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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 30, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. covid, climate change and iran — a few of the pressing issues world leaders hammer out at the 620 summit in rome. also in rome, borisjohnson warns the eu that french threats over post—brexit fishing licences are "completely unjustified". we are "completely unjustified". are going to get on ai things we are going to get on and do the things that matter to both of us. and make sure that we work together on tackling the big issues that face the world. there's some turbulence in the relationship. france's emmanuel macron says the row over fishing raises questions about
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britain's reliability. the two leaders will discuss the dispute at the 620 in rome tomorrow. three people have been killed in sudan as hundreds of thousands of people protest on the streets against the military coup. chaotic scenes as climate activist greta thunberg arrives in glasgow hours before the start of the cop26 conference. and church bells have rung out across the uk sounding a warning about the dangers of climate change. hello and welcome, if you re watching in the uk or around the world. after a long day of discussions in rome,
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620 leaders have signed off on a landmark deal to tax the profits of large business by at least 15%. they also discussed climate change, covid vaccines and, on the sidelines, concerns about iran's nuclear programme. the summit comes on the eve of an historic conference on climate change in glasgow called cop26. britain's prime minister boris johnson says that climate conference will be "the world's moment of truth." 0ur north america editorjon sopel reports from the summit in rome. good to go. and with that thumbs up from the american president the biggest gathering of world leaders since covid arrived could get under way. and everyone is relearning social etiquette. to mask or not to mask. unmask. to shake hands or not. shake. and with everyone back in the same room, the host,
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the italian prime minister, made a tentative call to order. i think we can start. and after so long apart, he urged a renewed commitment to working together. multilateralism is the best answer to the problems we face today. in many ways, it's the only possible answer. from the pandemic to climate change, to fair and equitable taxation, going alone is simply not an option. the great set piece of these occasions is the family photo, but then something unexpected happened, the men in white coats arrived. no, not to take them away, but to underline the role that first responders have played since the pandemic took hold, and how to speed up vaccine distribution to the poorest nations. there is also mounting concern
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about iran's nuclear programme. the leaders of the us, france, germany, and britain released a joint statement expressing grave and growing concern. but borisjohnson�*s most immediate concern is next week's climate change conference in scotland. here, he is shaking hands, but also trying to twist arms. the draft communique that's been agreed talks about the urgent need to keep global warming to 1.5 celsius. but for all the words in this draft communique, and there are a lot of them, it's very short on detailed commitments or concrete measures to limit carbon emissions. borisjohnson is going to have his work cut out in glasgow next week. and the pressure is growing. in 6lasgow they were on the streets today demanding action, and in rome, too. the world is going to be watching. john sopel, bbc news, rome. climate change has been high on the agenda for the 620 leaders.
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from rome, they'll head to glasgow for the crucial cop26 summit on how to reduce global warming. but for the uk and france, the row overfishing rights has continued to cause friction. borisjohnson said today there is "turbulence" in relations between london and paris, and the french are threatening to block some british boats from their ports next week. from rome, our political editor laura kuenssberg reports. 0ld rivalries and fierce fights, rome's coliseum has hosted a few. but it's the uk and france this time both flexing their strength. france threatening to disrupt trade if their boats don't get more access to fish the channel. do you think france is trying to punish the uk with this row overfishing permits? i think that the things that unite france and the uk are far more important than the things that
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divide us, and i must say we are a bit worried that france may be about to become in breach or is already in breach of the trade and cooperation agreement that we struck. president macron is going round questioning your credibility. you have been summoning the french ambassador into the foreign office in london. what are you actually going to do about it? we are going to get on. and do the things that matter to both of us and make sure that we work together on tackling the big issues that face the world. there is some turbulence in the relationship. if one of our partners decides to breach the trade and cooperation agreement that we struck, obviously that's a matter that we'll have to pursue. the prime minister may want to play nice with the french president and their other high ranking friends, but if macron goes further that power hug might not last. borisjohnson�*s lieutenant david frost wrote online that french rhetoric was problematic and troubling, and warned the uk could trigger legal action, a dispute settlement mechanism
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before too long. the fist bump isn't yet a dramatic punch—up over channel permits. borisjohnson has, to use hisjoke, much bigger fish to fry. 6etting other wealthy big countries to move faster. india, and especially china, borisjohnson with his wife carrie tonight wanting other leaders to stop and think, to believe that they ought to, they must give up more cash, give up more carbon. people are often very conceited about history and about our civilisation. we think that we can be on a remorseless forward march when actually we can be actively conniving in our own decline and fall. what we need to do is to ensure that at the cop26 summit next week, the world leaders come together. are you disappointed with what china has come forward so far? look, they have made progress on overseas financing of coal. that's a good thing. what china needs to do,
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i think is to find ways of making a more ambitious nationally determined contribution. they are not going to do that. they published what they said they are going to do and it's not enough. you must be disappointed. let's see where we can get to. in september, you rated the chances of success in glasgow as six out of ten. what would you say now? i would say they are about the same. borisjohnson hopes he will make history, brokering an agreement to slow down the warming of the planet. it is the metaphor. either the cop26 succeeds or the dark ages, that's what i'm saying, or could be the dark ages. but he is trying to corral many dozens of countries. there is certainly no one emperor who can rule supreme. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, rome. let's get more now on cop26 — britain's prime minister boris johnson has called it "the world s moment of truth" in combatting climate change. 0ur political correspondent chris masonjoins me now.
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what chris masonjoins me now. more has he been sayir is what more has he been saying? this is his eve of — what more has he been saying? ti 3 is his eve of cop26 words really, very important moment diplomatically for the uk hosting this huge international conference, i20 world leaders expected in glasgow arriving tomorrow night, many flying straight from rome where the 620 summit we have just been hearing about, i from rome where the 620 summit we havejust been hearing about, i of the biggest events the uk has ever hosted, in the words of number 10 downing st, the prime minister's residents. a big moment notjust for the british prime minister but more broadly for the un and world leaders trying to reach some sort of deal. they have 2 weeks to do it, but the real focus for international leaders, the summit starting on monday with borisjohnson at leaders, the summit starting on monday with boris johnson at the heart of that, the prince of wales, the heir to the throne in the uk, there as well, sir david attenborough the naturalist, the duke and duchess of cambridge and
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cornwall, and a recorded message from the queen as well. so a real attempt in the early days to hammer out some sort of agreement. they already have to go back to the paris agreement, the previous big international climate agreement, and sort out elements of that, while hoping, as far as borisjohnson is concerned, to reach something that, to use the phrase we will hear a lot of, keep 1.5 alive. that is the slogan we are hearing from boris johnson and others, the idea of keeping climate change to 1.5 above preindustrial levels. plenty of scientists say already that shipper may have sailed, and it could be way higher than that. but that is clearly no ambition. the phrase keep 1.5 alive, it sounds ambitious but as long as people are not saying it is completely dead and cannot possibly happen, they can claim some sort of success around that number, evenif
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sort of success around that number, even if some of the pledges in the next couple of weeks lead some to conclude that meeting the target is not likely. fist conclude that meeting the target is not likel . �* ., , not likely. at the same time, he has been talking. _ not likely. at the same time, he has been talking, written's _ not likely. at the same time, he has been talking, written's prime - been talking, written's prime minister, saying that he gives the outcomes at 6lasgow�*s cop26, only a 6 out of 10 chance. outcomes at glasgow's cop26, only a 6 out of 10 chance.— 6 out of 10 chance. yes, there is robabl 6 out of 10 chance. yes, there is probably an _ 6 out of 10 chance. yes, there is probably an element _ 6 out of 10 chance. yes, there is probably an element of - 6 out of 10 chance. yes, there is i probably an element of expectation management around that, politicians learn not to over promise and under deliver, it is better to do the opposite, under promise and over deliver. equally when you speak to people in government, they are nervous about pulling off some sort of deal, given that they are the hosts, and a particularfocus of deal, given that they are the hosts, and a particular focus on the uk, given it is the host of the summit. 196 different countries arriving, 25,000 delegates, each country has its own particular challenges around trying to reach net 0, some have made targets, some
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are yet to make targets, some want targets to be brought forward. i spoke to scientists heading to glasgow this weekend who think some 6lasgow this weekend who think some of the plans at the leaders would regard as a success are nowhere near ambitious enough. but clearly the leaders don'tjust have the prism of climate to look through, plenty of competing priorities as well. so there is 1 competing priorities as well. so there is1 heck of competing priorities as well. so there is 1 heck of a tall order for there is 1 heck of a tall order for the world to pull off something that can convince those who in some instances are apocalyptic about the coming situation for the planet around climate. to strike a deal thatis around climate. to strike a deal that is worth having. that said, plenty of political leaders will make the point that a huge amount has changed pretty quickly as far as the conversation on climate change is concerned. not that long ago, it was way down many lists of priorities as far as the pressing concerns of political leaders were
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concerned. most would now acknowledge it is the big international challenge. the big question is can they make a deal that makes a difference?- that makes a difference? chris, thank you _ that makes a difference? chris, thank you very _ that makes a difference? chris, thank you very much. _ that makes a difference? chris, thank you very much. we - that makes a difference? chris, thank you very much. we will. that makes a difference? chris, i thank you very much. we will see. the white house says the us and the european union have reached an agreement to settle a dispute over tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. us officials said that under the deal, taxes introduced during the trump administration would not be removed completely, but a quantity of eu steel and aluminium would be allowed to enter the us without tariffs. the actor alec baldwin has said production is unlikely to resume on the set of a film where he accidentally shot dead a cinematographer. speaking to photographers, who'd been following the actor and his family in the us state of vermont, he said he had been ordered by the police not to discuss the ongoing investigation into the shooting, but that he was eagerly waiting to learn what it had yielded.
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three people have been killed by security forces in sudan following mass protests. it follows the military coup there earlier this week. hundreds of thousands demanded the restoration of a civilian—led government. anne soy reports. thousands of sudanese are on the streets in the capital and other cities. they chanted in praise of the revolution two years ago. protests like these helped bring down then—president 0mar al—bashir after three decades in power. these protesters are back on the streets to protect that revolution, they say. "may freedom live", they sang. freedom from military rule — a strong statement against the monday coup.
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0rganisers called it the million—strong march. defiance against military rulers who declared a state of emergency across the country. but these civilians responded by staging protests from even before the coup was confirmed — and against all odds. phone lines are down, even short text messages weren't going through. there has been no internet connectivity for days, but they still got people out to demonstrate for democracy. and they have the support of much of the west. the us government said they stand with the protesters. britain and the un urged the security forces to allow protests to proceed peacefully. shops and businesses remained closed, and a nationwide strike by doctors, bankers and teachers is ongoing. two years ago, the protesters braved it all to get democracy. they say they will stay
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put until they return to the path to democracy, with a civilian government leading it. ann soy, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. western powers meeting at the 620 summit in rome discuss providing more vaccines to poor countries, and urged iran to return to talks on reviving the 2015 nuclear deal. borisjohnson warns the eu that french threats over post—brexit fishing licences are "completely unjustified". france's emmanuel macron says the row over fishing raises questions about britain's reliability. the two leaders will discuss the dispute at the 620 in rome tomorrow.
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more now on the summit in rome where today. 620 leaders have a deal reached three weeks ago by 136 countries on a 15% minimum tax on global corporations including tech giants 6oogle, amazon and facebook. it will make it harder for them to avoid taxation by establishing offices in low—tax jurisdictions. joining me now isjeremy mark, senior fellow at the atlantic council, and former official at the international monetary fund. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. this is quite significant, isn't it? the 15% tax, a significant win for the biden administration, can you explain why? i win for the biden administration, can you explain why?— win for the biden administration, can you explain why? i think it's a siunificant can you explain why? i think it's a significant achievement, - can you explain why? i think it's a significant achievement, for- can you explain why? i think it's a significant achievement, for more thanjust the biden significant achievement, for more than just the biden administration. the shifting of corporate profit around the world has really taken money out of the pockets of many
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governments, particularly in lower income countries. but for the biden administration, you are absolutely right, it is an achievement, in particularfor right, it is an achievement, in particular forjanet yellen and the treasury department who have worked very hard on this. i think the challenge now is going to be to take this multilateral agreement and turn it into concrete tax policy at the individual country level. as you can see in washington, the biden administration is still waiting for an agreement among democrats in congress on tax changes. so the jury is inevitably out on something like this until governments have follow—through. in this until governments have follow-through.— follow-through. in terms of following — follow-through. in terms of following through, - follow-through. in terms of following through, let's - follow-through. in terms ofj following through, let's talk follow-through. in terms of - following through, let's talk about the 620. what can we expect to come out of this? i the 620. what can we expect to come out of this? ~ ., out of this? i think the tax agreement _ out of this? i think the tax agreement is _ out of this? i think the tax agreement is probably - out of this? i think the tax l agreement is probably going out of this? i think the tax - agreement is probably going to be the big takeaway in terms of an agreement. there will be a lot of
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rhetoric about other issues, for example climate change, but i think this is the big breakthrough. i think the real takeaway, the real positive, beyond specific policy, is the fact president biden is sitting and talking and working with the leaders, and we are not facing a situation of 19 governments versus 1—macro government, which we did see throughout the trump administration. let's turn to debt relief. a lot of countries attending the 620, part of the imf talks earlier this fall. they were rather hoping that something concrete would come out of this. what sort of achievements have been attained when it comes to debt relief? if i take the example of senegal, they have not been impressed at all. i senegal, they have not been impressed at all.— senegal, they have not been impressed at all. i think you are absolutely _ impressed at all. i think you are absolutely right. _
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impressed at all. i think you are absolutely right. there - impressed at all. i think you are absolutely right. there have - impressed at all. i think you are i absolutely right. there have been some achievements. essentially almost 2 years of moratorium on debt service payments to 620 governments, multilateral institutions, which probably reduced debt relief of around $5,000,000,000 across a0 odd countries. not that significant but probably kept some countries on life support. howeverthat probably kept some countries on life support. however that moratorium is due to expire at the end of this year. there is some hope it might be extended in the communiqu tomorrow, we will have to see. but on the broader issue of the heavy debt burdens, the 620 did have an agreement on the common framework to restructure outstanding debt. there has been virtually no progress. 3 countries, chad, ethiopia and zambia, in talks, but not a single penny of debt restructuring has been achieved so far. and a big issue is
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that private sector lenders, bondholders, banks and others, are not stepping up and participating in this photo. still not stepping up and participating in this hoto. ,, , :: ., this photo. still with the 620, and we have the _ this photo. still with the 620, and we have the cop26, _ this photo. still with the 620, and we have the cop26, but _ this photo. still with the 620, and we have the cop26, but there - this photo. still with the 620, and we have the cop26, but there are | we have the cop26, but there are some key faces missing. does that matter? i some key faces missing. does that matter? ., �* ~' some key faces missing. does that matter? ., �* ~ ., ,, , some key faces missing. does that matter? ., �* ~ .,~ , matter? i don't think it makes a big difference right _ matter? i don't think it makes a big difference right now. _ matter? i don't think it makes a big difference right now. i— matter? i don't think it makes a big difference right now. i am - matter? i don't think it makes a big difference right now. i am told - matter? i don't think it makes a big difference right now. i am told the. difference right now. i am told the chinese leader, xi and vladimir putin from russia, participated via video connection. i think it's far more significant that president biden is at the table than who is not there. , , ., ~ biden is at the table than who is not there-— biden is at the table than who is not there. , , . ~' ,, ., not there. jeremy, thank you for our not there. jeremy, thank you for your time- _ let's look at some of the day's other news. in afghanistan, a taliban spokesperson has denied claims that the group authorised an attack on a wedding that left at least two people dead and as many as ten wounded. reports from nangarhar in eastern afghanistan suggest armed men opened fire because they objected
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to the music which was played as part of the ceremony on friday night. jordan has warned it will begin to expel foreign workers who aren't fully vaccinated against covid—19. the interior ministry said the expats had until mid—december to receive the two injections. there are tens of thousands of foreign passport holders from egypt, the philippines and elswhere working in the country. russian workers have begun a nine—day paid holiday as part of efforts to stem soaring coronavirus infections. the measures take effect as the government reveals its worst daily covid figures of over a0,000 cases on saturday. russia has europe's highest tally of covid fatalities at nearly a50,000 deaths. it's more than six weeks since the volcano on the spanish canary island of la palma first erupted, yet there are no signs of the lava flow coming to an end.
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some experts believe it could remain active for many months more. the lives of those who live on the island have been changed forever, with thousands of families now homeless. from the island, danjohnson reports. so far, everyone's been protected from the volcano. but there's uncertainty about what will happen next. and even the youngest lives have been shaken. the lava cut these children off from their classrooms. so now they learn in borrowed space with donated books. translation: they can't even go outside to play i because of the situation. it was very emotional to come back because i really wanted to see them. i didn't know how they felt. "i went to live with my grandmother", rodrigo says. "i thought it would end quickly but the volcano has destroyed houses". "it releases a lot of lava",
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sergio told me, "and it destroys trees and my grandfather's house". "it's beautiful", he says, "but it does a lot of damage". also here, eager to learn, are scientists from around the world, reading the ruins of this eruption. the runes of this eruption. and look how they examine the newest rocks on earth. a live geometry lesson literally as it's set in stone. this is science on a tectonic scale. these bubbles that were already in the magma get stretched out. the story of earth's origins retold here and now. the way it evolves and what magmas are involved and the timescales of the processes that are happening underneath us right now effects the hazard profile. the faster we can get information like that back to the people that
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are making decisions, the better more informed those decisions will be. parts of la palma are unrecognisable as layer upon layer of lava smothers and stifles one side of this island. the volcano is relentless. there's the noise, there's the lava and there are the earthquakes, too. on one hand, people are learning to live with this, but on the other, they're getting tired of it, they're afraid of it and everyone's asking, when will it end? that question comes loudest from the people living like this for five weeks now. there are six people in dacil�*s caravan but no sense of defeat. translation: | feel fortunate - because we got out even if we just had the clothes we were wearing. i could take my kids, my animals, we have a caravan to stay in, we're not on the streets, and we've received a lot of help so why wouldn't i feel fortunate? that resilience runs deep but every
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day more people find this eruption's impact is impossible to escape. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good morning. saturday started wet but quickly improved to sunny spells with a few isolated showers. some pretty miserable weather just recently isolated showers. some pretty miserable weatherjust recently on the borders, but a better day today with glimpses of sunshine. a similar story today, sunday will start pretty wet across some areas, with a significant area of low pressure to the southern flank we will likely see gale force gusts of wind, which may well act as a friend in some respects, pushing that heavy early morning rain quickly northwards. so
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it will tend to linger a crossbar north of scotland but an improvement as we go into the afternoon with a frequent glass shower is being driven in along west facing coasts. close to 30 miles an hour inland, possibly 50 miles an hour elsewhere. feel of the weather, 10—13 in scotland and northern ireland. 13— 1a further south. 0ut scotland and northern ireland. 13— 1a further south. out of sunday into the start of monday, and the start of a new month, the low pressure will drift into scandinavia. the wind direction becomes north—westerly, and more cool, which drives warmer yellow tones back over to the near continent, and the cooler air pushing across the uk, which means temperatures through the 1st few days of november could be a little bit under par for the time of year. we start on monday on a chilly note 1st thing, with clearer skies. a frequent rash or showers driven along by the brisk north—westerly wind, some of the showers will be
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pushed further south as we go through the afternoon. temperatures just 8—10, and to the north a maximum of 12— 13 further south. through the middle of the week, the north—westerly flow is likely to stay with us, and the ridge of high pressure trying to build from the atlantic. that is likely to kill off some of the showers but it does mean we are going to stay cool for the time of year. it also means we could see more overnight frost, and we haven't seen that much frost so far this season. it does mean that overall, things will stay a little bit drier and quieter, but cool as we go through the week ahead. bit drier and quieter, but cool as we go through the week ahead.
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hello, this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines. the prime minister says the cop26 summit opening in glasgow tomorrow is the world's moment of truth and calls on global leaders to seize the moment in tackling the climate emergency. meanwhile, the uk warns the eu that french threats over post—brexit fishing licences are "completely unjustified". lawyers for prince andrew claim the woman who's accused him of sexual assault is out for another payday as they ask a new york court to dismiss the case against him. bbc wales understands that a major river rescue operation in pembrokeshire has led to deaths. one person has been taken to hospital after a group of people came into distress in the water in haverfordwest. the south central ambulance service has declared
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a critical incident due to extreme pressures across the service.

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