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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 30, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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you are watching bbc news. i'm rich preston. our top stories: pope francis calls for radical decisions at next week's climate change summit in a special message recorded for the bbc. translation: this crisis lays in front of us radical— decisions that are not easy. but each hurdle also represents an opportunity that cannot be wasted. ahead of the summit, the pope also held an audience with president biden — only the second catholic president in us history. as the row over post—brexit fishing rights escalates, france says britain's credibility is on the line. american public drug regulator approves the pfizer buy to covid—19 vaccine for a 20 million children aged 5—11. and thousands of fans gather to mourn the death of the indian
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bollywood star aged just 46. hello and welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the world. with the crucial cop26, getting under way on sunday, the pope has called on the global leaders make medical decisions and to offer hope to the world. the message recorded by the bbc, pope francis said those attending should act now to attack global warming. the pope also met uis presidentjoe biden, who is in rome for a meeting of g20 leaders. 0ur north american editor jon sopel is travelling with president biden and sent this report. the ruler of the world's pre—eminent superpower en route to meet the world's most powerful religious leader. but forjoe biden, only america's second roman catholic president, this is an audience with his spiritual guide and clearly someone
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he admires enormously. you are the most significant warriorfor peace i have ever met. and with your permission, i'd like to be able to give you a coin. i know my son would want me to give you this to you. the president gave him a coin as a gift, and thenjoked about his irish heritage. i'm the only irish man you've ever met who's never had a drink! and the pope choose the bbc today — in particular, thought for the day on radio 4 — to deliver a firm message to the political elite ahead of next week's crucial c0 p26 summit. translation: the political- decision-makers who will meet at cop26 in glasgow are urgently summoned to provide effective responses to the present ecological crisis and, in this way, to offer concrete hope to future generations. joe biden agrees with the pope about the urgency, but will words be
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matched by actions? the motorcades will be sweeping through rome this weekend and through glasgow next week. world leaders tasked with saving the planet. so, no big deal, then. around the world, there have been protests of varying size to chivvy world leaders into action. this was the scene in tel aviv today. in glasgow, outside where the summit will be held next week, the demonstrators seemed to be outnumbered by security guards. and in london, greta thunberg was the star attraction — she's buried somewhere in this mob of photographers — and she had this message for president biden. when you are leader of the most powerful country in the world, you have lots of responsibility. and when the us is actually, in fact, expanding fossil fuel infrastructure, that is a clear sign that they are not really treating the climate crisis as an emergency.
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and this salvo to other nations from the former california governor and terminator star. all of those countries that come and give speeches, "we are not going to go and losejobs because of going greener" — they're liars. 0r they're alljust stupid and they don't know how to do it. joe biden, on this trip to europe, wants to show that america is leading the world on tackling climate change. but his 85—vehicle convoy — most of which were flown in from the us — may not be leading by example or, in this holy city, practising what you preach. jon sopel, bbc news, rome. after meeting the pope, president biden went on for talks with his french counterpart emmanuel macron. relations between the us and france had been strained since washington announced a security deal with australia and the uk. the aukus deal to sell submarines to australia sidelined france and was said
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to have cost the country billions. president macron said they were rebuilding confidence while president biden admitted things could have been done better. what happened was, to use an english phrase, what we did was clumsy. it was not done with a lot of grace. it was was under the impression certain things had happened that had not happened and, but i want to make it clear france is an extremely, extremely valuable partner. let's discuss this with a visiting fellow at the centre on the united states and europe at bookings and joins us life. thank you forjoining us. this did join —— thank you forjoining us. this didjoin —— fora thank you forjoining us. this did join —— for a wedge between these two allies. is the wound healed now? fist these two allies. is the wound healed now?— these two allies. is the wound healed now? at least there has been a lot _ healed now? at least there has been a lot of— healed now? at least there has been a lot of progress. - healed now? at least there has been a lot of progress. the - been a lot of progress. the least we can say is after recognising partly the
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responsibility in the crisis, the americans have engaged in good faith, in—depth consultation, which was what the french were hoping for and what we saw today during the bilateral meeting between president macron and president biden is thought of the result of this month— long series of consultations that involved high—level cabinet members on both sides and many, many diplomat and many other members of the advising corps but decided to get together on a joint statement which was put out today which lunches and holes —— jlauncher is a whole series of initiatives and reveals important new trajectories for the french american relationship. what are some of those _ american relationship. what are some of those initiatives, - american relationship. what are some of those initiatives, what. some of those initiatives, what does each side get out of the franco— us relation? fin does each side get out of the franco- us relation?- does each side get out of the franco- us relation? on the us side, it is _ franco- us relation? on the us side, it is a _ franco- us relation? on the us side, it is a good _ franco- us relation? on the us side, it is a good reminder - side, it is a good reminder that france is a steadfast ally which, by the decision of aukus
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in many ways, many french had believed aukus to be a form of betrayal from the americans, forgetting that france is on the side of america, has been a very reliable and capable ally engaged in counterterrorist operations but also, you know, a guardian of multilateral organisations and institutions at a time when the us was led by donald trump so in this joint statement, us reaffirms its proximity with france, it brings a lot of support to french initiatives, in particular moving assets to effectively do a sort of a surge in the french and european operations in this hell but also providing a lot of support for some crucial transatlantic initiatives —— the sahel. in particular the strategic security and defence
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front. with, for example, acknowledging the importance of the eu in nato, european defence but also insisting that, or reaffirming the need for us—eu strategic dialogue on security and defence which is launched now and in the first instance in december they will talk about the indo pacific so overall, in general, very positive initial statement that reaffirms the proximity of the two powers. reaffirms the proximity of the two powers— two powers. celia belin from bookings. — two powers. celia belin from bookings, thank _ two powers. celia belin from bookings, thank you - two powers. celia belin from bookings, thank you very - two powers. celia belin from i bookings, thank you very much for being with us.— for being with us. appreciated. thank yon _ saudi arabia has cut diplomatic ties with lebanon, following criticism of the kingdom's military involvement in yemen. the saudi foreign minister announced it was recalling its ambassador to lebanon and requested that lebanon follow suit, also declaring a complete ban on imports from its fellow arab state. the heightened tensions follow the emergence of old comments made by the lebanese minister of information george, kordahi, who has since apologised for any offence
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caused. in a previous tv interview, he accused the kingdom of aggression against yemen's houthis and blamed them for the deaths of civilians. the uk recorded higher levels of covid infections in the week to last friday than at any time last winter. the office for national statistics has estimated that 1.3 million people would've tested positive in that period. here's our health editor hugh pym. boosterjabs, like these being delivered in leeds today, are seen by ministers as vital in the drive to keep ahead of the virus. they are offered six months after a second dose but from today, the nhs has been told there can be flexibility on timing. for example, if someone, a doctor, is visiting a care home and there might be one or two residents that are just short of the six—month point, they can use their discretion and make sure everyone is boosted in the same session.
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daily reported cases may not be rising, but part of the explanation may be fewer school pupils coming forward for tests during half—term holidays. the office for national statistics does regular household testing, which picks up the underlying trend. the latest 0ns survey suggests that last week, 1.3 million people in the uk had the virus — higher than the peak injanuary. in england, one in 50 people had the virus. in wales, it was one in a0. and in both scotland and northern ireland, one in 75 people. there were increases in all the uk's nations. so, what might the 0ns data tell us about this week when it's published? i wouldn't be surprised to see a reduction in our data in the next week or so. however, what we saw this time last year was that little half—term reduction followed by a significant increase, so i really am not being complacent there. case rates may be higher,
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but hospital admissions are about a quarter the level seen injanuary, thanks to protection offered by vaccines. wales has the highest infection rate in the uk and new measures are being brought in to tackle the virus. covid passes are being extended to cinemas, theatres and concert halls from mid november, and other venues may yet be included. the first minister said this was necessary to allow a normal christmas, and the pandemic was far from over. hugh pym, bbc news. the us drug regulator the fda has approved the pfizer—biontech coronavirus vaccine for children aged 5—11. the decision is expected to make a vaccine available to 28 million american children, many of whom are back to be due back at school in the coming days. the superintendent of the high school union spearheaded a campaign which provided cash incentives for teachers and
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eligible students to receive the vaccine. hejoins eligible students to receive the vaccine. he joins us from phoenix. good to see you. what does this news mean for you. this is fantastic news, just for phoenix, arizona but our entire nation and you said 28 million children here in america ages five to ii and in arizona, 600,000 5—11 year old and we as leaders across our country have been doing everything we can to keep our communities safe that i think more importantly keep our kids in school. , , ., in school. does this mean in practice? — in school. does this mean in practice? how— in school. does this mean in practice? how does - in school. does this mean in practice? how does this - practice? how does this influence the way you are going to be teaching children in the classroom?— classroom? first, it's about iiettin classroom? first, it's about getting as _ classroom? first, it's about getting as many _ classroom? first, it's about getting as many vaccines i classroom? first, it's about getting as many vaccines to classroom? first, it's about - getting as many vaccines to our community as possible. we've been leading vaccination pods or sites since last january, giving out tens of thousands of vaccines on our sites and we will be working without elementary school here in phoenix to bring vaccines to our community, remove all barriers because the goal is what we call uninterrupted
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days, we want uninterrupted academic, art, activities, we want people on research, —— recess, teachers teaching and minimise quarantine and keep the kids in school.— minimise quarantine and keep the kids in school. what do the teachers and _ the kids in school. what do the teachers and children - the kids in school. what do the teachers and children you - the kids in school. what do the teachers and children you have| teachers and children you have spoken to have to say about this? a , ., this? our teachers are thrilled. _ this? our teachers are thrilled, as _ this? our teachers are thrilled, as you - this? our teachers are thrilled, as you know, | this? our teachers are - thrilled, as you know, because we have been able to vaccinate youth i2 and older, high schools and middle schools have been able to mitigate the spread of covid—i9 at better rates in elementary schools and so as we talk to kindergarten through fifth grade teachers across the valley here, across our state, they are thrilled to know safer and more uninterrupted learning isjust uninterrupted learning is just on uninterrupted learning isjust on the horizon. has uninterrupted learning is 'ust on the horizon.i uninterrupted learning is 'ust on the horizon. has there been any pushback _ on the horizon. has there been any pushback from _ on the horizon. has there been any pushback from the - on the horizon. has there been any pushback from the parents| any pushback from the parents at all? ., , ., at all? no, parents in general have been _ at all? no, parents in general have been extremely - at all? no, parents in general. have been extremely supportive. parents learned last year, the youth need to be in school. as we have talked to our parents, parents in arizona, they said one thing, that they will follow the mitigation measures.
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vaccines, masks, sanitising protocols. if that means that children get to come back to school and stay back at school. and if a parent or child refuses the vaccine or for another reason cannot have it, does that mean they cannot go back to school?— back to school? no, that's not the case here _ back to school? no, that's not the case here in _ back to school? no, that's not the case here in arizona. - the case here in arizona. that's not the case here in phoenix at this point. vaccines are not required. they are strongly recommended. students who are not vaccinated are still welcome to school. we do have universal masking indoors and do expect families to follow our safety and mitigation protocols but we wanted everything we can to get our students in school and we don't want vaccine to be a barrier but we do know that the vaccine is definitely a benefit for safety. vaccine is definitely a benefit for safety-— vaccine is definitely a benefit for safe . ~ , ., for safety. we believe leave it there, for safety. we believe leave it there. dr _ for safety. we believe leave it there, dr chad _ for safety. we believe leave it there, dr chad gestson, - for safety. we believe leave it| there, dr chad gestson, thank you for being with us.- you for being with us. thank ou. you for being with us. thank yon stay — you for being with us. thank you. stay with _ you for being with us. thank you. stay with us _ you for being with us. thank you. stay with us here - you for being with us. thank you. stay with us here on i you for being with us. thank i you. stay with us here on bbc news. you. stay with us here on bbc news still— you. stay with us here on bbc news. still to _ you. stay with us here on bbc news. still to come, - you. stay with us here on bbc. news. still to come, thousands of fans gathered to mourn the death of an indian
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at the age of 46. indira gandhi, ruler of the world's largest democracy, died today. 0nly yesterday, she had spoken of dying in the service of her country and said, "i would be proud of it. "every drop of my blood will contribute to the growth "of this nation." after 46 years of unhappiness, these two countries have concluded a chapter of history. no more suspicion, no more fear, no more uncertainty of what each day might bring. booster ignition and lift—off of discovery with a crew of six astronaut heroes and one american legend. enjoying the show is right, this is beautiful. a milestone in human history.
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born today, this girl in india is the seven billionth person on the planet. you're watching bbc news, our latest headline: pope francis calls for radical decisions at next week's climate change summit in a special message recorded for the bbc. here in the uk a woman who attacked her husband with a kitchen knife has been found guilty of his murder. penelope jackson, 66, admitted manslaughter but denied murder, claiming she had been subjected to coercion, control and physical violence throughout her marriage. she is expected to serve at least 18 years in jail. andrew plant has this report. february this year, and police arrive at a bungalow on the somerset coast. hello, madam.
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do you want to just step outside for me a minute? can you come outside? yes. - thank you. pennyjackson opens the door, filmed on police body cam. inside, her78—year—old husband is dying. the retired lieutenant colonel has called police to say she stabbed him. paramedics arrive. as she waited for the police, she told 999 she'd stabbed her husband with a kitchen knife.
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while she waited, pennyjackson wrote this note entitled confession. she said, "i have taken so much abuse over the years," adding, "may he rot in hell". the retired accountant claimed she'd been subjected to control, coercion, and violence throughout their marriage. the court heard david jackson had been aggressive to his wife on three occasions, 20 years ago. but the judge said it was pennyjackson who'd been the controlling one in their marriage. he said he had no doubt that she had intended to kill her husband, and he added she'd shown "not one shred of remorse" for what she'd done throughout this whole trial. there's only been one voice in this trial, and that's of penelope jackson. david jackson hasn't been able to respond to the allegations put to him around the history of domestic abuse, and that was a really difficult issue for the jury to make a judgement on.
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david and penny's daughter isobel said she'd had two fantastic parents. but from the moment an officer knocked on her door she knew she had lost not just her dad but her mum too. penny jackson was sentenced to life in prison — she will serve a minimum of 18 years. andrew plant, bbc news, bristol crown court. let's bristol crown court. get some of the days of stories let's get some of the days of stories now. the polish parliament has approved a plan to build a wall along parts of its border with belarus in response to what it says is an unprecedented wave of migrants and refugees in recent months. the estimated 353 million euros wall will replace existing fencing along more than 100 kilometres of the country's eastern border. and the us supreme court has rejected healthcare workers in the state of maine who were seeking a religious exemption to a covid—19 vaccine mandate. the
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court rejected a request by nine unnamed plan that —— plaintiffs. the mandate came into force on friday meaning those unvaccinated could lose theirjobs. queen elizabeth has been advised to rest for at least the next two weeks following concerns about her health. earlier this month the queen, who is 95, underwent medical checks in hospital. 0ur royal correspondent johnny diamond 0ur royal correspondent johnny dymond says it is significant that she still plans to attend next month's remembrance sunday events. this fortnight essentially gives her a couple of weeks now of not travelling, not meeting people, only carrying out virtual engagements, light desk—based duties, to recover from what seems like a sort of bout of fatigue. you know, she's carried out, what, three different engagements in the last three days. she has smiled broadly through a couple of them. she doesn't appear to be actually unwell, as many of us would see it. but she's clearly been a bit
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too tired to do travel, either to northern ireland, that was cancelled last week, or to glasgow, that was cancelled this week. and the doctors have said, look, no more travel for a couple of weeks. she will miss the festival of remembrance. that happens on the evening before remembrance sunday, but she will get to remembrance sunday. and the reason i bang on about this is because it is absolutely the most important day in the queen's calendar. it's the most important day in the royal calendar, but it is a very important day for her personally. and the fact that it was marked up by the palace is indicative, i think, of what this fortnight is about. it's just a chance to say, look, there's not much in the diary, but we're not going to do any travel. we are going to keep it and keep the queen in windsor, and we will be back on remembrance sunday on the 14th. there has been an outpouring of grief from fans of the indian film star puneeth rajkumar who has died at the age of 46. thousands gathered in
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the streets of the southern city of bengaluru, following news of his sudden death from a heart attack. aru na ayengar reports. he was known as "power star", for his action roles in the kannada language industry. he may not have been as famous as his bollywood fellow actors, but to his fans in southern india, puneeth rajkumar was a dancing and singing superstar. prime minister narendra modi led tributes, tweeting: i think everybody is in just a state of shock, myself included, because just yesterday he was performing on stage with his brother. and with a very prominent star called yash on stage, and to hear this news this morning, just has taken everyone by total shock. there were angry scenes outside the bengaluru hospital where the actor died. authorities enhanced security around his house, fearing violence by his fans. some chased the ambulance in which his body was taken from the hospital.
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puneeth rajkumar was the son of the legendary actor known simply as rajkumar. he starred in around 30 films with his debut action comedy film appu being one of his biggest hits. hindi—language bollywood is india's biggest film industry, but the country also produces hundreds of films in its 21 other official languages every year. the kannada language is spoken in the indian state of karnataka and surrounding southern states. the death of rajkumar is seen as a huge loss to the kannada language film industry. spot the robot dog has become something of a celebrity in recent years, developed by a team in boston it mimics natural movements and has been used in a variety of different roles. now, spot seems to be launching something of a musical career stop joining up with rock royalty as tim allman
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explains. for anyone wondering, mick jagger is the one on the left. although in some ways, it is quite hard to tell. # if you start me up, if you start me up i'll never stop... to celebrate the 40th anniversary of their album tatupu you, the rolling stones got together with the engineers at austin dynamics to create this unusual video of their song start me up. it is not just mick, there is a robot case, robot charlie and robot donnie as well. every guitar lick and drumbeat synchronised to match the original. why, you might ask? well, why not? # do you like it like this...
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this is by no means the first time spot has dabbled in some classic rock �*n' roll. # do you love me... classic rock 'n' roll. #do ou love me... �* ., # do you love me... along with fellow robot _ # do you love me... along with fellow robot at _ # do you love me... along with fellow robot at least _ # do you love me... along with fellow robot at least the - fellow robot at least the a—legged automaton has become quite the mover. no easy task for the programmers, but you can't always get what you want. it can be frustrating sometimes, the robots crash a lot. it is kind of a choreographed routine, it is an athlete that has practised these moves dozens or hundreds of times even to get that high level, that exciting capability. level, that exciting caabili . , capability. perhaps this will be the beginning _ capability. perhaps this will be the beginning of- capability. perhaps this will be the beginning of a - capability. perhaps this will i be the beginning of a beautiful career, spot making cameos in countless music videos. a robot that brings true... satisfaction. i think ithinki i think i have found a new training challenge for my non— robotic dog. you can reach me on twitter, i'm at @richpreston.
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there's much more on all those stories on the bbc news website or the bbc news app. stay with us. skies have cleared across some parts of the country and it's even dried out, but in other areas, it's rain again. the next weather front is currently moving into western parts of the uk, and the whole weekend will be very changeable. from rain to sunshine back to rain again. here's the satellite picture, and you can see lots of weather systems circling around the north atlantic, some of them moving in. this is the one that's over western parts of the uk right now. so if it's raining where you are, it's as a result of this weather front, and you can see it here through the early hours of the morning. the rain will be heaviest around south—western scotland, wales and also the south—west of england. in some areas there could be 20, 30, maybe even 40mm of rain.
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at the same time, this is 7am, it's dry in newcastle, hull and just about dry in london as well. but watch the weather front moving into central parts of the uk, and then pushes eastwards by late morning. certainly by lunchtime the bulk of that rain is out in the north sea. and the weather improves across most of the uk. it will not be completely dry, there will be showers around, but certainly a lot more sunshine around the second half of the day. 15 in london, around 11 in belfast and glasgow. then saturday night, a window of opportunity, a window of dry weather before the next area of low pressure sweeps in. certainly worthy of a mention, it's the fact that the clocks go back early hours of sunday. so here we go, sunday's weather map. here's the low pressure moving into the uk. a lot of isobars, pressure lines, which means there will be quite a strong wind blowing into western and south—western parts. gale force winds, in fact.
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here's that band of rain in the morning. by the time we get to lunch time, the bulk of that rain is out in the north sea. it dries out, not completely — some areas around the irish sea, northern ireland, we will have showers. now the good news is for some of the trick—or—treaters, the skies will be clear enough and i think there'll be some dry weather around as well. but not completely dry, always some showers about. and the forecast shows the weather will be changeable for the first half of the week, but towards the end, things should settle down. bye— bye.
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you are watching bbc news. the headlines. pope francis has urged world leaders at next week's climate summit in glasgow to take radical decisions, offering concrete hope to future generations. in a message recorded for the bbc, the pope said that with climate change and the pandemic, people felt increasingly powerless, frail and fearful. the us drug regulator the fda has approved the pfizer dion tech vaccine for children. they are expecting to make the vaccine available to 28 million american children, many of whom will be back to face—to—face learning in the coming days. a prominent film actor in india has died at the age of 46. doctors say he died from a heart attack. described as a superstar, he had acted in several blockbusters.

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