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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 31, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: the world's moment of truth. borisjohnson urges leaders to use their summit in glasgow to start to fix climate change. we think that we can be on a remorseless forward march, when actually we can be actively conniving in our own decline and fall. than 25,000 people start to arrive in the city, but there are concerns about whether any agreement on limiting global warming will go far enough. health teams are to visit more than 800 secondary schools in england to offer coronavirus vaccinations to children aged 12 to 15.
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it was a smashing day for england. this is why. up, up and away. jos buttler destroys the aussie bowlers as england make it three wins out of three at the t20 world cup. good morning. low pressure in charge of our weather today, bringing us some heavy showers or longer spells of rain. there will be some sunshine mixed in as well, but it is going to feel windy for many of us through the course of the day. i will have all the details here on bbc brick. -- bbc all the details here on bbc brick. —— bbc breakfast. it is sunday 31 october. world leaders will be making their way from the 620 summit in rome to glasgow today for the start of the cop26 climate conference. before they set off, prince charles will warn them they have an overwhelming responsibility to future generations to fix the climate crisis. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale is in rome.
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for g20 leaders, this is theirfirst time to spend time together, face—to—face for almost two years. whether dining at the presidential palace in rome or sitting around the summit table, a chance to catch up and do deals. today their minds will turn to perhaps the most important and most necessary deal. they are expected to agree climate change is an existential threat, but so far there have been no new, firm commitments to reduce carbon emissions, much to the frustration of the host of the cop26 summit. people are often very conceited about history and about our civilisation. we think that we can be on a remorseless forward march, when actually, we can be at the conniving in our own decline and fall. and what we need to do is to ensure that at the cop summit next week the world leaders come together
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and make the commitments that are necessary. and make the commitments that are necessa . ., , , necessary. today he will win support from an unexpected _ necessary. today he will win support from an unexpected source. - necessary. today he will win support from an unexpected source. the - from an unexpected source. the prince of wales has been invited to the summit by the italian hosts, and he will tell the g20 leaders they have an overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn.
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it was a privilege to devote four
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months to the climate. i it was a privilege to devote four months to the climate.- it was a privilege to devote four months to the climate. i am walking with my children _ months to the climate. i am walking with my children and _ months to the climate. i am walking with my children and my _ with my children and my grandchildren, and i am demanding for them a good climate. the teenager— for them a good climate. the teenager greta _ for them a good climate. the teenager greta thunberg arrived in the city by train. she has already expressed her concern that cop26 will not lead to any significant changes. 0thers admit it will be challenging. changes. others admit it will be challenging-— changes. others admit it will be challenauin. ~ ., challenging. when you look at the science, challenging. when you look at the science. the _ challenging. when you look at the science, the latest _ challenging. when you look at the science, the latest report - challenging. when you look at the science, the latest report from . challenging. when you look at the | science, the latest report from the intergovernmental panel on climate change is clear that the world is warming. it is human induced, and if we do not act now, we're going to see increased floods, droughts, heatwaves and all of us will be affected. , ., , ., .,, heatwaves and all of us will be affected. , .,, ., ., affected. glasgow will host more than 120 world _ affected. glasgow will host more than 120 world leaders, - affected. glasgow will host more than 120 world leaders, and - affected. glasgow will host more than 120 world leaders, and up l affected. glasgow will host more | than 120 world leaders, and up to 25,000 delegates. around 10,000 police officers will be deployed each day. for those living in the city, disruption is expected, and there are mixed feelings about the
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summit. i there are mixed feelings about the summit. ~ , ., , summit. i think it is really good that peeple _ summit. i think it is really good that people are _ summit. i think it is really good that people are coming - summit. i think it is really good | that people are coming together about the environment, because it is about the environment, because it is a really big deal right now. the money they — a really big deal right now. the money they have spent setting it up, and then_ money they have spent setting it up, and then they hired. ijust don't -et and then they hired. ijust don't get it _ and then they hired. ijust don't get it i — and then they hired. i 'ust don't aet it. . . and then they hired. i 'ust don't iet it. ., ., , and then they hired. i 'ust don't aet it. . ., , ., ., get it. i have heard it is going to increase the _ get it. i have heard it is going to increase the covid _ get it. i have heard it is going to increase the covid numbers - get it. i have heard it is going to increase the covid numbers as l get it. i have heard it is going to - increase the covid numbers as well, so that_ increase the covid numbers as well, so that is_ increase the covid numbers as well, so that is obvious _ increase the covid numbers as well, so that is obvious the _ increase the covid numbers as well, so that is obvious the a _ increase the covid numbers as well, so that is obvious the a bit - increase the covid numbers as well, so that is obvious the a bit of - increase the covid numbers as well, so that is obvious the a bit of a - so that is obvious the a bit of a wow — so that is obvious the a bit of a wor . ., worry. the venue for the united nations climate _ worry. the venue for the united nations climate change - worry. the venue for the united i nations climate change conference just across the river is now officially you and territory. this is where world leaders and delegates will meet. this is where those high—stakes discussions will take high—sta kes discussions will take place. high—stakes discussions will take place. the uk government is hosting the summit, and on behalf of the scottish government, nicola sturgeon welcomed everyone to glasgow. at? scottish government, nicola sturgeon welcomed everyone to glasgow. # what a wonderful well. .. _ welcomed everyone to glasgow. # what a wonderful well. .. as _ welcomed everyone to glasgow. # what a wonderful well. .. as others _ welcomed everyone to glasgow. # what a wonderful well. .. as others united - a wonderful well. .. as others united to net a wonderful well. .. as others united to get their — a wonderful well. .. as others united to get their message _ a wonderful well. .. as others united to get their message across, - a wonderful well. .. as others united to get their message across, the - to get their message across, the prime minister said this could be one of the most important global gatherings this century.
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it is understood people have died following an incident on a river in the pembrokeshire area of west wales. dyfed—powys police say a major rescue operation was launched on the river cleddau in haverfordwest after a group of people were seen in distress. police, firefighters, coastguard, ambulance crews and four helicopters were deployed. more details are expected to be released later today. alec baldwin has described the death of a colleague on the set of his film as a one in a trillion episode after he accidentally shot her with a prop gun. speaking in public for the first time since cinematographer halyna hutchins died on the set of the western film rust, the actor said he would be in favour of limiting the use of firearms on films. he also confirmed production of the movie was unlikely to resume. as pupils return after the half—term break, health teams will visit 800 schools across england to offer those aged 12 to 15 a coronavirus vaccine.
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young people are also being encouraged to take a covid test before returning to classes, as simonjones reports. you lot are braver than most of the grown—ups. you lot are braver than most of the grown-m— you lot are braver than most of the u-rown-us. ~ , , , ., grown-ups. when pupils returning to school this week _ grown-ups. when pupils returning to school this week asked _ grown-ups. when pupils returning to school this week asked what - grown-ups. when pupils returning to school this week asked what did - grown-ups. when pupils returning to school this week asked what did you | school this week asked what did you do in the half term break, some will be able to say i got myjab. special sessions are being put on for 12 to 15 year at vaccination centres like this one in kent, and now the plan is to allow more pupils to get a jabber school, with teams going into hundreds of schools in england this week. i hundreds of schools in england this week. , .. , ., week. i might be carrying it and i don't even _ week. i might be carrying it and i don't even know, _ week. i might be carrying it and i don't even know, and _ week. i might be carrying it and i don't even know, and if- week. i might be carrying it and i don't even know, and if he - week. i might be carrying it and i i don't even know, and if he catches it then... don't even know, and if he catches itthen...�* , ., don't even know, and if he catches itthen... �* , ., ., it then... because i am quite old, i am an old — it then... because i am quite old, i am an old dad. _ it then... because i am quite old, i am an old dad, in _ it then... because i am quite old, i am an old dad, in my _ it then... because i am quite old, i am an old dad, in my 60s, - it then... because i am quite old, i am an old dad, in my 60s, and - am an old dad, in my 60s, and obviously— am an old dad, in my 60s, and obviously he worries bit about that. we have _ obviously he worries bit about that. we have had deaths in the family, so we thought— we have had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... _ we have had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... i— we have had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... i know- we have had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... i know she - we have had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... i know she is. we thought maybe... i know she is young, _ we thought maybe... i know she is young, but— we thought maybe... i know she is young, but it — we thought maybe... i know she is young, but it is _ we thought maybe... i know she is young, but it is relatively- we thought maybe... i know she is young, but it is relatively safe. - we thought maybe... i know she is young, but it is relatively safe. i. young, but it is relatively safe. wanted to get it done. i want young, but it is relatively safe.“ wanted to get it done. i want all young, but it is relatively safe]. wanted to get it done. i want all of the things to be back to normal again. the things to be back to normal aaain. . , ., ., �* , the things to be back to normal aaain. . , ., . �* , ., again. parents who haven't yet had the 'ab are
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again. parents who haven't yet had the jab are being _ again. parents who haven't yet had the jab are being encouraged - again. parents who haven't yet had the jab are being encouraged to . again. parents who haven't yet had the jab are being encouraged to go j the jab are being encouraged to go online so they can make an informed choice. more than 600,000 young people have been vaccinated since the rollout was extended to include 12 to 15 —year—olds at the end of september. another 140,000 children had theirjabs booked the next few weeks, according to nhs england. the office for national statistics says the percentage of people testing positive remains highest amongst children in school years seven to 11, estimated atjust over 9%. pupils are also being urged to take a lateral flow test before returning to school to minimise disruption to lessons. the aim: to keep as many children safely in the classroom as possible. let's take a look at some of today's newspapers, and cop26 features prominently on many of the front pages. the climate summit is the world's moment of truth according to scotland on sunday. the paper carries a photograph of the activist greta thunberg arriving in glasgow. the observer reports that scientists and environmentalists have called for borisjohnson and french
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president emmanuel macron to end the row over anglo—french fishing rights amid fears it could overshadow the climate conference. the fishing row also appears on the front page of the sunday telegraph. the paper reports that mrjohnson has accused mr macron of participating in a pattern of threats against the uk. and the most read story on the bbc news website this morning is the latest on the film set shooting involving alec baldwin. it reports that the actor has spoken out in public for the first time since he accidentally shot dead cinematographer halyna hutchins, saying she was my friend. shall we have a look inside some of the papers? i don't want to start a stampede. this is inside the sunday
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telegraph, the panik buying of books. the sunday telegraph is reporting paper cuts prove a pain in the race for christmas bestsellers. essentially what they are saying is that they could be a shortage of the really popular titles over christmas if a second print run is required because of problems with paper supply and the problems that we know about shipping, because a lot of the colour printed books apparently are donein colour printed books apparently are done in the far east and therefore have to be brought in on container ships. there is a bit of a shortage of paper as well, so the gist of this story is if you want to buy a book for someone for christmas, buy it early. book for someone for christmas, buy it earl . , ., , , book for someone for christmas, buy it earl . , . , , ., it early. presumably the headline above it, by _ it early. presumably the headline above it, by your _ it early. presumably the headline above it, by your wedding - it early. presumably the headline | above it, by your wedding dresses it early. presumably the headline i above it, by your wedding dresses a yearin above it, by your wedding dresses a year in advance, brides are being told for similar reasons. that may be the case- _ told for similar reasons. that may be the case. in _ told for similar reasons. that may be the case. in the _ told for similar reasons. that may be the case. in the observer, - told for similar reasons. that may be the case. in the observer, thisj be the case. in the observer, this really captured — be the case. in the observer, this really captured my _ be the case. in the observer, this really captured my imagination. l be the case. in the observer, this i really captured my imagination. this is an ancient roman party town. this was basically a hot bed of partying ljy was basically a hot bed of partying by the romans in the third century.
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they were good at parties. thea;r by the romans in the third century. they were good at parties.- they were good at parties. they -- it was buried _ they were good at parties. they -- it was buried under _ they were good at parties. they -- it was buried under the _ they were good at parties. they -- it was buried under the sea. - they were good at parties. they -- it was buried under the sea. on i they were good at parties. they -- it was buried under the sea. on a l it was buried under the sea. on a clear day and italian air force pilot spotted what he described as a strange ghost town underneath, and they have gradually been unpicking it and it has become a tourist destination. it is absolutely beautiful. you can see the floor with a diver up close to it. staying with a diver up close to it. staying with a diver up close to it. staying with a similarly _ with a diver up close to it. staying with a similarly highbrow - with a diver up close to it. staying with a similarly highbrow theme, | with a diver up close to it. staying i with a similarly highbrow theme, we are talking high art here. hogarth, the famous painter, according to the sunday times, because there were so many fakes of his paintings that were done on the day, he started to make adjustments at the last minute to try and throw the forgers off. so that they were not able to produce knockoff prints of his own famous works before he published them himself. ~ ., , ., , ., , himself. what sorts of things does it sa ? a himself. what sorts of things does it say? a man _ himself. what sorts of things does it say? a man hanging _ himself. what sorts of things does it say? a man hanging on - himself. what sorts of things does it say? a man hanging on a - himself. what sorts of things does i it say? a man hanging on a lamppost
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in the background _ it say? a man hanging on a lamppost in the background of _ it say? a man hanging on a lamppost in the background of one _ it say? a man hanging on a lamppost in the background of one that - it say? a man hanging on a lamppost in the background of one that has i in the background of one that has been revealed in an x—ray. that in the background of one that has been revealed in an x-ray. that is fascinating- _ been revealed in an x-ray. that is fascinating. keeping _ been revealed in an x-ray. that is fascinating. keeping it— been revealed in an x-ray. that is fascinating. keeping it highbrow, | fascinating. keeping it highbrow, these are people _ fascinating. keeping it highbrow, these are people who _ fascinating. keeping it highbrow, these are people who have i fascinating. keeping it highbrow, these are people who have made motors their homes. this one is my favourite. this is basically people who have taken different vehicles and turn them into motorhomes. charlie glover was living in his nan's �*s bedroom when he bought a truck for two grand in 2018 and now he has turned it into his full—time home. he is living in it. it has a sound system salvaged from a nightclub. water is stored in beer kegs and the kitchen is made from pallets. early on. he would fit in well in glasgow this week, everything is up cycled. stargazers were in for a treat last night, as the northern lights lit up the skies across the uk. the lights, also known as the aurora borealis, were particularly vibrant across the north of scotland. let's take a look at some of images people have been posting. here is findhorn bay on the moray firth. the north—facing coastline
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is well—known for being a good place to spot the lights. typically the northern lights are spotted between 9:00pm and midnight, and they're best seen away from any light pollution. even further north, in dornoch in the scottish highlands, the colours got even more spectacular. fantastic. it is nice when you get such dark skies and you can see. sarah keith lucas has an image of the northern lights.— sarah keith lucas has an image of the northern lights. anyone would think there is _ the northern lights. anyone would think there is some _ the northern lights. anyone would think there is some production i the northern lights. anyone would| think there is some production that goes into this programme. what a happy coincidence! it goes into this programme. what a happy coincidence!— goes into this programme. what a happy coincidence! it matches your dress, happy coincidence! it matches your dress. sarah- _ happy coincidence! it matches your dress, sarah. i— happy coincidence! it matches your dress, sarah. iwould _ happy coincidence! it matches your dress, sarah. iwould like - happy coincidence! it matches your dress, sarah. i would like to i happy coincidence! it matches your dress, sarah. i would like to say i dress, sarah. i would like to say that is preplanned. _ dress, sarah. i would like to say that is preplanned. we - dress, sarah. i would like to say that is preplanned. we did i dress, sarah. i would like to say i that is preplanned. we did forecast some aurora borealis last night. some fantastic pictures coming in this morning from our weather watches. a fantastic view of the northern lights last night. that was down to fact we had a strong geomagnetic storm which is when the
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sun gives off charge solar particles. —— charged. they interact with oxygen and nitrogen and give off these fantastic colours. who needs fireworks when you have nature bozza goan firework display. it was seen as far south as norfolk. they got a glimpse of it further south but best under the clear skies. as we head through the course of the day, we are expecting skies to cloud over because we have wet and windy weather on the clouds so another outbreak today bringing outbreaks of rain with showers and thunderstorms and a bit of sunshine as well so it isn't a write—off. some brighter weather developing later on this afternoon. but it will feel windy. here is a cloud that has been rolling in on the latest low pressure system. more rain around. this is the radar picture from the past few hours showing the rain that has been moving in across across northern ireland. as this curl of rain moves north and east across all
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parts of the uk we are expecting gales at times to develop and some heavy showers rattling on behind the main rain band. a bit of sunshine in between the showers but if you do catch them they could be heavy and potentially thundery and gusts of wind even inland about 30 mph close to the coast around 50 mph. particular for wales and south—west of england. temperatures 10— 14 degrees so a little bit cooler than we've seen over recent days and some people might be heading trick—or—treating through this evening. you might want to bring an umbrella. the driest weather across the south and the east of england. 0n through the course of tonight, still more wet weather across parts of northern ireland and into scotland. furthersouth of northern ireland and into scotland. further south just the odd shower around. temperatures, for many of us, single figures. largely frost free to start monday. the winds rotate around the low pressure so it is going to be blustery once again and a bit of a change in wind
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direction so you will notice that the let that make the yellow colours get cleared away and the blue colours move in so it will turn cooler behind these heavy showers on monday. the heaviest of the downpours for parts of western scotland in western england, areas seeing the flooding so we could really do without yet more rainfall which is in the forecast. further south a little bit drier. not quite as warm as it has been recently. low pressure still not father what —— far away. you will notice the winds coming in for a far away. you will notice the winds coming infora more far away. you will notice the winds coming in for a more northerly direction. i returned overnight frost for the middle part of the week but things are looking a bit more settled into the week ahead are some showers but then drier into the week. back to you both.— week. back to you both. looking better as the _ week. back to you both. looking better as the week _ week. back to you both. looking better as the week goes - week. back to you both. looking better as the week goes on. i salmonjumping is one of the most impressive spectacles of autumn, and traditionally one of the best places to see them is the river severn. but according to the environment agency, their numbers are at an all—time low. laura may mcmullan has
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been finding out why. it been finding out why. is a waiting game on the rivi severn it is a waiting game on the river severn in shrew spree. i’ere it is a waiting game on the river severn in shrew spree.— severn in shrew spree. i've had about 50 photographs - severn in shrew spree. i've had about 50 photographs so i severn in shrew spree. i've had about 50 photographs so far. i severn in shrew spree. i've had i about 50 photographs so far. over the last 15 days or so. it is quite interesting. blink and you will miss them. i interesting. blink and you will miss them. . , ., , . them. i have been down here since about 9:30am _ them. i have been down here since about 9:30am and _ them. i have been down here since about 9:30am and nothing - them. i have been down here since about 9:30am and nothing at i them. i have been down here since about 9:30am and nothing at all i them. i have been down here since| about 9:30am and nothing at all so far. about 9:30am and nothing at all so far~ reid _ about 9:30am and nothing at all so far~ reid il— about 9:30am and nothing at all so far. reid it is something you want little _ far. reid it is something you want little ones — far. reid it is something you want little ones to see. it is so lovely that it _ little ones to see. it is so lovely that it is — little ones to see. it is so lovely that it isjust a shame that if it disappears it willjust be terrible. at this _ disappears it willjust be terrible. at this time of the year there is usually a spectacle of salmon jumping but stock is now at an all—time low. it jumping but stock is now at an all-time low.— all-time low. it is extremely concerning _ all-time low. it is extremely concerning to _ all-time low. it is extremely concerning to the _ all-time low. it is extremely l concerning to the environment all-time low. it is extremely - concerning to the environment agency that over the last five years we have seen a decline in those salmon stocks and quite significant. so much so that we have had to bring further regulations into place. this where, further regulations into place. this where. many. _ further regulations into place. this where, many, other barrierto further regulations into place. this where, many, other barrier to the migration up stream —— weir. they
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are returning to the welsh mountains to lay their eggs. and there is a conservation limit. the minimum number of eggs that need to be laid in this river is almost 13 million. that comes from 4000 spawning adults. the latest assessment shows they have reduced to a level of between 50 and 70%. it is believed climate change could be a factor but also angling. alice brazier has been fishing the river severn since he was a child and says he doesn't see the benefit of a new salmon angling bylaw which was introduced last month. i bylaw which was introduced last month. ~ . , ., �* , month. i think any genuine angler's ut month. i think any genuine angler's put salmon — month. i think any genuine angler's put salmon back _ month. i think any genuine angler's put salmon back for _ month. i think any genuine angler's put salmon back for a _ month. i think any genuine angler's put salmon back for a number i month. i think any genuine angler's put salmon back for a number of i put salmon back for a number of years anyway. the new laws really are something that targets a small minority of anglers and makes it a lot harderfor them to minority of anglers and makes it a lot harder for them to enjoy the river and the sport they love and really does very little to protect the stocks of salmon. whatever the answer is, the stocks of salmon. whatever the answer is. one _ the stocks of salmon. whatever the answer is, one of— the stocks of salmon. whatever the
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answer is, one of the _ the stocks of salmon. whatever the answer is, one of the solutions i the stocks of salmon. whatever the answer is, one of the solutions is i answer is, one of the solutions is to build new fish passes. all to help these iconic salmon return home to their breeding grounds. let's hope it works, what a shame. it is worrying. time now for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. and taking us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so, mark, what do we have this week? very mixed bag. we have passing, the directing debut for rebecca hall. we have last night in soho which is the latest from edgar wright. and we have antlers which is a strangely sombre horror movie.
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let's start off with passing. directorial debut for rebecca hall who is a fine actress of course. very fine actor. an adaptation of the novel by nello lawson. tessa thompson are irene and claire. they knew each other as kids, this is set in 1929, and they meet by chance at an upmarket new york establishment. here's a clip. pardon me, i don't mean to stare, but... i think i know you. i'm afraid you're mistaken. no, of course i know you. you lookjust the same. tell me, do they still call you renee? yes, but no one's called me
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that for a long time. - don't you know me? not really, reenee? i'm afraid i can't seem to place... claire? that's right. so what's happened is irene's now living in harlem with her husband who is a doctor. claire, however, is married tojohn, who is a bigot, a racist, who believes that his wife is white, which is the passing of the title. but one of the the interesting things of the film is pretty much everyone in it is pretending to be something that they're not. you saw from that clip, the film is shot in foursquare film black and white. if you are watching a movie in this 1929, movies would look like a square frame,
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black and white. the use of the black and white is fascinating because when you look at a black and white film it isn't to do with black and white, it's to do with all the shades in between. and it kind of brilliantly encapsulates all the ambiguity going all through the film. i should say, this is a very difficult subject matter to make a film about. and i think rebecca hall has done it rather brilliantly. because it's sensitive and it's handled very well. but it's also dramatically engaging. there are moments of melodrama, absolutely. looks really good, performances are really convincing and it's just one of those films that the more you think about it, the greater an achievement it is. because it would be so easy to do this and to get it wrong. it's quite a brave film to a maid. ——to have made. i think it's really rather good. it's in cinemas now, it's going to be on netflix. if you get a chance to see it in cinemas, and you saw from that, it needs to be seen projected because it's a really good—looking film. a bit like seeing a film in the �*205, almost. exactly. before every one could watch everything on streaming.
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halloween coming up. so it's spooky time and some horror films out. last night in soho. this is a film by edgar wright. made by shaun of dead... so the story is a young girl from cornwall comes to london to be a fashion student, she is obsessed with the �*60s. she finds herself nightly taken back into the �*60s through dreams, or are they dreams or are they ghostly apparition? sandy is a wannabe singer in the 19605 whose lives she starts to mirror and in fact starts to share that life. so on the one hand this is like a wishful film fantasy with somebody who loves a �*60s wakes up in the �*60s, in a cafe. but it's also a nightmare because what happens is she starts to see things she can't do anything about. the thing i really love about it, i'm a big fan of edgar wright anyway, his movies of always sort of teetered on the brink of being musicals. when he does a car chases they're like musical car chases.
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when he does fight scenes, they're like musical fight scenes. this have dance scenes and big pop soundtracks but it slips between being this retro thing to and a proper slasher movie. at that was really clever between doing and how it shifted. people may find it's a bit too full of movie references because walking around in soho, like, every single street has a history of its own. he called it peeping tom's midnight garden which i think is a brilliant description of it. i absolutely loved it. i've seen it twice and i loved it. and the soundtrack is supposed to be great. wall—to—wall �*60s pop hits. used brilliantly to get that slightly off—kilter field. ——used brilliantly to get that slightly off—kilter feel. he's got a great pop sensibility anyway. i think you'd enjoy it, i think you should see it twice because it's part of the second time. i see every film you recommend. also another horror out is antlers. this is strange. this is a very sombre horror film.
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story is, 0regon, rural town, very impoverished. a teacher in a school starts to worry about one of her pupils. here's a clip. i know you've been working on a story. will you read us a little bit? once there were three bears that lived in a dark and wet cave i up above a small town. big bear, little bear and baby bear. big bear used to takei care of the little bears but big bear got sick. lost his job and his i insides turned black.
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you get a sense from that of the sort of sombre creepy tone of it. i want and it's a film about which is about social problems, domestic abuse, poverty. 0n the other hand it's a fantasy film. if you think of the devil's backbone which this makes specific reference to, it does nothing about melding reality and fantasy. i think this is only partly successful. there are some bits in it that are like creature feature like pumpkin head. there are other things in it that are really about the grim, gritty reality of life. and i don't think they fully got the parts to match up with that, but i do think it's interesting to see somebody trying to tell an important story through the horror of fantasy genre. i think the problem with it is, i mean, it's halloween, people go to movies for scares, if you're looking forjump scares it doesn't really have that many of them. if you're looking for something that is flat social commentary it got too much fantasy.
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in a way the two halves don't quite match up. but it's ambitious and guillermo del toro does hang over like a shadow. you look at this and you think, this is produced by the guy who made the devil's backbone and who made the shape of water and pan's labyrinth. this isn't as good as any of those but it is interesting. do people go and see herjust because it's halloween do you think? absolutely. yes, because everyone likes a good scare. of course they do. best out at the moment? dune. have you seen dune? no, i tried to read the book which is a very big, thick book from 1965? yes. so here's what they've done, they cut it in half. this is dune part i, not knowing whether they be able to make part two. as of tuesday part two is definitely happening. when you consider how many people have been defeated by the novel of dune, i think they've done a terrificjob.
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as i said last week on the show, the massive space worms are really impressive. i mean that as a compliment. and best reissue? yeah, seven samurai is back in seminaries as part of the bfi's japan season. this is curacao's masterpiece was that many people know because it's the film that inspired magnificent seven. back on the big screen. a great reason to go back to the cinema, every one's seen seven samurai but see it projected, on a big screen is really fabulous. it still looks as exciting and thrilling as it did when it first came out and it is fantastically influential. why, why is it so influential? because it's good. it literally comes down to that. because it's good. it is a brilliant story well told ab and story which is been retold in so many different genres. so it's the source well. and it works because it's a really well—made film. i think the secret to cinema is that simple, good films endure. if only everybody can make a good film. yeah. if only it was that simple.
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mark, thank you very much indeed. that is it for this week. thank you all for watching, goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: there is nothing that england cricket fans like more than a victory over the aussies. yes, en . land victory over the aussies. yes, england looking _ victory over the aussies. yes, england looking fantastic i victory over the aussies. yes, england looking fantastic at i victory over the aussies. 1a: england looking fantastic at this t20 world cup. they are hoping to
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become the first team to hold the t20 world cup title and the 50 over title at the same time, they won that in 2019. can they win this? england are on the verge of the t20 world cup semi—finals after absolutely hammering australia by eight wickets. it keeps up england's100% start to the tournament, but this was a standout win against the side they'll face in the ashes from december. joe lynskey reports. in cricket, unrelenting schedule, there is one standout fixture. this year, england hope australia bring out the best in them. itruihat year, england hope australia bring out the best in them.— year, england hope australia bring out the best in them. what a catch! chris woakes! _ out the best in them. what a catch! chris woakes! it _ out the best in them. what a catch! chris woakes! it often _ out the best in them. what a catch! chris woakes! it often takes - out the best in them. what a catch! chris woakes! it often takes the i chris woakes! it often takes the extraordinary — chris woakes! it often takes the extraordinary to _ chris woakes! it often takes the extraordinary to remove - chris woakes! it often takes the extraordinary to remove steve l chris woakes! it often takes the i extraordinary to remove steve smith. he is the ashes batsmen england have found so hard to get out. but this time of the wickets were easy to find. at one stage they were 21—4, and staggering to the last ball. australia bowled out for 125. the winter's ashes test will look different to this match. t20 cricket
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is made for batsmen, likejos buttler, who with one flick of the wrists found the dubai skies. five times he launched a six into the stands, 50 runs injust 25 balls. jos buttler is in a hurry to get back to the hotel. jos buttler is in a hurry to get back to the hotel.— jos buttler is in a hurry to get back to the hotel. this was england at their dominant _ back to the hotel. this was england at their dominant best. _ back to the hotel. this was england at their dominant best. they - back to the hotel. this was england at their dominant best. they made | at their dominant best. they made the chase with eight overs to spare. they have now won all three world cup games at a canter, but to do so like this against australia means that much more. england than on the verge of the semifinals after thrashing australia in dubai. all out for 125 with the help of this stunning catch by chris woakes. we are showing you this again, if you haven't had enough of it, england fans, you get to experience it all over again. they will face australia in test format in december and it may not be as straightforward. you are getting
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your money's worth, england fans. shall we move on and talk about manchester united? this is not me avoiding talking about manchester united winning, i promise you. relief for manchester united manager 0le gunnar solskjaer as his side beat tottenham 3—0 to relieve some pressure. goals from cristiano ronaldo, edinson cavani and this one from marcus rashford wrapped up a convincing win as united bounced back from their 5—0 defeat against liverpool. it is always going to be in the history books. it is going to be one of the darkest days any of us involved in... and it is going to feel like a dark spot on our cv, of course, but football becomes history so quick. you've got to look forward. you have got to make sure you are ready for the next one. manchester city unexpectedly lost ground in the title race as they lost 2—0 at home to crystal palace. not a good day for city defender aymeric laporte, who was caught in possession as palace scored their first goal through wilfried za ha. laporte was later sent off. palace go 13th. city are third, two points behind liverpool and five behind leaders chelsea.
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liverpool also dropped points as brighton came back from 2—0 down to draw 2—2 at anfield. liverpool were two up inside 25 minutes thanks tojordan henderson and sadio mane here, but after mane had a third ruled out for offside, brighton hit back. enock mwepu scored just before half—time, and then a well taken goal from leandro trossard earned a deserved draw for graham potter's side. i don't want to take anything away from them, i respect what they did. but today was the day when we could have given it a proper knock, and we didn't do it. i am not that diet that says it is impossible to draw against brighton, but my disappointment is that i know today is the day where we could have given them a proper one, and we didn't do it. that is the frustration. chelsea maintained their position at the top of the table after beating newcastle 3—0 at a packed stjames' park. newcastle were playing at home for the first time since parting
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company with steve bruce. all the goals came in the last 25 minutes. england defender reece james scored twice before jorginho added a penalty. manager thomas tuchel says he isn't focusing on their title rivals dropping points. i believe what goes around comes around, so i don't feel happy to celebrate other performances, other results. we should be focused on us. there is still a long way to go. we know what we need to consistently produce to be able to have results, and it is not the moment — never the moment, honestly — to be happy about other people, other teams dropping points. rangers can go four points clear at the top of the scottish premiership with a win at motherwell later today. celtic missed the chance to go top yesterday. they were held to a goalless draw at home to livingston after giorgos giakou—makis saw his injury—time penalty saved.
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wales were overwhelmed by new zealand in their first match of the autumn internationals. they haven't beaten the all blacks since 1953, and their quest for victory continues as they were thrashed 54-16. it was an important match for welsh captain alun wynjones as he became the most capped player of all time, with 149 appearances. unfortunately he was subbed after 18 minutes with what looked like a shoulder injury. without many key players, wales were outplayed by new zealand, beauden barrett sealing the victory with this try. meanwhile scotland cruised to victory over tonga. rufus mclean crashed over twice on his debut, the first came in the seventh minute. kyle steen then added four of his own to become the first scotland player to score four tries in a match for over 25 years. leicester tigers won again to stay top of the premiership. the leaders beat local rivals northampton saints 55—26 to make it seven wins from seven. fijian nemani nadolo
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went over twice. eventually — after a stumble here. there were also wins for wasps, bristol and worcester. england's women begin their autumn international campaign with a tough match against new zealand today. despite the rivalry between the two sides, many of the england squad will be facing the black ferns for the first time, and that intimidating haka. but captain sarah hunter says they won't allow it to affect their focus. it is important in terms of how we respect what they are doing, but also how we want to maybe, like, sort of lay down our challenge or how we want to face it in terms of more to do with our preparation, so how do we want to take it on board while still staying focused on what we are about to do. so yes, it certainly has been a discussion point. finally, as far as famous owners go, wrexham football club have a pretty
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star studded line—up, it's fair to say. actors ryan reynolds and rob mcelhenney took over the welsh side back in february. yesterday they watched them play a home game for the first time. the pair have previously said their big dream would be to reach the premier league. small steps — wrexham were held to a 1—1 draw by torquay. an exciting time for their fans, hollywood owners. a long way to go, but the journey starts somewhere. ambitions for premier league, though maybe not this season. full promotion _ maybe not this season. full promotion is _ maybe not this season. full promotion is some - maybe not this season. full promotion is some way off. maybe not this season. full- promotion is some way off. dare to dream. air quality is one of the top issues on the agenda at the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow, with china, india, russia and the united states already named as the biggest polluters on the planet. however, questions remain around how to achieve net zero emission targets. 0ur bbc correspondents can explain the challenges facing these four countries.
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the team coming from china is arguably the most important group of people heading to glasgow. china is the world's biggest emitter of carbon in absolute terms, in this country is still very much in the depths of dealing with the aftermath of decades of burning coal to fuel its phenomenal economic growth. but at the same time, it is now at the forefront of developing and manufacturing renewables technology like solar. china's leader, xi jinping, almost certainly won't be in scotland, but that probably has more to do with the threat of covid. he hasn't left this country for more than 20 months now. instead, another man will be in charge. china has committed to start reducing its carbon emissions by 2030 or possibly before. it was to be net zero on emissions by 2060. but the big questions for him around the
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scottish tables will be when, specifically, will china start to reduce its emissions? what will the actual number be in terms of the peak? and then after that, how quickly will china start to reduce the amount of carbon is pumping out from cities like this in this country? prime minister modi along with a senior delegation will be present at the summit. there are huge expectations from india as it remains the third largest emitter and is yet to commit to a net zero deadline. the country is still heavily reliant on fossil fuels. for instance, 70% of the country's power is generated by coal. at the summit, new delhi is expected to reiterate its position that rich countries must compensate the poor and developing nations, and also help them get easier access to clean alternative technologies. even as the summit gets under way, the worrying fact is india is the world's third most polluted country, and delhi, where i am, is the world's most polluted capital city.
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it is now clear that the russian president, vladimir putin, will not be attending the conference in person. this apparently due to concerns about coronavirus, and instead a deputy minister will go to glasgow to take part in the meeting. now, in terms of climate change, russia is feeling the effect. for example, in siberia, there have been very, very serious wildfires. they have had record numbers of fires, and also there is a concern about a release of methane as the permafrost melts, then methane is now going up into the atmosphere. president biden has made fighting climate change atop priority. he wants to reposition the us as a world leader on this issue, and already has been reversing donald trump's rollback on climate regulations. he has pledged
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net zero emissions no later than by 2050. to do that he has been pledging an ambitious agenda to switch to green energy. that includes around $500 billion in incentives to encourage clean energy. but because of political opposition he was forced to drop the key provision, which is penalising the polluters. so his plan has lost punch. it is mostly carrots now, not really stick. however, it is the largest investment that any us government would have ever made in terms of combating climate change, and that is something that mr biden will be emphasising in glasgow. it is going to be very interesting, and you are off there tomorrow. yes. and you are off there tomorrow. yes, and you are off there tomorrow. yes, and as we were _ and you are off there tomorrow. yes, and as we were hearing _ and you are off there tomorrow. yes and as we were hearing from our correspondence, each country has a different priority. coming to an agreement that is tangible and will make a difference will be complicated. but as we say, you have to try. brute complicated. but as we say, you have tot . ~ . ~ complicated. but as we say, you have tot . ~ ., ,, ., complicated. but as we say, you have tot .~ .,~ ., to try. we will talk more about it durin: to try. we will talk more about it during the _ to try. we will talk more about it during the course _ to try. we will talk more about it during the course of— to try. we will talk more about it during the course of the - to try. we will talk more about it i during the course of the programme. of course, it all plays into the of course, it all plays into the effects on the weather. sarah has the forecast. effects on the weather. sarah has the forecast-— effects on the weather. sarah has the forecast. good morning to you, ro . er the forecast. good morning to you, roaer and the forecast. good morning to you,
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roger and nina. _ the forecast. good morning to you, roger and nina. we _ the forecast. good morning to you, roger and nina. we have _ the forecast. good morning to you, roger and nina. we have had i the forecast. good morning to you, roger and nina. we have had a i the forecast. good morning to you, roger and nina. we have had a lot| the forecast. good morning to you, i roger and nina. we have had a lot of wet weather in recent days, flooding problems across parts of north—west england, wales, parts of scotland as well. there are still some flood warnings in force. today there is more rain on the cards, but it is going to be quite a windy day, so the rain will move through relatively quickly. there are yellow warnings in force from the met office for heavy rain for some of us. a bit of sunshine around as well. it won't be raining all day is that rainfall moves its way gradually north eastwards across the uk. it has been piling in for the past few hours on this low pressure system. you can see the kohler cloud associated with that on the satellite image. it has been raining overnight across northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england. that rain now pushing into southwest scotland, north england, in the south—east as well. this area of rain quite heavy at times, the green colours indicating quite torrential bursts. that makes its way northwards and eastwards. really windy conditions, gail is likely around some piracy coasts and through the english channel as well. scattered showers rolling on behind the main rain band. the blustery
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day, gust of wind 50 mph close to the coast. some sunshine around, particularly for sensual and eastern parts, and temperatures between ten and 14 degrees. not far off what we would expect for this time of year, but not as cold as it has been. if you have plans to take the kids trick—or—treating, it'll be about dodging those showers. plenty of blustery showers rattling in, particularly for the northern half of the uk, through the course of tonight. some quite heavy bursts of rain in the north—west as we move through into monday morning. with the clear spells, temperatures will be down into mid— single figures. probably still frost free at this stage. heading through into monday, low pressure sitting in the north of the uk, winds rotating around that. they will start to come in from a more north—westerly direction and you can see the yellow colours moving away. things will turn quite a bit colder. to start monday, another blustery day. some heavy rain for the west of scotland, north—west england as well. areas that have still got some flood
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warnings in force, or wet weather as we head through the day tomorrow. further south it is looking drier, with sunshine and scattered showers around. heading on into the middle part of the week, low pressure to the north of the uk. the wind is coming in from the north—west, bringing a drier spell of weather through the week, but also cooler as well. as winds fall a bit lighter, well. as winds fall a bit lighter, we will start to see a return to overnight frost. something we have not seen for many areas for quite awhile. through the week, it is looking a little bit drier and more settled after the next couple of fairly unsettled days, but you will notice a dip in the temperature by day and by night as well. i will leave you with this picture. this was last night's aurora borealis from aberdeenshire. absolutely stunning, and many of our weather watchers were out last night. maybe you caught a glimpse where you are if you had clear skies. it just look spectacular. —— itjust look spectacular. —— looks. the mastermind puppeteers behind the celebrated play war horse have
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created a life sized elephant for the royal shakespeare company's new musical. "the magician's elephant" is the first production to run at the theatre since march 2020 when lockdown restrictions began. joan cummins reports. the rsc has welcome some giants of the stage over the years but could this african elephant puppet one of biggest yet? this this african elephant puppet one of bi est et? , ,., this african elephant puppet one of biggest yet?— this african elephant puppet one of binest et? , ,., ., biggest yet? this is a young female african elephant, _ biggest yet? this is a young female african elephant, life-sized. - biggest yet? this is a young female african elephant, life-sized. they l african elephant, life—sized. they do get bigger. african elephant, life-sized. they do get bigger-— african elephant, life-sized. they do get bigger. simply referred to as the elephant- _ do get bigger. simply referred to as the elephant. this _ do get bigger. simply referred to as the elephant. this enormous - do get bigger. simply referred to as| the elephant. this enormous puppet is the centrepiece of the rsc's new play, the magician's elephant. to the actors worry about being upstaged?—
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the actors worry about being upstaged? the actors worry about being ustaaed? ., �* ., ., ., upstaged? you can't have an ego if ou are upstaged? you can't have an ego if you are going _ upstaged? you can't have an ego if you are going to — upstaged? you can't have an ego if you are going to be _ upstaged? you can't have an ego if you are going to be working - upstaged? you can't have an ego if you are going to be working with i upstaged? you can't have an ego if| you are going to be working with an elephant. i think elephant, it is huge. it is hard for me not to be just completely enchanted by it all the time, to be honest. it, she, is amazing. the time, to be honest. it, she, is amazinu. . , the time, to be honest. it, she, is amazin.. . _ ., amazing. created by the same team behind war horse, _ amazing. created by the same team behind war horse, creators - amazing. created by the same team behind war horse, creators say i amazing. created by the same team behind war horse, creators say this | behind war horse, creators say this elephant is a feat of engineering but it is her place in our imagination they are proudest offer. this kind of puppet starts with anatomy studies, really. we look at real elephants, look at skeletons, videos. it is there to invite you to imagine an elephant and what the puppeteers do on stage on the night is to come onstage and say to the audience, imagine that this is real, imagine that this is alive and that is a sort of, special sort of theatre magic.— is a sort of, special sort of theatre magic. is a sort of, special sort of theatre manic. �* ~ .,, theatre magic. but like most wild animals, theatre magic. but like most wild animals. they _ theatre magic. but like most wild animals, they are _
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theatre magic. but like most wild animals, they are not easily i theatre magic. but like most wild. animals, they are not easily tamed was puppeteers animals, they are not easily tamed puppeteers aren't easily contained either. you are wondering what they are doing when they have gone backstage. there she is finding some cauliflowers. jean backstage. there she is finding some cauliflowers-— cauliflowers. joan cummins, bbc news. the attention to detail. did you see war horse? — the attention to detail. did you see war horse? no _ the attention to detail. did you see war horse? no but _ the attention to detail. did you see war horse? no but it _ the attention to detail. did you see war horse? no but it came - the attention to detail. did you see war horse? no but it came here i the attention to detail. did you see war horse? no but it came here to | war horse? no but it came here to the breakfast _ war horse? no but it came here to the breakfast studio. _ war horse? no but it came here to the breakfast studio. did _ war horse? no but it came here to the breakfast studio. did it? - now on breakfastjeremy cooke explores the link between mental health and living with obesity. i feel weak, ifeel weak, i i feel weak, i feel like a failure because i can't lose weight. that's it. ., ., , because i can't lose weight. that's it. for thousands across the uk, livin: it. for thousands across the uk, living with _ it. for thousands across the uk, living with obesity _ it. for thousands across the uk, living with obesity can _ it. for thousands across the uk, living with obesity can be - it. for thousands across the uk, living with obesity can be hard, l living with obesity can be hard, physically and mentally. i living with obesity can be hard,
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physically and mentally.- living with obesity can be hard, physically and mentally. i think if ou are physically and mentally. i think if you are living _ physically and mentally. i think if you are living with _ physically and mentally. i think if you are living with severe - physically and mentally. i think if you are living with severe chronic obesity than it's highly likely that you will have a mental health difficulty. you will have a mental health difficul . , , ., you will have a mental health difficul. ,, .,, _ you will have a mental health difficul. ,, .,, difficulty. this is not simply about lifes le difficulty. this is not simply about lifestyle choices, _ difficulty. this is not simply about lifestyle choices, it _ difficulty. this is not simply about lifestyle choices, it is _ difficulty. this is not simply about lifestyle choices, it is a _ difficulty. this is not simply about lifestyle choices, it is a tangled i lifestyle choices, it is a tangled mix of genetics, environment and emotion. ., ., . , mix of genetics, environment and emotion. ., , , , mix of genetics, environment and emotion. .,, , , ., ,, ,, emotion. food has been my happiness for 15 years — emotion. food has been my happiness for 15 years and _ emotion. food has been my happiness for 15 years. and new _ emotion. food has been my happiness for 15 years. and new research - emotion. food has been my happiness for 15 years. and new research has - for 15 years. and new research has found a link _ for 15 years. and new research has found a link between _ for 15 years. and new research has found a link between obesity - for 15 years. and new research has found a link between obesity and l found a link between obesity and feelings of despair and shame. i didn't realise i had self—confidence issues, i thought i was just an introvert and that was that. but we'll also see — introvert and that was that. but we'll also see how for some, the most advanced treatments can offer a fresh start. india is 28 and she has lived with obesity for most of her life. the first time i _ obesity for most of her life. iie: first time i remember leading starting i was injunior school, all through senior school, just got e—mails that used to go around about
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me. oh, she is really fat, she is really ugly. you know, it was horrible. portion sizes are going to be the biggest thing. mi horrible. portion sizes are going to be the biggest thing.— be the biggest thing. all of that, the stiuma be the biggest thing. all of that, the stigma that _ be the biggest thing. all of that, the stigma that comes _ be the biggest thing. all of that, the stigma that comes with - be the biggest thing. all of that, i the stigma that comes with obesity leave deep mental health scars. are you sad a lot of the time?— you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time. you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time- why? _ you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time. why? because _ you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time. why? because i - you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time. why? because ijust, - you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time. why? because ijust, i. the time. why? because i 'ust, i don't the time. why? because i 'ust, i am like — the time. why? because i 'ust, i don't like myself. i the time. why? because i 'ust, i don't like myself. neverh the time. why? because ijust, i don't like myself. never have i the time. why? because ijust, i don't like myself. never have done. that's such an awful thing to hear. so we have the gastric beginners cook book. for so we have the gastric beginners cook lrook-— cook book. for india very is a hormone _ cook book. for india very is a hormone problem _ cook book. for india very is a hormone problem and - cook book. for india very is a hormone problem and a - hormone problem and a complex relationship with food. the hormone problem and a complex relationship with food.— relationship with food. the full li . uid relationship with food. the full liquid diet- _ relationship with food. the full liquid diet. so _ relationship with food. the full liquid diet. so that _ relationship with food. the full liquid diet. so that is - relationship with food. the full liquid diet. so that is going - relationship with food. the full liquid diet. so that is going to | relationship with food. the full l liquid diet. so that is going to be the first four _ liquid diet. so that is going to be the first four weeks, _ liquid diet. so that is going to be the first four weeks, or? - liquid diet. so that is going to be the first four weeks, or? i - liquid diet. so that is going to be the first four weeks, or? i let - liquid diet. so that is going to be the first four weeks, or? i let my mental health _ the first four weeks, or? i let my mental health get _ the first four weeks, or? i let my mental health get the _ the first four weeks, or? i let my mental health get the better - the first four weeks, or? i let my mental health get the better of l the first four weeks, or? i let my l mental health get the better of me and i let that turn to food and once i got there, every time i would eat, every time i would feel better, just for those 30 seconds, i would always feel worse afterwards because i'd
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end up putting on weight. laughs. it wasjust a vicious end up putting on weight. laughs. it was just a vicious cycle. we end up putting on weight. laughs. it wasjust a vicious cycle.— was 'ust a vicious cycle. we first met wasjust a vicious cycle. we first met india _ wasjust a vicious cycle. we first met india in _ wasjust a vicious cycle. we first met india in a _ wasjust a vicious cycle. we first met india in a hospital- wasjust a vicious cycle. we first met india in a hospital when - wasjust a vicious cycle. we first| met india in a hospital when she wasjust a vicious cycle. we first - met india in a hospital when she was thinking about bariatric surgery. that is where most of the stomach is removed to trigger dramatic weight loss. ~ ., removed to trigger dramatic weight loss. ~ . , ., removed to trigger dramatic weight loss. ~ ., , ., ., removed to trigger dramatic weight loss. ~ ., ., ., removed to trigger dramatic weight loss. ., ., ., loss. what you want to change? everything- _ loss. what you want to change? everything. happiness, - loss. what you want to change? everything. happiness, weight. loss. what you want to change? - everything. happiness, weight loss. ijust think i'm going to be happy and comfortable for the first time in a very long time. that and comfortable for the first time in a very long time.— and comfortable for the first time in a very long time. that was in two ma and in a very long time. that was in two may and a — in a very long time. that was in two may and a month _ in a very long time. that was in two may and a month later, _ in a very long time. that was in two may and a month later, a _ in a very long time. that was in two may and a month later, a big - may and a month later, a big decision. india's been approved for the surgery on the nhs. after all the surgery on the nhs. after all the counselling and all of the failed diets.— the counselling and all of the failed diets. i'm really excited. i'm really _ failed diets. i'm really excited. i'm really looking _ failed diets. i'm really excited. i'm really looking forward - failed diets. i'm really excited. i'm really looking forward to i failed diets. i'm really excited. | i'm really looking forward to the future and the next minute i'm really sad. i'm really nervous. i kind ofjust what really sad. i'm really nervous. i kind of just what this really sad. i'm really nervous. i kind ofjust what this phase to be over. good girl. i've got some great support— good girl. i've got some great support around me. my husband's
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fantastic — support around me. my husband's fantastic. come on then, this way. at home _ fantastic. come on then, this way. at home in — fantastic. come on then, this way. at home in sussex, life for alex is good _ at home in sussex, life for alex is good she — at home in sussex, life for alex is good she is — at home in sussex, life for alex is good. she is a career woman, at home in sussex, life for alex is good. she is a careerwoman, a mum, living _ good. she is a careerwoman, a mum, living a— good. she is a careerwoman, a mum, living a comfortable family life. but — you can logically look at your life, i've achieved this, i'm great at this, _ i've achieved this, i'm great at this, but— i've achieved this, i'm great at this, but that's irrelevant, you know? — this, but that's irrelevant, you know? because there is something in my head _ know? because there is something in my head saying to me it doesn't matter. — my head saying to me it doesn't matter, young still fat, you can't lose weight, you're failure. it is soul— lose weight, you're failure. it is soul destroying.— lose weight, you're failure. it is soul destroying. soul destroying because for _ soul destroying. soul destroying because for some, _ soul destroying. soul destroying because for some, living - soul destroying. soul destroying because for some, living with i because for some, living with obesity the eat less move more mantra of weight loss doesn't work. scientists say their bodies are preprogrammed to store fat and they can feel that they are set up to fail. ii can feel that they are set up to fail. , ., ., ., ~ , , fail. if you are waking up every sinale fail. if you are waking up every single day _ fail. if you are waking up every single day saying _ fail. if you are waking up every single day saying you - fail. if you are waking up every single day saying you are - fail. if you are waking up every single day saying you are not l single day saying you are not normal, _ single day saying you are not normal, you are too fat, you should be able _ normal, you are too fat, you should be able to _ normal, you are too fat, you should be able to do— normal, you are too fat, you should be able to do something about this, they told _ be able to do something about this, they told you if you would eat well and exercise, they told you if you
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live a _ and exercise, they told you if you live a healthy life that you can lose _ live a healthy life that you can lose weight and when that doesn't happen, _ lose weight and when that doesn't happen, you think well, why? what have i_ happen, you think well, why? what have i done — happen, you think well, why? what have i done wrong? and you blame yourself _ have i done wrong? and you blame ourself. . , ., have i done wrong? and you blame ourself. ,, , . ., , , yourself. self blame, embarrassment, shame. research _ yourself. self blame, embarrassment, shame. research suggests _ yourself. self blame, embarrassment, shame. research suggests people - shame. research suggests people living with obesity are more likely to live with mental health problems. the experience of living with obesity is a very significant factor that contributes to the development of psychological difficulties. many people experience difficulties with anxiety and depression, social anxiety and depression, social anxiety and depression, social anxiety and eating difficulties. hello, you look great! four weeks since the operation. _ hello, you look great! four weeks since the operation. india - hello, you look great! four weeks since the operation. india is - since the operation. india is recovering _ since the operation. india is recovering from _ since the operation. india is recovering from the - since the operation. india is l recovering from the operation since the operation. india is - recovering from the operation that removed most of her stomach. you have five incisions. _ removed most of her stomach. gm, have five incisions. 0ne up here, have five incisions. one up here, one there... have five incisions. one up here, one there- - -_ have five incisions. one up here, one there. . .- one _ have five incisions. one up here, one there... yes. one this side and one there... yes. one this side and
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one that side _ one there... yes. one this side and one that side and _ one there... yes. one this side and one that side and this one is the main one, this is the one they pulled the stomach out of will stop her stomach is now the size of a pen. it her stomach is now the size of a en. . , her stomach is now the size of a en. . y ., .. her stomach is now the size of a en. , , .,~ her stomach is now the size of a en, . . ., ., .. ~' . pen. it is tiny. her food intake is minuscule- _ pen. it is tiny. her food intake is minuscule. a _ pen. it is tiny. her food intake is minuscule. a meeting _ pen. it is tiny. her food intake is minuscule. a meeting half- pen. it is tiny. her food intake is minuscule. a meeting half a - pen. it is tiny. her food intake is minuscule. a meeting half a tub| pen. it is tiny. her food intake is l minuscule. a meeting half a tub of this and it is _ minuscule. a meeting half a tub of this and it is lasting _ minuscule. a meeting half a tub of this and it is lasting me _ minuscule. a meeting half a tub of this and it is lasting me 15 - minuscule. a meeting half a tub of this and it is lasting me 15 minutes because i have to eat it so slowly. how are you mentally? honestly? low. really low. it how are you mentally? honestly? low. reall low. . ~ , ., really low. it feels like your relationship _ really low. it feels like your relationship with _ really low. it feels like your relationship with food - really low. it feels like your relationship with food is - really low. it feels like your - relationship with food is completely different. it’s relationship with food is completely different. �* . .. relationship with food is completely different. �* , ., �* , different. it's not there. it's non-existent. _ different. it's not there. it's non-existent. i— different. it's not there. it's non-existent. i don't - different. it's not there. it's non-existent. i don't enjoy| different. it's not there. it's - non-existent. i don't enjoy eating non—existent. i don't enjoy eating anymore. for me, personally, the loss of food, i'm grieving the loss of the food and that's why i'm so low. because that's... food has been my happiness for 15 years. did low. because that's... food has been my happiness for 15 years.— my happiness for 15 years. did you ever find yourself _ my happiness for 15 years. did you ever find yourself even _ my happiness for 15 years. did you ever find yourself even for - my happiness for 15 years. did you ever find yourself even for a - my happiness for 15 years. did you i ever find yourself even for a moment thinking oh, i wish i'd never done this. . . , you
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this. yeah. yeah. only fleeting. you know what i — this. yeah. yeah. only fleeting. you know what i think? _ this. yeah. yeah. only fleeting. you know what i think? i _ this. yeah. yeah. only fleeting. you know what i think? i think _ this. yeah. yeah. only fleeting. you know what i think? i think you - this. yeah. yeah. only fleeting. you know what i think? i think you are i know what i think? i think you are an absolute the idea you have had the sheer courage to open your door to us and let us into see you now i think that when we come and see you... it think that when we come and see ou. .. . . think that when we come and see ou... , ., .,. , you... it will be a totally different _ you... it will be a totally different story. - you... it will be a totally different story. my - you... it will be a totally| different story. my name you... it will be a totally i different story. my name is you... it will be a totally - different story. my name is tom, you... it will be a totally _ different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day — different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day was _ different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day was 34 _ different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day was 34 stone. - different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day was 34 stone. tom - different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day was 34 stone. tom is i different story. my name is tom, my heaviest day was 34 stone. tom is a | heaviest day was 34 stone. tom is a lot further down _ heaviest day was 34 stone. tom is a lot further down the _ heaviest day was 34 stone. tom is a lot further down the line. _ heaviest day was 34 stone. tom is a lot further down the line. his - lot further down the line. his bariatric surgery was four years ago and it came after constant cycles of exercise and diets thatjust didn't work. exercise and diets that 'ust didn't work. .. exercise and diets that 'ust didn't work. ., .. exercise and diets that 'ust didn't work. ., ., .. exercise and diets that 'ust didn't work. ., ., ., , .. exercise and diets that 'ust didn't work. .. ., ., . ., it work. you need to do it slower. it has been physically _ work. you need to do it slower. it has been physically and _ work. you need to do it slower. it has been physically and mentally| has been physically and mentally exhausting. i has been physically and mentally exhausting-— exhausting. i didn't know at the time i suffered _ exhausting. i didn't know at the time i suffered with _ exhausting. i didn't know at the | time i suffered with depression. exhausting. i didn't know at the i time i suffered with depression. i didn't— time i suffered with depression. i didn't know it was a thing. my mental— didn't know it was a thing. my mental health could kind ofjust stop me — mental health could kind ofjust stop me in my tracks. you wake up and i_ stop me in my tracks. you wake up and i don't — stop me in my tracks. you wake up and i don't want to get up, i don't want _ and i don't want to get up, i don't want to— and i don't want to get up, i don't want to speak to people, i don't want _ want to speak to people, i don't want to— want to speak to people, i don't want to go— want to speak to people, i don't want to go up. it want to speak to people, i don't want to go up-— want to speak to people, i don't wanttou-ou. ., , want to go up. it cost him thousands but for tom — want to go up. it cost him thousands but for tom the _ want to go up. it cost him thousands but for tom the bariatric _ want to go up. it cost him thousands but for tom the bariatric surgery - but for tom the bariatric surgery has had a dramatic impact. from 34 to 16 stone. a total game changer. i
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felt immeasurably different. life 'ust felt immeasurably different. life just seemed easier to stop do you look at _ just seemed easier to stop do you look at life — just seemed easier to stop do you look at life before and laughed afterm — look at life before and laughed after... they are completely different _ after... they are completely different lives. after. .. they are completely different lives.— after... they are completely different lives. but with obesity, thins different lives. but with obesity, thin . s are different lives. but with obesity, things are seldom _ different lives. but with obesity, things are seldom simple. - different lives. but with obesity, things are seldom simple. for i different lives. but with obesity, - things are seldom simple. for tom, losing i8 things are seldom simple. for tom, losing 18 stone brings new problems. so the biggest thing i got going for me now— so the biggest thing i got going for me now is — so the biggest thing i got going for me now is that i have a fair amount of excess _ me now is that i have a fair amount of excess skin. i've gone through all of— of excess skin. i've gone through all of this— of excess skin. i've gone through all of this effort and i still can't this t—shirt out of my wardrobe and 'ust this t—shirt out of my wardrobe and just wear— this t—shirt out of my wardrobe and just wear it. — this t—shirt out of my wardrobe and just wear it. i— this t—shirt out of my wardrobe and just wear it, i have to have this compression top on.— just wear it, i have to have this compression top on. tom is clearly self-conscious _ compression top on. tom is clearly self-conscious about _ compression top on. tom is clearly self-conscious about the _ compression top on. tom is clearly self-conscious about the excess i self—conscious about the excess skin. self-conscious about the excess skin. . self-conscious about the excess skin. , , ~ self-conscious about the excess skin. . , ~ ., skin. here there is 'ust kind of skin. here there is 'ust kind of skin. it willh skin. here there is 'ust kind of skin. it will cost _ skin. here there isjust kind of skin. it will cost him _ skin. here there isjust kind of skin. it will cost him excess i skin. here there isjust kind of skin. it will cost him excess of £20,000- _ skin. it will cost him excess of £20,000- step _ skin. it will cost him excess of £20,000. step two _ skin. it will cost him excess of £20,000. step two of - skin. it will cost him excess of £20,000. step two of the - skin. it will cost him excess of - £20,000. step two of the operation would be to — £20,000. step two of the operation would be to pull— £20,000. step two of the operation would be to pull the _ £20,000. step two of the operation would be to pull the skin _ £20,000. step two of the operation would be to pull the skin tight. - £20,000. step two of the operation would be to pull the skin tight. butl would be to pull the skin tight. but he wants would be to pull the skin tight. he wants it would be to pull the skin tight. pm he wants it gone, for his confidence and his self—esteem. that he wants it gone, for his confidence and his self-esteem.— and his self-esteem. that kind of 'ust and his self-esteem. that kind of just creeps _ and his self-esteem. that kind of just creeps into _ and his self-esteem. that kind of just creeps into my _ and his self-esteem. that kind of just creeps into my thoughts - and his self-esteem. that kind of - just creeps into my thoughts because that is— just creeps into my thoughts because that is one _ just creeps into my thoughts because that is one of the things that gets in my— that is one of the things that gets in my way. — that is one of the things that gets in my way, i'm just sat there thinking _ in my way, i'm just sat there thinking you know, i'd like to get rid of— thinking you know, i'd like to get
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rid of this — thinking you know, i'd like to get rid of this. thinking you know, i'd like to get rid of this-— rid of this. clever girl. your life is so much _ rid of this. clever girl. your life is so much free, _ rid of this. clever girl. your life is so much free, isn't _ rid of this. clever girl. your life is so much free, isn't it, - rid of this. clever girl. your life is so much free, isn't it, it - rid of this. clever girl. your life i is so much free, isn't it, it seems to me. i is so much free, isn't it, it seems to me. .. is so much free, isn't it, it seems to me. ., ., , ., ., to me. i can go anywhere and do anything- — to me. i can go anywhere and do anything- tom — to me. i can go anywhere and do anything. tom is _ to me. i can go anywhere and do anything. tom is saving - to me. i can go anywhere and do anything. tom is saving hard - to me. i can go anywhere and do anything. tom is saving hard for| to me. i can go anywhere and do i anything. tom is saving hard for the surue , anything. tom is saving hard for the surgery. hoping. _ anything. tom is saving hard for the surgery, hoping, finally, _ anything. tom is saving hard for the surgery, hoping, finally, for- anything. tom is saving hard for the surgery, hoping, finally, for peace l surgery, hoping, finally, for peace of mind. i surgery, hoping, finally, for peace of mind. . . ~ surgery, hoping, finally, for peace of mind. .. . ~ ., surgery, hoping, finally, for peace of mind. .. ~ ., . of mind. i was thinking how nice it would be to _ of mind. i was thinking how nice it would be to actually _ of mind. i was thinking how nice it would be to actually post - of mind. i was thinking how nice it would be to actually post that i of mind. i was thinking how nice it i would be to actually post that photo and go. _ would be to actually post that photo and go, you know, i did it, this is now— and go, you know, i did it, this is now where — and go, you know, i did it, this is now where i'm at. the and go, you know, i did it, this is now where i'm at.— and go, you know, i did it, this is now where i'm at. the link between obesity and — now where i'm at. the link between obesity and mental _ now where i'm at. the link between obesity and mental health - now where i'm at. the link between obesity and mental health is - obesity and mental health is complex. it can be both cause and effect. add in genetic, biology and a modern food culture and you get an issue that impacts thousands across the uk. i issue that impacts thousands across the uk. .. issue that impacts thousands across the uk. ., ,., , issue that impacts thousands across the uk. ., ., issue that impacts thousands across theuk. ., ., ,, ., the uk. i would say that access to mental healthcare _ the uk. i would say that access to mental healthcare is _ the uk. i would say that access to mental healthcare is very - the uk. i would say that access to mental healthcare is very patchy i the uk. i would say that access to l mental healthcare is very patchy for people, particularly in weight management services stop that can be a form of stigma, i think, that people are often left struggling with these difficulties that are struggling to their obesity and don't have access to the treatments that might help. don't have access to the treatments that might help-— that might help. well, it's been a while. i know, _ that might help. well, it's been a while. i know, how— that might help. well, it's been a while. i know, how have - that might help. well, it's been a while. i know, how have you i that might help. well, it's been a l while. i know, how have you been? i've been all—
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while. i know, how have you been? i've been all right. _ while. i know, how have you been? i've been all right. how— while. i know, how have you been? i've been all right. how have i while. i know, how have you been? i've been all right. how have you i i've been all right. how have you been, that's the point.— i've been all right. how have you been, that's the point. yeah, i've been, that's the point. yeah, i've been all right. _ been, that's the point. yeah, i've been all right. so _ been, that's the point. yeah, i've been all right. so this _ been, that's the point. yeah, i've been all right. so this was - been, that's the point. yeah, i've been all right. so this was two i been all right. so this was two weeks prior to surgery and this was the other day. i weeks prior to surgery and this was the other day-— the other day. i mean that's studying- — the other day. i mean that's studying. like, _ the other day. i mean that's studying. like, wow, i the other day. i mean that's studying. like, wow, the i the other day. i mean that's i studying. like, wow, the changes really there _ studying. like, wow, the changes really there in _ studying. like, wow, the changes really there in the _ studying. like, wow, the changes really there in the face. _ studying. like, wow, the changes really there in the face. it - studying. like, wow, the changes really there in the face. it is i studying. like, wow, the changes really there in the face. it is now| really there in the face. it is now three months _ really there in the face. it is now three months since _ really there in the face. it is now three months since india's i three months since india's operation. she has already lost four stone. six more to go. 50. operation. she has already lost four stone. six more to go.— operation. she has already lost four stone. six more to go. so, how have ou stone. six more to go. so, how have you been? — stone. six more to go. so, how have you been? yeah. _ stone. six more to go. so, how have you been? yeah, really— stone. six more to go. so, how have you been? yeah, really good, i stone. six more to go. so, how have you been? yeah, really good, really| you been? yeah, really good, really good. i rememberyou you been? yeah, really good, really good. i remember you last time you are here, i was so miserable. your smile's coming _ are here, i was so miserable. your smile's coming through _ are here, iwas so miserable. your smile's coming through now as well which is brilliant.— which is brilliant. yet, yeah. no, i do a look — which is brilliant. yet, yeah. no, i do a look in _ which is brilliant. yet, yeah. no, i do a look in the _ which is brilliant. yet, yeah. no, i do a look in the mirror _ which is brilliant. yet, yeah. no, i do a look in the mirror and - which is brilliant. yet, yeah. no, i do a look in the mirror and think. do a look in the mirror and think you don't look up bad. oi do a look in the mirror and think you don't look up bad. of course bariatric surgery _ you don't look up bad. of course bariatric surgery is _ you don't look up bad. of course bariatric surgery is not _ you don't look up bad. of course bariatric surgery is not for i bariatric surgery is not for everyone. forsome bariatric surgery is not for everyone. for some the best hope is the development of a new generation of weight loss drugs. but for india, the operation is changing everything. you look positive, you sound positive. i’m everything. you look positive, you sound positive.— everything. you look positive, you sound positive. i'm excited for the future. i sound positive. i'm excited for the future- i was _ sound positive. i'm excited for the future. i was think _ sound positive. i'm excited for the future. i was think that _ sound positive. i'm excited for the future. i was think that i _ sound positive. i'm excited for the future. i was think that i wasn't i future. i was think that i wasn't going to have a future because i went through times when i was suicidal and i don't want to live
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anymore and i didn't want to have anything to do with this but now it is completely different. totally excited. good gal!— is completely different. totally excited. good gal! through all of this it is really _ excited. good gal! through all of this it is really clear— excited. good gal! through all of this it is really clear that - excited. good gal! through all of this it is really clear that the i this it is really clear that the harshjudgement of this it is really clear that the harsh judgement of society piles of pressure on to those living with obesity. i pressure on to those living with obesi . . ~ obesity. i 'ust thinki need kindness. j_ obesity. i just think i need kindness. i— obesity. i just think i need kindness. i need - obesity. i just think i need kindness. i need kindness| obesity. i just think i need i kindness. i need kindness from others but i mostly need kindness from myself and i think that could be the help that i need. the from myself and i think that could be the help that i need.— be the help that i need. the hope for many is _ be the help that i need. the hope for many is that _ be the help that i need. the hope for many is that with _ be the help that i need. the hope for many is that with more i be the help that i need. the hope for many is that with more public| for many is that with more public understanding of obesity, stigma finally start to lift. mr; understanding of obesity, stigma finally start to lift.— finally start to lift. my biggest and was realising _ finally start to lift. my biggest and was realising that - finally start to lift. my biggest and was realising that it i finally start to lift. my biggest and was realising that it was i finally start to lift. my biggestj and was realising that it was a problem — and was realising that it was a problem that i had, that it was affecting — problem that i had, that it was affecting the decisions that i was making _ affecting the decisions that i was making in— affecting the decisions that i was making in my life and at least being able to— making in my life and at least being able to admit that to not only myself — able to admit that to not only myself but to the people around me that it _ myself but to the people around me that it also — myself but to the people around me that it also affected. it changed everything for me. | that it also affected. it changed everything for me.— everything for me. i 'ust have learned to h everything for me. i 'ust have learned to give i everything for me. i 'ust have learned to give a i everything for me. ijust have learned to give a little - everything for me. ijust have
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learned to give a little bit i everything for me. ijust have i learned to give a little bit more to myself than i did before.— learned to give a little bit more to myself than i did before. where are ou with myself than i did before. where are you with that _ myself than i did before. where are you with that now? _ myself than i did before. where are you with that now? i'm _ myself than i did before. where are you with that now? i'm getting i you with that now? i'm getting there, you with that now? i'm getting there. i'm _ you with that now? i'm getting there, i'm getting _ you with that now? i'm getting there, i'm getting there. it's i you with that now? i'm getting there, i'm getting there. it's a| there, i'm getting there. it's a long journey. there, i'm getting there. it's a longjourney. it there, i'm getting there. it's a long journey. it is years and years and years and years of change, but i'm getting there. if and years and years of change, but i'm getting there.— i'm getting there. if you have been affected by any _ i'm getting there. if you have been affected by any of— i'm getting there. if you have been affected by any of the _ i'm getting there. if you have been affected by any of the issues i i'm getting there. if you have been| affected by any of the issues raised in this programme there is more information at w ww. bbc .co .uk/ action online.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: the world's moment of truth. borisjohnson urges leaders to use their summit in glasgow to start to fix climate change. we think that we can be on a remorseless forward march, when actually, we can be actively conniving in our own decline and fall. more than 25,000 people start to flood into the city, but there are concerns about whether any agreement on limiting global warming will go far enough. health teams are to visit more than 800 secondary schools in england to offer coronavirus vaccinations to children aged 12 to 15.
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england are closing in on the semi—finals of the t20 world cup after thrashing australia by eight wickets, asjos buttler helped make it three wins out of three. good morning. low pressure in charge of our weather today, bringing us some heavy showers or longer spells of rain. there will be some sunshine mixed in, too, but it's going to feel windy for many of us through the course of the day. i will have all the details here on bbc breakfast. it is sunday 31 october. world leaders will be making their way from the g20 summit in rome to glasgow today for the start of the cop26 climate conference. before they set off, prince charles will warn them they have an overwhelming responsibility to future generations to fix the climate crisis. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is in rome. for g20 leaders, this is theirfirst time to spend time together face—to—face for almost two years.
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whether dining at the presidential palace in rome or sitting around the summit table, a chance to catch up and do deals. today their minds will turn to perhaps the most important and most necessary deal. they are expected to agree climate change is an existential threat. but so far there have been no new firm commitments to reduce carbon emissions, much to the frustration of the host of the cop26 summit. people are often very conceited about history and about our civilisation. we think that we can be on a remorseless forward march, when actually, we can be actively conniving in our own decline and fall. and what we need to do is to ensure that at the cop summit next week, the world leaders come together and make the commitments that are necessary. today he will win support from an unexpected source. the prince of wales has been invited to the summit by the italian hosts,
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and he will tell the g20 leaders they have an overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn. amidst all this, the prime minister is expected to meet the french president to discuss the continuing row over fishing rights. president to discuss the continuing row overfishing rights. the french say the boats are being squeezed out of uk waters against the post brexit rulebook. the uk disagrees and is threatening legal action, a row that shows no sign of going away. this summit will make some progress, agreeing a minimum global corporation tax and new targets to vaccinate more people in developing countries. but on tackling global warming, it is yet to live up to expectations. let's speak now to mark
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lowen, who is in rome. mark, we heard the prince of wales is one of many voices calling on world leaders to come together to tackle climate change. is there any sign they are taking any notice? good morning. the ambitions are there. question today, really, is whetherthe there. question today, really, is whether the firm commit inside there. on that, it is less clear, really, that the g20 leaders will come up with any firm new pledges to keep the goal of capping global warming at1.5 degrees keep the goal of capping global warming at 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels alive. that is the level beyond which scientists believe the effect of global warming would cause irreparable damage to the claimant. there will be pressure on the big emitters here, the biggest emitters, china and india, to produce new emissions targets known as nationally determined contributions. they have not done that. there will be pressure on the 620 that. there will be pressure on the g20 as a whole to stump up more
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money to give to poorer countries to help them curb climate change and transition to a green economy, and pressure also on countries like china, for example, whose leader is not here. he sent his foreign minister because of the covid crisis in china, on countries like that to stop coal powered plants both at home and abroad. a lot of expectations and we wait to see if there will be real movement in the press conferences at the end of the day. more than 25,000 people representing nearly 200 countries have begun arriving for that conference in glasgow. the aim of the two—week event is to commit to measures to limit the rise in global temperatures and cut emissions, as our scotand correspondent alexandra mackenzie reports. the negotiations have yet to begin, but activists have been arriving in glasgow. some walked four weeks to get here. they all want more done to
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tackle climate change. and get here. they all want more done to tackle climate change.— tackle climate change. and i walked the entire way _ tackle climate change. and i walked the entire way from _ tackle climate change. and i walked the entire way from sweden - tackle climate change. and i walked the entire way from sweden to i tackle climate change. and i walked | the entire way from sweden to hear, to bring awareness of climate. this is my way to do it. it is to bring awareness of climate. this is my way to do it.— is my way to do it. it is the question — is my way to do it. it is the question of _ is my way to do it. it is the question of our _ is my way to do it. it is the question of our time. - is my way to do it. it is the question of our time. i - is my way to do it. it is the i question of our time. i mean, is my way to do it. it is the - question of our time. i mean, we question of ourtime. i mean, we need _ question of ourtime. i mean, we need to— question of ourtime. i mean, we need to act— question of ourtime. i mean, we need to act now. i felt it was a privilege to devote four months to the climate. i'm walking for my children and my grandchildren, - my grandson, and i am demanding, - for them, a good climate. the teenager greta thunberg arrived in the city by train. she has already expressed her concern that cop26 will not lead to any significant changes. others admit it will be challenging. when you look at the science, the latest report from the intergovernmental panel on climate change is clear that the world is warming. it is human—induced, and if we do not act now, we are going to see increased floods, droughts, heatwaves, and all of us will be affected.
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glasgow will host more than 120 world leaders and up to 25,000 delegates. around 10,000 police officers will be deployed each day. for those living in the city, disruption is expected, and there are mixed feelings about the summit. i think it's really good that people are coming together about the environment, because it's, like, a really big deal right now. what are they coming here to change? i have heard it's going to increase the covid numbers, as well, - so that's obviously a bit of a worry. i the uk government is hosting the summit, and on behalf of the scottish government, nicola sturgeon welcomed everyone to glasgow. # what a wonderful world...
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as others united to get their message across, the prime minister said this could be one of the most important global gatherings this century. alexandra joins us from glasgow. we were seeing people arriving, upwards of 25,000 in the city. what is the mood like there? is it ready? goad mood like there? is it ready? good morninu. mood like there? is it ready? good morning- yes. _ mood like there? is it ready? good morning. yes, that _ mood like there? is it ready? good morning. yes, that is _ mood like there? is it ready? good morning. yes, that is a _ mood like there? is it ready? good morning. yes, that is a lot - mood like there? is it ready? good morning. yes, that is a lot of - morning. yes, that is a lot of people due to arrive and they have started arriving in glasgow. i am afraid, as you can possibly see, it is a rather wet and dark morning in glasgow. we are down by the banks of the river clyde and just opposite us here is the venue for cop26. this is a key moment for glasgow, but more crucially, this is a key moment for climate change. we have heard that borisjohnson has said that this summit is the world's moment of truth. as you said there, yes, thousands of people arriving in
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glasgow, world leaders, delegates, activists. some of them, as you saw in my peace, have been walking for weeks to get here to glasgow. and greta thunberg last night she arrived at central station was just mobbed by people. she is on the front pages of most, if not all, of the newspapers here this morning. yes, it is a lot of people to come into glasgow and i was out speaking to people on the streets yesterday. some people think it is a great opportunity, not only for the city but to highlight climate change. they hope for a good outcome. they hope that something can be done here in glasgow. for other people, they were more concerned. you heard one woman mentioned covid. the climate change conference was delayed for a year because of the pandemic, but there are concerns that the number of cases of covid could increase as
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a result of so many people coming into the city. many of the roads around where the conference is being held, including key roads, are being closed for the duration of the conference, so people are also very concerned about getting around the city and also getting between edinburgh and glasgow. a lot of people will be staying in edinburgh as well. a lot of difficulties, possibly, as well. fix, as well. a lot of difficulties, possibly, as well.— as well. a lot of difficulties, possibly, as well. a big moment nonetheless. _ possibly, as well. a big moment nonetheless. alexandra, - possibly, as well. a big moment nonetheless. alexandra, many l possibly, as well. a big moment - nonetheless. alexandra, many thanks. it is understood people have died following an incident on a river in the pembrokeshire area of west wales. dyfed—powys police say a major rescue operation was launched on the river cleddau in haverfordwest after a group of people were seen in distress. police, firefighters, coastguard, ambulance crews and four helicopters were deployed. more details are expected to be released later today. alec baldwin has described the death of a colleague on the set of his film as a one—in—a—trillion
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episode after he accidentally shot her with a prop gun. speaking in public for the first time since cinematographer halyna hutchins died on the set of the western film rust, the actor said he would be in favour of limiting the use of firearms on films. he also confirmed production of the movie was unlikely to resume. as pupils return after the half—term break, health teams will visit 800 schools across england to offer those aged 12 to 15 a coronavirus vaccine. young people are also being encouraged to take a covid test before returning to classes, as simonjones reports. you lot are braver than most of the grown—ups. when pupils returning to school this week are asked, what did you do in the half—term break, some will be able to say i got my jab. special sessions are being put on for 12— to 15—year—olds at vaccination centres like this one in kent, and now the plan is to allow more pupils to get a jab at school, with teams going into hundreds of schools in england this week. i might be carrying it
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and i don't even know, and if he catches it then... because i'm quite old. i'm an old dad, so i'm in my 605, and obviously he worries a bit about that. we've had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... - i know she's young, - but it's better to be safe. i wanted to get it done. i want things to be back to normal again. parents who haven't yet had the jab are being encouraged to go online so they can make an informed choice. more than 600,000 young people have been vaccinated since the rollout was extended to include 12— to 15—year—olds at the end of september. another 140,000 children have theirjabs booked over the next few weeks, according to nhs england. the office for national statistics says the percentage of people testing positive remains highest amongst children in school years 7 to ii, estimated atjust over 9%. pupils are also being urged to take a lateral flow test before returning
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to school to minimise disruption to lessons. the aim — to keep as many children safely in the classroom as possible. a big week, everyone heading back after half term. as we've been hearing, the cop26 climate change summit begins in glasgow today. the meeting of world leaders is seen as crucial if global warming is to be brought under control. almost 200 countries are being asked for their plans to cut emissions, and it could lead to major changes to our everyday lives. we're joined now by dr amanda maycock, director of the institute for atmospheric and climate science at leeds university. what is the big, i mean, we have a cop every year but what is the big, this one seems to have a lot of
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importance placed on it? in this one seems to have a lot of importance placed on it? in 2015 the governments — importance placed on it? in 2015 the governments of _ importance placed on it? in 2015 the governments of the _ importance placed on it? in 2015 the governments of the world _ importance placed on it? in 2015 the governments of the world signed - importance placed on it? in 2015 the governments of the world signed up| governments of the world signed up to the paris agreement which aims to reduce global warming to below two celsius and pursue actions to limit the warming to below one celsius. meeting taking place this year is the major checkpoint, if you like, along the way towards that paris agreement so the governments have been asked this year to come to cop with renewed ambitions on how they are going to cut emissions to meet those targets. and that is the thing we're to hear, to keep 1.5 alive. how are we going to do this? the re ort how are we going to do this? the report was _ how are we going to do this? the: report was published how are we going to do this? t't;e: report was published showed how are we going to do this? tt9 report was published showed that how are we going to do this? tt9: report was published showed that in order to achieve the 1.5 target, to keep it within reach we need rapid, large—scale reductions in emissions to begin immediately. large-scale reductions in emissions to begin immediately.— large-scale reductions in emissions to begin immediately. because we're not doinu to begin immediately. because we're not doing enough _ to begin immediately. because we're not doing enough at _ to begin immediately. because we're not doing enough at the _ to begin immediately. because we're not doing enough at the moment? i to begin immediately. because we'rej not doing enough at the moment? at not doing enough at the moment? git the moment, the pledges we have on table for countries currently would put us on track the warming of 2.7
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degrees. there are new pledges that have been put out in the recent days and if all of those were fulfilled, that would come down by about another 0.5 degrees and looking at warming of about 2.2 celsius but we are still over those thresholds that we are aiming for in the paris agreement so there is more work to put us on track for that. what agreement so there is more work to put us on track for that.— put us on track for that. what would that look like? — put us on track for that. what would that look like? can _ put us on track for that. what would that look like? can we _ put us on track for that. what would that look like? can we expect - put us on track for that. what would that look like? can we expect a - put us on track for that. what would that look like? can we expect a big l that look like? can we expect a big moment where they all agree on something we don't yet know about that will have that significant impact and add that extra 0.5%? irate impact and add that extra 0.5%? , probably shouldn't expect a big eureka moment that we had in 2015 with the big targets that were announced but what we are looking as commitments by government to pursue those targets. particular what has come out in recent days, look forward pledges by the middle of the century, countries like china and russia who are now talking about reaching net zero, we need to see more detailed plans about how they are going to get to that point stop
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we need interim steps, 2030 is often referred to as a marker along the way that i2030 need to have cut emissions by about 45% in 2010 levels, to be on track to get to that 1.5 degrees target and at the moment the pledges we have are still a long way off that so we need to see more nearer term action. {line a long way off that so we need to see more nearer term action. one of the criticism — see more nearer term action. one of the criticism since _ see more nearer term action. one of the criticism since paris _ see more nearer term action. one of the criticism since paris is _ see more nearer term action. one of the criticism since paris is these - the criticism since paris is these pledges were made that was a eureka moment and then the targets aren't necessarily met all the details aren't given about how the targets will be met so lots of people scratching their head and saying, what is the point? it is scratching their head and saying, what is the point?— what is the point? it is important to recognise _ what is the point? it is important to recognise progress _ what is the point? it is important to recognise progress has - what is the point? it is important to recognise progress has been l what is the point? it is important - to recognise progress has been made. ten years ago we were on track for a warming of between four and five celsius by the end of this sultry that would have caused catastrophic changes that make this century. —— this century. the work that has been done, the paris agreement, the landmark agreement on the pledges that have come from country since then have brought us down significantly in the temperature target that we have made progress which is very positive and we want
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to see, and hope to see, countries travelling along that trajectory. that is important to hear, that's —— that's it has been made. t5 that is important to hear, that's -- that's it has been made.— that's it has been made. is the uk doinu that's it has been made. is the uk doing enough? — that's it has been made. is the uk doing enough? the _ that's it has been made. is the uk doing enough? the uk— that's it has been made. is the uk doing enough? the uk was - that's it has been made. is the uk doing enough? the uk was one i that's it has been made. is the uk doing enough? the uk was one ofj that's it has been made. is the uk - doing enough? the uk was one of the first to ut doing enough? the uk was one of the first to put it — doing enough? the uk was one of the first to put it into _ doing enough? the uk was one of the first to put it into law. _ doing enough? the uk was one of the first to put it into law. net _ doing enough? the uk was one of the first to put it into law. net zero - first to put it into law. net zero carbon emissions means by the middle of the century, any carbon that we will be omitting remaining into the atmosphere we will take out through technologies or through natural solutions. so we've had that target in place now for some years but we've just seen recently from the government net zero strategy so this is actually the detail behind that target. how they will actually put in place policies to deliver on net zero. ,, , ., zero. serve the uk is that getting there. zero. serve the uk is that getting there- one _ zero. serve the uk is that getting there- one of— zero. serve the uk is that getting there. one of the _ zero. serve the uk is that getting there. one of the big _ zero. serve the uk is that getting there. one of the big complaints| there. one of the big complaints from some of the big looters, the developing word, places like india, a saviour countries that have developed their economies of the back of fossil fuels should be
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helping them and it should be compensating them. is that likely because it sounds like that could be crucial. ~ , ,:, , because it sounds like that could be crucial. ~ , , ~ because it sounds like that could be crucial. , ~ ., ~ because it sounds like that could be crucial. ~ , ~ ., ~ ., crucial. absolutely. we talk about climate finance _ crucial. absolutely. we talk about climate finance which _ crucial. absolutely. we talk about climate finance which is _ crucial. absolutely. we talk about climate finance which is the - climate finance which is the commitments from the wealthier nations to support the lower and middle income countries in developing a green and sustainable way and also helping them to to adapt to the effects of climate change that we were already experiencing today stop we know that in 2009 there was an agreement that that payment finance would reach this $100 billion level and at the moment we are not achieving that end unlikely to achieve that until next year so that is something which again has been delayed a little bit that we are trying to provide that climate finance to support those countries and their development. interesting. are you optimistic? t interesting. are you optimistic? i think we, as i said, we've made interesting. are you optimistic? t think we, as i said, we've made a lot of progress. you know, ten years ago we couldn't have imagined the paris agreement, i don't think. we were a long way away from that and it was such a landmark thing that
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has really set the stage for everything that we were doing but i think there is reason for optimism because we are seeing more and more countries. in the countries that us —— historically haven't been —— have been slower to respond to the needs to change, so china and russia, i mentioned. we are now seeing them talk about net euro and making pledges to get to net zero. so what we need now is more detail behind those plans on how other countries are going to achieve it.— are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing _ are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing to _ are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing to end _ are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing to end on _ are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing to end on a _ are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing to end on a note - are going to achieve it. thank you. and testing to end on a note of. and testing to end on a note of optimism _ and testing to end on a note of optimism. we will be of course talking — optimism. we will be of course talking about cop26 throughout the morning _ talking about cop26 throughout the morning and indeed the upcoming week _ morning and indeed the upcoming week. we — morning and indeed the upcoming week. ~ :, morning and indeed the upcoming week. ~ . ., morning and indeed the upcoming week. ~ :, :, :, ~' morning and indeed the upcoming week. ~ . ., ., ~ ., week. we are also talking about the weather. good _ week. we are also talking about the weather. good morning, _ week. we are also talking about the weather. good morning, sarah. - week. we are also talking about the| weather. good morning, sarah. this is the sunrise _ weather. good morning, sarah. this is the sunrise off _ weather. good morning, sarah. tt 3 is the sunrise off the coast of north yorkshire at the moment. lovely pink colours in the sky for many areas but not everywhere because we have rain that is moving its way in from the west and that is going to be the story of today. outbreaks of rain are heading from west to east and it will be a windy
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feeling for many of us but some sunshine around as well so don't write the day offjust yet. loose quy write the day offjust yet. loose guy for many of us as we head into the afternoon. here is the area of cloud that has been piling its way in four hours, bringing us all of the wet and windy weather from the west. looking at the weather rain has already been falling, over the past few hours it has been rainfall northern ireland, into wales in south—west england as well. it is starting to push into eastern england and associated with the heavy bursts of rain also gales as well so really windy conditions particularly for wales, the south—west of england, through the english channel as well stop 50 mph around exposed coasts. and also the showers that are following on in the breeze and some of them will be heavy. some hail and thunderstorms mixed in. quite a bit of dry weather mixed in. quite a bit of dry weather mixed in. quite a bit of dry weather mixed in to the showers for most areas but the rain lingers longest for the north—east of scotland where they could be a0 millimetres and the potential for further flooding problems there. into the evening hours, if you are heading out
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trick—or—treating, perhaps halloween plans, some clear skies around but most of them in north and west and dries towards the south and east. through tonight, low pressure is still with us with quite a windy night and the breeze rattling some windows on the north—west with some heavy showers around stop temperatures getting down to single figures but a frost free nights tonight. low pressure still with us through tonight and into tomorrow as well. just drifting its way a little bit further north—east stop as the low pressure moves north—east over the next few days it will open the doors of the north—westerly winds to come in. that will turn colder through the week ahead but for monday it is a showery, breezy day. some sunshine for many of us but longer spells of rain for north—west england in western scotland and areas that have still got flood warnings embossed. —— in force. temperatures only 9— 1a degrees so starting to come down on monday. adding through tuesday, low pressure clearing to the north—east. the isobars moving apart so that means
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not as windy. with the clear skies overnight frosts are likely. balancing the first widespread frost but we could see it as we head into the middle part of this week. here is the outlook for the next five days or so. we will see the rain today and into monday by tuesday. some sunny skies but have deep in the weather stop perhaps something a little bit more unsettled once again as we head into next weekend. a little bit up—and—down. clear skies for many areas last night and are weather watcher 's were lucky enough to glimpse at the aurora borealis. that was caused by a geomagnetic storm. solid particles enter our atmosphere and they are charged so they head to the magnetic poles, the north and the south pole and this is a picture as they interacted with
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our atmospheric particles, oxygen and nitrogen. maybe you were lucky enough to catch a glimpse. stunning. every time- — after months of working from home and not having to dress up for the office — has the pandemic permanetly changed our dress codes? this week the bbc was forced to answer whether it has ever had a dress code for its senior executives after a viewer complained about the smart casual choices of the corporation's director general tim davie. so are office styles changing? let's ask expert stylist, clare watkins, who joins us now. glute —— newsreaders will probably lose these, sunday morning, wearing a tie. have we set on that a journey
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that we aren't going to turn back from? it that we aren't going to turn back from? :, , : :, that we aren't going to turn back from? :,, : :, :, ~' , that we aren't going to turn back from? ., : . . ~ , ., from? it has changed markedly over the last two — from? it has changed markedly over the last two years. _ from? it has changed markedly over the last two years. business - from? it has changed markedly over the last two years. business casual, j the last two years. business casual, as it was named a while ago, what i'm saying with my clients now, address for your day. you can dress according to whatever you have on your schedule for that particular day. whether it be a meeting where you need to dress slightly more formally or whether you can head into the office in jeans and trainers and something slightly more casual. :, :, , �* trainers and something slightly more casual. :, :, ,�* ., , casual. two doesn't matter, is something _ casual. two doesn't matter, is something being _ casual. two doesn't matter, is something being lost? -- - casual. two doesn't matter, is| something being lost? -- does casual. two doesn't matter, is i something being lost? -- does it matter. something being lost? -- does it matter- the _ something being lost? -- does it matter. the younger _ something being lost? -- does it matter. the younger generation l something being lost? -- does it. matter. the younger generation are embracing casual dressing. i think there are arguments for and against both but what people are most preferring is flexibility within their wardrobe to be able to wear what they could wear on the weekend just by switching up their footwear or accessories or a key piece,
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putting a blouse on instead of a t—shirt. t putting a blouse on instead of a t-shirt. .. putting a blouse on instead of a t-shirt. :, , , , ., ~ putting a blouse on instead of a t-shirt. :, , ,, .,~ :, putting a blouse on instead of a t-shirt. :, :, ., t-shirt. i can only speak from a male perspective _ t-shirt. i can only speak from a male perspective because - t-shirt. i can only speak from a male perspective because i - t-shirt. i can only speak from a male perspective because i do. t-shirt. i can only speak from a i male perspective because i do not venture into speaking about female fashion but for a guy, maybe you need a couple of suits, a few shirts, a few ties, it takes all the stress out of it because you haven't got to worry about being cool or fashionable. t got to worry about being cool or fashionable.— got to worry about being cool or fashionable. i understand that. it makes life easier _ fashionable. i understand that. it makes life easier because - fashionable. i understand that. it makes life easier because you i fashionable. i understand that. it makes life easier because you goj fashionable. i understand that. it i makes life easier because you go to that section of the wardrobe, pull the closeout and get dressed and don't have to think about it. what is lovely about being able to wear slightly more casual clothes as you can express your personality through your wardrobe a little bit more and your wardrobe a little bit more and your colleagues can get to know you. psychologically do you think it would — psychologically do you think it would make an impact? i love leisurewear, i would would make an impact? i love leisurewear, iwould be in would make an impact? i love leisurewear, i would be in my tights every— leisurewear, i would be in my tights every day— leisurewear, i would be in my tights every day if— leisurewear, i would be in my tights every day if it wasn't for this job. if you _ every day if it wasn't for this job. if you out — every day if it wasn't for this job. if you put something smart on then mentally— if you put something smart on then mentally you enter a different headspace. do you think that will change? — headspace. do you think that will change? i — headspace. do you think that will chan . e? g headspace. do you think that will chance? ~ ,:, headspace. do you think that will chance? ~' �* ,
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headspace. do you think that will chance? ~ �* , . change? i think so. i'm very much when you — change? i think so. i'm very much when you look— change? i think so. i'm very much when you look good, _ change? i think so. i'm very much when you look good, you - change? i think so. i'm very much when you look good, you feel- change? i think so. i'm very much l when you look good, you feel good, but you can look at in casual clothes, put together well. but you can look at in casual clothes, put togetherwell. it clothes, put together well. it is about choosing the right pieces that would work for you in the workplace that would still make you feel good. leggings on the sofa? tia that would still make you feel good. leggings on the sofa?— leggings on the sofa? no leggings! m clients leggings on the sofa? no leggings! my clients watching _ leggings on the sofa? no leggings! my clients watching this _ leggings on the sofa? no leggings! my clients watching this will - leggings on the sofa? no leggings! my clients watching this will be i my clients watching this will be saying this as well, leggings for the gym only!— saying this as well, leggings for the gym only! leisurewear... not doinu an the gym only! leisurewear... not doing any sport- _ the gym only! leisurewear... not doing any sport. laughter. i the gym only! leisurewear... not doing any sport. laughter. doesl the gym only! leisurewear. .. not| doing any sport. laughter. does it chanae doing any sport. laughter. does it change the _ doing any sport. laughter. does it change the way — doing any sport. laughter. does it change the way that _ doing any sport. laughter. does it change the way that people i doing any sport. laughter. does it i change the way that people perceive you? i don't want to make it about the bbc but i suppose if that is the reason for it, the current director—general is very relaxed. his predecessor was very much a suit and tie man. slightly older. as a change the way people perceive you? i don't feel that is the case was up if you are doing a good job your measure should be on how well you do thejob. we only
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measure should be on how well you do the job. we only has seven seconds to form an image and that is rather close. there are arguments for and against. i do feel that this more casual approach makes people more approachable as well. two interesting. thank you, claire. but no leggings! the interesting. thank you, claire. but no leggings!— no leggings! the big question, andrew marr _ no leggings! the big question, andrew marr is _ no leggings! the big question, andrew marr is on _ no leggings! the big question, andrew marr is on bbc - no leggings! the big question, andrew marr is on bbc one i no leggings! the big question, l andrew marr is on bbc one after no leggings! the big question, i andrew marr is on bbc one after us at nine o'clock this morning. i don't know andrew whether you would actually wear leisure clothes on your programme?— actually wear leisure clothes on our roaramme? ~ . ., your programme? well we are hearing a very slightly — your programme? well we are hearing a very slightly moist _ your programme? well we are hearing a very slightly moist gloves _ your programme? well we are hearing a very slightly moist gloves go - your programme? well we are hearing a very slightly moist gloves go for i a very slightly moist gloves go for a very slightly moist gloves go for a special— a very slightly moist gloves go for a special programme. —— we are here ina very— a special programme. —— we are here in a very slightly moist glasgow. we will he _ in a very slightly moist glasgow. we will be talking to greta turnbow, alec sharma, ed miller brand —— greta _ alec sharma, ed miller brand —— greta turnbow. a lock sharma. the andrew marr show is on bbc one straight after breakfast at 9am.
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they have blown australia away and are on the verge of victory in the world cup. this stunning catch from chris woakes removed steve smith. england, of course, will face australia in the test format when the ashes starts in december, but it may not be as straightforward as this. jos buttler smashed five sixes on the way to england reaching that target with eight overs to spare. it means they have three wins from three in the super 12s. relief for manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer as his side beat tottenham 3—0 to relieve some pressure. goals from cristiano ronaldo, edinson cavani and this one from marcus rashford wrapped up a convincing win as united bounced back from their 5—0 defeat against liverpool.
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it has been a difficult week for the players, for the club, for the fans, for me. you are right, i have stayed away from most of the noise, but you know what is happening out there. you know that you have to put a performance up. as i said, every time you lose a game it is the worst feeling in the world, as a coach, manager and player. you want the next game to come. manchester city unexpectedly lost ground in the title race as they lost 2—0 at home to crystal palace. not a good day for city defender aymeric laporte, who was caught in possession as palace scored their first goal through wilfried za ha. laporte was later sent off. palace go 13th. city are third, two points behind liverpool and five behind leaders chelsea. liverpool also dropped points as brighton came back from 2—0 down to draw 2—2 at anfield. liverpool were two up inside 25 minutes thanks tojordan henderson and sadio mane here. but after mane had a third ruled out for offside,
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brighton hit back. enock mwepu scored just before half time and then a well taken goal from leandro trossard earned a deserved draw for graham potter's side. chelsea maintained their position at the top of the table after beating newcastle 3—0 at a packed stjames' park. newcastle were playing at home for the first time since parting company with steve bruce. all the goals came in the last 25 minutes. england defender reece james scored twice beforejorginho added a penalty. rangers can go four points clear at the top of the scottish premiership with a win at motherwell later today. celtic missed the chance to go top yesterday. they were held to a goalless draw at home to livingston after giorgos giakoumakis saw his injury—time penalty saved. wales were overwhelmed by new zealand in their first match of the autumn internationals. they haven't beaten the all blacks since 1953 and their quest for victory continues as they were thrashed 5a—16. it was an important match for welsh captain alun wynjones as he became
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the most capped player of all time, with 1a9 appearances. unfortunately he was subbed after 18 minutes with what looked like a shoulder injury. without many key players, wales were outplayed by new zealand, beauden barrett sealing the victory with this try. meanwhile, scotland cruised to victory over tonga. rufus mclean crashed over twice on his debut. the first came in the seventh minute. kyle steen then added four of his own to become the first scotland player to score four tries in a match for over 25 years. england's women begin their autumn international campaign with a tough match against new zealand today. despite the rivalry between the two sides, many of the england squad will be facing the black ferns for the first time — and that intimidating haka. during the match, players from both sides will be wearing special mouthguards containing head impact monitors. it marks a significant shift towards collecting data for women after studies have shown
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they are twice as likely as men to suffer concussions. that is so clever. it could be a aood that is so clever. it could be a good way _ that is so clever. it could be a good way of — that is so clever. it could be a good way of using _ that is so clever. it could be a good way of using technology | that is so clever. it could be a l good way of using technology to that is so clever. it could be a - good way of using technology to help with a big issue. find good way of using technology to help with a big issue.— with a big issue. and many see this as the first — with a big issue. and many see this as the first step _ with a big issue. and many see this as the first step is _ with a big issue. and many see this as the first step is the _ with a big issue. and many see this as the first step is the sport - with a big issue. and many see this as the first step is the sport looks l as the first step is the sport looks to take this much more seriously than they have before. we have seen legal action taken in other forms of rugby league and rugby union in terms of concussions and head injuries. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00am this morning, and coming up in the next hour: after a week of falling covid infection rates and plans to send health teams into schools in england, we'll talk to one of our regular experts, professor adam finn. the remaining couples were back under the strictly glitterball last night for the halloween special. we'll discuss the highlights with one of the show�*s former professionals — flavia.
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i have not seen last night's yet. the first a0, at the earliest point of the competition. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. let us check in with sarah and the weather. isn't it stunning, a glorious sunrise off the coast of north yorkshire. they had the northern lights visible last night and woke up lights visible last night and woke up to a stunning sunrise this morning. all of nature's colours lighting up the sky this morning. some of us have got clear skies around this morning but for other areas, rain already with us. we're at a wet and windy day to day. a bit
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of sunshine between the showers, so you are likely to see some blue skies for most areas through the day. loud piling in from the atlantic. here is the latest in a series of weather fronts that have been moving in. this has brought not only rain but strengthening winds to many western areas in particular. this is the radar picture. for the past few hours, raining for northern ireland, south—west scotland and western parts of england and wales. that rain is pushing its way northwards and eastwards. here is the main curl of rain. the green colours showing heavier bursts in that. as it moves north and east it will be followed by sunshine and scattered showers moving in from the west. some of these heavy and thundery and gust of wind about 50 mph or more around the coasts. even then we could see 30 mph gusts. a blustery day, top temperatures around ten to 15 degrees or so. just around ten to 15 degrees or so. just a little bit cooler than we have seen over recent days, and if you are planning on heading out trick the driest of the weather will be in southern and eastern parts of england. for many areas there will
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be further showers putting their way through for the evening and overnight as well. the winds are notable feature as well, you may see those rattling windows. raining across northern ireland, western scotland and north—west england as we head into monday morning. monday's weather is still very much dominated by low pressure. it is slowly moving off towards the north and east and as we head through the coming week, as the low pressure clears away, we will start to see the winds coming in from more of a north—westerly direction, importing colder air. a bit of a cold spell of weather into the middle part of the week. for monday morning, a showery scene for many areas. particular heavy rain for western scotland and north—west england, where we have already seen flooding. not good news, that is falling on already saturated ground. further south, largely dry with some sunshine but scattered showers moving their way through and another breezy feeling day. moving through to the middle of the week, the clearing off towards the week, the clearing off towards the north—east. not so many isobars so the winds will not be as strong and they will be from a northerly
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direction. that is the recipe for some overnight frosts. we haven't seen the first widespread frost of the season, we may see it by the middle part of the week. by day temperatures nine or 10 degrees for many northern areas, 11 or 12 further south. many northern areas, 11 or 12 furthersouth. not many northern areas, 11 or 12 further south. not as mild as it has been over the last couple of days. change of month and change of weather type. certainly some showers, from tuesday onwards things looking colder. autumn well and truly with us. we have waved goodbye to the temperatures of summertime. i will leave you with this picture from aberdeenshire, a glorious view of the northern lights. ladle from aberdeenshire, a glorious view of the northern lights.— of the northern lights. we had not really made _ of the northern lights. we had not really made the _ of the northern lights. we had not really made the point _ of the northern lights. we had not really made the point this - of the northern lights. we had not| really made the point this morning that it really made the point this morning thatitis really made the point this morning that it is 7:37am and the clocks have gone back overnight. yes, thank you very much. time now for the travel show. we are talking shop in paris is one of the department store celebrates
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its belated 150th birthday. tt’s its belated 150th birthday. it's bi , its belated 150th birthday. it's big. really _ its belated 150th birthday. tt�*s big, really big. its belated 150th birthday. it's big, really big. the _ its belated 150th birthday. it's l big, really big. the underground railroad that _ big, really big. the underground railroad that had _ big, really big. the underground railroad that had no _ big, really big. the underground railroad that had no stations i big, really big. the underground railroad that had no stations and big, really big. the underground i railroad that had no stations and no trains but helped thousands of enslaved african—americans escape to freedom in canada. t enslaved african-americans escape to freedom in canada.— freedom in canada. i love the term freedom in canada. i love the term freedom seeker, _ freedom in canada. i love the term freedom seeker, because - freedom in canada. i love the term freedom seeker, because had i freedom in canada. i love the term freedom seeker, because had they| freedom in canada. i love the term i freedom seeker, because had they not sought freedom, who knows where we would have been to this day? find t would have been to this day? and i had for the — would have been to this day? and i had for the hebrides _ would have been to this day? and i had for the hebrides to _ would have been to this day? and i had for the hebrides to get - would have been to this day? and i had for the hebrides to get my first ever glimpse of a galaxy over 20 million light years away. i thought that was a galaxy because it looks like the opening credits of a sci—fi movie. that is so cool.
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hello and welcome to the travel show, with me, ade adepitan, coming to you from a lockdown free london where the city's world—famous shops us slowly starting to fill up again. over in paris it is pretty much the same story, especially for one iconic department store, that celebrated not only opening its doors again but also 150 years of being in business. we sent emily over to do a little bit of windowshopping. lovely. paris is a second home to me. last time i was here, the streets were empty and shops were boarded up. today it feels great to see things returning back to normal, even though some restrictions are still in place. but i am notjust here to drink coffee.
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i am notjust here to drink coffee. i am notjust here to drink coffee. i am here to shop, and where better to do it than here? new york has its macy's, london has at harrods, and paris? well, paris has a new and improved version of this iconic department store re—opened injune last year after a long 16—year closure. so, here it is. la samaritaine. each of three sections representing a different moment in time and, actually, it started as a small store just over there. and now look at it! despite its humble beginnings, la samaritaine soon became one of the most well—known department stores in paris. it was a place to see and be seen. the shop where you could supposedly find everything. founded in 1870, the art nouveau building came first.
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the 19th century was a time of big change in paris, and la samaritaine symbolised that change, but its ornate features soon became outdated. a few decades later, an art deco building was constructed next door, in an effort to lure in the next generation of shoppers. and it worked. with the help of its quirky advertising, the store flourished. at its peak, employing over 3000 parisians. but, as times and tastes change, the shop's popularity dwindled. safety concerns and high maintenance costs meant that, in 2005, la samaritaine had to close its doors. many thought that was it
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for the store until luxury fashion brand lvmh stepped in with the help of 750 million euros. for parisian people, la samaritaine is notjust a building or a department store. when we are reopening this building, all of the parisian people came to visit, especially the building — the department store for the store, for the retail also, but, for us, it was for the — for the architecture. the building was completely gutted. some original features were discovered when stripping back the layers that used to cover the art nouveau interior when it went out of fashion. specialist craftspeople were tracked down from across france for thejob.
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the result is breathtaking. wow. it's big, really big. this is great to see. i mean, it's heaving with people and you... you can just see that they're not obviouslyjust here to shop and eat because they're walking around taking pictures of the structure. yeah. how hard was it to redo? from this level, you can see every details of the art nouveau period and architecture. you can see the stairs there, the historic stair with the detail of the handrail, refurbished exactly the same design and the same kind of detail by the artisan. and you can see also a famous fresque, 50 years ago in the 1960. you didn't see this fresque because this fresque was totally covered
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by the white painting. but it has been far from a smooth ride. a brand—new building on rue de la monnaie struggle for years to get planning permission with opponents saying the modern facade didn't fit in with the architecture of the area. wow, right here you can really get a sense of where the older building, that i know and love, meets this new, more modern development. personally, i have a real soft spot for the older one. we are very careful to keep the dna that was really given by the ernest and marie—louise, the founders. first, they were real innovators and they were innovators in terms of, for example, architecture. because now you have the art nouveau and the art deco.
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right now it seems traditional but, at that time, it was really revolutionary for them. and we did the same thing, a little bit, with the levallois facade. you know, we asked the son of architect to do this very contemporary facade. and that, you know, we prolong the tradition of innovation from ourfunders. the store has reinvented itself as a day tripper destination with 600 brands, several restaurants, and even a luxury hotel. it's something to see. and before, it was just part of our lives, we don't see it, you know? we go into la samaritaine, we didn't take the time to admire. now, we stop and we look and we gawk. i really like these cherries. this definitely reminds me of being a child. but with the rise of online shopping, fuelled by the pandemic, is there still a place for the department store?
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16 years have passed, and we have to build some return for the next 30 years, so, i mean, we adapted to the changing habits, the changing clients that became much more sophisticated, demanding, expecting, you know, an experience, to really offer something different that you cannot find online. the decoration aspect is really important. and then also all the experience that you have. you have a lot of light, you know, it's really nice walking around. and a lot of surprises scattered in the store. there are many different things that you cannot do online. this hat is absolutely gorgeous, look at that colour! ah, ok, doesn't fit, which is a shame because i have always wanted to be a hat lady.
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ah, 0k! a velvet beret. as they say, "when in paris..." super cute, but the price? yeah, sadly not for today. stay right there, looking beautiful. la samaritaine has been in business for over 150 years, and it's come a long way since then. and while you might not be able to buy everything here any more, visiting is an experience in itself, and it sure feels good to be back. stay with us because still to come on the travel show, we're off to america to meet the people from chicago who are learning more about the part their city played in the fight
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against slavery. we were just talking about how it connects to our heritage, being black women, and how empowering and invigorating it is to know part of your history. and i head up to the hebrides for a spot of stargazing, scottish style. so those are the stars! that's way more than you can see with the naked eye. we are off to the us now where the story of how the american civil war ended slavery in the country's southern states is a well—known one. but what is not so well—known is the story of the underground railroad. it was a secret network which, before the civil war, help to smuggle escaped slaves out of america and onto freedom. a new tour is helping many local people from chicago reconnect with that history, and we've been to meet some of them. the underground railroad has no stations, no trains, and no tunnels.
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it got its name because it operated amidst the highest secrecy. once escaping slaves jumped on—board the railroad, they simply vanished until they were either recaptured or reached their final destination — freedom. an undercover network of conductors — or guides — operated along the route of the railroad, which stretched from slave—owning states in america's deep—south all the way north to the canadian border. now, something called the african—american heritage water trail has been created to help preserve and share the history of this little—known but important section of the underground railroad. it really starts with days like this, paddling along the african—american heritage water trail and telling the stories of folks who've shown courage and fortitude. we're from the south side of chicago, born and raised. i got an email to come out
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and take part in his historic canoeing trip. i wanted to bring these guys along — these are my daughters. there are 29 stops along the self—guided journey, covering more than 180 years of african—american history. you have freedom seekers travelling from south further north and this being a point of salvation in terms of, like, being able to stop somewhere and then be guided further up north in a safe space. it's estimated that tens of thousands of escaping enslaved african—americans used the underground railroad to push north and finally cross the border into what was then known as british north america, or modern—day canada, and freedom. the indiana avenue bridge was built by george dawson and his son, who were abolitionists, back in the 1830s. along with the bridge came
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a new ferry, which became an integral part of the escape network. along the trail, you'll also find several locations like ton farm, which was owned by a dutch farming couple that provided safe places to stay, offering escaping slaves food and shelter for the night before they continued their journey north. there were black abolitionists and white abolitionists working together to assist freedom seekers and some of those folks stopped at the ton farm. this site is a stop on the journey. when we finally did the very deep map and archaeological
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research that the actual site of the ton farm is on the property of what is now called chicago's finest marina, which is the oldest black—owned marina in the chicago region. we're part of chicago but we're also part of a deep, rich history that has not been told yet. the property was actually used during the underground railroad to hide freedom seekers who were coming from all over, trying to escape slavery down south. and just to look off into the water and wonder what their travels were to get this far and this close. the mixed emotional thing because it is an honour being the owner but also, you are kind of like the keeper of the records. piece by piece, researchers have been slowly uncovering many of the until now unknown people and places that played such an important role in the story of the underground railroad. it is a tale of bravery, endeavour and, above all, hope for freedom
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and a better life. me and my paddle buddy, we were just talking about how it connects to our heritage, being black women, and how empowering and invigorating it is to know parts of your history. our ancestors, the people came before us, the freedom seekers — i felt honoured for a moment just to be where they walked and kind of experience a little bit of what they may have experienced. i love the term 'freedom seekers' because had they sought freedom, who knows where we would have been to this day. well, if you are a regular view of the travel show, you will remember that earlier this year, we took a trip across the length and breadth of the british isles in our all—electric travel show van. but when we visited the outer hebrides, the group of islands off scotland's wonderful west coast,
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we made an extra stop in stornoway, where i met the organisers of the annual hebridean dark skies festival, which ended this month. stornoway is the main town on the outer hebrides. welcome. ——and despite the weather, they have given me a warm welcome. hello! hey, guys! chuckles. i have arrived at the town's an lanntair arts centre, where they are just about to wrap up their latest exhibit. andrew, so what are we seeing here on this screen? this is a series of films called our night skies, which were made all over the world during lockdown. ah, wicked!
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it was commissioned by an artist collective called lumen, and lumen are doing theirfirst scottish exhibitions as part of our festival. andrew is one of the main organisers of the hebridean dark skies festival, which has been running since 2019 with events combining art and astronomy. i think one of the interesting things that artists and astronomers have in common is this sense of wonder, you know, about the universe and the scale of the universe. and would you say that you could only really hold a festival like this here in the hebrides? i think so, yeah. because you've got, on the one hand, you've got stornoway with a fairly sizeable town with an arts centre. but on the other hand, the rest of the island is mostly villages and so, there is almost no light pollution and so, that's where you really get to see the incredible skies above. one of the best stargazing spots on the island can be found one hour down the road at gallen head.
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it was an raf base during the cold war and now, it's where the festival takes people to observe and photograph the night sky. this is andy. andy! so we've got andrew and andy — you have done this on purpose, haven't you? we have, just to confuse you. what is it about seeing galaxies and seeing stars? oh, they're just — well, galaxies in particular are so far away, you know? you're looking back in time. one of our nearest galaxies the andromeda, its 2.5 million light years away. it is like a moment in time, isn't it? and this area is particularly good for seeing the planets? oh, it's amazing. we have some of the darkest skies in the whole country. around the world, there are more than 100 official dark sky locations, designed to protect remote spots like this one against light pollution. gallen head has not been officially recognised by the dark sky organisation but as the last rays of sunshine fade away, i am given one of the best views of the night sky that i have ever seen. soaring music plays.
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all right, so show me how to take these pictures then, andy. this? that's the one. yep, yep. yep, that's all you need to do — press that one. andy set up the camera to take 30—second—long exposures — that's to allow enough time for the light from those distant stars to reach the camera's sensors. so those are the stars? that's way more than you can see with the naked eye! are there any galaxies and stuff like that? can you see them yet? or is this camera not good enough? this camera would not be good enough, no. but a telescope would be. 0k! so is there like a camera on the bottom of this?
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that's right, yep. very clever! light, please. thank you! and here. yeah. here you are. so that is a galaxy? that is a galaxy, which is... i mean, it — i thought that was a galaxy, because it looks like the opening credits of a sci—fi movie. right? i mean, i know that sounds really weird! but that is so cool! so that is is called messier 101 or the pinwheel galaxy, which is about 21 million light years away... quite far away! ..give or take the odd yard. it is really beautiful, and you know what? guys, this is the first time i've seen a galaxy in real life. oh, great! no, this is my first time. congratulations. no, thank you for this. this is — yeah, it's so cool! look at that! and the hebridean dark skies
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festival starts up again in february next year. now, that was a really special experience. seeing all of those galaxies millions of light years away blew my mind. truly amazing! now, i hope you enjoyed that because that's your lot for this week. join us next week, when... christa will be in iceland, joining the annual traditional round—up of thousands of wild horses before the winter sets in. and these guys are not just any old horses — these are viking horses. no time to check them. and we start an epicjourney to siberia in a car that's frankly seen better days. i hope you canjoin us
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for that — and don't forget, in the meantime, you can find more about travel show adventures on the bbc iplayer. but for now, from me, ade adepitan, in an autumnal london, it's goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: "the world's moment of truth" — borisjohnson urges leaders to use their summit in glasgow to start to fix climate change. we think that we can be
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on a remorseless forward march, when actually, we can be actively conniving in our own decline and fall, more than 25,000 people start to flood into the city — but there are concerns about whether any agreement on limiting global warming will go far enough. health teams are to visit more than 800 secondary schools in england to offer coronavirus vaccinations to children aged 12 to 15. england are closing in on the semifinals of the t20 world cup after thrashing australia by eight wickets asjos buttler helped make it three wins out of three. good morning. low pressure in charge of our weather today, bringing us some heavy showers or longer spells of rain. there will be some sunshine mixed in, too, but it's going to feel windy for many of us through the course of the day. i will have all the details here on bbc breakfast. it's sunday, the 31st of october.
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world leaders will be making their way from the g20 summit in rome to glasgow today, for the start of the cop26 climate conference. before they set off, prince charles will warn them they have an overwhelming responsibility to future generations to fix the climate crisis. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale is in rome. for g20 leaders, this is theirfirst time to spend time together face—to—face for almost two years, whether dining at the presidential palace in rome or sitting around the summit table, a chance to catch up and do deals. today their minds will turn to perhaps the most important and most necessary deal. they are expected to agree climate change is an existential threat, but so far there have been no new firm commitments to reduce carbon emissions, much to the frustration of the host of the cop26 summit. people are often very conceited about history and about our civilisation. we think that we can be on a remorseless forward march,
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when actually, we can be actively conniving in our own decline and fall. and what we need to do is to ensure that at the cop summit next week, the world leaders come together and make the commitments that are necessary. today he will win support from an unexpected source. the prince of wales has been invited to the summit by the italian hosts, and he will tell the g20 leaders they have an overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn. he will say it is it is impossible not to see future generations is your responsibility. amidst all this, the prime minister is expected to meet the french president to discuss the continuing row overfishing rights. the french say the boats are being squeezed out of uk waters,
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against the post—brexit rule book. the uk disagrees and is threatening legal action — a row that shows no sign of going away. this summit will make some progress, agreeing a minimum global corporation tax and new targets to vaccinate more people in developing countries. but on tackling global warming, it is yet to live up to expectations. let's speak now to mark lowen who is in rome. mark, lots of voices calling on world leaders to come together to tackle climate change , is there any sign they are taking any notice? the expectations of our, the ambitions of there, but will they deliver? today will be a day of tough talks on attempts to curb climate change as leaders are corralled into making more ambitious targets about reducing carbon emissions. some of the big emitters here, china and india, for example have not released new and updated targets to try to achieve carbon neutrality by the middle of the century which would be seen as
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essential to keeping the goal of keeping global warning at 1.5 and scientists believe that is the point at which global warming would become irreparable. also to give more money from them to smaller countries to help them transition towards cleaner energy and to curb climate change. before the talks get under way, when in rome do as of course you have to do and you go to see the sights and so the leaders are no going for a little stroll by the trevi fountain, one of the most iconic sights in the city. one of the most famous in the world, built in the middle of the 18th century and if you throw three times in their the first one means she will return to rome, preferably not before the glasgow tops, the second one is you find love and the
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third one is that you marry so we will see which of the leaders throws a coin into that fountain. then the talks get under and we will wait to see whether or not they can really arrive at front commitments to show they are serious to keeping that 1.5 goal life before the glasgow talks get under way earnest tomorrow. more than 25,000 people — representing nearly 200 countries — have begun arriving for that conference in glasgow. the aim of the two week event is to commit to measures to limit the rise in global temperatures and cut emissions — as our scotand correspondent alexandra mackenzie reports. the negotiations have yet to begin, but activists have been arriving in glasgow. some walked for weeks to get here. they all want more done to tackle climate change. and i walked the entire way from sweden to here, to bring awareness of climate.
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this is my way to do it. it is the question of our time. i mean, we need to act now. i felt it was a privilege to devote four months to the climate. i'm walking for my children and my grandchildren, my great—grandson, and i am demanding for them a good climate. the teenager greta thunberg arrived in the city by train. she has already expressed her concern that cop26 will not lead to any significant changes. others admit it will be challenging. when you look at the science, the latest report from the intergovernmental panel on climate change is clear that the world is warming. it is human—induced, and if we do not act now,
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we are going to see increased floods, droughts, heatwaves, and all of us will be affected. glasgow will host more than 120 world leaders and up to 25,000 delegates. around 10,000 police officers will be deployed each day. for those living in the city, disruption is expected, and there are mixed feelings about the summit. i think it's really good that people are coming together about the environment, because it's, like, a really big deal right now. what are they coming here to change? i've heard it's going to increase the covid numbers, as well, so that's obviously a bit of a worry. the uk government is hosting the summit, and on behalf of the scottish government, nicola sturgeon welcomed everyone to glasgow. # what a wonderful world... # as others united to get their message across, i the first minister said this could be one of the most important global gatherings this century.
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let's go to glasgow now and speak to our scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie. i was away and the scene is set here in glasgow for cop26. we are here on the banks of the river clyde and opposite us is the venue for cop26, where thousands of people will gather. i am afraid the weather so far has not been very welcoming and it has been a very dreich glasgow morning but hopefully that will improve. many people arriving today and over the past few days world leaders and activists. greta thunberg arrived last night by
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train. she was mobbed by people and had to be taken back into the station by police officers. dash—mac back onto the train. i was speaking to people on the street in glasgow yesterday to find out what cop26 meant to them. many people were very enthusiastic and thought it was not only great thing for the city but also for the world showed a lot of optimism that something can be achieved just across the river here in glasgow but other people were not quite so sure. we are still in the middle of a pandemic. cop26 was delayed because of covid. people are concerned that with so many people coming into the city the cases of coronavirus could increase and especially as we are coming into the winter again. the other concerns are over the next couple of weeks with road closures and people trying to get to work tomorrow morning many
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people will also be staying outside the city in edinburgh, saw thousands of people coming along the m8. there are going to be coronavirus restrictions and precautions in the venue opposite. people will be getting the temperature checked and they will have daily lateral flow tests and will have to wear masks and will have to keep their distance so the countdown is on. today will be quite ceremonial, whereas the hard work will really get started tomorrow. it's understood people have died following an incident on a river in the pembrokeshire area of wales. dyfed—powys police say a major rescue operation was launched on the river cleddau in haverfordwest after a group of people were seen in distress. police, firefighters, coastguard, ambulance crews and four helicopters were deployed. more details are expected to be released later today.
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alec baldwin has described the death of a colleague on the set of his film as 'a one—in—a—trillion episode' after he accidentally shot her with a prop gun. speaking in public for the first time since cinematographer halyna hutchins died on the set of the western film 'rust�*, the actor said he would be in favour of limiting the use of firearms on films. he also confirmed production of the movie was unlikely to resume. as pupils return after the half—term break, health teams will visit 800 schools across england to offer those aged 12 to 15 a coronavirus vaccine. young people are also being encouraged to take a covid test before returning to classes as simonjones reports. you lot are braver than most of the grown—ups. when pupils returning to school this week are asked, what did you do in the half—term break, some will be able to say i got myjab. special sessions are being put on for 12 to 15—year—olds at vaccination
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centres like this one in kent, and now the plan is to allow more pupils to get a jab at school, with teams going into hundreds of schools in england this week. i might be carrying it and i don't even know, and if he catches it then... because i'm quite old. i'm an old dad, so i'm in my 605, and obviously he worries a bit about that. we've had deaths in the family, so we thought maybe... i know she's young, but it's better to be safe. i wanted to get it done. i want things to be back to normal again. parents of pupils who haven't yet had the jab are being encouraged to go online so they can make an informed choice. more than 600,000 young people have been vaccinated since the roll—out was extended to include 12 to 15—year—olds at the end of september. another 1a0,000 children have theirjabs booked over the next few weeks, according to nhs england. the office for national statistics says the percentage of people
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testing positive remains highest amongst children in school years seven to 11, estimated atjust over 9%. pupils are also being urged to take a lateral flow test before returning to school to minimise disruption to lessons. the aim — to keep as many children safely in the classroom as possible. we will talk more about that in just a couple _ we will talk more about that in just a couple of— we will talk more about that in just a couple of moments. here's sarah keith lucas with a look at this morning's weather. last night we had clear skies across the uk _ last night we had clear skies across the uk and — last night we had clear skies across the uk and if you were lucky in the north— the uk and if you were lucky in the north you — the uk and if you were lucky in the north you might have caught a glimpse — north you might have caught a glimpse of the northern lights. that was caused by a really strong geomagnetic storm when solar particles — geomagnetic storm when solar particles through the sun raced through— particles through the sun raced through space and as they bump into
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oxygen— through space and as they bump into oxygen and _ through space and as they bump into oxygen and nitrogen in our fs atmosphere they create these beautiful greens and pinks as well. really— beautiful greens and pinks as well. really fantastic pictures of the northern lights from last night. today— northern lights from last night. today clear skies are not lasting too long — today clear skies are not lasting too long because we have wet and windy— too long because we have wet and windy weather moving through. that will move _ windy weather moving through. that will move into sunshine through the afternoon — will move into sunshine through the afternoon. here is the low pressure system _ afternoon. here is the low pressure system that has been bringing the rain and _ system that has been bringing the rain and cloud over recent hours. it is clearing — rain and cloud over recent hours. it is clearing out of northern ireland and ringing across parts of western scotland _ and ringing across parts of western scotland. much of england and wales with a _ scotland. much of england and wales with a really soggy start to the day _ with a really soggy start to the day not — with a really soggy start to the day. notjust wet but with a really soggy start to the day. not just wet but also windy. gale _ day. not just wet but also windy. gale is _ day. not just wet but also windy. gale is likely at times. the windless— gale is likely at times. the windless conditions probably towards wales— windless conditions probably towards wales in— windless conditions probably towards wales in the south—west of england. this main— wales in the south—west of england. this main band of persistent rain will clear— this main band of persistent rain will clear from the east coast in most _ will clear from the east coast in most areas but linger longest in northern— most areas but linger longest in northern and eastern scotland with 40 millimetres more of rain to fall ao millimetres more of rain to fall and may— ao millimetres more of rain to fall and may some flooding. went likely to reach _ and may some flooding. went likely to reach 50mph gusts and it will be windy— to reach 50mph gusts and it will be windy everywhere with temperatures
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of 10 to _ windy everywhere with temperatures of 10 to 15 _ windy everywhere with temperatures of 10 to 15 but there windy everywhere with temperatures of10 to 15 but there will windy everywhere with temperatures of 10 to 15 but there will be blue sky and _ of 10 to 15 but there will be blue sky and between the heavy showers. if you're _ sky and between the heavy showers. if you're heading out this evening you may— if you're heading out this evening you may want to bring an umbrella because _ you may want to bring an umbrella because plenty of heavy showers, particularly the further north and west— particularly the further north and west you — particularly the further north and west you are there will be persistent heavy downpours through this evening and overnight. cleaver spells _ this evening and overnight. cleaver spells towards the south and temperatures will get into single figures _ temperatures will get into single figures but still a frost free picture _ figures but still a frost free picture as we head to the first day of november. on monday pressure and winds rotating around the low pressure _ winds rotating around the low pressure bringing more rain into the north— pressure bringing more rain into the north and _ pressure bringing more rain into the north and west of the uk. as those winds— north and west of the uk. as those winds develop over the next few days. _ winds develop over the next few days, things will turn colder as we move _ days, things will turn colder as we move into — days, things will turn colder as we move into the middle part of the week _ move into the middle part of the week for— move into the middle part of the week. for monday itself, most of the rain will— week. for monday itself, most of the rain will he _ week. for monday itself, most of the rain will be across western scotland and north—west england. warning here for a heavy— and north—west england. warning here for a heavy rain from the met office and still— for a heavy rain from the met office and still some flood warnings. elsewhere sunny spells and scattered, blustery showers and the odd thunderstorm around. monday
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night _ odd thunderstorm around. monday night into— odd thunderstorm around. monday night into tuesday, as low pressure drifts _ night into tuesday, as low pressure drifts into— night into tuesday, as low pressure drifts into the north—east, not quite — drifts into the north—east, not quite as— drifts into the north—east, not quite as windy into the middle part of the _ quite as windy into the middle part of the week and with a north—westerly breeze cooler air, clear— north—westerly breeze cooler air, clear skies— north—westerly breeze cooler air, clear skies and overnight frosts likely — clear skies and overnight frosts likely we _ clear skies and overnight frosts likely. we have not seen the first widespread frost of the season but may see _ widespread frost of the season but may see it— widespread frost of the season but may see it next week. from tuesday onwards— may see it next week. from tuesday onwards you — may see it next week. from tuesday onwards you can see a return to more sunny— onwards you can see a return to more sunny spells _ onwards you can see a return to more sunny spells on the outlook. things will eventually come down into the first week — will eventually come down into the first week of november. still heavy rain over— first week of november. still heavy rain over the next few days and things— rain over the next few days and things are _ rain over the next few days and things are going to turn colder as we move — things are going to turn colder as we move into the middle of the week. this could be the week forgetting the hot water bottle out. pupils in england return to school this week following the half—term break and with covid rates high across the age group health teams
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will visit hundreds of schools in an effort to get more young people vaccinated. let's speak about this and more with professor adam finn, a paediatrician who also sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation — hejoins us now. the latest figures went up and we have seen a slight drop off this week. is that related to schools being off for half term and is it important the vaccine roll—out in school are successful? the important the vaccine roll-out in school are successful? the figures are inching — school are successful? the figures are inching up _ school are successful? the figures are inching up and _ school are successful? the figures are inching up and down _ school are successful? the figures are inching up and down a - school are successful? the figures are inching up and down a bit. it i school are successful? the figuresj are inching up and down a bit. it is are inching up and down a bit. it is a relief they are not going relentlessly up. i think the slight drops we saw probably happened a bit too soon to be attributed to schools, except that it may have resulted in less tests being done and that may have made the figures look a little bit lower and it takes a week or so for children being a part to contribute to bringing down the rates. ~ : ,
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part to contribute to bringing down the rates. ~ . , ., . :, the rates. what is the advice for arents the rates. what is the advice for parents who _ the rates. what is the advice for parents who are _ the rates. what is the advice for parents who are offered - the rates. what is the advice for parents who are offered by i the rates. what is the advice for parents who are offered by the l parents who are offered by the school and asked to sign a consent form for the child as a secondary pupil, what can you reassure them with if they have any concerns? t think they need to look at the information being provided and make their decision. clearly, the more children we have immunised the more immunity there is in that part of the population, and that will contribute to bringing those numbers down. the main driver, of course, for the paediatric programme is to try to minimise the chance of further disruption to education, which is really the major harm this pandemic is done to all of our children stop searches away of contributing to making that less likely to happen and there are of course always risks and benefits to be considered and people can make their own decisions but it is definitely contributing to increasing the overall immunity we have got and that is really useful.
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is it at the pace you would like? t think we would all like to see things happen faster. i think there has been a lot of pressure put on the nhs to deliver multiple different parts of this programme at the moment and in particular in schools we have other vaccine programmes that need to be delivered as well which may in some senses be more important. but things are happening and we are glad to see so many people come forward. th the happening and we are glad to see so many people come forward. in the usa at the food and — many people come forward. in the usa at the food and drug _ many people come forward. in the usa at the food and drug administration i at the food and drug administration there has approved the use of the pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11. could we see primary children here vaccinated? t five to 11. could we see primary children here vaccinated? i think there is every — children here vaccinated? i think there is every likelihood - children here vaccinated? i think there is every likelihood the i there is every likelihood the european and uk regulators will look at the same data and provide
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approval because of the study that pfizer have done with the vaccine actually at a lower dose is very good at producing an immune response in younger kids and they have not seen problems. whether or not that translates into policy in due course is another question and we will have to see how things are going at that point and if there is a real need to do that, but i think we will probably see the vaccine approved for that age group in due course it is well. t5 for that age group in due course it is well. , ., , for that age group in due course it is well. , . , ., ,:, :, for that age group in due course it is well. , . , . ., , is well. is there any reason to be more concerned _ is well. is there any reason to be more concerned about _ is well. is there any reason to be more concerned about smaller. more concerned about smaller children having the vaccine compared to teenagers? t children having the vaccine compared to teenagers?— to teenagers? i think it is more of a matter that _ to teenagers? i think it is more of a matter that as _ to teenagers? i think it is more of a matter that as you _ to teenagers? i think it is more of a matter that as you get - to teenagers? i think it is more of a matter that as you get younger| to teenagers? i think it is more of. a matter that as you get younger and younger, covid becomes a milder and milder disease which is an enormous mercy amongst all the harm and destruction this virus has caused us. it very rarely makes healthy children sick in any serious way so we would not want to run programme
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to all these younger children if there was not a need to do it but of course if there is a need to do it we should go forward with that so we will need to look at the evidence, see where we are with the epidemic at the time that this becomes a possibility and then make a decision. and just as with the adolescents, it will be up to the prince to make the final decision whether or not they wish to have their children immunised, if indeed their children immunised, if indeed the decision is made to take the vaccine forward right down to that age. that vaccine forward right down to that a . e. : , vaccine forward right down to that a t e. �* , :, vaccine forward right down to that a . e. : , ., , vaccine forward right down to that ace. : , :, , . ., age. at the beginning of this chat, ou age. at the beginning of this chat, you mention _ age. at the beginning of this chat, you mention the _ age. at the beginning of this chat, you mention the numbers - age. at the beginning of this chat, you mention the numbers had i age. at the beginning of this chat, | you mention the numbers had been going up and then come down slightly and you said that was reassuring. can we read anything into that? this time last week we were talking about potentially facing another lockdown in the run—up to christmas. do you think the combination of vaccine top ups and herd immunity means we are moving in a better direction? there are multiple _ moving in a better direction? there are multiple factors _ moving in a better direction? there are multiple factors that _ moving in a better direction? ttee are multiple factors that influence these numbers and the vaccine programme and the head immunity you
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refer to comes from both vaccination and actually having had the infection only part of the story. at the moment there are still a lot of susceptible people out there as we can see the number of cases we are seeing. and so how people are behaving when the go indoors, whether they wear masks and whether they make an effort to avoid large and crowded indoor spaces, whether they are taking lateral flow tests before going to work or going out socialising, all these things are influencing the number of cases we are seeing. it's notjust a matter of the vaccine programme. yes, things are inching up over the last month or so. what we are hoping for is to see that stabilise, plateau and eventually those cases start going down a number. if and when that happens, we can all begin to be more relaxed but for now i would advise people to need to be really careful. 50 advise people to need to be really careful. , :, advise people to need to be really careful, , :, ., advise people to need to be really careful. , :, ., , careful. so you are still quite
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worried? _ careful. so you are still quite worried? we _ careful. so you are still quite worried? we are _ careful. so you are still quite worried? we are all - careful. so you are still quite worried? we are all still i careful. so you are still quite i worried? we are all still watching us anxiously. _ worried? we are all still watching us anxiously, hoping _ worried? we are all still watching us anxiously, hoping we - worried? we are all still watching us anxiously, hoping we get i worried? we are all still watching us anxiously, hoping we get to i worried? we are all still watching us anxiously, hoping we get to al us anxiously, hoping we get to a point where we can get to more normality but there are still very large numbers of cases and there is a lot around at the moment and people need to continue to be aware of that. ., ,, . ., , of that. the health secretary said no that peeple — of that. the health secretary said no that people can _ of that. the health secretary said no that people can get _ of that. the health secretary said no that people can get their - of that. the health secretary said i no that people can get their booster less than six months after the second dose which is reassuring. you will also be aware of the data from imperial college which says people who have had to vaccine doses can be as infectious as those who have not had the jab. for a long time we were told that doubly vaccinated people were less of a risk to pass the virus on so should be be concerned? two really important questions. on the booster side of things, just to be clear that the policy is still six months. what has been announced as there should be some sensible
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approach taken so people who are marginally less than six months but are in an old folks home where the vaccine is being produced should not be deprived of the vaccine at that point so it is a kind of logistical permission to make sensible decisions but the policy are still six months for the posters as people become eligible. the six months for the posters as people become eligible.— become eligible. the imperial colle . e become eligible. the imperial college with _ become eligible. the imperial college with the _ become eligible. the imperial college with the other - become eligible. the imperial college with the other thing i become eligible. the imperial- college with the other thing about doubly vaccinated people being a risk of passing it on which we were told was not the case for a long time. , , ., ., , told was not the case for a long time. , ,. ., , ., time. this is a really important study from _ time. this is a really important study from imperial— time. this is a really important study from imperial college. . time. this is a really important study from imperial college. it j time. this is a really important l study from imperial college. it is important to emphasise that what it is showing is that if you are unlucky enough to get the infection after being fully vaccinated you are still infectious other people like people who have not been vaccinated to get the infection. nevertheless,
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you're less, cover risk overall because having had the vaccination which are less likely to get the virus in the first place. it is not showing the vaccine is not having any impact on onward transmission because the vaccine does stop you getting the infection moderately well and stops you getting sick extremely well but if you do get the infection having been vaccinated you are still infectious and need to take the same precautions as everybody else. i5 take the same precautions as everybody else.— everybody else. is there any evidence _ everybody else. is there any evidence at _ everybody else. is there any evidence at the _ everybody else. is there any evidence at the moment - everybody else. is there any - evidence at the moment regarding testing from another country where people are now switched toward the lateral flow test within a day or two of the returning? is there any evidence to suggest that will change for the viruses? i evidence to suggest that will change for the viruses?— for the viruses? i am quite in favour of _ for the viruses? i am quite in favour of the _ for the viruses? i am quite in favour of the switch - for the viruses? i am quite in favour of the switch from - for the viruses? i am quite in l favour of the switch from doing for the viruses? i am quite in - favour of the switch from doing pcr to the lateral flow because the lateral flow gives you a quick result as you know straight away if you are infectious and it is a test
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of infection us rather than a test of infection us rather than a test of infection. the pcr is much more sensitive and tell you if you have the virus but the lateral flow will tell you if you are infectious to other people and will tell you straight away. we do not yet know really whether there is any change as the result of that change the rules. it is onlyjust happened. but i think it is a logical step in the right direction because those tests to give you these instant results thank you very much, we are very grateful to you for taking the time to top to us. you see less people wearing masks but it is still important. coming up in the next half hour: we'll be bringing you all the latest drama from the dance floor as strictly come dancing's halloween week got off to a spooky start including a special appearance
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from our very own rock lobster. stay with us, lots more to come.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. hello, good morning. sorry... you tell them the _ hello, good morning. sorry... you tell them the time. _ hello, good morning. sorry... you tell them the time. you _ hello, good morning. sorry... you tell them the time. you seem - hello, good morning. sorry... you| tell them the time. you seem very keen. it's half _ tell them the time. you seem very keen. it's half past _ tell them the time. you seem very keen. it's half past eight. - tell them the time. you seem very keen. it's half past eight. it - tell them the time. you seem very keen. it's half past eight. it is - keen. it's half past eight. it is half ast eight, the clocks have gone back, remember. the un climate conference... the un climate change conference begins in glasgow in just two days. ahead of that global summit, ros atkins has taken a look at which countries are the largest producers of greenhouse gases.
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the un's climate summit, cop26, is here. and central to it are the world's biggest emitters, because four territories are responsible for more than half of the world's emissions — china, the us, india and europe. and i want to look at their promises and policies. so we'll look at europe, india and the us in a moment, but first of all, china. it produces 27% of all co2 emissions, more than any other country. it's at the heart of this issue, as the us emphasises. we're all going to be dealing with this, certainly for the rest of our lives. this challenge is as big as any that we face on a global basis. and china, my friend, plays a supercritical role. but is china willing to play that critical role? is it willing to adapt how it industrialises? well, china has made commitments. it's emissions have almost quadrupled since 1990, but it says they'll peak before 2030. the blue line here shows it's on target to do that, though right now china's emissions are going up, unlike for example the us.
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china also wants to be carbon neutral by 2060. that path is shown here in red. the us and the eu are aiming for2050. the context, though, is that the west's industrialised economies were created on the back of fossil fuels. president xi argues that if the west wants developing countries to become wealthier via a different route, the west needs to help. translation: developed countries need to increase climate _ ambition and action, and make concrete efforts to help developing countries accelerate the transition to green and low—carbon development. the problem is that while china and the west disagree over who bears the cost, climate analysts are clear — china's current plan just isn't enough. they argue china needs to be following this yellow line. adair turner chairs a think tank on industry and climate. he puts it like this. a simple mathematical fact — that if china does not peak emissions until 2030,
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i do not think we have anything like a 50—50 chance of limiting global warming to 1.5 celsius. and at the heart of this is coal. over half of china's energy comes from it, and while china says coal use will fall after 2026 and that it won't build any new coal plants abroad, inside china they keep coming. the campaign group greenpeace says 2a plants were approved in the first half of this year. the analyst byford tsang explains why. what's stopping china to go further in the domestic coal is the fact that a large section of the economy is dependent on coal—fired power. another factor is manufacturing. china is often described as the world's factory, and it's estimated that 10% of china's emissions come from producing goods for export, goods we all consume. and while much of china's industry is fuelled by coal, it is also looking beyond it.
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china has built hundreds of solar power plants. it also made nearly half of all electric cars in the last decade. and it's a world leader in treeplanting, something that helps absorb carbon. but treeplanting and technology alone won't resolve the central issue here. many millions of chinese have a new degree of financial security thanks to industrialisation. china fears cutting emissions too quickly jeopardises that. some, though, argue that trade—off may soon be gone. what they're tackling is a huge, massive economy which is growing at 10% every single year and they're trying to actually lift all of their population out of extreme poverty, which was their central goal. now they've almost done that, then they can actually focus on how we produce our energy. the issue is whether china reaches that point before it's too late for our climate.
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now, let's go back to this chart, because while china produces more emissions overall — per capita, america is higher. the us is responsible for ii% of global co2 output, and president biden wants to reduce american emissions. the united states sets out on the road to cut greenhouse gases in half, and half by the end of this decade. that's the ambition. some don't think america means it. the biden administration doesn't seem to take the climate crisis the least bit serious, since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure. well, let's look at america's promises and how they compare with its actions, and some progress has been made. us emissions peaked in 2005, they've fallen since. and president biden wants to reach half of that peak by 2030. christiana figueres masterminded the paris climate agreement, and this is her assessment. it is actually the largest additional national reduction proposed in this round of 2020
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and '21 climate target updates, so very significant. the target's true significance, though, will be if america hits it, and this projection shows us the us is not on course. to change that will require a major shift, which comes down to personal and political choices, not least on energy. president biden wants us energy to be carbon—free by 2035. key to that plan is how america makes it's electricity. this is about using fewer fossil fuels and producing fewer fossil fuels. the president has acted on this too. he announced a moratorium on all new oil and gas leases on public lands and waters, but as this headline from ap notes, "us drilling approvals have increased, despite biden climate pledge". that's on [and already leased. it's a decidedly mixed picture on fossil fuel production, on energy and on transport. it produces more emissions
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than any other sector. by 2030, president biden wants half of car sales to be like these, electric. right now, though, it's not half — it's 2% of sales, so something has to change. the big push right now is on building the infrastructure that gives people comfort that as they move around this big country, they'll be able to charge their vehicles as easily as they can pull up to the gas pump. that's the big push, but for it to happen, two giant pieces of legislation need to become law. if congress votes them through, the us is much more likely to hit its targets. but the republicans aren't keen. cost is one concern, and as we saw in this campaign ad last year, jobs is another. transition from the oil industry, yes. no oil? that means no jobs. yes. that means a state depression. to protect ourjobs, defeatjoe biden. but it's notjust republicans who want president biden to change his plans.
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this is senatorjoe manchin. he's a democrat, chair of the senate energy committee, and he earns thousands of dollars a year from fossil fuel investments. he wants a slower transition from fossil fuels. politically, this is hard going for president biden. the us is aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050. that's marked by the red line. but america right now is the blue line. again, it is off track. unless more of its people and politicians are persuaded to do more about emissions, there will continue to be a significant gap between american targets and american reality. well, if that is the us and china, next, let's look at india. it produces more than 6% of global co2 emissions and its next move matters. we need such action at a high speed, on a large scale, and with a global scope. we in india are doing our part.
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that may be, but since 1990, india's emissions have risen sharply. that's directly related to the transformation of its economy. india is one of the biggest emitters, but look at its emissions per person and you get a different story. india's per person co2 emissions are 1.9 tonnes. compare that to 7.1 in china, or compare that to the uk, which is 5.5. unlike the european union and the us, india does not have a target to reduce its overall emissions. instead, its target for 2030 is relative. it's committed to slow the increase in emissions linked to economic growth. and because india's economy is growing, that target actually means india's co2 emissions will grow. now, the blue line here shows that india is on course to emit less than its target. climate analysts, though, say that india needs to do much more.
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they say it needs to follow this yellow truck to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees. but there is resistance to take on more. the indian minister for climate change said recently, we should not be shifting goalposts and setting new benchmarks for global climate ambition. now, there may be a desire for consistency here, but the government is also aware that setting harder targets will be, well, harder. this is why. india's coal belt helps power this vast nation. more than two—thirds of the country's energy production still depends on it. such is the demand that the country is planning on building or expanding dozens of mines in the coming years. and the demand that she describes connects to india's economic development. if we stop the coal production under pressure from the world community, then how can we maintain our livelihood?
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the answer here may lie in moving from one abundant resource to another, and india wants 40% of its electricity capacity from non—fossil fuels by 2030. it is expanding output to a50 gigawatts, but it has a long way to go. now, at present, only 100 gigawatts of installed renewable energy is being produced in the country, and definitely it is much behind the targets and the need. india argues it can only hit these targets with financial support from developed countries, and while the developing and world manoeuvre over funding, 2030 remains a key year. by then, india wants to radically increase what is called its carbon sink — its ability to absorb more c02. india is aiming to plant 10 billion trees to assist doing that. and for all its undoubted challenges, some, including the us, see india as an example of how the developing world can address poverty and climate change. india is a world leader in demonstrating economic development and clean energy is not a zero—sum choice, one or the other. but there are tensions in india's
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approach that remain unresolved. here is the prime minister, narendra modi, again. the guiding philosophy of back to basics must be an important pillar. the problem is that as developing countries lift their people out of poverty, back to basics is rarely part of it. as people gain wealth, they travel more, buy more, consume more, and the economies that create their wealth are industrialising. all of this creates emissions. if india can develop and cut emissions, it will help create a blueprint for many countries. but it's not there yet. the final big emitter i want to look at is the eu. its 27 member states, along with the uk, produce more than 7% of all c02, and the eu has plans. there is a race to cut emissions, and europe is out in front. the overarching goal was and,
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of course, is to make europe the very first climate neutral continent in the world. and some progress has been made. from 1990—2020, the eu reduced emissions by a quarter, beating its own targets. now the aim is to reach 55% of 1990 levels by 2030. it also aims to get over 40% of its energy from renewables by the same point. the strategy to get there includes carrots and sticks. you have to accept to change business models and behaviour of investors to finance green investments and to penalise those who do not make this move. key to the eu's climate plan is emissions trading. under emissions trading, industries are allowed to emit a certain amount of co2, with the allowance cut over time. it's the main tool being used to wean eu industry off the dirtiest fuels. first and foremost among them is coal. poland gets 70% of its energy from coal. the government is investing
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to change this, but its deadline to stop using coal is 20119. then there is germany. it produces more coal emissions than any other eu country, and if you look at the top ten entities that produce emissions in the eu, six of them are german coal power stations. this does look likely to change, though. the party's in talks to form a new coalition government in germany, and have agreed to end coal by 2030. olaf scholz from the social democrats is tipped to be the next chancellor. translation: it will be the biggest industrial modernisation _ project germany has undertaken in probably more than 100 years, and it will greatly benefit our economy. for other eu members, though, they remain practical concerns about the shift to clean energy. this is the outgoing czech prime minister. translation: the czech republic is a very industrial country. - we don't have the sea, we don't have many renewable resources. and while its member states grapple with finding clean energy sources, the european union is also
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tightening its transport policies. tighter emission limits for cars are coming. that will effectively end new petrol and diesel vehicle sales by 2035, and for travel there will be a new tax on jet fuel. france has gone even further, passing a law banning domestic flights where the same journey could be made by train in 2.5 hours or less. that, though, is one example, in many others, of course, europeans still fly. to use policies to change habits, people need to be persuaded. some are worried about the pace and the cost of climate policies. others, though, worry that they are not enough. the campaign group greenpeace argues this package is based on a target that is too low. celebrating these policies is like a highjumper claiming a medalfor running under the bar. well, some eu members are trying to move the bar up. finland wants to become carbon neutral by 2035, sweden by 2045.
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bear in mind the eu's target overall target is 2050, just like the uk. and if that is in the long—term, right now the blue line here shows current eu emissions. it's almost on track for its 2030 target. and as it pursues this, one word comes up a lot. at the end of the day, people are most worried, is this going to be fair? i think fairness is a crucial point here. fairness within societies and fairness between member states. fairness is crucial. we see the issue in many climate discussions. and if a climate plan doesn't feel fair, people in countries are much less likely to buy into it. there is, though, a risk here that a sense of unfairness becomes a reason not to act, and while the big emitters negotiate over who picks up the bill and who changes when, that our world warms dangerously. cop26 is the latest chance to stop that from happening.
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it's fascinating, isn't it? if you people made any point on e—mail and twitter the fact that the leaders are having a g20 in italy and then flying to glasgow. are having a 620 in italy and then flying to glasgow.— flying to glasgow. yes. it is tric , flying to glasgow. yes. it is tricky. isn't _ flying to glasgow. yes. it is tricky, isn't it? _ flying to glasgow. yes. it is tricky, isn't it? you - flying to glasgow. yes. it is tricky, isn't it? you have i flying to glasgow. yes. it is - tricky, isn't it? you have 25,000 people getting somehow to a different city and energy will be using that process but arguably they have to come together for progress to be made so... especially after the last couple of years we have had. we will be covering the cop summit over the next couple of days. now, let's check in on the sport. so england have beaten australia. on the sport. so england have beaten australia- they _ on the sport. so england have beaten australia. they wait _ on the sport. so england have beaten australia. they wait is _ on the sport. so england have beaten australia. they wait is going, - australia. they wait is going, england _ australia. they wait is going, england are closing in the semifinals.— england are closing in the semifinals. , ., ., ., ~' , semifinals. they are looking very aood. semifinals. they are looking very good- there _ semifinals. they are looking very good. there will _ semifinals. they are looking very good. there will be _ semifinals. they are looking very good. there will be a _ semifinals. they are looking very good. there will be a lot - semifinals. they are looking very good. there will be a lot of- semifinals. they are looking very| good. there will be a lot of indian families, mine included, meeting ahead of diwali and england having to beat... england hammered
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australia. england are on the verge of the semi finals of the t20 world cup after thrashing australia by eight wickets in dubai. they bowled out the aussies for just 125 with the help of this stunning catch by chris woakes to remove steve smith. england, of course, will face australia in the test format when the ashes starts in december, but it may not be as straightforward as this. jos buttler smashed five sixes on the way to england reaching that target with eight overs to spare. it means they have three wins from three in the super 12s. relief for manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer as his side beat tottenham 3—0 to relieve some pressure. goals from cristiano ronaldo, edinson cavani and this one from marcus rashford wrapped up a convincing win as united bounced back from their 5—0 defeat against liverpool. manchester city unexpectedly lost ground in the title race as they lost 2—0 at home
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to crystal palace. not a good day for city defender aymeric laporte, who was caught in possession as palace scored their first goal through wilfried zaha — laporte was later sent off. city are third in the table — two points behind liverpool, who also dropped points — they were held to a 2—2 draw with brighton. chelsea maintained their position at the top of the table after beating newcastle 3—0 at a packed stjames' park. newcastle were playing at home for the first time since parting company with steve bruce. all the goals came in the last 25 minutes, england defender reece james scored twice before jorginho added a penalty. rangers can go four points clear at the top of the scottish premiership with a win at motherwell later today. celtic missed the chance to go top yesterday. they were held to a goalless draw at home to livingston after giorgos giakoumakis saw his injury—time penalty saved. wales were overwhelmed by new zealand in their first match of the autumn internationals. they haven't beaten the all blacks since 1953 — and their quest for victory continues as they were thrashed 5a points to 16.
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it was an important match for welsh captain alun wynjones as he became the most capped player of all time with 149 appearances. unfortunately, he was subbed after 18 minutes with what looked like a shoulder injury. without many key players, wales were outplayed by new zealand, beauden barrett sealing the victory with this try. meanwhile scotland cruised to victory over tonga. rufus mclean crashed over twice on his debut, the first came in the seventh minute. kyle steen then added four of his own to become the first scotland player to score four tries in a match for over 25 years. and england's women begin their autumn campaign with a tough match against new zealand today. despite the rivalry between the two sides, many of the england squad will be facing the black ferns for the first time and that intimidating haka. not to look forward to. the women's
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fa cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, we say goodbye _ cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, we say goodbye to _ cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, we say goodbye to nina _ cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, we say goodbye to nina who - cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, we say goodbye to nina who is - cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, we say goodbye to nina who is off. cup on bbc two. this is ten to nine, | we say goodbye to nina who is off to read the news for andrew marr. showery get a weather forecast? thanks, rogerand nina. it is halloween today and the weather has got a few to exhibit sleep but also if you treats as well. it is going to be a day of some sunshine and heavy showers. quite a wet and windy start to the day for many of us. more sunshine developing as we head through the afternoon. moving on from the us behind this area of rain. this is where it has been raining over the past couple of hours. the rain is spreading across much of england, wales, scotland and northern ireland. . notjust living, also gilles, particularly windy. this area of lane largely creating.
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lingering longest for northern and eastern scotland where there could be a0 millimetres of rain some further flooding possible there. gusts of wind a real feature, 30 further flooding possible there. gusts of wind a realfeature, 30 mph in mild for some of us. top temperatures today 10—15. in mild for some of us. top temperatures today 10—15 . there will be some drier weather for parts of southern and eastern england for a time. if you're heading out trick—or—treating this evening, plenty more showers rattling in for northern and western areas. a little for east anglia and the south—east. tonight, it will be a windy night. there will be more showers rattling through in the breeze for the northern half of the uk. drier further south and into single figures but it should be a fuss free start to the first day of november. the pressure is with us on monday, winds rotating around that area —— frost—free start. a low pressure were clear to the north—east and that will open the doors for this co—director start to spilling from the north. a spell of slightly colder weather on the way. sunshine
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and showers for most places, more persistent rain for west of scotland and the north—west of england so possibly further flooding issues. 9-1a , possibly further flooding issues. 9—1a , touch cooler than has been recently built the middle of the week, is that low pressure shifts survey, not as many isomers on the map. it will not be quite as windy as we move into wednesday. we could see the first widespread frost of the season through the middle of the week we have not seen that so far this year. it is certainly turning a bit cooler is really week, after the rain of the next few days, does look a bit drierfrom most rain of the next few days, does look a bit drier from most of us. enjoy the rest of us. halloween is here once again and strictly come dancing didn't disappoint last night with its yearly spook—fest on the dance floor. it was a fantastic night with the first perfect score of the series so far for rose ayling—ellis
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and giovanni pernice who were on top of the leaderboard — and how can we not mention our very own "lobster" dan walker? and giovanni pernice who were on top of the leaderboard — and how can we not mention our very own "lobster" dan walker? here to take us through all the action is our regular strictly pundit and former professional flavia cacace—mistry. thank you so much forjoining us is always on a sunday morning. i guess i was going to say, what caught your eye, but i suppose it had to be rose and giovanni last night, didn't it? absolutely, yes. it was the best one of the night. and she comes back every week and she is getting stronger and better. it was beautiful. again, same as last week, really. heracting beautiful. again, same as last week, really. her acting comes from so well when she is interpreting a dance and her technique is getting better and better. for me, it was the best performance of the night, by far. it the best performance of the night, b far. , , by far. it is the first time there has been _ by far. it is the first time there has been a _ by far. it is the first time there has been a perfect _ by far. it is the first time there has been a perfect score - by far. it is the first time there has been a perfect score of- by far. it is the first time there has been a perfect score of 1a| by far. it is the first time there i has been a perfect score of 14 as has been a perfect score of 1a as early in the series. many strictly
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fans will know this, you can't emphasise it enough, but rose was born deaf so she has at that to work into how she choreographs her routines. i mean, can you imagine how they're able to do that? because it is just so beautiful. i how they're able to do that? because it isjust so beautiful.— it isjust so beautiful. i think that actually _ it isjust so beautiful. i think that actually adds _ it isjust so beautiful. i think that actually adds to - it isjust so beautiful. i think that actually adds to her - that actually adds to her performance. everything with cavani and goes is they dance as one and i'm definitely sure —— with giovanni. but with her being deaf, i think she is using her other senses much more and better than anyone else so the fact that their body contact stays united for the whole of the routine, it is to do with that. she is following his every move. so she is much more engine with everything else around her. and thatis with everything else around her. and that is why her buildings shines through in every performance. —— her brilliance. when you're watching her, you have absolutely no idea
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that she is having to use a different ways of hearing the beat, listening to the music. you don't know everything that is going on inside her and yet, the end result is amazing. i don't want to make it all about arose because there are other contestants in this. but if anyone on this —— about rose. but this compatibility with. .. anyone on this -- about rose. but this compatibility with. . .— anyone on this -- about rose. but this compatibility with... would she have compatibility _ this compatibility with... would she have compatibility with _ this compatibility with... would she have compatibility with any - this compatibility with... would she have compatibility with any dancerl have compatibility with any dancer or is it unique to this partnership? with volume dances you have to fit body was, if you have a very tall partner and yearn a bit smaller, you don't quite in. —— ballroom dances. she would have had it with most of the other dancers as well but there is a bit of a chemistry, the size of their body shapes just seem to fit together and sometimes thatjust happens. with those too, that is the case. and that is why there ballroom
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especially is very unique and very united. it is like they have danced for a lot longer than we have. talking about body shape, we talk about dan on this programme because he sits here the days of the week. he is six foot four, six foot five and it is difficult for a tall guy, we would imagine, but his enthusiasm and energy seems to be popular with the audience, it has to be said. and i fully admire _ the audience, it has to be said. 2:1c i fully admire him, the audience, it has to be said. 2.1c i fully admire him, i the audience, it has to be said. 2.1c ifully admire him, i have the audience, it has to be said. 2.1c i fully admire him, i have to say. absolutely. you're absolutely right. when you're six foot six, it is going to be harder, especially the latin dances, it is not easy. but every week, he comes back, he is training, he almost comes across like he is really enjoying it genuinely. his technique is good and i think thejudges genuinely. his technique is good and i think the judges said he genuinely. his technique is good and i think thejudges said he is genuinely. his technique is good and i think the judges said he is taking the small steps and he needs to work on the hip action still, but he always put any really good performance and it makes people smile. a lot of the programme you have to remember is about
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entertainment and the audience enjoying what they're seeing. it is not all everybody being brilliant dancers, so he is bringing that element of entertainment. anybody can dance. it doesn't matter if you're six foot six, you can still enjoy it and he is doing it every week. ., 2. enjoy it and he is doing it every week. ., , ., week. you can see anyone can dance, but i bet i can't- _ week. you can see anyone can dance, but i bet i can't. you _ week. you can see anyone can dance, but i bet i can't. you can, _ week. you can see anyone can dance, but i bet i can't. you can, you - week. you can see anyone can dance, but i bet i can't. you can, you can! . but i bet i can't. you can, you can! just a but i bet i can't. you can, you can! just a thought. _ but i bet i can't. you can, you can! just a thought, we _ but i bet i can't. you can, you can! just a thought, we have _ but i bet i can't. you can, you can! just a thought, we have about - but i bet i can't. you can, you can! just a thought, we have about 60| just a thought, we have about 60 seconds left, i want to ask you you think might go out this week, but anyone else, first of all, who caught your eye last night? i think it was a difficult _ caught your eye last night? i think it was a difficult week, _ caught your eye last night? i think it was a difficult week, the - caught your eye last night? i think it was a difficult week, the week l it was a difficult week, the week before everyone's standard was so high. aj came back really strong, tilly came back very strong. it seems to be the same ones coming back really strong each week i think the leader board is correct. you have a sarah, judi, dan at the bottom and from a dance perspective thatis bottom and from a dance perspective that is correct. it all depends if it is another shock result as to who
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ends in the bottom two, possibly with one of those three. if someone from the middle of the bird gets down, they will be saved by the judges. it will be interesting if the dance—off between sarah, judi and done, it will be very difficult for thejudges to make and done, it will be very difficult for the judges to make a choice because i feel they are only part, all three. so we will see. can because i feel they are only part, all three. so we will see.- because i feel they are only part, all three. so we will see. can i pin ou? all three. so we will see. can i pin you? you — all three. so we will see. can i pin you? you have — all three. so we will see. can i pin you? you have had _ all three. so we will see. can i pin you? you have had it— all three. so we will see. can i pin you? you have had it right - all three. so we will see. can i pin you? you have had it right every l you? you have had it right every week. in ten seconds, how do you think this week? it is week. in ten seconds, how do you think this week?— think this week? it is going to be between sarah _ think this week? it is going to be between sarah and _ think this week? it is going to be between sarah and judi, - between sarah and judi, possibly done. one of those three. and it could go in any direction. —— possibly dan. could go in any direction. -- possibly dan— could go in any direction. -- possibly dan. could go in any direction. -- ossibl dan. ., . possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicel . possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicely- thank— possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicely. thank you _ possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicely. thank you for _ possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicely. thank you for talking - possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicely. thank you for talking to - possibly dan. 0k, sat on the fence nicely. thank you for talking to us. one of the former professionals on strictly if you years ago. and you can see tonight's results show on bbc one at 7.15pm. that's all for today dan and sally will be back tomorrow from six o'clock.
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good morning, this is bbc news. cop26 i am live in glasgow as the as the summit gets under way. "the world's moment of truth" — borisjohnson urges leaders to use their summit in glasgow to start to fix climate change. we to start to fix climate change. need to make sure t leaders we need to make sure that world leaders come together and make the changes necessary.

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