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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  October 29, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at six, a woman is found guilty of murdering her husband, whom she'd claimed coerced, controlled and physically abused her for years. penelope jackson stabbed her husband david three times with a kitchen knife, admitting the attack when police made their arrest. i admit it all. all right. she's been sentenced to life, with a minimum term of 18 years. also on the programme... in the row over post—brexit fishing rights, france threatens to block british vessels, while the uk says, "two can play that game." making treatment for the menopause cheaper. prescription charges for hormone replacement therapy in england will be cut.
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the president meets the pope at the vatican, with both hoping for progress at next week's climate talks in glasgow. and, celebrating immigration into britain, to mark 150 years of the royal albert hall. and coming up on the bbc news channel, manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer is in defiant mood, saying his team are ready to fight back after their difficult week ahead of their game against spurs. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. a woman has been found guilty of murder, after stabbing her husband to death following a row over a birthday meal. penelope jackson, who's 66,
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attacked david jackson, who was 12 years older, with a kitchen knife at their home in somerset in february. mrs jackson claimed he was violent and coercively controlling. she was sentenced to life in prison at bristol crown court. here's andrew plant. february this year, and police arrive at a bungalow on the somerset coast. pennyjackson opens the door, filmed on police body cam. inside, her78—year—old husband is dying. the retired lieutenant colonel has called police to say she stabbed him. paramedics arrive.
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as she waited for the police, she told 999 she stabbed her husband with a kitchen knife. while she waited, penny jackson wrote this note entitled "confession". she said, "i have taken so much abuse over the years," adding, "may he rot in hell." in court, the retired accountant said she was ashamed of what she had said and done. she admitted manslaughter but denied murder, claiming she had been
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subjected to coercion, control and physical violence throughout their 2a year marriage. but the judge said it was pennyjackson who had been the controlling one in their marriage. he said he had no doubts that she had intended to kill her husband, and he added, she had shown not one shred of remorse for what she'd done throughout this whole trial. there has only been one voice in this trial and that's of penelope jackson. david jackson hasn't been able to respond to the allegations put to him around the history of domestic abuse, and that was a really difficult issue for the jury to make a judgment on. david and penny's daughter read a statement in court. she said from the moment an officer knocked on her door in february, her world changed forever and she knew she'd lost not only her dad but her mum too. and their daughter isabel met out that emotional statement to the court that she and her husband are
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now pregnant with their very first child and she said that was a grandchild herfather child and she said that was a grandchild her father would child and she said that was a grandchild herfather would now grandchild her father would now never get grandchild herfather would now never get to see. penny jackson was sentenced to life in prison today and she will serve a minimum term of 18 years. andrew, thank you, live in bristol. the french ambassador to the uk has been summounded to the foreign office over the escalating and increasingly acrimonious row over post—brexit fishing rights. the french are unhappy about a decision from the uk and jersey last month to deny fishing licences to dozens of french boats to access british waters. in response, the french seized a british trawler and another was fined during checks near the port of le havre. let's get the latest from our political correspondent, alex forsyth. jersey is on the front line of the fight over fishing rights, caught in an escalating row. authorities here and across the uk say they have issued licences to french boats that can prove a history of fishing these waters, as agreed after brexit.
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but france says dozens have been unfairly denied. the local fishermen, like their counterparts across the channel, are frustrated and worried. the feeling amongst the fleet yesterday was one of absolute despair. certainly, there are really difficult times ahead and our big worry down here is how are we going to try and preserve the fleet and come out the other end with a fishing fleet intact. this week, a british trawler was detained by french authorities in a dispute over paperwork — a warning shot about what might follow. france has threatened further checks on vessels, said it could stop british boats landing at french ports, even suggested it could disrupt cross—channel trade or energy supplies. today, uk ministers said they were prepared to retaliate. two can play at that game, is what i would say, but in the first instance, what we're doing is raising this with the european commission. it is always open to us to increase the enforcement
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we do on french vessels, to board more of them, if that is what they are doing to our vessels. today the french ambassador was summoned to the foreign office, a rare public rebuke for the threats made. but while the language on both sides is ramping up, they are still talking. both here and in france, fishing is an emotional issue which carries political clout. borisjohnson promised british fishermen brexit would mean a better deal. in france, president macron is facing an election, which brings its own pressures. both sides have reasons to take a tough stance but both know a serious escalation could be damaging. this spring, french boats staged a protest offjersey over the same issue. the uk says it wants a diplomatic solution to this ongoing dispute. france has set a deadline of tuesday for it to be resolved. there is a time for flexing muscles and putting, you know, _ your trump cards on the table.
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there are times for negotiations. the next step is really negotiation. this afternoon, the prime minister left downing street to head to rome to meet world leaders, including president macron, who arrived earlier. there, the two are expected to have talks on the fringes, to see if they can relieve this tension. in the last few minutes we have heard the prime minister did speak to reporters on the plane on the way to reporters on the plane on the way to roam about this and he said he was puzzled about what was going on there may be a breach of the brexit agreement and that the uk stands by to take whatever action is needed. he suggested he would raise it with president macron but said he would remind him of the long history of a close relationship between france and the uk, saying the ties that unite us and bind us are par stronger than the turbulence that currently exists. he said he would be surprised if france tried to disrupt cross—channel trade but said the uk would do whatever necessary to protect its interests. of course this has not been the only point of
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tension between the uk and france recently, there is rarely a friendship that comes without a falling out and it is most often how you make up that really counts. ok, alex, thank you, alex forsyth at westminster. the uk recorded higher levels of covid infection in the week to last friday than at any time last winter. the office for national statistics estimates 1.3 million people would have tested positive, or one in every 55. in the last few minutes, the government has announced more flexibility on when you can receive the boosterjab in england. with more, here's our health editor, hugh pym. boosterjabs like these being delivered in leeds today are seen by ministers as vital in the drive to keep the head of the virus. they are offered six months after a second dose, but from today, there will be flexibility on that, with some getting the jabs more quickly, including in care homes. what we have done now is working with the nhs is to say that you can have more
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flexibility and be more pragmatic on the timing, and what that really means is if someone is very close to the six—month point but not quite there, then the nhs canjust be pragmatic. so, for example, if someone, a doctor, is visiting a care home and there might be one or two residents that are just short of the six—month point, they use their discretion. infections among school children have been one of the main factors in the recent rise in covid cases. overall numbers are now falling a little, but half—term may be part of the as fewer pupils come forward for tests. the office for national statistics does regular household testing, which picks up the underlying trend. the latest ons survey suggests that last week 1.3 million people in the uk had the virus, higher than injanuary. in england, one in 50 people have the virus, in wales, it was 1 and a0. in both scotland and northern ireland, one in 75 people. there were increases
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in all the uk's nations. so what might be ons data tell us about this week when it's published? i wouldn't be surprised to see a reduction in our data in the next week or so. however, what we saw this time last year was that little half—term reduction followed by a significant increase. so, i really am not being complacent there. covid hospital admissions are about a quarter of a level they were in january, thanks to protection offered by vaccines. but there are warnings that the months ahead could yet be challenging, with the spread of the virus. we seem to have stalled at a high level of infection, which is not where we want to be as we move into winter. it is really difficult to tell what is going to happen next. we could have exponential growth, or we could see a gradual decline. wales has the highest infection rates in the uk, and new measures are being brought into tackle the virus. covid passes are being extended to cinemas,
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theatres and concert halls and other venues may yet be included. the first minister said the pandemic is from over. hugh pym, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were nearly 43,500 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that's nearly 6,000 fewer cases than last friday. it means an average of 41,000 new cases were reported per day in the last week. the number of people in hospital with covid was close to 9,000 as of yesterday. there were 186 deaths — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive test. that takes the average number of deaths over the past seven days to 152. the total number of people who have died with covid now stands at atjust over 140,000. on vaccinations, 86.5% of people aged 12 and over have now received a first dose. and nearly 80% have had two doses. and 7.2 million people have received their boosterjab. this includes third doses for those with certain health conditions.
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within the last hour, buckingham palace has said that the queen's doctors have advised her to continue to rest — for at least the next two weeks. that means she will not be able to attend this year's festival of remembrance on november 13. helen wilkinson is with me, what more do we know? we wilkinson is with me, what more do we know? ~ . , ., we know? we had the statement in the last 20 minutes — we know? we had the statement in the last 20 minutes from _ we know? we had the statement in the last 20 minutes from buckingham - last 20 minutes from buckingham palace and we know the queen has been resting on doctor's orders at windsor castle following her stay in hospital last wednesday overnight for preliminary investigations, is how it was described. doctors had advised the queen to rest for a couple of days. we know she cancelled her trip to glasgow on monday for a reception for cop 26 and now doctors have advised her to have further rest for, in a statement, at least the next two weeks, at least the next two weeks.
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the statement goes on to say that doctors have advised the queen that she can carry out those light desk —based duties but she is not to carry out any official public duties for at least the next couple of weeks and we have seen her carrying out those video conferences and impact last week she did look incredibly well, but for rest for the queen, as you say, she will miss that date on saturday the 13th for the festival of remembrance but the palace says it remains that the queen's firm intention is to be present for the national service of remembrance on sunday the 14th of november. . ., ~ , ., treatment for the menopause is to be made cheaper, with the government announcing that prescription charges for hormone replacement therapy or hrt in england will be significantly reduced. women will now only have to pay once a year for hrt prescriptions, which the government says could save some up to around £200 annually. in scotland, northern ireland and wales, prescriptions are free.
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our political correspondent helen catt reports. cheering. they are menopausal and they came to parliament square to shout about what that means. among them, some famous faces who have made breaking taboos around the menopause a personal mission. i am trying to help one woman at a time but in there, we just saw the start of something where it feels like all women will get help. it wasn't political, it was, like, it was the beginning of a female revolution. i'm postmenopausal so... for many women, the symptoms that come with menopause can be a shock. it affected the way- i was thinking and feeling. yeah, from confidence to mood swings to brain fog. _ adelle now combines running this pub in kent with helping other women through a life stage that she found challenging. i felt like i'd just- completely lost myself. at the time, ijust- didn't know what it was. sorry. no, not at all. it was menopause, and this is why i do what i do, -
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because ijust didn't- want another woman... ..to look in the mirror and lose themselves like i did. - adelle says hormone replacement therapy helped her. it is free on the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland, but has to be paid for in england. adelle's patches cost £9.35 a time on the nhs, but other women can face a double charge if their treatment contains two hormones. in house of commons, a labour mp who has been a leading campaigner on menopause pushed for change. there is no avoiding the menopause for half of the population. most women will spend at least a third of their lives either perimenopausal, postmenopausal, or thejoy, menopausal. we must ensure that for those women who need it, they are not denied hrt because of financial restraints. the minister agreed. she said she would look at the charging policy for treatments which contain two hormones. she also said doctors would be able
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to prescribe a year's worth of hrt for the cost a woman would usually pay for one batch. i can tell the house that we will amend the regulations to reduce the cost and improve access to hrt, so instead of paying for a repeat prescription every month, or every three months, the prescriber can issue a batch of prescriptions for up to 12 months, with one signature and one prescription charge. so hrt will not be free in england, but it will cost less. another step in what seems to be a growing move to make real changes for women at a crucial stage of their lives. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. the time is 17 minutes past six. our top story this evening... pennyjackson is found guilty of murdering her husband. she'd claimed she'd suffered years of coersion, control and physical abuse. and i amjon sopel in rome, where
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president biden has been meeting the pope to discuss climate change. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel — a win at last for the defending champions west indies at the men's t20 world cup, but they are taken to the very last ball by bangladesh in a thriller in sharjah. schools across the uk, have been marking black history month this october, and from next year black history will become a mandatory part of the curriculum in wales. that isn't the case, however, in england, scotland and northern ireland, despite repeated calls from campaigners. at the moment teachers can choose whether or not to include black history in lessons. here's our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell. he is actually huge in history, garett morgan. do you know traffic lights? before traffic lights were red and green. so he invented the amber in—between to make it a three—way traffic light. new discoveries
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about black pioneers. classrooms in cardiff, like many others in the uk, have spent the last few weeks exploring black history. i think it's a really important thing. it's great to learn about where you came from, the struggles that people in your family have had. as we get older our country- is going to become more diverse. we have to learn to respect one another, our cultures, our- traditions. black history month continues to be divisive. every year we hear the same debates. it is a token gesture. why does it only last for a few weeks? and concerns about the range of content available and discussed. but yet perhaps more than ever, when there has been as sharp refocus about the black experience, race and racism, some say it's even more necessary, and that's what's happening here in wales, the first home nation to take action. from september next year, black and other ethnic minority history will be taught in all welsh schools, a move
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welcomed by campaigners. and last month, a statue of betty campbell, wales' first black head teacher, was unveiled in cardiff. but for most children in the uk, october is the only time in the school calendar they learn about black history. way too little and undervalued, according to the uk's first black studies professor. well, i think the first thing would be to scrap how we think about history, about how we think about social studies generally. i just thinkjust get rid of it and start again. when you think about the british empire, you know, africa, the caribbean, asia were part of britain. so when we think about the caribbean as being somewhere separate, as somewhere with a different history, we really miss the point. why only yesterday, in the morning chronicle... but it's the personal discoveries which can mean even more. actor paterson joseph, who has written and performed a play about britain's first black voter, was so moved by his story, he is about to release a book
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about the hidden historicalfigure. the more we know the more we know about ourselves, the more confident we are. so when i discovered ignatius sancho, for example, my confidence grew. of course i belong here, for many reasons. some of them negative, but a lot of them very positive. icons of the past many hope will be better acknowledged in the future. adina campbell, bbc news. e—cigarettes could soon be prescribed on the nhs in england to help people stop smoking tobacco products. the medicines agency, the mhra, has updated its guidance to allow manufacturers to submit their vaping devices for regulatory approval. it could mean england becomes the first country in the world to prescribe e—cigarettes as a medical product. president biden has met the pope at the vatican, ahead of a meeting of g20 leaders in rome. the pope earlier urged
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governments to come up with "effective responses," to deal with rising carbon emissions. this weekend, the united nations�* cop26 climate summit gets underway in glasgow, with the aim of coming up with firm proposals to limit emissions. our north america editor, jon sopel, is travelling with the us president. the ruler of the world's pre—eminent superpower en route to meet the world's most powerful religious leader. but forjoe biden, only america's second roman catholic president, this is an audience with his spiritual guide, and clearly someone he admires enormously. you are the most significant warriorfor peace i have ever met. and with your permission i'd like to be able to give you a coin. i know my son would want me to give you this to you. the president gave him a coin as a gift, and thenjoked about his irish heritage. i'm the only irish man you've ever met who's never had a drink! and the pope choose the bbc today, in particular thought for the
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day on radio 4, to deliver a firm message to the political elite ahead of next week's crucial cop26 summit. translation: the political- decision-makers who will meet at cop26 in glasgow are urgently summoned to provide effective responses to the present ecological crisis, and in this way to offer concrete hope to future generations. joe biden agrees with the pope about the urgency, but will words be matched by actions? the motorcades will be sweeping through rome this weekend, through glasgow next week, world leaders tasked with saving the planet. so, no big deal then. around the world there have been protests of varying size to chivvy world leaders into action. this was the scene in tel aviv today. in glasgow, outside where the summit will be held next week, the demonstrators seem to be
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outnumbered by security guards. and in london, greta thunberg was the star attraction. she is buried somewhere in this mob of photographers. and she had this message for president biden. when you are leader of the most powerful country in the world, you have lots of responsibilities. and when the us is actually, in fact, expanding fossil fuel infrastructure, that is a clear sign that they are not really treating the climate crisis as an emergency. and this salvo to other nations from the former california governor and terminator star. all of those countries that come and give speeches, "we are not going to go and lose jobs because of going greener", they're liars. they are all just stupid and they don't know how to do it. joe biden, on this trip to europe, wants to show that america is leading the world and climate change. but his 85 vehicle convoy, most of which were flown in from the us, may not be leading by example. or, in this holy city,
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practising what you preach. and joe biden has praised the pope for his leadership over climate change and also on vaccine distribution around the world. if that meeting was all sweetness and light, his encounter with president macron of france altogether more difficult after that defence cooperation deal signed between the united states, britain and australia, which has cost the french tens of millions in lost submarine contracts, joe biden conceded the americans had been clumsy over it and had been under the impression that the french had been told. i'm not sure whether they kissed and made up but they seem to have healed some of their divisions. jon sopel thereit live in the vatican city. archaeologists working on the route of the hs2 high—speed rail link, have uncovered what they've
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described as an "astounding" set of roman statues. two complete figures, appearing to be a man and a woman, and a head of a child, were found at an abandoned medieval church, in buckinghamshire. to mark the 150th anniversary of the royal albert hall, a new festival is opening tonight, to celebrate the contribution of immigrants to british life and culture. a concert by the musician nitin sawhney begins a week of events at the hall, showcasing the immigrant experience. nitin, has been speaking to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. nitin sawhney at the royal albert hall rehearsing his new work highlighting the contribution immigrants have made to the uk. it is the opening concert of a festival he has created, which focuses on this topic. he has created, which focuses on this to - ic. ., he has created, which focuses on this to - ic. . ., , he has created, which focuses on this toic. . ., , ., this topic. the idea was to counteract _ this topic. the idea was to counteract any _ this topic. the idea was to counteract any negative i this topic. the idea was to . counteract any negative ideas this topic. the idea was to - counteract any negative ideas of influence and who they are. i really think people who came to this country from the caribbean or from africa or india, or pakistan, a lot
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of them have got very strong, amazing and inspiring journeys that i wanted to reflect in the music. nitin sawhney plus my parents emigrated from india in the 1960s. he was born and grew up in kent. he is worried about what he sees as a tougher stance on immigrants and refugees today. i tougher stance on immigrants and refugees today-— refugees today. i have seen attitudes — refugees today. i have seen attitudes change _ refugees today. i have seen attitudes change within - refugees today. i have seen attitudes change within the | attitudes change within the concourse of my lifetime. when i was young there was the national front, who actually were very, very anti—immigrant. there was a time during the 2012 olympics where we were really embracing multiculturalism. things have shifted again, i think. there has been a lot of anti—immigrant sentiment. d0 been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment-— been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment. , ., , ., , sentiment. do you understand why --eole sentiment. do you understand why peeple have _ sentiment. do you understand why people have concerns _ sentiment. do you understand why people have concerns when - sentiment. do you understand why people have concerns when they i sentiment. do you understand why i people have concerns when they see the daily crossings from calais and there are people losing their own jobs and are struggling? ida. there are people losing their own jobs and are struggling? ha. i there are people losing their own jobs and are struggling? no, i don't see it. i jobs and are struggling? no, i don't see it- i get — jobs and are struggling? no, i don't see it. i get frustrated _ jobs and are struggling? no, i don't see it. i get frustrated when - jobs and are struggling? no, i don't see it. i get frustrated when i - jobs and are struggling? no, i don't see it. i get frustrated when i say. l see it. i get frustrated when i say. i think it's based on bigotry and prejudice and it is as as that. this
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woman is an _ prejudice and it is as as that. this woman is an american of indian heritage has been living in the uk for the past decade. to heritage has been living in the uk for the past decade.— heritage has been living in the uk for the past decade. to be able to come and be _ for the past decade. to be able to come and be at _ for the past decade. to be able to come and be at a _ for the past decade. to be able to come and be at a very _ for the past decade. to be able to come and be at a very important i come and be at a very important english — come and be at a very important english institution that's historical, that is classical, that kind _ historical, that is classical, that kind of— historical, that is classical, that kind of dichotomy and that interaction is really special. it's important — interaction is really special. it's important for voices like mine to be heard _ important for voices like mine to be heard because we have the potential to impact— heard because we have the potential to impact the next generation. born in riaht or to impact the next generation. born in right or wrong — to impact the next generation. econ in right or wrong location... sanjeev bhaskar will be reading one of nitin sawhney�*s poems, the two of them france since university, and together they developed these gadgets goodness gracious me. mumbai is the ca - ital gadgets goodness gracious me. mumbai is the capital of — gadgets goodness gracious me. mumbai is the capital of india _ gadgets goodness gracious me. mumbai is the capital of india so _ gadgets goodness gracious me. mumbai is the capital of india so how _ gadgets goodness gracious me. mumbai is the capital of india so how come - is the capital of india so how come every— is the capital of india so how come every friday— is the capital of india so how come every friday night we ended up here? that is— every friday night we ended up here? that is what— every friday night we ended up here? that is what you do. you go out, you get tanked up when you go for an english. get tanked up when you go for an enalish. ~ , ., �* english. when we started we didn't see --eole english. when we started we didn't see peeple like _ english. when we started we didn't see people like us _ english. when we started we didn't see people like us that _ english. when we started we didn't see people like us that were - english. when we started we didn't see people like us that were in - english. when we started we didn't see people like us that were in a i see people like us that were in a position to have a public platform which you could cure it. irate
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position to have a public platform which you could cure it.— which you could cure it. we 'ust didn't which you could cure it. we 'ust dun-t fl which you could cure it. we 'ust didn't see those i which you could cure it. we 'ust didn't see those kinda �* which you could cure it. we just didn't see those kinda people i didn't see those kinda people around~ — didn't see those kinda people around. and i think we are very much now part _ around. and i think we are very much now part of. — around. and i think we are very much now part of, you know, the fabric of society, _ now part of, you know, the fabric of society, whether people like that or not. �* , , ., , not. and while this is only the start of the — not. and while this is only the start of the journey _ not. and while this is only the start of the journey festival, l not. and while this is only the - start of the journey festival, nitin sawhney helps its impact will continue to travel. colin patterson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz schafernaker. rain has obviously been the story in some parts of the country. the river levels are running pretty high across the north west of england, southern parts of scotland. there is more rain on the way this weekend. if there is some good news, the good news is that the rain should be moving swiftly through. we will have a succession of bouts of rain through the weekend. right now it is very quiet out there for most of us. through the course of the night of the next weather front moves in. it is raining through the night in western pa rt is raining through the night in western part of the uk. this is six
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o'clock in the morning. from central and southern into the midlands, and these western coast as well. you should wake up to dry weather and possibly sunshine in norwich. that weather front will sweep through there during the course of saturday. that also means that later in the morning western areas will dry out. but this weather front will probably linger for quite some time in the extreme north—east of england, round the borders, eastern scotland as well. but for many of us, saturday afternoon is not looking too bad. of lengthy sunny spells and occasional showers. 15 in the south is possible. and the evening on saturday is also looking dry. the winds will drop out. it will not be bad out there at all on saturday evening, saturday night. before the next weather front moves in. this is the low pressure moving across ireland two early on sunday morning. you can see the rain wrapping around the centre of this low pressure. this is the morning. and swiftly moves the weather front towards the east through the morning. there will
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be some very strong winds around

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