i want an - 2050. why do you believe 2050 is - some magic figure? i want an answer, because you ask me the question. being convinced that 2050 is not negotiable. but being convinced that 2050 is not neuotiable. �* being convinced that 2050 is not negotiable-— being convinced that 2050 is not neuotiable. �* ~ , negotiable. but the prime minister has wriggled _ negotiable. but the prime minister has wriggled back _ negotiable. but the prime minister has wriggled back in, _ negotiable. but the prime minister has wriggled back in, and - negotiable. but the prime minister has wriggled back in, and for- negotiable. but the prime minister has wriggled back in, and for the i has wriggled back in, and for the heir to the throne, it has been a moment long in the making. now, afteri moment long in the making. now, after i sunpose _ moment long in the making. now, after i suppose very _ moment long in the making. now, after i suppose very nearly - moment long in the making. now, after i suppose very nearly 50 - moment long in the making. now, after i suppose very nearly 50 years of trying _ after i suppose very nearly 50 years of trying to — after i suppose very nearly 50 years of trying to raise awareness of the growing _ of trying to raise awareness of the growing climate and environmental crisis, _ growing climate and environmental crisis. i_ growing climate and environmental crisis. i am — growing climate and environmental crisis, i am at last sensing a change _ crisis, i am at last sensing a change in _ crisis, i am at last sensing a change in attitude. the cop26 begins in glasgow— change in attitude. the cop26 begins in glasgow tomorrow, quite literally the last_ in glasgow tomorrow, quite literally the last chance saloon. as
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in glasgow tomorrow, quite literally the last chance saloon.— the last chance saloon. as the diplomatic— the last chance saloon. as the diplomatic caravan _ the last chance saloon. as the diplomatic caravan moves - the last chance saloon. as the | diplomatic caravan moves from the last chance saloon. as the - diplomatic caravan moves from rome's street to scottish streets, boris johnson still has a lot of arm twisting to do. hope may spring eternal, reality does not. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, rome. here in glasgow no—one is underestimating the challenge facing the delegates over the coming 12 days. and to confirm the urgent need for action, the world meteorological organisation has just published its annual global climate report, stating that the past seven years have been the hottest on record, with far—reaching repercussions for current and future generations. the cabinet minister chairing cop26 alok sharma said this was the �*last, best hope' to achieve the goal of limiting the rise in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees. our science correspondent rebecca morelle has more details. a gloomy start to proceedings in
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glasgow, but there are high hopes for us sunnier outcome. in a socially distanced conference centre, a reminder we are still in a time of covid, as alec sharma formally takes the reins for what some say is the last chance to save the planet. some say is the last chance to save the planet-— the planet. floods, cyclones, wildfires. _ the planet. floods, cyclones, wildfires, record _ the planet. floods, cyclones, i wildfires, record temperatures, the planet. floods, cyclones, - wildfires, record temperatures, we know that our shared planet is changing for the worse. and we can only address that together through this international system. the world meteorological— this international system. the world meteorological organisation - this international system. the world meteorological organisation warned | meteorological organisation warned today that these extremes are the new normal. but it is developing countries who are suffering the most, and they say the onus should be on richer nations.— be on richer nations. malawi, like many countries _ be on richer nations. malawi, like many countries that _ be on richer nations. malawi, like many countries that are - be on richer nations. malawi, like i many countries that are developing, have been_ many countries that are developing, have been at the receiving end of climate _ have been at the receiving end of climate change issues, pretty much brought— climate change issues, pretty much brought by— climate change issues, pretty much brought by those developed nations who continue to emit so much carbon.
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centrai— who continue to emit so much carbon. central to— who continue to emit so much carbon. central to look to these talks is a vital number, 1.5 degrees. if temperatures go above this, we move into dangerous territory. the world is already 1.1 degrees above preindustrial levels, and we are seeing the impacts of that right now. even if every country does what it is promising, we are on course for 2.7 degrees by the end of the century. activists are demanding more action now, led by greta third thunberg, mobbed as she arrived in glasgow. irate thunberg, mobbed as she arrived in glasuow. ~ ., , thunberg, mobbed as she arrived in glasaow.~ ., , , glasgow. we can always prevent thins glasgow. we can always prevent things from _ glasgow. we can always prevent things from getting _ glasgow. we can always prevent things from getting worse. - glasgow. we can always prevent things from getting worse. it - glasgow. we can always prevent things from getting worse. it is. things from getting worse. it is never too late to do as much as we can. �* . , never too late to do as much as we can. ~ ., , .. , ., can. after nearly three decades of talks, there _ can. after nearly three decades of talks, there are _ can. after nearly three decades of talks, there are questions - can. after nearly three decades of talks, there are questions over i can. after nearly three decades of. talks, there are questions over how much can be achieved here. the fate of the planet is in their hands. cop26 has officially begun. let's spell out what
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negotiators here in glasgow need to achieve by the end of next week. more ambitious targets to cut emissions are needed. that means more action to limit global warming to a maximum of 1.5 degrees. cutting down on the use of coal is essential — it's the most polluting fossil fuel. but many countries are still very dependent on it. the effects of climate change are already clear so countries and communities need more help to adapt to the new reality. also the money — how much help will richer countries give to those nations worst affected by the effects of climate change. bangladesh is among the most vulnerable, so our science editor david shukman looks now at one village there and what it needs. ina in a village on the coast of bangladesh, people are using mod to try to hold back the sea. it's all they've got. the rising level of the
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ocean means they are getting flooded more often. and we saw the same villagers are struggling in the same way back in 2009. the people who have done least to cause climate change are suffering the most from it. if the forecasts of climate scientists are right and the sea rises even more, may be by a metre by the end of the century, how on earth are these millions of people going to cope? with life so precarious, this community has long been desperate for international help. that is why this woman wanted to share her story at the climate summit in copenhagen 12 years ago. she told me she was pleased to be there and believed that world leaders would do something. they didn't. now her life is tougher than ever. extreme weather is striking more often, and there is still very little assistance. translation: we
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have no idea what we can do. if people can help us, something can change. we don't have the money to move to other places. i have nothing that i can give to my children. along some stretches of coast, there are now rows of sandbags to try to keep the sea at bay. the new school provides shelter during cyclones. freshwater is harder to find. most supplies are contaminated by the rising sea. more than a decade ago, developing countries were given a promise that by now they would be getting $100 billion a year in climate aid. here we are at the glasgow summit, and that promise still hasn't been fulfilled. 30c} still hasn't been fulfilled. 300 billion was — still hasn't been fulfilled. 300 billion was just _ still hasn't been fulfilled. 300 billion wasjust a _ still hasn't been fulfilled. 2: billion was just a promise that has not been kept, and its importance is that leaders who made the promise are not keeping the promise, and therefore, these leaders have no
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credibility. therefore, these leaders have no credibili . therefore, these leaders have no credibility-— therefore, these leaders have no credibili ., , , credibility. back in bangladesh, she sa s she credibility. back in bangladesh, she says she doesn't _ credibility. back in bangladesh, she says she doesn't want _ credibility. back in bangladesh, she says she doesn't want her - credibility. back in bangladesh, she says she doesn't want her children | says she doesn't want her children and grandchildren to suffer more than she is. but they are facing a hotter and more hostile climate, so there is real pressure for the talks in glasgow to get somewhere. the conference centre is just across the river clyde behind us, and david sugarman, ourscience river clyde behind us, and david sugarman, our science centre, river clyde behind us, and david sugarman, ourscience centre, is inside the centre. we have talked about the warnings and heard the prince of wales spell out what he thinks is now the stakes at stake here — what do you think they need to do by the end of next week? bluntly, the world is still heading in the wrong direction. if you add up in the wrong direction. if you add up the promises that different countries have made to tackle climate change, we are still on course for dangerous levels of warming. with a very long list of severe consequences, from melting of theice severe consequences, from melting of the ice sheets, accelerated sea level rise, challenges to agriculture, grubbing and food, the
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risks of mass migration, and that's why the head of the un, antonio gutteres, and so many others, are extremely worried as we go into this conference. one thing that particularly disturbs them is the disconnect between what global leaders are saying about climate change and how important it is and what they are actually doing collectively, which so far, in his view, isn't nearly enough. the hope is that during the next two weeks, there will be a shift in political will to put the world on a different and safer course, but as things stand, it has to be said, and i'm sorry to report this, things don't look particularly optimistic on that front. ., , ., . front. david, many thanks. we will have more — front. david, many thanks. we will have more from _ front. david, many thanks. we will have more from the _ front. david, many thanks. we will have more from the opening - front. david, many thanks. we will have more from the opening day l front. david, many thanks. we will| have more from the opening day of the cop26 summit in glasgow at ten o'clock tonight. now, letsjoin clive for the day's of the news. three people have died and another is in a critical condition in hospital, after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a river in wales.
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five people were rescued from the water uninjured. severe rain had led to turbulent conditions, on the river and police have begun an investigation. tomos morgan has the story. at 9am yesterday morning, rescue services were called after a group of nine paddle boarders, part of the south wales paddle boarders, were in difficulty on this stretch of the river in haverfordwest. around 30 firefighters from mid and west wales fire and rescue services worked alongside police, paramedics and the coast guard in a risky operation in pembrokeshire. police confirmed that a member of the public also jumped into the water to help. two women and a man, whom the bbc now understands was paul o'dwyer from port talbot, died at the scene. tributes have been paid to mr o'dwyer online. a yellow weather warning for rain was in place at the
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time of the incident, and had been in place since friday, meaning river levels were far higher than usual. one local resident described the conditions at the time to the bbc as dangerous. conditions at the time to the bbc as dancerous. . ., _, ., , dangerous. recent weather conditions and warnings — dangerous. recent weather conditions and warnings have _ dangerous. recent weather conditions and warnings have mentioned - dangerous. recent weather conditions and warnings have mentioned that - dangerous. recent weather conditions and warnings have mentioned that the river was flowing high and fast, and the conditions of the river will form part of the investigation to understand the precise conditions that the paddle boarders found themselves in. the that the paddle boarders found themselves in.— that the paddle boarders found themselves in. , ., ., , themselves in. the rest of the group were taken to _ themselves in. the rest of the group were taken to hospital— themselves in. the rest of the group were taken to hospital outside - themselves in. the rest of the group were taken to hospital outside the i were taken to hospital outside the town for treatment. five were discharged but one remains in a critical condition. the families of those involved have been contacted as the investigation to exactly what happened here yesterday morning continues. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were just over 38,000 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average, there were 40,580 new cases reported
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per day in the last week. 7a deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 157 related deaths were recorded every day. in rugby union, england s women have beaten the world champions new zealand. abbey ward scored twice early on, but it was ellie kildunne, here with the pick of england's seven tries, in their a3—12 thrashing, a record winning margin of victory over the black ferns. the result means england remain world number one, ahead of the delayed 2021 world cup in new zealand next year. chelsea have beaten mnchester city 3—0 in the semi—final of the women s fa cup. they'll now play either arsenal or brighton in december�*s final. the latter stages of the competition have been carried over from last season, due to the coronavirus pandemic. ben croucher reports.
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this year's women's fa cup is nearly as old as some fans, but after delays due to the pandemic, the final is in touching distance. for chelsea. erin cuthbert�*s opener was within reach but it didn't mean she could stop it. the third choice keeper got hands—on chelsea's second as well, today of all days turning into a nightmare. city's array of injured stars were helpless as the defending champions managed to block their own path to wembley. chelsea will be heading there for the first time in three years. england made sure of that. time in three years. england made sure of that-— sure of that. their ticket to wembley _ sure of that. their ticket to wembley is _ sure of that. their ticket to wembley is well _ sure of that. their ticket to wembley is well and - sure of that. their ticket to wembley is well and truly. sure of that. their ticket to - wembley is well and truly booked. a december date for fans of all ages to look forward to. that's it. we're back with the late news at ten. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good evening.
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hello, i'm asad ahmad. and a warm welcome to viewers also joining us today in kent, surrey and sussex. as the cop26 climate conference begins many people are wondering about the individual changes they personally need to make to decrease their carbon footprint. it's something scientists say we all need to do. so our environment correspondent, tom edwards has been looking at how practical that is. trying to be greener sometimes can be tricky. i've got to go find the bus stop now. our reporter, tara welsh, tried living more sustainably. it wasn't straightforward. but these changes will face all of us if we are to reduce carbon dioxide produced from fossil fuels that cause climate change. it will change how we get around, what we eat and how we heat our homes.
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so, how do we get people to change their behaviour? so there's this idea that when people are undergoing changes in their day—to—day lives such as starting a newjob or starting university or moving house, they're much more amenable to be making pro—environmental changes at those times, so thinking about the timing at which we suggest that people make changes and also thinking about the kind of advice and practical steps that people can do. but who should be leading the change? governments, corporations or individuals? more than 100 countries, every country from around the world coming together and making real, real commitments to grip runaway climate change, but it's about demonstrating ahead of cop26 that there is a lot of activity already in the uk that shows that everyday people want climate change to be gripped. so, what about tara? has she changed her habits about two years on? it completely changed my mind—set and i really tried to instil a lot
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of the things that i learned straight after and then the pandemic hit and everything, everyone wanted everything to be clean and so taking my reusable cup was no longer an option and that's a really small thing. no one doubts that if you want to slow the warming climate there are big changes ahead. strong winds and a reported "tornado" has brought down trees causing major travel disruption on roads and railways. this was euston station where hundreds of passengers have been delayed. more than 600 thousand have been vaccinated. another 140,000 children have their job according to nhs england. the
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office for national statistics said the percentage of people in real seven to 11 estimated atjust over 9%. the aim is to keep as many people safely in the classroom as possible. now, as we speak, boris johnson is probably somewhere in the air between rome and glasgow. they should have been held in rome but the italians were a bit unsure, the britishjumped in they would have it. that is why it is being held in glasgow. there was a news conference given in the last hour and he spoke about that briefly. the main subject was not to discuss the un climate change being in glasgow. if we are going to prevent cup 26
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from being a favour, the failure, that must change and i have to be clear that if glasgow fails in the whole thing feels for the —— prevent cop26 from being a failure. the paris agreement would have come at the first reckoning. you will�*s only mechanism, viable mechanism for dealing with climate change, will be held beneath the waterline. right now, the paris agreement and the hope that came with it is just a of paper. we need to feel that paper, to populate with real progress and i know that humanity has, in it, the power to rise to the challenge. with me as chris mason, he said it was reasonable, that is the most damning we have heard. could we read
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that as disappointing? brute damning we have heard. could we read that as disappointing?— that as disappointing? we could. forrester very — that as disappointing? we could. forrester very demure _ that as disappointing? we could. forrester very demure and - that as disappointing? we could. . forrester very demure and character is normally is rarely more than a sentence or two away from the jocular, from puns, from wordplay, and there was none of that, really, there, this was a prime minister serious with intent, consciously is effectively the host of this summit thatis effectively the host of this summit that is starting in glasgow this evening, cop26, and in his view, as you say, the agreement at the g 20 were just reasonable and as we heard him asked in that, if you cannot get agreement amongst 20, how do you get agreement amongst 20, how do you get agreement amongst 20, how do you get agreement amongst 200 at the assembled collection of leaders heading to glasgow? the prime minister said that his nip and tuck, touch and go, inching forward as far as progress was turned at the g 20 and a very, very difficult days ahead, and acknowledging when it was
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put him in a question that the communiqu , the diplomatic phrase for the final documents at the end of the summit as far as the g 20 was concerned, merely talking about trying to reach net zero by, at or around mid—century, that language to accommodate the fact there are some g 20 countries, not least russia who are saying it might take us until 2060 and the foreign minister openly in his news conferencing, what is this obsession with 2050? no specific promise from india as well. if that is a challenge amongst the g 20, far more country setting to glasgow. huge amount at stake. white the hope is that in ten days that are left before... well, as you're telling me earlier, we don't have an end date for this, it's an ongoing process but theoretically in the next week or so, they are supposed to iron out all the stuff. prime minister quite blunt, though, saying if we do not get an agreement,
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meaningful agreement, if we do not get an agreement, meaningfulagreement, paris if we do not get an agreement, meaningful agreement, paris is dead. yes, that is a reference to the paris agreement, the last regular cop. there have been many but that was the last regular one. unless you get dot might be how you get in glasgow, how you meet the promises made several years back, then what was agreed there was merely a piece of paper, as he wrote it, a question of paper, as he wrote it, a question of will and leadership, he went on to say. if we do not act now, the paris agreement will look like the moment we turned away from actually dealing with the threat that the planet faces, as many see it, and there were no more compelling excuses for our procrastination. quite striking because borisjohnson pre— being prime minister would occasionally pen columns in the telegraph and elsewhere that would not have been necessarily sceptical about climate change but they were certainly not coming from the kind of place he comes at this argument from now and to people close to him
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and since you have been in government, you've been briefed by science. �* ., , ., , science. and he now gets that this is something _ science. and he now gets that this is something that _ science. and he now gets that this is something that is _ science. and he now gets that this is something that is pretty - is something that is pretty significant. another striking phrase used, without being preachy or sounding virtuous. there a thought. we can point to a pretty good wreck in the uk, he says, which is knowing a language from a man who used to write the type of columns to which i refer or he would have been the first to leap on those who, in his view, then, might have sounded preachy or virtuous, so he's well aware of the scale of the challenge head on the scale of the arms that have to be twisted. the all thing start in the next few days with a world leaders summit which is kind of a part of the order process of the cop which will be opened by him tomorrow lunchtime, we have the prince of wales and sir david attenborough also involved in that with an evening reception tomorrow evening and as you say, a couple of weeks of protest without a
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definitive end process. expectation is weak after an expert who knows because who knows what we will be agreement wise or lack of? lets talk about much — agreement wise or lack of? lets talk about much simpler— agreement wise or lack of? lets talk about much simpler things - agreement wise or lack of? lets talk about much simpler things that - agreement wise or lack of? lets talk about much simpler things that only | about much simpler things that only evolve to countries, the dispute over fishing evolve to countries, the dispute overfishing between evolve to countries, the dispute over fishing between the evolve to countries, the dispute overfishing between the french evolve to countries, the dispute over fishing between the french and british, if only, i did say it with a slight wry expression and uri in response, why is this proving to be so difficult. response, why is this proving to be so difficult-— so difficult. because this is a case stud in so difficult. because this is a case study in the _ so difficult. because this is a case study in the trade _ so difficult. because this is a case study in the trade and _ so difficult. because this is a case| study in the trade and cooperation agreement, the tca as it is described by both sides, between the uk and eu, after brexit, this is the reality of that new deal, the robber of that hitting the road, if you like, and i think it was perhaps inevitable that all would be something particularly over fish because the curiosity is that it is colossally important but economically, it is tiny. in france and the uk- _ economically, it is tiny. in france and the uk. geographically - and the uk. geographically particularly _ and the uk. geographically particularly communities i and the uk. geographically l particularly communities feel and the uk. geographically - particularly communities feel it keenly but what is striking today as
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the two men, borisjohnson and the french president had a brush by as they call it, you wonder how firm that brush might have been diplomatically because both sides, and you read from the shop is a lyc e in paris and from number ten, it is pretty spiky particularly from downing street and he was saying that he was pretty peeved with the remarks from the french prime minister suggesting the uk should be punished for brexit. —— from the champs elysee. punished for brexit. -- from the champs elysee-— champs elysee. could be find ourselves _ champs elysee. could be find ourselves in _ champs elysee. could be find ourselves in the _ champs elysee. could be find ourselves in the paradoxical. champs elysee. could be find - ourselves in the paradoxical vision of it being ruled by the body we don't want to be involved in these rules? you'll make the first stage of the legal process which could come as quickly as next week in france carries out its threat to make trade more difficult between the uk and france by tuesday, which is currently the threat on the table, the first stage of the legal
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process would be lawyers assembling on both sides and the european commission being involved as opposed to just being commission being involved as opposed tojust being a commission being involved as opposed to just being a spat between the uk and france, my understanding is it getting as far as the courts is a long way off, the court ofjustice and process involving the european union tend to turn quite slowly stop meanwhile the french have sent a 48—hour deadline, that will pass because nothing will happen between now and tuesday, will it was my goal it will pass and that is the deadline beyond which france said it will crank up retaliation and the prime minister yesterday said it would lead to a response as far as the beginning of this legal process, so alongside cop, there will be plenty of fish chat as well in the next 48 hours or so. fascinating stuff. thank you so much. hello,
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you're watching bbc news with me, headlines at 5:30 pm... cop26 gets underway in glasgow. the biggest summit meeting ever held in the uk is already underway. the summit is widely seen as the last chance to save the planet from irreversible damage caused by climate change. earlier the leaders of the world's richest nations were meeting in rome, where the climate challenge was spelled out clearly. if we do not act now, the paris agreement will be looked at in the future, not as the moment humanity flinched and turned away. prince charles added his voice to calls for more action to tackle climate change, telling leaders in rome they owe it to the next generation.
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cop26 begins tomorrow in glasgow. quite literally it is the last chance saloon. we must now translate fine words into still finer actions. three people have died and another is in a critical condition, after a group of paddleboarders got into difficulty on a welsh river. and the british government says it's "up to france" to solve the post—brexit fishing row with the uk by stepping back from threats over access to its ports. we will be rejoining christian in glasgow at six o'clock. now on bbc news, what triggered the covid—19 pandemic? the bbc�*s global health correspondent tulip mazumdar looks into the main theories. what exactly happened at the start of this pandemic? where did this virus come from? what happened that brought us into this situation?

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