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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 29, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 2pm: the french government warn they'll start blocking british fishing boats next week — the uk government says "two can play at that game" over the post—brexit fishing row. we will see what they do on tuesday but obviously we reserve the right to respond in a proportionate way. the pope calls for radical decisions from world leaders gathering this weekend in glasgow for the cop 26 climate change summit. meanwhile, the teenage climate activist greta thunberg says she hasn't been formally invited to the cop summit. of course, this is notjust a question about me.
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but i think that many people might be scared that if they invite too many "radical" young people, then that might make them look bad. last week saw the highest levels of coronavirus infections ever reported across uk. one in 55 people had the virus. women in england will now only have to pay once a year for prescription of hormone replacement therapy for the menopause. and archaeologists discover a set of what they call astounding roman statues — on the route of the h52 rail link.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. two can play at that game — that's the warning today to france from the british government as the row over post brexit fishing rights continues to escalate. the french ambassador to london has been summoned to the foreign office this afternoon. the french are angry about what they claim is a lack of licences for their boats to fish in uk waters. france has threatened to block british boats from its ports if the issue over fishing licences is not resolved by tuesday. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. rows over fishing are nothing new. this isjersey in the summer. french boats protesting at a loss of catching rights after brexit. now, the uk and french governments are involved in an escalating war of words. the uk says it's given most french boats licences to keep fishing here.
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but it has rejected some because they don't qualify. france is furious and has threatened to block british boats landing at french ports from tuesday. let's be serious, 244 boats with a pending license, this is not the treaty we signed when we dealt with brexit. the truth is that we have french fishermen losing 25% of their business every day. and, you know, it's something that we have to act on. this row could have an impact beyond fishing. france has threatened to increase checks from the uk and that could slow down trade over the channel. but ministers in london aren't backing down, saying they are prepared to retaliate if france takes action. two can play at that game, is what i would say. we've said that, for now, we're not going to respond in the way that france has. we're going to raise this with the commission and we're going to raise it through diplomatic channels with the french ambassador. but we'll reserve our right to do more things, obviously, if france continue to press ahead
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with these threats. this scottish boat was detained earlier this week in france. authorities said it didn't have a proper licence. but this is a diplomatic row that goes a lot deeper. the french ambassador has been summoned here to the foreign office in london this afternoon. that's something that's normally reserved for hostile states, not for close neighbours and allies. the uk says it still wants to try and figure out a diplomatic solution. but ministers have also held talks about what to do if one can't be found. it was all smiles when borisjohnson and the french president met back in june. they are due to hold brief talks on sunday at the 620, where the tensions over fishing are likely to make things a little less friendly. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. and let's get more now from nick eardley now.
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this is all, as we have heard, many mps are surprised at how quickly this has escalated. what is it all about at the heart of it all? we are not adverse _ about at the heart of it all? we are not adverse to _ about at the heart of it all? we are not adverse to rouse _ about at the heart of it all? we are not adverse to rouse overfishing i about at the heart of it all? we are not adverse to rouse overfishing in i not adverse to rouse overfishing in this country. they have happened a number of times over the past few decades. i think this is also a sign that some elements of the brexit trade deal, remember it was only signed at the end of last year, have been fairly complicated and haven't been fairly complicated and haven't been particularly easy to implement. there does seem to be some genuine surprise in the uk government how quickly this has all escalated. the french government seems to be genuinely quite angry at the way this has panned out. it's worth pointing out there is also some politics at play here. there is a french presidential election in april and emmanuel macron wants to be seen to be tough on brexit.
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whereas boris johnson be seen to be tough on brexit. whereas borisjohnson and his government we know is never shy of having a row over its relationship with the european union. that said, there will potentially be some talks over the next few days. we have the ambassador being summoned to meet the uk's europe minister this afternoon, potentially some talks over the weekend, and then the prime minister meeting the french president at the g20 for a brief meeting on sunday. so there is some opportunity potentially for some diplomacy to try and solve this, but it is an escalating row. as we have seen over the last couple of days, there is some pretty fiery rhetoric on both sides and at the moment it is hard to see how this is resolved. where does jersey and guernsey fit into this? , , , ., ., into this? jersey is one of the laces a into this? jersey is one of the places a lot — into this? jersey is one of the places a lot of _ into this? jersey is one of the places a lot of french - into this? jersey is one of the places a lot of french boat. into this? jersey is one of the l places a lot of french boat fish, into this? jersey is one of the - places a lot of french boat fish, so over the past few months there have
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been some flash points, you saw one in the package where french boats have tried to blockade parts of jersey harbour in particular, and another way in whichjersey is key to this story is a lot of electricity that goes to jersey comes from france and there have been suggestions on the french side in the past that if this situation really escalated and if french boats were really being kept out of british waters, then potentially the price of that electricity to jersey could go up and potentially at some point it could even be cut off. so jersey plays a really important role. the uk has always worked closely with jersey as a crown dependency to try to figure out the solution that works for both sides, but the big argument today really is between the uk government and french government and it remains to be seen whether it can be figured out before the tuesday deadline. the european
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commission — the tuesday deadline. the european commission have _ the tuesday deadline. the european commission have been _ the tuesday deadline. the european commission have been rather- the tuesday deadline. the european commission have been rather quiet| the tuesday deadline. the european l commission have been rather quiet on this matter. wouldn't you expect them to step in? because we are talking about legal action here. quite potentially, and it is worth remembering the uk negotiated the main trade deal with the european commission, the annual negotiations overfishing quotas happened with the european commission as well. and there are some in downing street saying quietly that it is france having this row, not the european union. a lot of it they would argue is to do with french internal politics. that said, if france pursues this, it is fair to say that the european union is likely to be on the side of its french allies rather than necessarily on the uk side. there is a broader question to be asked about how this would figure out legally and the uk government seems to think it is on pretty sound territory illegally that it would win potentially any court case over
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whether these boats that are not being allowed in at the moment, the french boats that haven't been given access to uk water should be. it comes down to whether boats can prove they have a historic link to uk waters and there are some that the french sayjust don't have the tracking equipment to allow them to prove that. the british say the onus is on you to provide the evidence to show you have been fishing in uk waters for some time, so you can see where the argument happens. but the uk seems confident at the moment that if this did end up in a legal case, then it would be covered by the brexit trade deal. you case, then it would be covered by the brexit trade deal.— the brexit trade deal. you have mentioned _ the brexit trade deal. you have mentioned so _ the brexit trade deal. you have mentioned so much _ the brexit trade deal. you have mentioned so much there, - the brexit trade deal. you have - mentioned so much there, quotas, qualifying vessels, butjust going back to british fishermen, were they happy with the brexit deal when it was finally agreed? it is complicated. _ was finally agreed? it is complicated. there's i was finally agreed? it 3 complicated. there's different levels of british fishermen, the big
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fishermen with massive quotas, smaller ones with smaller quotas. some were unhappy about how much of the quota was put on the table and negotiated away to the european union side. that said, they did eventually accept what was agreed with the european union with some caveats. there are subclauses, the you can talk about fish all day, there is also the question about some of the fish producers in the uk, so the places where fish is landed, they have had a lot of trouble getting their product into the european market. some of the fish caught in europe is exported back to the uk, some of the fish thatis back to the uk, some of the fish that is caught in the uk is exported to france, there is a complicated network that goes on, various levels of unhappiness and happiness. not everyone got what they wanted in this deal, although i think the
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message coming from the industry this morning, certainly on the uk side, is they want to try and get this resolved one way or another and not end up in some sort of trade war with france overfishing rights. nick eardley in westminster, thank you. the pope has called on leaders at next week's climate summit in glasgow to make radical decisions to offer hope to the world. in a message recorded for the bbc, he called on all those gathering at cop26 to act now to tackle the looming crisis of global warming and rising emissions. this morning, pope francis also met the us presidentjoe biden, who's in rome for a summit of g20 leaders. from rome, mark lowen reports. a rare papal media message for an urgent crisis. the environmentalist pope francis taking to the bbc airwaves just before glasgow's climate conference. he evoked the world's multiple challenges, but urged against turning inwards, seeing them instead as a chance for change.
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the pope himself won't be in glasgow, despite expectations he would, but he hopes his voice will be heard there, telling world leaders the time to act is now.
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from extreme weather to forest fires, to rising sea—levels, the climate emergency is critical, and tackling it is at the centre of francis's papacy. and he's using all means before glasgow to raise it. including today, meeting the american president at the vatican. joe biden shares the pope's views on climate change, and it will be a focus of their discussions. the president and the pontiff eye—to—eye on the key issue of our times. the leader of the 1.3 billion
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catholics of course carries huge moral weight, and by meeting key leaders before glasgow and by spreading his message on air, pope francis will hope to coax those at the summit towards an agreement. the political, the spiritual, the ecological all coming together in these crucial few days. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is in rome for the g20 meeting and he told us why it is so important. it's a huge, huge challenge for them because they've got a lot of things to deal with. as you've heard, climate change is top of the agenda. this is very much a stepping stone summit before the cop26 meeting in glasgow. the leaders meeting here at the g20, their economies produce 80% of global emissions. how much will they commit to cutting emissions and by when? they will also be discussing how much money to give poorer countries
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to adapt to climate change, and will it be enough? they have also got to talk about the covid pandemic. in the longer term, there's the issue of recovering their economies from the pandemic. how do they fix those broken supply chains? how do they deal with rising energy prices? and in the shorter term, there's the question of how do you deal with that issue of vaccine inequality? the fact that 60%, 70% of the richer countries have produced... have got all their populations vaccinated but that number is probably about 2% for many, many poor developing countries. how would they address that? gordon brown, the former prime minister, is calling for an emergency airlift of surplus vaccines. so two big issues for this summit to deal with, and it's a big test of multilateral cooperation. on both climate and on covid, many countries have addressed those issues unilaterally, by themselves. this weekend is a test to see if they can act more collectively. last week saw the highest levels of coronavirus infections ever reported across uk, according to the office
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for national statistics. the infection survey found that nearly 1.3 million people in the uk, around one in 55 people, would have tested positive for coronavirus in the week to last friday. but the survey does not cover the week that's just ending, where the daily number of infections has appeared to be beginning to fall. our head of statistics robert cuffe is here. those ons figures, i tried to explain it a little bit but could you take us through that? we have seen winter _ you take us through that? we have seen winter levels _ you take us through that? we have seen winter levels of _ you take us through that? we have seen winter levels of infections - you take us through that? we have| seen winter levels of infections but we are not seeing winter levels of sickness. we can show quite clearly in the data what we have been seeing in the data what we have been seeing in recent months, and the number of people in hospital is only a quarter of the number of people infected. this shows the trend in recent times. we saw case numbers rise as
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society opened up into the middle of summer, and injuly and october they bubbled around a lot, they are up and down, peaks and troughs all following closely. it is only in the last month they have started driving up last month they have started driving up again past a million and that reinforces the difficulty of having an open society as we move into winter when respiratory viruses like colds and coughs and the flu will thrive. that puts more pressure on and we will see the infection levels, there is a chance they could keep on rising. levels, there is a chance they could keep on rising-— keep on rising. how does that translate to — keep on rising. how does that translate to the _ keep on rising. how does that translate to the r _ keep on rising. how does that translate to the r number? i keep on rising. how does that i translate to the r number? the keep on rising. how does that - translate to the r number? the r number combines _ translate to the r number? the r number combines this _ translate to the r number? the r number combines this number, . translate to the r number? the r l number combines this number, and translate to the r number? tue: t number combines this number, and the government say this is between 1.1 and 1.3 at the moment. the epidemic is growing, is what they are saying, but it is worth remembering still hospitalisations and deaths are at much lower levels compared to what
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we are seeing in the case numbers. when we talk about the case numbers, those ons figures were for the week to last friday. where are we now? the ons and hospitalisations are all old news, what happened a couple of weeks ago. on sunday the daily reported case numbers have been starting to edge down, so that there is helpful but i don't think it is case proven that we are on the way down right now. the modellers who advise the government say there is reason for hope, with high levels of vaccinations and high levels of people who have had the virus we could be reaching the peak. as we were showing, they have been false peaks, false dawns and false disasters so we need to be careful but it is certainly good news. t’m but it is certainly good news. i'm lad that but it is certainly good news. i'm glad that data has been put back on the screen. is there anyway to tie
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that peak to what is driving those cases? schools, vaccinations? you can see the _ cases? schools, vaccinations? you can see the recent _ cases? schools, vaccinations? tm. can see the recent drive is pushing through october but what has really been driving this underneath it is secondary school age kids. the number we are hitting, the 1.25 million, secondary school age kids make up 9% of that so that is what is running much higher than everyone else. they are at 9%, their parents about 2%, most other adults 1% so it is running very hard in that about 2%, most other adults 1% so it is runnin- very hard in that school is running very hard in that school age group who mix a lot, haven't had as much access to vaccination, and we are seeing that it is spilling over into parents. the big wave amongst kids is probably leaking through the walls of the vaccination programme a little bit but not necessarily bursting through yet so the hope is the vaccines will hold rapid booster campaign will keep it in check as well. just
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rapid booster campaign will keep it in check as well.— in check as well. just one more question. _ in check as well. just one more question. in — in check as well. just one more question, in terms _ in check as well. just one more question, in terms vaccine - in check as well. just one more i question, in terms vaccine uptake amongst that group, how has that been going?— amongst that group, how has that been going? sluggish i think is the answer. about _ been going? sluggish i think is the answer. about 9096 _ been going? sluggish i think is the answer. about 9096 of _ been going? sluggish i think is the answer. about 9096 of younger - answer. about 90% of younger teenagers have been vaccinated —— 19%. they are not in an imminent danger. they are at much lower risk if they do catch the virus but certainly we will see the number of infections consistent with the low levels of vaccination. and it is worth saying as well, we are seeing a reasonable number of infections. 2% of infections in 55—year—olds is similar to last winter and the vaccine campaign isn't over by any stretch of the imagination.- stretch of the imagination. thank ou ve stretch of the imagination. thank you very much — stretch of the imagination. thank you very much indeed. _ the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, has warned that covid rules which had been scrapped could be brought back in order to allow people
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to have a normal christmas. new measures are already being brought in to tackle wales' high covid rates — the worst in the uk. covid passes will be extended to cinemas, theatres and concert halls from the 15th of november as part of the plans. pubs, restaurants and cafes might also require passes if infections climb. there are a wide range of further measures that we can take. we don't want to. we've managed to keep wales at alert level zero for many weeks now. but with the numbers as they are in the community, we have literally thousands of people every day falling ill with the coronavirus. they can't be in work. they can't be out, helping with the economy. and we have to do something to bring those numbers down. that was mark drakeford. treatment for the menopause is to be made cheaper in england with the government announcing that prescription charges will be significantly reduced. the announcement follows a campaign
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from labour mp carolyn harris. she had put forward a bill to make hrt treatment free. the government said they would not go that far, but that women would only have to pay for the prescription once a year, saving around £200. our political correspondent helen catt reports. they're menopausal and they're in parliament square to shout about what that means. among them, some famous faces. the night sweats prevent you from sleeping, so you can't even begin your day properly, and every amount of anxiety, every decision you have to make, is not in your control any more, and then you feel like you're having a nervous breakdown. someone who knows that all too well is adelle martin, who runs this pub in kent and helps other women through menopause. i felt like i just completely lost myself. and at the time ijust didn't know what it was. sorry.
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no, not at all. it was menopause. and this is why i do what i do, because ijust didn't want another woman... ..to look in the mirror and lose themselves like i did. adelle says hormone replacement therapy helped her. it is free on the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland, but has to be paid for in england. adelle's patches cost £9.35 a month on the nhs, but many other treatments that also use two hormones cost double that. in the house of commons, a labour mp pushed for change. the menopause doesn't discriminate, so the cost to treat it shouldn't either. we have got women struggling to find almost £20 a month, and itjust isn't right when this is a time in their life that women will reach. there is no avoiding the menopause for half of the population. the minister agreed. she announced doctors will now be able to prescribe 12 months�* worth of hrt for the cost a woman would usually pay for one batch. i can tell the house
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that we will amend the regulations to reduce the cost and improve access to hrt. we will do this by reducing the cost of repeatable prescriptions for hrt for women experiencing menopausal symptoms. that is a saving too for those who already pay less than that, £108 a year, because they have chosen to prepay for their prescription. the reaction from carolyn harris was evident. can i thank the minister, can i thank the clerks... wonderful women, thank you. so hrt won't be free in england, but it will soon cost less. another step in what seems to be a growing move to make real changes for women at a crucial stage of their lives. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. and we will be speaking to carolyn harris just after 2:30pm.
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for the first time, journalists are to be allowed to report family court hearings in england and wales. the most seniorjudge in the family division, sir andrew mcfarlane, says a perception of excessive secrecy is harming the reputation of the courts, but stressed that identities would still be protected. our correspondent sanchia berg has been investigating this issue. would it be fair to say there had been previous attempts to try and reform the family courts? why now? the pressure has been building because previous efforts didn't get very far. i have been trying to report the family court since journalists were first allowed in, 12 years ago. we can only report if thejudge gives his or her 12 years ago. we can only report if the judge gives his or her express permission for us to do so. so the proposals today would be a really radical change because we would be able to sit in court, listen to cases and report what we see and hear bearing in mind we can't
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identify the families and children. because it is worth reminding people what family courts do, they hear some of the most sensitive and personal details of people's lives. these are cases about families are splitting up, where the children will go. there are cases about children who have been allegedly abused and neglected, the local authority wants to take them into care, so very difficult details. i have been in a courtroom where the family said they didn't want me even to hear about their case, let alone think about reporting it. so the first question i put to sir andrew was, given this, wasn't this going to be quite difficult? tt was, given this, wasn't this going to be quite difficult?— to be quite difficult? it will be difficult, to be quite difficult? it will be difficult. it — to be quite difficult? it will be difficult, it is— to be quite difficult? it will be difficult, it is difficult, - to be quite difficult? it will be difficult, it is difficult, and - to be quite difficult? it will be| difficult, it is difficult, and that is why— difficult, it is difficult, and that is why the _ difficult, it is difficult, and that is why the decision to open the court _ is why the decision to open the court has — is why the decision to open the court has not been taken in the way i am proposing court has not been taken in the way lam proposing it court has not been taken in the way i am proposing it should now be taken _ i am proposing it should now be taken for— i am proposing it should now be taken for years. this has been a topic— taken for years. this has been a topic we — taken for years. this has been a topic we have been looking at for decades, — topic we have been looking at for decades, but i now take the view that the — decades, but i now take the view that the public interest in the court — that the public interest in the court being open and openjustice being _ court being open and openjustice being the — court being open and openjustice
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being the principle that is adhered to is more — being the principle that is adhered to is more powerful and i'm confident— to is more powerful and i'm confident that we can strive to enhance — confident that we can strive to enhance the anonymity that is afforded — enhance the anonymity that is afforded to the parties. you said there was a _ afforded to the parties. you said there was a risk— afforded to the parties. you said there was a risk the _ afforded to the parties. you said there was a risk the courts - afforded to the parties. you said| there was a risk the courts would suffer serious reputational damage if there wasn't greater transparency, why is that? tt is if there wasn't greater transparency, why is that? it is not health i transparency, why is that? it is not healthy i think— transparency, why is that? it is not healthy i think for _ transparency, why is that? it is not healthy i think for society - transparency, why is that? it is not healthy i think for society to - healthy i think for society to understand there is something called the secret— understand there is something called the secret family court but not understand what goes on behind closed _ understand what goes on behind closed doors, and therefore to assume — closed doors, and therefore to assume that what goes on may not be satisfactory _ assume that what goes on may not be satisfactory. it is, i believe, satisfactory, and i think we have a duty to _ satisfactory, and i think we have a duty to allow through press reporting the public to understand far more _ reporting the public to understand far more of what goes on day by day up far more of what goes on day by day up and _ far more of what goes on day by day up and down the country in the family— up and down the country in the family courts. | up and down the country in the family courts.— family courts. i have spoken to 'udaes family courts. i have spoken to judges who _ family courts. i have spoken to judges who support _ family courts. i have spoken to judges who support the - family courts. i have spoken to - judges who support the transparency initiatives and i have also encountered in courtjudges who are not very supportive of journalists
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in their court. how do you think the judges will view this overall? the 'ud . es judges will view this overall? the judges individually will have different views about it, and you have _ different views about it, and you have described the spectrum. it is important — have described the spectrum. it is important for me to explain what i am proposing and hopefully draw them alon- am proposing and hopefully draw them along with _ am proposing and hopefully draw them along with me, but what i'm proposing involves piloting the proposals to courts and the purpose of piloting _ proposals to courts and the purpose of piloting them is to see how they work— of piloting them is to see how they work out — of piloting them is to see how they work out. and of course we will listen _ work out. and of course we will listen to — work out. and of course we will listen to views and recommendations for change. _ listen to views and recommendations for change, and consider it step—by—step along the way. what he's proposing our plans that will be discussed, then they will be piloted in a couple of locations in england and wales, and then he will go from there. so nothing will happen immediately, but as i said, a radical change that is being proposed. radical change that is being proposed-— radical change that is being --roosed. ., ~ i. , radical change that is being --roosed. . ~' , . proposed. 0k, thank you very much indeed. the clear—up has begun in cumbria after some a0 homes were flooded
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due to torrential rain. across the borders and north west england there has been major road and rail travel disrupted. the met office has issued a yellow warning, meaning some disruption is possible, and the environment agency has a number of flood warnings in place. megan paterson is in in cockermouth in cumbria. well, as you can see, the river here in cockermouth still looks like a force to be reckoned with this afternoon. within the last few minutes, we've seen a cumbria county council worker come here to take pictures of the structural integrity of the bridge. the reassuring thing, though, is that the water has receded considerably here. you can see by the line of leaves left by the river on the ground here that the river has gone down and that's the case across the county. river levels have peaked. the lakes are levelling out. the environment agency says that this is an improving situation although it still will continue to rain for the next few hours. people are being advised to stay vigilant. we haven't had any more reports of flooding to properties,
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that a0 you mentioned, but hopefully there shouldn't be any more today. the environment agency saying the rain should ease off and that the river catchment area should be able to cope with that. unfortunately, there has been disruption to the roads. localised flooding making it difficult to get around for some people in cumbria today. and for people trying to travel through the county, on the west coast mainline, that's been very difficult too. the weather affecting west coast rail services. we expect by later this afternoon, those services should get back to some sense of normality, although people are still being advised not to travel if they don't have to do. the weather warning is still in place here. it's been downgraded from that amber level last night. so the next 2a hours we expect some rain but not as bad as we've seen the previous two days. there's a sense of relief here in cockermouth and elsewhere in cumbria that this time the flooding hasn't been as bad, but there's also a realisation, an acceptance that flooding like this is likely to happen again in the future.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. thank you. it's been an extremely wet few days for some parts of the uk. still flood warnings in force and more rain to come this afternoon especially across northern england up especially across northern england up across the eastern side of scotland, a slice of clear and sunny skies following on before showers and turn from the south west later in the day. temperatures between 12— 16. this evening, a slice of clear skies and potentially for a time particular towards the north—east. more rain pushing in from the west by the end of the night. these are the temperatures as we begin saturday morning. it will be a wet start for many. at least this band of rain is on the move eastwards, so just about all of us getting a dose of wet weather but behind that, the sunshine will re—emerge albeit with a scattering of showers. it will feel cooler and fresher. 11— 15. after quite a chilly saturday night,
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rain returns from the south—west as we head into sunday and, along with that, some strong and blustery wind. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the french government warn they'll start blocking british fishing boats next week. the uk government says two can play at that game over the post—brexit fishing row. the pope calls for radical decisions to tackle climate change from world leaders gathering in glasgow for the cop 26 summit. meanwhile the teenage climate activist greta thunberg says she hasn't been formally invited to the summit, which starts this weekend. of course, this is notjust a question about me. but i think that many people might be scared that if they invite too many "radical" young people, then that might make them look bad.
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last week saw the highest level of coronavirus infections ever reported across uk. figures suggest 1.3million people would test positive — in england around 1 in 50 people had the virus treatment for the menopause is to be made cheaper in england , prescription charges are to be significantly reduced. sport now. thank you. good afternoon. ole gunnar solskjaer is in defiant mood following more questions about his future at old trafford following last weekend 5— zero defeat to liverpool. man united are at tottenham tomorrow as they look to bounce back in the premier league and the united boss insists he is the right person to turn things around. t the right person to turn things around. . , the right person to turn things around. ., , ., ,., around. i have been through some ve bad around. i have been through some very bad moments _ around. i have been through some very bad moments here _ around. i have been through some very bad moments here as - around. i have been through some very bad moments here as a - around. i have been through some l
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very bad moments here as a player. and when i've been a coach and a manager, i have had to deal with setbacks, two or three crises, at least. since i became the manager here. one thing i can say is that i will always give it a good shot and fight back. we will always give it a good shot and fiuht back. ~ ., ., ., ., fight back. we are heading to an excitin: fight back. we are heading to an exciting finish _ fight back. we are heading to an exciting finish at _ fight back. we are heading to an exciting finish at the _ fight back. we are heading to an exciting finish at the men's - fight back. we are heading to an exciting finish at the men's t20| exciting finish at the men's t20 cricket world cup where the hell does the west indies are taking on bangladesh. both sides starting the dayjoint bottom of england's group having lost their opening two matches. bangladesh chose to field and the west indies were as— three off ten overs before hitting 94 off the next ten. the top score, 40. they finished 142— seven so in reply the moment, bangladesh, 113— four, with three overs remaining. they are
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going well. another boundary i can see. they are trying to get themselves to that target of 143. they need 26 from 17 balls. in half an hour pakistan will look to make it three out of three when they face afghanistan. the top two in that group are england and australia. they play each other tomorrow in dubai. it could be a confidence enhancing when for whoever comes out on top especially in an ashes year. england have been boosted by the return of ben stokes for the series which begins in december and despite ben stokes being one of their key players, the australian camp says they are happy he will be involved in the ashes. tare they are happy he will be involved in the ashes-— they are happy he will be involved in the ashes. i've grown up almost lovin: in the ashes. i've grown up almost loving cricket _ in the ashes. i've grown up almost loving cricket and _ in the ashes. i've grown up almost loving cricket and you _ in the ashes. i've grown up almost loving cricket and you always - in the ashes. i've grown up almost l loving cricket and you always wanted the best— loving cricket and you always wanted the best teams in the best players compete, — the best teams in the best players compete, so, yeah, iwouldn't want to finish— compete, so, yeah, iwouldn't want to finish the — compete, so, yeah, iwouldn't want to finish the series and have an asterix — to finish the series and have an asterix next with saying this guy wasn't _ asterix next with saying this guy wasn't here on this guy wasn't here, so genuinely — wasn't here on this guy wasn't here, so genuinely i'm really pumped is
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going _ so genuinely i'm really pumped is going to _ so genuinely i'm really pumped is going to be out there. yeah, it might— going to be out there. yeah, it might make it a bit of a tougher competition, but it's going to be good _ competition, but it's going to be aood. , ., competition, but it's going to be aood. _ ., ., good. rugby union autumn international— good. rugby union autumn international start - good. rugby union autumn international start this - good. rugby union autumn - international start this weekend, wales have named their team to face new zealand tomorrow. 21 —year—old flanker ted basham gets his first start. gareth anscombe will play against the country of his birth. and captain alun wynjones we get is 149 cap surpassing the previous record set by all blacks richie mccaw. there's been a number of injuries and because the game is outside world rugby centre national window, many players are not available. window, many players are not available-— window, many players are not available. �* , ., ., , available. it's about what is the combination _ available. it's about what is the combination we _ available. it's about what is the combination we think _ available. it's about what is the combination we think to - available. it's about what is the combination we think to get - available. it's about what is the | combination we think to get the available. it's about what is the - combination we think to get the job done and the players who are available, so, yeah, it's been a tricky time. it has been nine or ten days now together as a group. with this group just focusing on one game of rugby, so that's how we pitched
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it. reinforcements coming into the squad next week.— it. reinforcements coming into the squad next week. emma raducanu will be lookin: squad next week. emma raducanu will be looking to — squad next week. emma raducanu will be looking to reach _ squad next week. emma raducanu will be looking to reach the _ squad next week. emma raducanu will be looking to reach the semifinals - be looking to reach the semifinals of the transylvanian open this evening. she says being with her father for the tournament in his native romania makes it extra special. she is new to the quarterfinals where she will face her opponent for a place in the last four. she's also revealed she given her us open trophy to the lawn tennis association as a thank you for the part it's played in her development. that is all the sport for now and i will have more for you later but for now back to you. thank you very much. ahead of the cop26 climate conference in glasgow, greta thunberg has also spoken to the bbc, saying that there's a real problem with youth activists not having their voices heard. she spoke of her hopes for leadership from the most powerful leader, including president biden. she spoke to the bbc�*s andrew marr just before taking part in a protest against the use of fossil fuels in the city of london.
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let's hear a little of their conversation. let me ask about the most powerful person coming to cop26, president biden. he hasjust announced a £500,000,000,000 plan to deal with climate change and has been working very, very hard with congress and so forth. how well you think he is doing and could it be a real leader on climate change? qt doing and could it be a real leader on climate change?— on climate change? of course everybody _ on climate change? of course everybody has _ on climate change? of course everybody has the _ on climate change? of course everybody has the possibilityl on climate change? of course i everybody has the possibility but on climate change? of course - everybody has the possibility but if they continue right now, no. t just they continue right now, no. i 'ust wonder what fl they continue right now, no. i 'ust wonder what more i they continue right now, no. i 'ust wonder what more he i they continue right now, no. i 'ust wonder what more he can i they continue right now, no. ijust wonder what more he can do. he is challenging in the courts to stop mining and oil extraction on federal land. he is using up all his political capital in congress to try to get this through. he is working quite hard. taste to get this through. he is working uuite hard. ~ . , ., quite hard. we all understand activists, we _ quite hard. we all understand activists, we understand - quite hard. we all understand activists, we understand thisl activists, we understand this doesn't fall on one single person, but of course when you are a leader of the most powerful country in the
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world, you have lots of responsibility. when it is expanding fossil fuel infrastructure is a clear sign we are not really treating the climate crisis as an emergency. treating the climate crisis as an emergency-— treating the climate crisis as an emeruen _. ., . emergency. was it fair in retrospect to sa blah emergency. was it fair in retrospect to say blah blah _ emergency. was it fair in retrospect to say blah blah blah _ emergency. was it fair in retrospect to say blah blah blah about - emergency. was it fair in retrospect to say blah blah blah about him? it| to say blah blah blah about him? tt was not directed to one person. i took lots of quotes from lots of them, lots of world leaders to say blah blah blah, but i think so. dr tamsin edwards is a climate scientist at kings college london, the lead author of the recent ipcc report and co—presenter of the bbc podcast — 39 ways to save the planet. a great podcast, by the way. i'm a great fan of it. thank you for joining us. let'sjust deal with greta thunbergmacro—poss point first of offer that does it matter that youth voices heard? qt of offer that does it matter that youth voices heard?— of offer that does it matter that youth voices heard? of course it has to be heard- — youth voices heard? of course it has to be heard. of— youth voices heard? of course it has to be heard. of course _ youth voices heard? of course it has to be heard. of course i'm _ to be heard. of course i'm sympathetic to her frustration
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because we have known that this problem for many decades now. and we are onlyjust problem for many decades now. and we are only just starting problem for many decades now. and we are onlyjust starting to see people, countries of the world, gearing up to actually make promises and make change, so i understand why she doesn't feel heard.— she doesn't feel heard. where are we with climate — she doesn't feel heard. where are we with climate change? _ she doesn't feel heard. where are we with climate change? in _ she doesn't feel heard. where are we with climate change? in terms - she doesn't feel heard. where are we with climate change? in terms of, i with climate change? in terms of, what reasonably we can expect from cop26? we are starting to hear more and more, we heard borisjohnson a half half ago saying it's going to be hard there is doubt we are going to be able to achieve anything. tt’s to be able to achieve anything. tt�*s important to remember that we have already achieved a lot. we are no longer on that part of unlimited fossil fuel longer on that part of unlimited fossilfuel burning longer on that part of unlimited fossil fuel burning that would take this up to four or 5, fossil fuel burning that would take this up to four or 5 , we are currently headed for 3 based on the currently headed for 3 based on the current policies we have got in place and so on, maybe about 2.5 for the current paris agreement pledges, but what we need is to be getting down to below 2 , so we are definitely not there yet but we have
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been making progress over the last few years and i expect to see more progress over the following days as well. . . , progress over the following days as well. . ., , .,. progress over the following days as well. ., ., , .,. .,, well. can we really achieve those temperature _ well. can we really achieve those temperature drops _ well. can we really achieve those temperature drops right - well. can we really achieve those temperature drops right up - well. can we really achieve those temperature drops right up do i well. can we really achieve those l temperature drops right up do you think we will get there? what's it going to take realistically? tt’s a going to take realistically? it's a really important _ going to take realistically? it's a really important point _ going to take realistically? it's a really important point that - going to take realistically? tt�*s a. really important point that we have to separate the promises and statements that different countries make and businesses make from the actual reality, from the implementation. i'll be effective, the uk for example set out a very specific strategy for how to get to net to zero particularly in the short—term but also thinking about the long—term and come those detailed plans and strategies, exactly when i'll be going to phase out coal? when are we going to ban fossil fuels, out coal? when are we going to ban fossilfuels, internal combustion engines? when are we going to reverse deforestation? we are not going to be able to be credible or meet those targets because the plans won't be there. it willjust be
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hotter. won't be there. it will 'ust be hotter. �* ., , , won't be there. it will 'ust be hotter. �* ., ,,,. won't be there. it will 'ust be hotter. ., ,,,. ., hotter. but also this is such an overwhelming _ hotter. but also this is such an overwhelming subject. - hotter. but also this is such an overwhelming subject. you - hotter. but also this is such an| overwhelming subject. you can imagine many people going, ijust can't deal with this and i'm going tojust carry on. can't deal with this and i'm going to just carry on. how do we change that mind—set? t to just carry on. how do we change that mind-set?— that mind-set? i completely sympathise- _ that mind-set? i completely sympathise. in _ that mind-set? i completely sympathise. in some - that mind-set? i completely| sympathise. in some senses, that mind-set? i completely i sympathise. in some senses, it that mind-set? i completely - sympathise. in some senses, it isn't the responsibility of individuals to solve this problem because it is a systemic problem, the whole of society has to change, all of our energy sources, the way we move around the world, the way we heat our homes, and that isn't in the power of the individual alone but has to be governments, businesses to the government regulations and so on. individuals do have a part to play, the behavioural changes, things we know about reducing meat and dairy, flying, unnecessary use of energy and fossil fuels, but really, it's in the hands of governments and parties collecting in glasgow next week. does climate
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chan . e in glasgow next week. does climate change cost? _ in glasgow next week. does climate change cost? the _ in glasgow next week. does climate change cost? the reason _ in glasgow next week. does climate change cost? the reason i'm - in glasgow next week. does climate change cost? the reason i'm asking| change cost? the reason i'm asking this is arnold schwarzenegger was speaking recently to your podcast and he wasn't impressed and said those that say climate change, tackling climate change is going to hurt our economy, are stupid or liars. what is the truth there? tt is so common that we just hear people talking about the cost of decarbonising our energy systems, making these changes, and they completely ignore the huge impacts of climate change is already having and will continue to have come the more warming we get the more those impacts will hit us, more women have extreme heatwaves, flooding, droughts, all these things that we know will keep on increasing, which cost us money and lives. they cost us opportunities as well, so the inequality, it's really about making sure we understand that full balance of what it costs to act first and
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what it costs to not act but also doing ourfair share. whether you're a fan of greta thunberg or pope or nova, everyone agrees that we have all got to do ourfair share, playing our part, and that's got to be the message next week. what playing our part, and that's got to be the message next week. what did ou make be the message next week. what did you make than _ be the message next week. what did you make than of _ be the message next week. what did you make than of the _ be the message next week. what did you make than of the un _ be the message next week. what did you make than of the un secretary . you make than of the un secretary generals comments that the summit will not deliver its objectives of tackling the climate crisis? people are concerned _ tackling the climate crisis? people are concerned of— tackling the climate crisis? people are concerned of course _ tackling the climate crisis? peoplel are concerned of course particularly some of the big emitting countries, not yet submitting the nationally determined contribution pledges. sometimes submitting less ambitious ones than before. so clearly there is a lot of concern if not ambitious enough and we need to cut our emissions by about half by 2030 so words around let's get to a particular place in 2050 or 60 is meaningless without those short—term goals so there's a real risk it will
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be disappointing, but it's not a binary thing of success or failure, because it's about incrementally making progress, increasing the ambition, reducing our emissions, taking some of that co2 back out of the air, changing our behaviour, all of those things keeping adding up year—on—year month on month to a difference. year-on-year month on month to a difference-— difference. finally, climate change financin: , difference. finally, climate change financing, when _ difference. finally, climate change financing, when you _ difference. finally, climate change financing, when you hear - difference. finally, climate change financing, when you hear some - difference. finally, climate change financing, when you hear some of| financing, when you hear some of these wealthy nations talk about the importance of financing and how much they are pledging, you do wonder whether this is a loophole for them not to meet their emissions, their domestic emission cuts. what is the role of climate change financing and does itjust let people get away with not cutting or dealing with a problem at home? they will say we are going to give this amount of money to developing nations. weill. are going to give this amount of money to developing nations. well, i mean, money to developing nations. well, i mean. thank — money to developing nations. well, i mean, thank thing _ money to developing nations. well, i mean, thank thing people _ money to developing nations. well, i mean, thank thing people may - money to developing nations. well, i mean, thank thing people may not i mean, thank thing people may not know about is this climate finance aspect of the paris agreement which is not yet been met, $100,000,000,000 per year, we is not yet been met, $100,000,000,000 peryear, we are not there yet with that target set
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backin not there yet with that target set back in 2009, so even that promise is not being made. even that amount it's been said it's nowhere near enough. it's a big and complex problem that clearly developing countries need help both to keep their emissions low or to cut them and also crucially to adapt so we won't be able to avoid all future climate change.— won't be able to avoid all future climate change. won't be able to avoid all future climate chance. ., . , �*, climate change. doctor edwards, it's been a pleasure. _ climate change. doctor edwards, it's been a pleasure. thank _ climate change. doctor edwards, it's been a pleasure. thank you - climate change. doctor edwards, it's been a pleasure. thank you very - climate change. doctor edwards, it's i been a pleasure. thank you very much indeed. thank you. let's get more now on the news that treatment for the menopause is to be made cheaper in england. the government has announced that prescription charges will be significantly reduced. the mp leading the campaign for free hrt — and for increased awareness of the impact of the menopause — is carolyn harris and shejoins me now. thank you very much forjoining us.
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my thank you very much forjoining us. my pleasure. what do you make of what you got today from the government? i am delighted. what you got today from the government? iam delighted. it what you got today from the government? i am delighted. it would have been wonderful to create our teeth but i think we've made a huge step forward today and the campaign was always about raising awareness and making sure women had a voice and making sure women had a voice and there's so much more we need to do one menopause and today we went leaps forward so i'm really happy. abs, leaps forward so i'm really happy. a lot of women themselves don't know about menopause, they don't know what's coming their way, doesn't always affect women badly, but what do you make of that? women don't know about it. t do you make of that? women don't know about it.— know about it. i was one who didn't know about it. i was one who didn't know about — know about it. i was one who didn't know about it _ know about it. i was one who didn't know about it so _ know about it. i was one who didn't know about it so back _ know about it. i was one who didn't know about it so back in _ know about it. i was one who didn't know about it so back in 2010, - know about it. i was one who didn't know about it so back in 2010, i - know about it so back in 2010, i diagnosed myself with having depression and anxiety and nervous breakdown and i ended up on antidepressants and it took me many to discover that what i was going through many other women were going through many other women were going through and i was menopausal. now i have gone on hrt and i've been able to be myself slowly off antidepressants, but there's many
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other symptoms women are notjoining the dots on and coming up with the menopause. they are coming up with fibromyalgia, early onset dementia, all these things which in reality, if we were to treat the menopause and look at it in its entirety we can save the nhs a lot of money and giving women peace of mind. t saitt giving women peace of mind. i will come on to — giving women peace of mind. i will come on to empowering _ giving women peace of mind. i will come on to empowering women because of the labour mp liz kendall also spoke earlier today. just going back to the diagnosis because that's really, really key, something has happened about addressing the costs, what needs to be done to address the gap in medical training on menopause?— gap in medical training on menopause? gap in medical training on menoause? ~ menopause? well, we need the medical schools to provide _ menopause? well, we need the medical schools to provide doctors _ menopause? well, we need the medical schools to provide doctors with - menopause? well, we need the medical schools to provide doctors with the - schools to provide doctors with the information when they are students information when they are students in order to be able to recognise that these symptoms are not necessarily stand—alone conditions. there is something like 32 symptoms
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which are pointing towards the menopause and if somebody has got even one of those maybe we should be looking at asking the questions around the other symptoms they may or may not have. it's about us as individuals learning about and talking about the menopause at a much younger age and being liberated if you like to actually discuss it with friends and family and partners. i have discovered since i've started talking about it that i have inadvertently helped a lot of women to identify their own menopause. i was someone who knew nothing about it. it's about talking, communication, better training, workplace is recognising the need to do more, and that's why we call it a revolution. and it's global. we've had japanese tv interviewing us today because nobody is doing this right and now in the uk we can be proud to say we are leading the way on responding and providing for menopausal women far better than we have ever done
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before. t better than we have ever done before. ., �* ~ ., better than we have ever done before. ~ ., , before. i don't know if you can help me with this, _ before. i don't know if you can help me with this, how _ before. i don't know if you can help me with this, how is _ before. i don't know if you can help me with this, how is it _ before. i don't know if you can help me with this, how is it the - before. i don't know if you can help me with this, how is it the doctorsl me with this, how is it the doctors don't know because that's where you go do have your questions answered? well, my understanding is there's probably 41% of medical schools do not have mandatory menopause training on the curriculum and those that do do a very minimal amount, so the chances are that your gp may never ever have looked at the menopause as a condition whilst they were in medical school, so unless they were in a placement or have joined the practice where someone has an interest in it, they will never learn about the menopause so we have to address that. we've got wonderful nurses out there who are far more in tune with women's health. we should be using them more and giving them training so they can work with menopausal women, especially prescribing nurses. there's loads of things we can do in order to make sure that women get the best service they deserve. 51% of the population, and it's taking
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us a long time to have this conversation but we are having it now and we intend to resolve the problems. t now and we intend to resolve the roblems. , ., , ., now and we intend to resolve the problems-— problems. i should 'ust note that scotland problems. i should 'ust note that sconand and h problems. i should just note that scotland and wales _ problems. i should just note that scotland and wales of— problems. i should just note that scotland and wales of course - problems. i should just note that scotland and wales of course the menopause treatment is free. just going back to what the labour mp liz kendall said, because she wasn't expecting to speak on the matter today. and she said i didn't know whether i should say something but i think it's only one week since she actually started her hrt. what is your final message to women and the government and people and services and support for menopause to get this right? why does it matter particularly often it's about money, isn't it? financially it makes more sense for women to have hrt. qt sense for women to have hrt. of course sense for women to have hrt. qt course it sense for women to have hrt. (ztt course it does but not everyone can take hrt but about the conversation around menopause. we will keep women in work, keep man and together, together, make sure women get the support and treatment they deserve as long as we talk and we
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communicate and we work together. it's not a political issue, there is no brownie points for anyone in this. it's about everybody coming together to make sure we get the best possible deal we can for women. and that's where i am going on this. ijust want to and that's where i am going on this. i just want to make sure the wonderful women get wonderful treatment. , w' , wonderful women get wonderful treatment-— wonderful women get wonderful treatment. , w , ., treatment. very quickly, when do these prescription _ treatment. very quickly, when do these prescription changes - treatment. very quickly, when do these prescription changes come| treatment. very quickly, when do - these prescription changes come into force? t’m these prescription changes come into force? �* ., , , these prescription changes come into force? �* , . ., , force? i'm hoping will see changes b earl force? i'm hoping will see changes by early 2022- _ force? i'm hoping will see changes by early 2022. 0k, _ force? i'm hoping will see changes by early 2022. 0k, fantastic. - by early 2022. 0k, fantastic. congratulations _ by early 2022. 0k, fantastic. congratulations by _ by early 2022. 0k, fantastic. congratulations by the - by early 2022. 0k, fantastic. congratulations by the way. l by early 2022. 0k, fantastic. - congratulations by the way. thank you. goodbye. smokers who are trying to give up could soon by offered e—cigarettes by the nhs in england. manufacturers of e—cigarettes will be invited to submit their products for approval in the same way as other medicines that are available on the nhs. our health editor hugh pym explained. vaping has been widely used by smokers trying to kick the habit with a certain degree of success. in
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fact, some smoking cessation clinics run by the nhs have handed out vaping devices, e—cigarettes, but we have not got to the point where the nhs can routinely prescribe e—cigarettes, so what has now happened as the medical regulator the nhra has announced a streamlined process for manufacturers to put forward devices so they can be approved or not as having a medicinal use. the nhra has said based on all the evidence available, across different health bodies, e—cigarettes are less harmful to health than smoking tobacco. now this doesn't mean it's automatically going to happen. this is for england, certainly at this stage. it needs to go to the nhra, each device, and then a nice, the organisation which decides what is cost—effective for the nhs and worth pursuing, also has to approve it, but it certainly seen as a step
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forward by enthusiasts for e—cigarettes. there are still some sceptics out there who say we don't have enough long—term research on how harmful they may be. most people really do concede it's less harmful than smoking. even though they still involve nicotine for those who are using them and of course the approaches may well death in different nations of the uk. that was hugh pym. here in the uk, a nine—year—old boy called charlie has been inspired to take up northern soul dancing by his grandfather. the northern soul scene emerged in the 1970s, when djs would hunt down rare black american soul vinyls, and bring them back to play in venues across the north—west of england. charlie fell in love with the dance, after hearing stories about his grandad carl's teenage years. and he's now been to his first real northern soul night. here's how charlie got on. my mum thinks i'm going to wear myself out in, like, the first four seconds, and i'm going to be coming back for a drink every ten minutes.
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but i ain't. that's what i'm going to say — i ain't. i'm charlie and i like to dance to northern soul. the first one i've ever been to, this is, and ijust said to my dad, ifeel like if i do this right, and i take it serious, i'm going to get invited to another 'un. i'm scott and i'm charlie's dad. i've always listened to the music. he started watching a few of the clips on youtube and other stations. just got well into it, really. i've seen some clips online of people dancing to it. i gave ita try and i'm... i'm rather good at it. hi, i'm chalky. basically, my co—promoter, ian, - he sent me a video of young charlie. he's aged nine. a lot of people ask me, _ what's the future for northern soul? people like charlie,
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we've got a future. | you know, he's aged nine, his grandad got him - into northern soul and it's - absolutely fantastic to have him at a venue like tonight with real northern soul people. - i'm carl, i'm charlie's grandad. he's the soul of my heart, like. you know, when i used to do it years ago, when i was about 18, 19, he's moved on now it is exactly the same. he used to do it when he was younger. i think he used to go from place to place. i used to go on the friday, saturday, sunday, and i would be back at work on the monday. so on the sunday, it had to be a quick one. he really influenced me in trying doing northern soul, really. charlie, he's an absolute star. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. there are still numerous flood warnings in force after the rain
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that's fallen in many parts of the uk over the last few days. this was the scene for a weather watcher in cumbria earlier on, and this is the earlier radar picture. you can see yet more rain that has been working its way across many parts of the country, with some particularly heavy rain moving once again across the far north—west of england into southern and eastern portions of scotland. as we go through the afternoon, some showers drifting across eastern england. then there is a slice of drier and brighter weather before some showers return from the west later in the day. top temperatures 13—16 degrees, and then as we head through this evening and tonight, that slice of clear skies doesn't last all that long. this band of showers tending to gang together into a longer spell of rain as it works eastwards, as we head into the early hours of saturday. it will stay quite breezy in places overnight, fairly chilly across northern and eastern areas, milder further south and west, and then into saturday low—pressure to the north—west of us, this frontal system pushing eastwards, taking some outbreaks of rain with it, but at least the front is moving through, so while it will be a soggy start
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for many, could see some particularly heavy rain drifting across parts of east anglia and the south east for a time, we will see brighter skies following on for the west, with some spells of sunshine. also some showers pushing in across western areas but, not a bad end to saturday in most places and it will feel a little cooler and fresher, 11—15 degrees. through saturday evening under these clear skies it will turn quite chilly for a time, but then there is another weather system that will start to push on from the west, and don't forget through the early hours of sunday morning the clocks go back one hour, but as we head into sunday here comes our next weather system, an area of low pressure winding itself up, pushing across the uk, and this will bring a swathe of wet weather northwards and eastwards as we go through sunday. still some uncertainty about just how far north the rain will get, but it looks like it will spread across all of scotland, blustery showers and the potential for gales following on into some western coasts, some sunny spells too, and certainly a coolerfeel, 10—14 degrees, and there is some
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cooler, or dare i say, quite chilly weather to come through the start of the new week. some showers at first, it will then turn drier for a time through the middle part of the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the french government warn they'll start blocking british fishing boats next week — the uk's environment secretary says "two can play at that game", as the post—brexit row overfishing continues. we will see what they do on tuesday but obviously we reserve the right to respond in a proportionate way. the uk sees highest level of coronavirus infections since the pandemic began — official figures show one in 55 people would have tested positive last week. lets ta ke lets take you straight to glasgow now. ., ., ., . . ., now. national clinical director jason leech- _ now. national clinical director jason leech. for— now. national clinical director jason leech. for the - now. national clinical director jason leech. for the next - now. national clinical director - jason leech. for the next fortnight, obviously glasgow and scotland will be at the centre of world attention,
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hosting this conference is undoubtedly a huge honourfor our country but it is also a major responsibility. and so we want to talk a little bit today about some of the ways in which we will live up to those responsibilities and what the next fortnight is likely to mean for people in glasgow and for visitors to our city. and in doing that, we hope to give people in glasgow but also visitors to the city information they need before the summit begins. glasgow has hosted large events before and has done so successfully, but i think it is important to recognise that cop26 is important to recognise that cop26 is a bit different, both in scope, significance and scale. it could quite literally determine the future of the planet, indeed the importance of the planet, indeed the importance of the planet, indeed the importance of the event is why it is even in the midst of the covid pandemic
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taking place in person. and obviously, the scale of the event is quite unprecedented, notjust in terms of the numbers of people who are likely to come to glasgow, but also of course the status and standing of some of those world leaders who will be visiting. in light of all of that, it is inevitable, given how major event this is, that it will bring some disruption. that will be particularly true over the next few days as national leaders and heads of state together of course with more than 20,000 delegates arrive here in scotland from countries across the world. we also know that certain dates are going to be particularly busy, for example this coming sunday, monday and tuesday during the world leaders summit, and there are planned demonstrations for friday and saturday of next week which i will say a bit more about in a moment. in addition, the security
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requirements of the conference mean that throughout the next two weeks, there will be and indeed already is in place significant road closures in place significant road closures in the area surrounding the scottish events campus where cop is taking place. in light of that, we are asking people to consider carefully unnecessary trips during the first few days of cop. that is especially the case for journeys few days of cop. that is especially the case forjourneys around or nearby but also applies across the central belt more generally. and it would apply too to journeys on public transport as well as car journeys. we are very pleased that strike action is no longer in prospect on scotrail services during cop or at all for that matter, but we do know trains are still likely to be busy. working from home will also help of course but this is
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already recommended as a way of reducing covid transmission. by avoiding where possible unnecessary trips during the busier parts of the cop26 summit, people will be helping to ease a bit the pressure on our roads and rail services, and also of course helping to ensure priority access for key workers such as nhs staff. if people do need to travel, and of course many people will require to travel, then our advice is to plan routes carefully. glasgow city council has created a set of maps which are designed to help people do that, and which provide information about where and when congestion is expected. those maps can be found on the travel section of the get ready glasgow website, which is get ready glasgow dot—com. we also anticipate some disruption as a result of protests during the
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next few weeks and i want to say a few words on that matterjust now as well. scotland and glasgow have a proud tradition of activism and peaceful protest. in fact i have personally taken part in many peaceful protest in the city over the past 30 years or so. the city slogan is people make glasgow and thatis slogan is people make glasgow and that is one that i hope at the end of cop will be applied warmly to this summit. so it is absolutely the case that we, and i know this is a very strong position of the united nations, want people's voices to be heard. we want the voices of young people, nations, want people's voices to be heard. we want the voices of young people, of nations, want people's voices to be heard. we want the voices of young people, of wider nations, want people's voices to be heard. we want the voices of young people, of wider civic nations, want people's voices to be heard. we want the voices of young people, of wider civic society nations, want people's voices to be heard. we want the voices of young people, of wider civic society and people, of wider civic society and people from across the world to be heard loudly and clearly by those around the negotiating table. we know there are two major schedule demonstrations, the friday for future school strike next week and
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the march two glasgow green next saturday on the global day of action. these will both provide opportunities for people to make their voices heard and i want to take the opportunity to thank the organisers of these demonstrations as well as a number of other activist groups for the engagement that i know they have had with the city council and indeed the police to make sure demonstrations can take place safely and securely. we also expect that other protests will take place without warning, that is understandable, and these are obviously harder for the city, for conference organisers and for the police to prepare for. and there are just some principles in addition to the important principle of the democratic right to protest that i would ask those intending to protest to pay attention to. firstly, whatever anyone thinks about the negotiations taking place in the conference centre, and i can understand why many think the world
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leaders are not yet doing enough, because world leaders are not yet doing enough and that is one of the things we hope to see change during the summit, but regardless of views on that, progress will not be made if discussions are disrupted. more generally, and this of course applies to all protests, i would ask that people demonstrating remember and show consideration for the city and show consideration for the city and for people living in the city. the people of glasgow are opening up the city to the world at what is a difficult time for everybody around the world and i hope those who are travelling here to this city, welcome though they are, to make their voices heard will recognise that. so please do that, and please and lastly also follow rules on covid because they are intended to protect everyone. and also respect our emergency services. i want to
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stress that our emergency services are there to keep everyone safe and that includes those who are here to negotiate and those who are here to protest. but of course our emergency services also have continued responsibilities to support the people of the city no matter what is happening inside cop26 so i would ask everyone to respect and support them as they do theirjobs. the final point i want to briefly cover relates to covid and jason will be able to say more about this later. this event which is bringing people from all around the world together to meet indoors and large numbers while the world are still in the midst of a pandemic, inevitably poses a risk of increased covid transmission and i understand why that makes some people wary. however, i want to give an assurance we are doing everything possible to
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mitigate the risks as far as is possible. the united nations, the uk government and scottish government have taken a number of steps to ensure as far as possible for example that delegates have been fully vaccinated before arrival here. in addition anyone coming to glasgow from outside the common travel area will be required to show a negative test result before arrival in the uk, and also anyone entering the blue zone will be required to take a lateral flow test every day that they are in attendance. anyone attending the green zone must show either their vaccine certificate for members of the public or their blue zone pass which will be updated with the results of the daily lateral flow tests. and at both venues, people must wear face coverings and follow one metre physical distancing and strict hygiene guidance. in partnership with the un and the uk, we will keep these procedures under
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review throughout the summit. and of course, i stress that everyone visiting glasgow for cop will be required to follow the same basic covid precautions that apply to everyone when we are in the city itself, for example wearing face coverings on public transport and in other indoor public places. through these measures, i hope we can reduce these measures, i hope we can reduce the risk of covid transmission and make cop as safe as possible for the people living already in the city and also for those who will visit our city over the next two weeks. finally, i know as i said at the beginning that the next two weeks will bring disruption to people living in glasgow, and i understand that will cause frustration. i do understand that and i'm both a resident of and representative of the city. i don't expect what i'm about to say will take all of that frustration away over the next two weeks but i think all of us
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hopefully will remember that what we are experiencing over these next two weeks is for a purpose. this is probably the most important global gathering of this century so far. it is notjust in glasgow's interest to have a safe and successful summit, thatis have a safe and successful summit, that is in the interest of the entire world. i know the vast majority of people in glasgow understand that, and even if we don't much like the disruption, we don't much like the disruption, we do understand the importance of what would be happening during this conference. so let me end by thanking everyone in the city for the welcome i know will be extended to visitors, but also for the patience and forbearance that will have to be shown over the next two weeks. my hope, and i know it is the hope of glasgow, scotland, the uk and world, that by the end of these two weeks, the outcome of the summit will have justified that patience. so thank you for listening and i'm going to hand over now to the chief
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constable before he, i and jason take your questions.— take your questions. thank you, first minister _ take your questions. thank you, first minister and _ take your questions. thank you, first minister and good - take your questions. thank you, l first minister and good afternoon. take your questions. thank you, i first minister and good afternoon. i want to— first minister and good afternoon. i want to assure people of scotland that~ ~~ _ want to assure people of scotland that... ,., ., .,, want to assure people of scotland that... ., ., that... ok, so that was nicola sturgeon _ that... ok, so that was nicola sturgeon just _ that... ok, so that was nicola sturgeon just laying _ that... ok, so that was nicola sturgeon just laying out - that... ok, so that was nicola sturgeon just laying out a - that... ok, so that was nicola i sturgeon just laying out a couple that... ok, so that was nicola - sturgeon just laying out a couple of details ahead of the start of cop26, which is going to take place from the 31st of october to the 12th of november. emphasising that this particular conference will be different in scope, significance and scale but also going through some of the covid details that they have had to consider along with london and really to ensure everybody stays safe. so one of the biggest questions will be how to keep people safe as they gather in large crowds, and they said everything they have done, they have done everything rather to mitigate the risk of
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contracting covid so people will have to take tests every day, masks will need to be worn and general hygiene measures as well, but also detailing the fact that they are expecting a number of protests, some official, some not, to take place in glasgow, two which will be on friday and then won on saturday on the global of action. so around 20,000 delegates expected to attend. the pope has called on leaders at next week's climate summit in glasgow to make radical decisions, to offer hope to the world. in a message recorded for the bbc, he called on all those gathering at cop26 to act now to tackle the looming crisis of global warming and rising emissions. this morning pope francis also met the us presidentjoe biden, who's in rome for a summit of g20 leaders. from rome, mark lowen reports. a rare papal media message for an urgent crisis. the environmentalist pope francis
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taking to the bbc airwaves just before glasgow's climate conference. he evoked the world's multiple challenges, but urged against turning inwards, seeing them instead as a chance for change. the pope himself won't be in glasgow, despite expectations he would, but he hopes his voice will be heard there, telling world leaders the time to act is now.
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from extreme weather to forest fires, to rising sea—levels, the climate emergency is critical, and tackling it is at the centre of francis's papacy. and he's using all means before glasgow to raise it. including today, meeting the american president at the vatican.
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joe biden shares the pope's views on climate change, and it will be a focus of their discussions. the president and the pontiff eye—to—eye on the key issue of our times. the leader of the 1.3 billion catholics of course carries huge moral weight, and by meeting key leaders before glasgow and by spreading his message on air, pope francis will hope to coax those at the summit towards an agreement. the political, the spiritual, the ecological all coming together in these crucial few days. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is in rome for the g20 meeting and he told us why it is so important. it's a huge, huge challenge for them because they've got a lot of things to deal with. as you've heard, climate change is top of the agenda. this is very much a stepping stone summit before the cop26 meeting in glasgow. the leaders meeting here at the g20, their economies produce 80%
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of global emissions. how much will they commit to cutting emissions and by when? they will also be discussing how much money to give poorer countries to adapt to climate change, and will it be enough? they have also got to talk about the covid pandemic. in the longer term, there's the issue of recovering their economies from the pandemic. how do they fix those broken supply chains? how do they deal with rising energy prices? and in the shorter term, there's the question of how do you deal with that issue of vaccine inequality? the fact that 60%, 70% of the richer countries have produced... have got all their populations vaccinated but that number is probably about 2% for many, many poor developing countries. how would they address that? gordon brown, the former prime minister, is calling for an emergency airlift of surplus vaccines. so two big issues for this summit to deal with, and it's a big test of multilateral cooperation. on both climate and on covid, many countries have addressed those issues unilaterally, by themselves.
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this weekend is a test to see if they can act more collectively. that was james landale. ahead of cop26, greta thunberg has also spoken to the bbc saying that there's a real problem with youth activists not having their voices heard. she spoke of her hopes for leadership from the most powerful leaders including president biden. she spoke to the bbc�*s andrew marr just before taking part in a protest against the use of fossil fuels in the city of london. let's hear a little of their conversation. let me ask about the most powerful person coming to cop26, president biden. he hasjust announced a £500 billion plan to deal with climate change and has been working very, very hard with congress and so forth. how well do you think he is doing and could he be a real leader on climate change? of course everybody has the possibility but if the way
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he continues like now, no. ijust wonder what more he can do? he is challenging in the courts to stop mining and oil extraction on federal land. he is using up all his political capital in congress to try to get this through. he is working quite hard. we all understand, activists, we understand this doesn't fall on one single person, but of course when you are a leader of the most powerful country in the world, you have lots of responsibility. when the us is expanding fossil fuel infrastructure, it is a clear sign they are not really treating the climate crisis as an emergency. was it fair in retrospect to say "blah blah blah" about him? it was not directed to one person. i took lots of quotes from lots of them, lots of world leaders to say blah blah blah, but i think so. that was greta thunberg speaking to andrew marr.
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"two can play at that game" — that's the warning today to france from the british government as the row over post brexit fishing rights continues to escalate. the french ambassador to london has been summoned to the foreign office this afternoon. the french are angry about what they claim is a lack of licences for their boats to fish in uk waters. france has threatened to block british boats from its ports if the issue over fishing licences is not resolved by tuesday. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. rows over fishing are nothing new. this isjersey in the summer. french boats protesting at a loss of catching rights after brexit. now, the uk and french governments are involved in an escalating war of words. the uk says it's given most french boats licences to keep fishing here. but it has rejected some because they don't qualify. france is furious and has threatened to block british boats landing at french ports from tuesday.
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let's be serious, 244 boats with a pending license, this is not the treaty we signed when we dealt with brexit. the truth is that we have french fishermen losing 25% of their business every day. and, you know, it's something that we have to act on. this row could have an impact beyond fishing. france has threatened to increase checks from the uk and that could slow down trade over the channel. but ministers in london aren't backing down, saying they are prepared to retaliate if france takes action. two can play at that game, is what i would say. we've said that, for now, we're not going to respond in the way that france has. we're going to raise this with the commission and we're going to raise it through diplomatic channels with the french ambassador. but we'll reserve our right to do more things, obviously, if france continue to press ahead with these threats. this scottish boat was detained earlier this week in france. authorities said it didn't have a proper licence. but this is a diplomatic row that goes a lot deeper.
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the french ambassador has been summoned here to the foreign office in london this afternoon. that's something that's normally reserved for hostile states, not for close neighbours and allies. the uk says it still wants to try and figure out a diplomatic solution. but ministers have also held talks about what to do if one can't be found. it was all smiles when borisjohnson and the french president met back in june. they are due to hold brief talks on sunday at the g20, where the tensions over fishing are likely to make things a little less friendly. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent nick eardley gave us some background to the row:
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we are not adverse to rows overfishing in this country. they have happened a number of times over the past few decades. i think this is also a sign that some elements of the brexit trade deal — remember it was only signed at the end of last year — have been fairly complicated and haven't been particularly easy to implement. there does seem to be some genuine surprise in the uk government how quickly this has all escalated. the french government seems to be genuinely quite angry at the way this has panned out. it's worth pointing out there is also some politics at play here. there is a french presidential election in april and emmanuel macron wants to be seen to be tough on brexit. whereas boris johnson and his government we know is never shy of having a row over its relationship with the european union. that said, there will potentially be some talks over the next few days. we have the ambassador being summoned to meet the uk's europe minister this afternoon, potentially some talks over the weekend, and then
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the prime minister meeting the french president at the g20 for a brief meeting on sunday. so there is some opportunity potentially for some diplomacy to try and solve this, but it is an escalating row. as we have seen over the last couple of days, there is some pretty fiery rhetoric on both sides and at the moment it is hard to see how this is resolved. where does jersey and guernsey fit into this? i wonder if you could just explain that for us. jersey is one of the places a lot of french boat fish, so over the past few months there have been some flash points, you saw one in the package there, where french boats have tried to blockade parts of jersey harbour in particular. another way in whichjersey is key to this story is a lot of electricity that goes to jersey comes from france and there have been suggestions
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on the french side in the past that if this situation really escalated and if french boats were really being kept out of british waters, then potentially the price of that electricity tojersey could go up and potentially at some point it could even be cut off. sojersey plays a really important role. the uk has always worked closely withjersey as a crown dependency to try to figure out a solution that works for both sides, but the big argument today really is between the uk government and french government and it remains to be seen whether it can be figured out before the tuesday deadline. last week saw the highest levels of coronavirus infections ever reported across uk — according to the office for national statistics. the infection survey found that nearly 1.3 million people in the uk — around 1 in 55 people — would have tested positive for coronavirus in the week to last friday. our head of statistics robert
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cuffe has been looking at the latest figures. we have seen winter levels of infections but we are not seeing winter levels of sickness. we can show quite clearly in the data what we have been seeing in recent months, and the number of people in hospital is only a quarter of the number of people infected. this shows the trend in recent times. we saw case numbers rise as society opened up into the middle of summer, and injuly and october they bobbled around a lot, they are up and down, peaks and troughs all following closely. it is only in the last month they have started driving up again past a million and that reinforces the difficulty of having an open society as we move into winter when respiratory viruses like colds and coughs and the flu will thrive.
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that puts more pressure on and we will see the infection levels, there is a chance they could keep on rising. how does that translate to the r number? the r number combines this number, and the government say this is between 1.1 and 1.3 at the moment. so ten people go on to infect between 11 and 13. the epidemic is growing, is what they are saying, but it is worth remembering still hospitalisations and deaths are at much lower levels compared to what we are seeing in the case numbers. when we talk about the case numbers, those ons figures were for the week to last friday. where are we now? the ons and hospitalisations are all old news, they're what happened a couple of weeks ago. on sunday the daily reported case numbers have been starting to edge down, so that is helpful but i don't think it is case proven that we are on the way down right now. the modellers who advise the government say there is reason for hope, with high levels of vaccinations and high levels of
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people who have had the virus, we could be reaching the peak. they are not going to call it exactly. but as we were showing, there have been false peaks, false dawns and false disasters so we need to be careful but it is certainly good news. i'm glad that data has been put back on the screen. is there anyway to tie that peak to what is driving those cases? schools, vaccinations? you can see the recent drive is pushing through october but what has really been driving this underneath it is secondary school age kids. the number we are hitting, the 1.25 million, that's about 2% of people, secondary school age kids make up 9% of that so that is what is running much higher than everyone else. they are at 9%, their parents about 2%, most other adults 1% so it is running very hard in that school age group who mix a lot, haven't had
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as much access to vaccination, and we are seeing that it is spilling over into pa rents. so the big wave amongst kids is probably leaking through the walls of the vaccination programme a little bit, but not necessarily bursting through yet, so the hope is the vaccines will hold and a rapid booster campaign will keep it in check as well. just one more question — in terms vaccine uptake in amongst that group, how has that been going? sluggish i think is the answer. about 19% of younger teenagers have been vaccinated. so it is not really high. they are not in imminent danger. they are at much lower risk if they do catch the virus but certainly we will see the number of infections consistent with the low levels of vaccination. and it's worth saying as well, we are seeing a reasonable number of infections.
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2% of infections in 35 to 50—year—olds is similar to last winter and the vaccine campaign isn't over by any stretch of the imagination. the first minister of wales mark drakeford has warned that covid rules which had been scrapped could be brought back in order to allow people to have a "normal" christmas. new measures are already being brought in to tackle wales' high covid rates — the worst in the uk. covid passes will be extended to cinemas, theatres and concert halls from 15 november as part of the plans. pubs, restaurants and cafes might also require passes if infections climb. there are a wide range of further measures that we can take. we don't want to. we've managed to keep wales at alert level zero for many weeks now. but with the numbers as they are in the community, we have literally thousands of people every day falling ill with the coronavirus. they can't be in work. they can't be out,
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helping with the economy. and we have to do something to bring those numbers down. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. it's been an extremely wet few days for some parts of the uk. still flood warnings in force and more rain to come this afternoon especially across northern england up across the eastern side of scotland, a slice of clear and sunny skies following on before showers and turn from the south west later in the day. temperatures between 12— 16. this evening, a slice of clear skies and potentially for a time particular towards the north—east. more rain pushing in from the west by the end of the night. these are the temperatures as we begin saturday morning. it will be a wet start for many. at least this band of rain is on the move eastwards, so just about all of us getting a dose of wet weather but behind that, the sunshine will re—emerge albeit with a scattering of showers. it will feel cooler and fresher. 11- 15. after quite a chilly saturday night,
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rain returns from the south—west as we head into sunday and, along with that, some strong and blustery wind. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the french government warn they could block british fishing boats next week in a row over post—brexit fishing rights. the brexit minister has told eu officials the uk could launch dispute proceedings in response. the pope calls for world leaders to consider radical decisions to tackle climate change, in an exclusive message recorded for the bbc ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow. the uk sees highest level of coronavirus infections since the pandemic began — officialfigures show one in 55 people would have tested positive last week. treatment for menopause symptoms
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is to be made cheaper in england with the government announcing that prescription charges for hrt will be significantly reduced, following a campaign led by labour mp carolyn harris. and archaeologists have uncovered a rare set of roman sculptures at the site of a suspected ancient mausoleum on the route of the new hs2 rail link. sport now from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. ole gunnar solskjaer is in defiant mood following more questions about his future at old trafford following last weekend 5— zero defeat to liverpool. man united are at tottenham tomorrow as they look to bounce back in the premier league and the united boss insists he is the right person to turn things around.
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it's been a difficult week, of course. we have had to deal with the result and performance against liverpool, which we know wasn't good enough. that is something footballers have to do deal with. that's why we are in this game and you've got to look forward to the next game, make sure you are ready for that game and when you get to that game, sort it out. it has been challenging earlier on. we've had a good week. a good read on the training field. i have to say that. of the premier league leaders are chelsea, they had to newcastle tomorrow. the manager says it seems they have closed the gap on previous champions manchester city and liverpool for the time being but his team have to prove they can sustain that level of quality over the entire season.— that level of quality over the entire season. ., ., ,
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entire season. there was a gap in the last year— entire season. there was a gap in the last year and _ entire season. there was a gap in the last year and liverpool - entire season. there was a gap in the last year and liverpool and i entire season. there was a gap in. the last year and liverpool and city set the _ the last year and liverpool and city set the standards. they are together and they— set the standards. they are together and they have a certain mentality with their— and they have a certain mentality with their managers over the years and that's— with their managers over the years and that's what we have to do. we try to _ and that's what we have to do. we try to close — and that's what we have to do. we try to close it. we were confident enough _ try to close it. we were confident enough to— try to close it. we were confident enough to say straight away we want to close _ enough to say straight away we want to close it _ enough to say straight away we want to close it from the first day in the season. this is what we are up to and _ the season. this is what we are up to and this — the season. this is what we are up to and this is — the season. this is what we are up to and this is what drives up. there was a thrilling _ to and this is what drives up. there was a thrilling finish _ to and this is what drives up. there was a thrilling finish at _ to and this is what drives up. there was a thrilling finish at the - to and this is what drives up. there was a thrilling finish at the men's l was a thrilling finish at the men's t20 world cup in england is group with the west indies just sneaking home for their first win of the competition. bangladesh won the toss and put the west indies into bat. 94 off the next ten overs. a top score off the next ten overs. a top score of 40. bangladesh were set 143 and looked like they were going to make it. both sides guilty of some poor fielding. it went down to the final
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ball. they needed four to go bangladesh the rim. the west indies got the win they needed by three runs to keep alive their hopes of making the semifinals. bangladesh almost certainly now are out. having beaten india and new zealand, pakistan looking to make it three wins from three and they've made a good start. they are 45— four. they chose to bat but the wickets have been tumbling. they beat scotland in their opening match. not looking the moment. third look at taken for pakistan a short while ago. pakistan in control for the moment. emma raducanu will be looking to reach the semifinals of the transylvanian open this evening. she says being with her father for the tournament in his native
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romania makes it extra special. she is through to the quarterfinals where she will face her opponent for a place in the last four. she's also revealed she given her us open trophy to the lawn tennis association as a thank you for the part it's played in her development. holly aitchison will maker 15 a side debut for england's women when she starts against new zealand in the union test on sunday. she was part of team gb at the tokyo olympics in the summer and she will take the place of injured emily skerritt. amber reid will start as her partner and will vice captain the side in sandy park. that is all the sport for now and i will have more for you later but for now back to you. thank you very much. treatment for the menopause is to be made cheaper in england with the government announcing that prescription charges will be significantly reduced. the announcement follows a campaign from labour mp carolyn harris. she had put forward a bill to make hrt treatment free.
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the government said they would not go that far, but that women would only have to pay for the prescription once a year, saving around £200. our political correspondent helen catt reports. they're menopausal and they're in parliament square to shout about what that means. among them, some famous faces. the night sweats prevent you from sleeping, so you can't even begin your day properly, and every amount of anxiety, every decision you have to make, is not in your control any more, and then you feel like you're having a nervous breakdown. someone who knows that all too well is adelle martin, who runs this pub in kent and helps other women through menopause. i felt like i just completely lost myself. and at the time ijust didn't know what it was. sorry. no, not at all. it was menopause. and this is why i do what i do, because ijust didn't want another woman...
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..to look in the mirror and lose themselves like i did. adelle says hormone replacement therapy helped her. it is free on the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland, but has to be paid for in england. adelle's patches cost £9.35 a month on the nhs, but many other treatments that also use two hormones cost double that. in the house of commons, a labour mp pushed for change. the menopause doesn't discriminate, so the cost to treat it shouldn't either. we have got women struggling to find almost £20 a month, and itjust isn't right when this is a time in their life that women will reach. there is no avoiding the menopause for half of the population. the minister agreed. she announced doctors will now be able to prescribe 12 months�* worth of hrt for the cost a woman would usually pay for one batch. i can tell the house that we will amend the regulations to reduce the cost and improve access to hrt.
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we will do this by reducing the cost of repeatable prescriptions for hrt for women experiencing menopausal symptoms. that is a saving too for those who already pay less than that, £108 a year, because they have chosen to prepay for their prescription. the reaction from carolyn harris was evident. can i thank the minister, can i thank the clerks... wonderful women, thank you. so hrt won't be free in england, but it will soon cost less. another step in what seems to be a growing move to make real changes for women at a crucial stage of their lives. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. smokers who are trying to give up could soon by offered e—cigarettes by the nhs in england. manufacturers of e—cigarettes will be invited to submit their products for approval in the same way as other medicines that are available on the nhs. our health editor
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hugh pym explained. vaping has been widely used by smokers trying to kick the habit with a certain degree of success. in fact, some smoking cessation clinics run by the nhs have handed out vaping devices, e—cigarettes, but we have not got to the point where the nhs can routinely prescribe e—cigarettes, so what has now happened as the medical regulator the mhra has announced a streamlined process for manufacturers to put forward devices so they can be approved or not as having a medicinal use. the mhra has said based on all the evidence available, across different health bodies, e—cigarettes are less harmful to health than smoking tobacco. now this doesn't mean it's automatically going to happen. this is for england, certainly at this stage. it needs to go to the mhra, each device, and then nice, the organisation which decides what is cost—effective
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for the nhs and worth pursuing, also has to approve it, but it certainly seen as a step forward by enthusiasts for e—cigarettes. there are still some sceptics out there who say we don't have enough long—term research on how harmful they may be. most people really do concede it's less harmful than smoking. even though they still involve nicotine for those who are using them and of course the approaches may well differ in different nations of the uk. the clear up has begun in cumbria after some 40 homes were flooded due to torrential rain. across the borders and north west england there has been major road and rail travel disrupted. the met office has issued a yellow warning, meaning some disruption is possible, and the environment agency has a number of flood warnings in place. megan paterson is in in cockermouth in cumbria. well, as you can see, the river here in cockermouth still looks like a force to be
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reckoned with this afternoon. within the last few minutes, we've seen a cumbria county council worker come here to take pictures of the structural integrity of the bridge. the reassuring thing, though, is that the water has receded considerably here. you can see by the line of leaves left by the river on the ground here that the river has gone down and that's the case across the county. river levels have peaked. the lakes are levelling out. the environment agency says that this is an improving situation although it still will continue to rain for the next few hours. people are being advised to stay vigilant. we haven't had any more reports of flooding to properties, that 40 you mentioned, but hopefully there shouldn't be any more today. the environment agency saying the rain should ease off and that the river catchment area should be able to cope with that. unfortunately, there has been disruption to the roads. localised flooding making it difficult to get around for some people in cumbria today. and for people trying to travel through the county, on the west coast mainline, that's been very difficult too. the weather affecting west coast rail services.
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we expect by later this afternoon, those services should get back to some sense of normality, although people are still being advised not to travel if they don't have to do. the weather warning is still in place here. it's been downgraded from that amber level last night. so the next 24 hours we expect some rain but not as bad as we've seen the previous two days. there's a sense of relief here in cockermouth and elsewhere in cumbria that this time the flooding hasn't been as bad, but there's also a realisation, an acceptance that flooding like this is likely to happen again in the future. as you've been hearing, world leaders will arrive in glasgow for the crucial un climate change conference cop26 this weekend. we'll be bringing you full coverage here on bbc news. at the conference, each country will be asked to update the world on targets to cut emissions. when different countries are bigger polluters than others? it's the thorny issue
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of climate justice. here's our reality check correspondent chris morris. who is most responsible for climate change? whose worst affected by it? who should take the lead in trying to fix it? these are the big questions at the heart of climate justice. the poorest and most vulnerable people around the world are the least likely to cause the pollution leading to climate change. if you look at the greenhouse gas emissions that are heating the planet up the richest 1% of the earths population are responsible for more than the pale rest 50%. but the poor often the most likely to be affected by the most detrimental impacts. farmland turning into desert. sea level rises threatening homes. or extreme weather events like flash floods and wildfires. these things can happen anywhere,
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but the poorest countries have far fewer resources to deal with them. climate justice also means taking account of historical emissions. it's true china produces the most greenhouse gases in the world at the moment but over the last 250 years, the united states and europe have produced far more. the rich world has accepted responsibility for these omissions but a promise to send $100,000,000,000 a year to developing countries by 2020 to help them adapt to climate change to build greener economies in the future hasn't yet been met. climate justice though isn't only about numbers but really about people. the school strikes have drawn a lot of attention to this demanding that their solution are found between rich and poor. that means supporting the very poorest countries and making sure they are not forced to take on huge amounts of debt. but also tackling inequality between people in richer societies. whether it's about how you heat your home
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may be the switch to electric cars. forcing change on the people who can't afford it isn't going to work. so governments are going to have to help people pay for it. a tax on carbon is one suggestion so people and especially companies that use the most pay the most. whatever happens, it's going to cost a lot less than acting too slowly to deal with global warming. and there is good reason to believe a green revolution can create millions of newjobs around the world. but whether you look at the whole world orjust whether you look at the whole world or just the local area whether you look at the whole world orjust the local area where you live, the transition to a more sustainable economy and a more sustainable economy and a more sustainable planet is only going to work if it's going to be fair. that was chris morris. the headlines on bbc news. the government warns it
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could implement more checks on fishing boats from the eu, if france carries out threats to disrupt british vessels in a row over post—brexit fishing rights. last week saw the highest levels of coronavirus infections ever reported across uk. figures show one in 55 people had the virus the cost of hormone replacement therapy prescriptions for women going through the menopause is to fall in england. schools across the uk have been marking black history month and from next year it ll become a mandatory part of the curriculum in wales. but in england, scotland and northern ireland teaching black history is not compulsory — despite repeated calls from campaigners. at the moment teachers can choose whether or not to include black history in their lessons. adina campbell reports. he is actually huge in history. garrett morgan. you know traffic lights? before — traffic lights were red and green. so, he invented the amber in between to make a three—way traffic light. new discoveries
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about black pioneers. classrooms in cardiff, like many others in the uk, have spent the last few weeks exploring black history. it's a really important thing. it's great to learn about where we came from, the struggles that people in your family have had. as we get older, our country'sl going to become more diverse. we have to learn to. respect one another, our cultures, our traditions. black history month continues to be divisive. every year, we hear the same debates. "it's a token gesture, why does it only last for a few weeks?" and concerns about the range of content available and discussed. but yet, perhaps more than ever, where there's been a sharp refocus about the black experience, race and racism, some say it's even more necessary. and that's what's happening here in wales, the first home nation to take action. from september next year, black and other ethnic minority history will be taught
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in all welsh schools. a move welcomed by campaigners. and, last month, a statue of betty campbell, wales's first black head teacher was unveiled in cardiff. but for most children in the uk, october is the only time in the school calendar they learn about black history. way too little and undervalued, according to the uk's first black studies professor. well, i think the first thing would be to scrap how we think about history, how we think about social studies generally. just get rid of it and start again. when we think about the british empire, africa, caribbean, asia, were part of britain. so we think about the caribbean as being somehow separate, somehow different history, we really miss the point. why, only yesterday, in the morning chronicle... but it's the personal discoveries which can mean even more. actor paterson joseph, who has written and performed a play about britain's first black voter, was so moved by his story,
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he's about to release a book about the hidden historicalfigure. the more we know about ourselves, the more confident we are. - so, when i discovered - ignatius sancho, for example, my confidence grew. of course i belong here! for many reasons. some of them negative, - but a lot of them very positive. icons of the past many hope will be better acknowledged in the future. adina campbell, bbc news. a group of women in the us have become social media stars after discovering they were dating the same man. when the trio found they shared a boyfriend, they soon ended the relationship and discovered he was not the only thing they had in common. they set about planning the trip of a lifetime together, by buying and renovating an old school bus to call home. they shared their story with megha mohan.
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this is the story of three young women, one boyfriend and a bus and how discovering they were dating the same guy turned into an inspiring journey that has gone viral. this whole experience, the ability to share our story with other people to see how many people resonate with it. i am beckett and i'm 18. i'm abby and i'm 19. and morgan and 21. tells the story of how he three came in seen each other�*s lives. i was getting suspicious of my man an agent of a particular reason, ijust had a really weird feeling. searching social media, she discovered another woman was also seeing him. the two women got in touch by instagram and started talking. we ended up talking for the whole day and then immediately she sent me abbie was like instagram and she says i think this colour but this too. i was like, kidding me? is more than just you? so they contacted abbie who turned out to also be dating him.
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so we were all on a cold trying to figure out what to do and he shows up at the house and knocks on the door and is showtime ladies. he ended up being like, what have you been up to? and she says it has actually been a great day, i have met new friends and she showed him our races on the facetime call and just saying his fate, it was so cinematic , seeing his face. after confronting him and dumping him they discovered they weren't alone. we all started comparing timelines and stuff and we all realised we had seen becker's name pop up on his phone. becker had also been dating him unaware of the other women, and it didn't end there. yeah, there were six that we know of! from this unpromising start, a firm friendship developed. one overlapping story he told the mole was a dream to do a road trip around the us they come up with a plan. they saved up money, but a school bus and set about renovating it.
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we were all very dedicated to making it happen and putting our energy into something that was constructive and that was positive rather thanjust dwelling on it. having now hit the road, their adventures have become something of an internet sensation. like, we get to share thisjoy of seeing the world. - oh, yes, it has been very cool. to hear everybody else's stories online at their situations on hard l times that have happened to them and then they have decided to go - and do something happy and exciting is that they have always teamed off because this was a dream - for all of us that we just had to make work this way, - unexpected but great. they are continuing to chat live adventures as they travel round the us. becoming a kind of naturally fell into place in a really beautiful way and we want to see whether friendship goes. megan lohan, bbc news. archaeologists digging on the route
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of the hs2 high—speed rail link have uncovered what they've described as an "astounding" set of roman statues. two complete sculptures of what appear to be a man and a woman, were found at an abandoned medieval church in buckinghamshire. simonjones reports. a dig with a difference, unearthing statues described as rare, remarkable, incredible. the head and shoulders of a woman. a bust of a man. plus the head from the statue of a child. in such good condition that archaeologists say it's like looking into the faces of the past. the team that found them cannot disguise their excitement or the smiles on their faces. pretty much a giant grin. everybody was really, really astounded to find them. they're just so unusual and so well preserved as well. really, really good condition. the only problem is the heads are no longer on the shoulders. we found the female head first.
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and what turned out to be the male shoulders. so we could tell the head did not quite fit that set of shoulders. and then the following day, we found the male head and the other set of shoulders. there used to be a norman church on the site built in 1080. this is what it would have looked like. it was when the team were excavating the remains of that, that they discovered another building underneath. it was a mausoleum, a roman tomb. a hexagonal glass jug was also uncovered with large pieces intact. these are the latest finds along the route of the hs2 line. at london euston, thousands of skeletons are being moved from an ancient burial site. back in buckinghamshire, these statues will now be cleaned up and heads reunited with shoulders. we may never know who these people actually were. but the hope is the statues will eventually go on display, the first time they would have been seen in public for more than 1,000 years. while experts are left wondering what else might be buried beneath england's medieval village churches.
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simon jones, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben. good afternoon. there are still numerous flood warnings in force after the rain that's fallen in many parts of the uk over the last few days. this was the scene for a weather watcher in cumbria earlier on, and this is the earlier radar picture. you can see yet more rain that has been working its way across many parts of the country, with some particularly heavy rain moving once again across the far north—west of england into southern and eastern portions of scotland. as we go through the afternoon, some showers drifting across eastern england. then there is a slice of drier and brighter weather before some showers return from the west later in the day. top temperatures 13—16 degrees, and then as we head through this evening and tonight, that slice of clear skies doesn't last all that long. this band of showers tending to gang together into a longer spell of rain as it works eastwards, as we head into the early hours of saturday. it will stay quite breezy in places overnight, fairly chilly across northern
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and eastern areas, milder further south and west, and then into saturday low—pressure to the north—west of us, this frontal system pushing eastwards, taking some outbreaks of rain with it, but at least the front is moving through, so while it will be a soggy start for many, could see some particularly heavy rain drifting across parts of east anglia and the south east for a time, we will see brighter skies following on for the west, with some spells of sunshine. also some showers pushing in across western areas but, not a bad end to saturday in most places and it will feel a little cooler and fresher, 11—15 degrees. through saturday evening under these clear skies it will turn quite chilly for a time, but then there is another weather system that will start to push on from the west, and don't forget through the early hours of sunday morning the clocks go back one hour, but as we head into sunday here comes our next weather system, an area of low pressure winding itself up, pushing across the uk, and this will bring a swathe of wet weather northwards and eastwards as we go through sunday.
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still some uncertainty about just how far north the rain will get, but it looks like it will spread across all of scotland, blustery showers and the potential for gales following on into some western coasts, some sunny spells too, and certainly a coolerfeel, 10—14 degrees, and there is some cooler, or dare i say, quite chilly weather to come through the start of the new week. some showers at first, it will then turn drier for a time through the middle part of the week.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 4pm... the french government say they could block british fishing boats next week in a row over post—brexit fishing rights — the uk warns the eu it could launch dispute proceedings in response, as the government considers its options. we will see what they do on tuesday but obviously we reserve the right to respond in a proportionate way. the uk sees highest level of coronavirus infections since the pandemic began — official figures show one in 55 people would have tested positive last week. treatment for menopause symptoms is to be made cheaper in england, as the government announces women will only need to pay for their prescription once a year following a campaign
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led by labour mp carolyn harris. cani can i thank the minister, can i thank the clerks. wonderful women, thank the clerks. wonderful women, thank you. the pope calls for world leaders to consider radical decisions to tackle climate change, in an exclusive message recorded for the bbc ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow. and archaeologists have uncovered a rare set of roman sculptures at the site of a suspected ancient mausoleum on the route of the new hs2 rail link. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news.
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"two can play at that game" — that's the warning today to france from the british government as the row over post brexit fishing rights continues to escalate. the french ambassador to london has been summoned to the foreign office this afternoon. the french are angry about what they claim is a lack of licences for their boats to fish in uk waters. france has threatened to block british boats from its ports if the issue over fishing licences is not resolved by tuesday. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. rows over fishing are nothing new. this isjersey in the summer. french boats protesting at a loss of catching rights after brexit. now, the uk and french governments are involved in an escalating war of words. the uk says it's given most french boats licences to keep fishing here. but it has rejected some because they don't qualify. france is furious and has threatened
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to block british boats landing at french ports from tuesday. let's be serious, 244 boats with a pending license, this is not the treaty we signed when we dealt with brexit. the truth is that we have french fishermen losing 25% of their business every day. and, you know, it's something that we have to act on. this row could have an impact beyond fishing. france has threatened to increase checks from the uk and that could slow down trade over the channel. but ministers in london aren't backing down, saying they are prepared to retaliate if france takes action. two can play at that game, is what i would say. we've said that, for now, we're not going to respond in the way that france has. we're going to raise this with the commission and we're going to raise it through diplomatic channels with the french ambassador. but we'll reserve our right to do more things, obviously, if france continue to press ahead with these threats.
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this scottish boat was detained earlier this week in france. authorities said it didn't have a proper licence. but this is a diplomatic row that goes a lot deeper. the french ambassador has been summoned here to the foreign office in london this afternoon. that's something that's normally reserved for hostile states, not for close neighbours and allies. the uk says it still wants to try and figure out a diplomatic solution. but ministers have also held talks about what to do if one can't be found. it was all smiles when borisjohnson and the french president met back in june. they are due to hold brief talks on sunday at the g20, where the tensions over fishing are likely to make things a little less friendly. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. live to westminster, and our political correspondent damian grammaticas.
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hi, damian. can you hear me? yes, i can. hi, damian. can you hear me? yes, i can- sorry. — hi, damian. can you hear me? yes, i can- sorry. so — hi, damian. can you hear me? yes, i can- sorry. so the — hi, damian. can you hear me? yes, i can. sorry, so the french _ hi, damian. can you hear me? yes, i | can. sorry, so the french ambassador has been summoned. _ can. sorry, so the french ambassador has been summoned. this _ can. sorry, so the french ambassador has been summoned. this has - has been summoned. this has escalated quickly, hasn't it? tt has been summoned. this has escalated quickly, hasn't it? it has ram ed escalated quickly, hasn't it? it has ramped up — escalated quickly, hasn't it? it has ramped up pretty _ escalated quickly, hasn't it? it has ramped up pretty fast. _ escalated quickly, hasn't it? it has ramped up pretty fast. what - escalated quickly, hasn't it? it has ramped up pretty fast. what you l escalated quickly, hasn't it? tt ta; ramped up pretty fast. what you have to be aware of in that is there is an issue with this weekend because this weekend is the point at which french boats which had been fishing in waters, particularly around jersey, will see their current access end. so i think that is where the real crunch point is coming from, the french side concerned about that. and particularly at the heart of this issue are something between 40 and 50 boats from the french side that have not got licences to fish in waters off jersey and believe they should have them. the issue there i think is the
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ability of those boats to provide historical data showing they have traditionally fished those waters which would entitle them to licences under the post brexit trade agreement. but if they are unable to provide that information because they are small boats without tracking systems or the uk government and jersey authorities don't accept the information they provide, that is where the difficulty comes. what we have seen todayis difficulty comes. what we have seen today is the efforts to try to address this in the high level talks between the eu and the uk, that is between the eu and the uk, that is between those dealing with other issues relating to northern ireland and the protocol, those have not led to a breakthrough. we have had the ambassador called in to london and this is the politics swirling around those 40 or 50 licences.- those 40 or 50 licences. damian grammaticas. — those 40 or 50 licences. damian grammaticas, thank _ those 40 or 50 licences. damian grammaticas, thank you - those 40 or 50 licences. damian grammaticas, thank you very i those 40 or 50 licences. damian i grammaticas, thank you very much those 40 or 50 licences. damian - grammaticas, thank you very much for that. mike park is from the scottish white fish
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producers association. hejoins us now. thank you he joins us now. thank you for your time, mike. what do you make on what has taken place over the last few days? tt has taken place over the last few da s? . , �* ., , days? if it wasn't true, it would be farcical. what _ days? if it wasn't true, it would be farcical. what you _ days? if it wasn't true, it would be farcical. what you have _ days? if it wasn't true, it would be farcical. what you have here - days? if it wasn't true, it would be farcical. what you have here in - farcical. what you have here in essenceis farcical. what you have here in essence is an administrative situation that they should manage to resolve but it has been elevated to a larger political level for domestic requirements and it is ridiculous we find ourselves in this situation where the french once again are starting to ride roughshod over the uk. flan again are starting to ride roughshod over the uk-— over the uk. can i ask, have your members. _ over the uk. can i ask, have your members, because _ over the uk. can i ask, have your members, because your - over the uk. can i ask, have your members, because your website | members, because your website describes your organisation is sort of the political arm of and the political voice for fishermen, where they happy first off with what was negotiated as part of the brexit deal? ., , ., , ., ., , deal? no, there is only one answer to that, no- — deal? no, there is only one answer to that. no- we _ deal? no, there is only one answer to that, no. we felt _ deal? no, there is only one answer to that, no. we felt we _ deal? no, there is only one answer to that, no. we felt we were - to that, no. we felt we were betrayed by a number of people but most of all the pm. we felt the deal we got in terms of most of my
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members was inadequate and nothing like what was promised to us. the vessel that has been detained is one of my members. the scottish industry is the poor boy out of this deal and we are still suffering yet. the threat of action at the channel once again which will then impact prices in the north—east of scotland is very bitter to take. 50 in the north-east of scotland is very bitter to take.— in the north-east of scotland is very bitter to take. so this is the cornelis journey _ very bitter to take. so this is the cornelis journey -- _ very bitter to take. so this is the cornelis journey -- jert - very bitter to take. so this is the cornelis journey -- jert gan, - very bitter to take. so this is the l cornelis journey -- jert gan, what cornelis journey —— jert gan, what will happen to them? we cornelis journey -- jert gan, what will happen to them? we understand currently they _ will happen to them? we understand currently they are _ will happen to them? we understand currently they are going _ will happen to them? we understand currently they are going to _ will happen to them? we understand currently they are going to let - will happen to them? we understand currently they are going to let the i currently they are going to let the vessel leave port and the court case has been set for 2022. i guess that is the outcome of that. you look at the situation where we had one vessel find at sea and one detained. that may have taken place anyway,
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but you now have the french government making a statement that i think the licences ran out on tuesday but after that pretty much they were going to lock up the channel again. that is intolerable, thatis channel again. that is intolerable, that is not in the spirit of the agreement and indeed the situation they have got themselves into by declaring they want more licences which is not a credible position for them to take is out of sync with everything in the pca. as working fishermen, we find this intolerable that the french have negotiated a position that they will not respect. obviously you would have heard george eustice speaking earlier today, he was saying the british government reserve the right to respond in a proportionate way. what in your view is a proportionate way? because it looks like it's going down the route of biscuit for tat. first and foremost, we would like this to be de—escalated and we would like trade to start flowing over the channel. the lack of trade over the
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channel impacts my members greatly. we would like to see if it all falls flat the uk exercising its own powers like france has. there are more french vessels in uk waters than there are uk vessels in french waters and if we go down this biscuit for tat route it will get messy. but at the end of the day we try to make the business work and this is not making our lives easy. how do your members feel out there in the waters at the moment? q0 how do your members feel out there in the waters at the moment? do they feel safe? they _ in the waters at the moment? do they feel safe? they feel _ in the waters at the moment? do they feel safe? they feel safe _ in the waters at the moment? do they feel safe? they feel safe in _ in the waters at the moment? do they feel safe? they feel safe in as - in the waters at the moment? do they feel safe? they feel safe in as much i feel safe? they feel safe in as much as they wouldn't fish if they didn't feel safe, but in terms of the rigour and resilience of their business, they have seen that socked away since brexit and certainly through covid and some of them are just hanging on. here we are into negotiations, trilateral negotiations, trilateral negotiations with the eu and norway setting quotas for next year and we are not sure what that will deliver. the fishing industry is at its lowest point probably for the last
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six or seven years. so lowest point probably for the last six or seven years.— six or seven years. so tuesday is the deadline. _ six or seven years. so tuesday is the deadline. if _ six or seven years. so tuesday is the deadline. if boats _ six or seven years. so tuesday is the deadline. if boats are - six or seven years. so tuesday is the deadline. if boats are unable j six or seven years. so tuesday is i the deadline. if boats are unable to enter french ports, what happens to those catches? and how many vessels is that likely to impact, do you know? , ., , is that likely to impact, do you know? , . , ., , ., know? they have been a number of vessels certainly _ know? they have been a number of vessels certainly in _ know? they have been a number of vessels certainly in the _ know? they have been a number of vessels certainly in the line - know? they have been a number of vessels certainly in the line that. vessels certainly in the line that have had their catches detained in the last few weeks and have stopped landing there. there are some smaller vessels landing in french port so it will impact on them. i guess what this highlight is we are totally dependent on getting a product across the channel into france, and as a responsible coastal state, what we need to do is find another route to market in europe because this threat of havoc at every opportunity by the french is now becoming intolerable. mike park, thank ou now becoming intolerable. mike park, thank you very — now becoming intolerable. mike park, thank you very much _ now becoming intolerable. mike park, thank you very much for _ now becoming intolerable. mike park, thank you very much for that. - mike park from the scottish white fish producers association there.
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an update on the uk covid figures, and in terms of those who had tested positive, 43,467, and 186 people have died from covid. that is death within 28 days of a positive test. last week saw the highest levels of coronavirus infections ever reported across uk, according to the office for national statistics. according to the office the infection survey found that nearly 1.3 million people in the uk — around 1 in 55 people — would have tested positive for coronavirus in the week to last friday. but the survey does not cover the week that's just ending, where the daily number of infections has appeared to be beginning to fall. and today the government has urged
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secondary school pupils in england to get themselves tested before returning to school after half term to try and avoid further disruption. our head of statistics robert cuffe is here. he has been explaining more. this shows the trend in recent times. we saw case numbers rise as society opened up into the middle of summer, and inbetweenjuly and october they bobbled around a lot, they are up and down, peaks and troughs all following closely. it is only in the last month they have started driving up again past a million and a quarter, and that reinforces the difficulty of having an open society as we move into winter when respiratory viruses like colds and coughs and the flu will thrive. that puts more pressure
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on and we will see the infection levels...there is a chance they could keep on rising. how does that translate to the r number? the r number combines this information, and the government say this is between 1.1 and 1.3 at the moment. so ten people go on to infect between 11 and 13. the epidemic is growing, is what they are saying, but it is worth remembering still hospitalisations and deaths are at much, much lower levels compared to what we are seeing in the case numbers. when we talk about the case numbers, those ons figures were for the week to last friday. where are we now? the ons and hospitalisations are all old news, they're telling us what happened a couple of weeks ago. on sunday the daily reported case numbers have been
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starting to edge down, so that's hopeful but i don't think it is case proven that we are on the way down right now. the modellers who advise the government say there is reason for hope, with high levels of vaccinations and high levels of people who have had the virus, we could be reaching the peak. they're not going to call it exactly. but as we were showing in the first chart, there have been false peaks, false dawns and false disasters, so we need to be careful but it is certainly good news. i'm glad that data has been put back on the screen. is there anyway to tie that peak to what is driving those cases? schools, vaccinations? you can see the recent drive is pushing through october but what has really been driving this underneath it is secondary school age kids. the number we are hitting, the 1.25 million, that's about 2% of people, roughly. secondary school age kids make up
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9% of that, so that is what is running much higher than everyone else. they're at 9%, their parents about 2%, most other adults 1% so it is running very hard in that school age group who mix a lot, haven't had as much access to vaccination, and we are seeing that is spilling over into parents. so the big wave amongst kids is probably leaking through the walls of the vaccination programme a little bit, but not necessarily bursting through yet, so the hope is the vaccines will hold and a rapid booster campaign will keep it in check as well. just one more question — in terms of vaccine uptake in amongst that group, how has that been going? sluggish, i think is the answer. about 19% of younger teenagers have been vaccinated. so it's not really high. they are not in imminent danger. they are at much lower risk if they do catch the virus but certainly we will see the number of infections consistent with the low levels of vaccination. and it's worth saying as well,
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we are seeing a reasonable number of infections. 2% of infections in 35 to 50—year—olds is similar to last winter and the vaccine campaign isn't over by any stretch of the imagination. that was our head of statistics, robert cuffe speaking to me earlier. the first minister of wales mark drakeford has warned that covid rules which had been scrapped could be brought back in order to allow people to have a "normal" christmas. new measures are already being brought in to tackle wales' high covid rates — the worst in the uk. covid passes will be extended to cinemas, theatres and concert halls from the 15th of november as part of the plans. pubs, restaurants and cafes might also require passes if infections climb. there are a wide range of further measures that we can take. we don't want to. we've managed to keep wales at alert level zero for many weeks now. but with the numbers
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as they are in the community, we have literally thousands of people every day falling ill with the coronavirus. they can't be in work. they can't be out, helping with the economy. and we have to do something to bring those numbers down. that was mark drakeford. let's discuss these latest figures with professor paul hunter from the university of east anglia. looking at the figures, should we be concerned? t at the figures, should we be concerned?— at the figures, should we be concerned? ,, , ., at the figures, should we be concerned? ~' , ., , concerned? i think the question is robabl concerned? i think the question is probably more _ concerned? i think the question is probably more are _ concerned? i think the question is probably more are there - concerned? i think the question is probably more are there groundsl concerned? i think the question is i probably more are there grounds for optimism? and i think there are. we have probably... well, we certainly have probably... well, we certainly have got more infection in the population at the moment than probably at any time during the pandemic with the possible exception of maybe the worst week injanuary.
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but reported cases are actually now falling. some of that fall might be because reduced testing over the half term period, particularly in children. but we are already seeing signs that we might be seeing falls in the over 80s. so hopefully that will continue, but as your statistician was pointing out that we have seen peaks and troughs going up we have seen peaks and troughs going up and down pretty much sincejuly, so that is always difficult to know whether actually this is the peak and things will get better. but i think there is a lot of other promising information out there. i think the booster campaign did start sluggishly but it is picking up already. and i think the emerging evidence is that the boosters are turning out to be hugely more
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effective than i think... well, certainly than i believed possible. so that may actually have a huge impact on both cases and hospitalisations and deaths. particularly that most hospitalisations and deaths occur in the over 50s, so we may well see a big drop because of the booster vaccination campaign if we manage this correctly and continue to build on what we have achieved so far. you sound surprised that the success of the booster programme, just talk me through that. tim the booster programme, 'ust talk me through that.— through that. i'm not surprised that the success — through that. i'm not surprised that the success of _ through that. i'm not surprised that the success of it, _ through that. i'm not surprised that the success of it, i'm _ through that. i'm not surprised that the success of it, i'm surprised - through that. i'm not surprised that the success of it, i'm surprised howj the success of it, i'm surprised how successful it is appearing to be. most of the information we have is coming from israel but there are initial results from at least one of the country that haven't yet been made publicly available that are suggesting... particularly the difference between pfizer between
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the people who weren't vaccinated and after the second dose, that was protecting people from severe disease of the order of about 95%. now, those figures have deteriorated as the vaccine effectiveness has waned over the last six months, but the evidence from israel is that the effectiveness of the third booster gives another 90% protection on top of what you still have from the first two rounds, so that is a big number. israel has certainly seen a dramatic decline in severe disease andindeedin dramatic decline in severe disease and indeed in infections associated with their booster campaign. so i'm pretty hopeful that providing we can get a reasonable number of people immunised for their third booster, as we go to christmas we will see substantial falls.
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as we go to christmas we will see substantialfalls. but as we go to christmas we will see substantial falls. but covid as we go to christmas we will see substantialfalls. but covid has substantial falls. but covid has a habit of never following the model plans as closely as we would like at times. ., , ., ., , ., times. for us mere mortals, not lookint times. for us mere mortals, not looking at— times. for us mere mortals, not looking at data, _ times. for us mere mortals, not looking at data, as _ times. for us mere mortals, not looking at data, as we _ times. for us mere mortals, not looking at data, as we head - times. for us mere mortals, not looking at data, as we head into| looking at data, as we head into winter normally people are worried and certainly a couple of weeks ago there were all the warnings of its flu season, it is prime conditions for covid, the corona virus to spread, and now models from last week as saying those figures will fall. what should we believe? t fall. what should we believe? i think most models were fall. what should we believe? t think most models were suggesting they would fall, not all. but i think we are getting to that point. the vast majority of adults, well over 90%, 95% of adults have got antibodies or have had vaccine. that will be having a big impact on
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reducing the severity of the epidemic going forward. we are not over this yet, but we are getting to the point i think where we will start to see this changing from being the dreadful disease it has beenin being the dreadful disease it has been in the past are ultimately being just one of the other causes of the common cold, as many infectious disease experts have pointed out. infectious disease experts have pointed out-— infectious disease experts have tointed out. ., ,,., ., pointed out. professor paul hunter, as ever and — pointed out. professor paul hunter, as ever and always, _ pointed out. professor paul hunter, as ever and always, thank— pointed out. professor paul hunter, as ever and always, thank you - pointed out. professor paul hunter, as ever and always, thank you very| as ever and always, thank you very much. the energy the energy regulator says it may change the way it caps bills for millions of households across britain as a major spike in gas prices drives suppliers out of business. ofgem has given no details of what adjustments it might make to how the cap is calculated, but will set out its thinking as it launches a consultation next month. currently the regulator caps the energy bills of more than 14 million households at £1,277 per year on average.
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our business editor simonjack is here. hello, simon. how badly was this needed? . , , ,, hello, simon. how badly was this needed? . , , ., , needed? the recent spike in energy trices needed? the recent spike in energy prices exposed _ needed? the recent spike in energy prices exposed problems _ needed? the recent spike in energy prices exposed problems in - needed? the recent spike in energy prices exposed problems in the - prices exposed problems in the energy market. one is the existence of the cap itself. here you have a market where the wholesale price moves on a daily basis, and yet you have got this cap which is set twice a year, so pretty inflexible. so when you see wholesale prices shooting up, you have some companies who have made promises to their customers but haven't pre—bought lagasse at the right price to be able to supply them, so they face going to the wholesale market and buying it miles higher than they are allowed to sell it to their customers. the net result is we have seen 16 companies go bust because they don't have deep enough pockets to take those losses. that is one thing so the regulators says we will have another look at how the cap is
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calculated. some thoughts are it may be calculated more frequently, more often than every six months. it may be relative to the cheapest price or the most expensive price that suppliers offer, to stop them offering unrealistically cheap deals to get customers which they then can't fulfil, so that is one part. the other thing is the regulator will look at how strong are these companies. there was a huge flood of new entrants to the market. we went from the big six to 70 companies and may end up with ten. the regulator says we should be looking at how resilient these companies were and how able they were to withstand a shot like that. a lot of people in the market saying this is what the sensible regulator should have been doing in the first place, rather than piling in as many entrants as you could, kicking and that i had to see where they were strong enough to withhold a shot like that. but as you say, they have this consultation, they will go away and
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ask people how we should change the way the markets are regulated, how the cap is calculated, and report back by february of next year in time for the next cap to be said which is due to be set in february for introduction in april. whatever the result of the consultation, we can be sure energy bills will go very sharply higher when those things are reset because the cost of this crisis will have to be paid back. ,, ., this crisis will have to be paid back, ,, ., . ., . ~' this crisis will have to be paid back. ,, ., ., ,, this crisis will have to be paid back. ,, ., .~ . ~ ., ~ i., back. simon jack, thank you very much indeed. _ back. simon jack, thank you very much indeed. we _ back. simon jack, thank you very much indeed. we have _ back. simon jack, thank you very much indeed. we have some - back. simon jack, thank you very - much indeed. we have some breaking news for you now. in the past few minutes, a 66 year old woman from somerset has been found guilty of murdering her husband after a row over a family meal. penelope jackson stabbed david jackson to death at their home in somerset. after her arrest, she told police she had stabbed him as "he was an aggressive bully". jon kay has the background to the case.
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february this year and police arrive at a bungalow on the somerset coast. penny jackson pennyjackson opens penny jackson opens the pennyjackson opens the door filmed on police body count. inside, her 78—year—old husband is dying. the retired lieutenant colonel has called police to say she stabbed him. paramedics arrive. it was locked down at the time and the couple were having a meal here
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at their home for pennyjackson's at their home for penny jackson's birthday. at their home for pennyjackson's birthday. while they at their home for penny jackson's birthday. while they were at their home for pennyjackson's birthday. while they were eating, they were having a zoom call with relatives. she told her trial that during that meal, her husband made comments about some bubble and squeak she had prepared and that she then lost it. she claimed that after years of belittling, that night was the final straw. as she waited for the police, she told 999 she had stabbed her husband with a kitchen knife. in court, penny jackson in court, pennyjackson said she was ashamed of what she had done and what she had said after the killing. she admitted manslaughter but denied
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murder, claiming she had been subjected to coercion, control and physical violence by her husband throughout their 24 year marriage. police were called to their home over an incident last year, but the prosecution said there was a difference between a relationship with some occasional difficulties and one that is abusive. the with some occasional difficulties and one that is abusive.- and one that is abusive. the key toint to and one that is abusive. the key point to keep — and one that is abusive. the key point to keep in _ and one that is abusive. the key point to keep in our _ and one that is abusive. the key point to keep in our minds - and one that is abusive. the key point to keep in our minds here| and one that is abusive. the key. point to keep in our minds here is there has only been one voice in this trial and that is penelope jackson. david jackson hasn't been able to respond to the allegations put to him around domestic abuse, and that was a really difficult issue for the jury to make a judgment on. i couldn't believe it. ijust could not believe it. i couldn't believe it. i 'ust could not believe ith i couldn't believe it. i 'ust could not believe it. ron lives next door. as far as l'm _ not believe it. ron lives next door. as far as i'm concerned, _ not believe it. ron lives next door. as far as i'm concerned, they - not believe it. ron lives next door. as far as i'm concerned, they were j as far as i'm concerned, they were
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very good — as far as i'm concerned, they were very good neighbours.— as far as i'm concerned, they were very good neighbours. penny jackson said in court — very good neighbours. penny jackson said in court that _ very good neighbours. penny jackson said in court that for _ very good neighbours. penny jackson said in court that for years _ very good neighbours. penny jackson said in court that for years she - very good neighbours. penny jackson said in court that for years she had i said in court that for years she had been belittled by her husband and controlled by him. did you ever see anything like that?— anything like that? nothing at all. over the fence, _ anything like that? nothing at all. over the fence, talking _ anything like that? nothing at all. over the fence, talking to - anything like that? nothing at all. over the fence, talking to them, i j over the fence, talking to them, i won't _ over the fence, talking to them, i won't believe he was that type of person — won't believe he was that type of terson. , ., .,, won't believe he was that type of terson. , . .,, ., , won't believe he was that type of terson. , . ., , ., , person. this trial has raised many issues, person. this trial has raised many issues. from _ person. this trial has raised many issues, from allegations - person. this trial has raised many issues, from allegations of - person. this trial has raised many i issues, from allegations of coercive control to the potential impact of lockdown on mental health. but after watching the video evidence and hearing from her in person, thejury concluded pennyjackson hearing from her in person, thejury concluded penny jackson was guilty of murder. jon kay, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben. good afternoon. there will be a lot of people hoping for a dry weekend. lots of places around the uk that could do with a chance to dry out. i don't think we will get it. more rain in the forecast. this is where we have seen rain over the last few hours drifting over the eastern side
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of scotland. that will clear north—eastward then and a slice of clear skies and then we see yet more rain pushing in from the west. the one thing we can save this weekend as the various bouts of rain will be moving through quite quickly. so tomorrow morning we will start off with this band of cloud and rain across parts of scotland, wales, england but it will slide eastwards in these areas willjoin northern ireland by the off limits on spells of sunshine. quite a cool fresh feel at 11- 15. chile of sunshine. quite a cool fresh feel at 11— 15. chile and about slice of clear sky on saturday night sunday, more rain but again the rain will be moving north eastwards, blustery showers following on, a chance for gales around western coasts later, 10- 13. gales around western coasts later, 10— 13. yes, some dry spells but more rain in the forecast this weekend. hello, this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines. the brexit minister warns the uk is considering more checks on eu fishing boats,
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after french threats in an ongoing row about fishing rights. the government say it's considering its response. the uk sees highest level of coronavirus infections since the pandemic began. official figures show one in 55 people would have tested positive last week. 66—year—old penelope jackson has been found guilty of murdering her husband by stabbing him to death, after a row over a family meal at their home in somerset earlier this year. treatment for menopause symptoms is to be made cheaper in england as the government announces women will only need to pay for their prescription once a year, following a campaign led by labour mp carolyn harris. sport now from the bbc sport centre. hello. good afternoon. manchester
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united, that's who we will start with, ole gunnar solskjaer says it's been a tough few days but he is ready to fight back. he goes to tottenham tomorrow following the tumbling 5— zero defeat to liverpool last weekend. he insists he is the right person to turn things around and expects a reaction from his players at spurs. tt and expects a reaction from his players at spurs-— players at spurs. it has been a difficult week, _ players at spurs. it has been a difficult week, of _ players at spurs. it has been a difficult week, of course. - players at spurs. it has been a difficult week, of course. we i players at spurs. it has been a - difficult week, of course. we have had to deal with the result and performance against liverpool. which we know wasn't good enough. that is something that footballers have to deal with. that's why we are in this game and you have got to look forward to the next game, make sure you are ready for that game and, when you get to that game, sort it out what has been challenging earlier on and we had a good week. a good week on the training field. i have to say that.—
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good week on the training field. i have to say that. united stopped the returned eight _ have to say that. united stopped the returned eight points _ have to say that. united stopped the returned eight points behind - have to say that. united stopped the j returned eight points behind chelsea who went to newcastle and their manager says it's a difficult match to prepare for after the saudi backed takeover at st james's park and the sacking of steve bruce. thea;t and the sacking of steve bruce. they have new energy _ and the sacking of steve bruce. they have new energy in _ and the sacking of steve bruce. they have new energy in the city and new energy— have new energy in the city and new energy in _ have new energy in the city and new energy in the club. by the announcement of the takeover. they decided _ announcement of the takeover. they decided now to change the manager. this is— decided now to change the manager. this is how— decided now to change the manager. this is how we have to do deal. this is what _ this is how we have to do deal. this is what we _ this is how we have to do deal. this is what we have to deal with and what _ is what we have to deal with and what we — is what we have to deal with and what we have to overcome. a bit more difficult _ what we have to overcome. a bit more difficult to _ what we have to overcome. a bit more difficult to analyse them because we have only _ difficult to analyse them because we have only one match with the current manager— have only one match with the current manager to _ have only one match with the current manager to look at. not 100% sure what _ manager to look at. not 100% sure what to— manager to look at. not 100% sure what to expect. the manager to look at. not 10096 sure what to expect-_ manager to look at. not 10096 sure what to expect. the premier league has a t reed what to expect. the premier league has agreed to _ what to expect. the premier league has agreed to meet _ what to expect. the premier league has agreed to meet with _ what to expect. the premier league has agreed to meet with amnesty i has agreed to meet with amnesty international for discussions about a revised owners and directors test following that saudi backed takeover at newcastle. it's understood the premier league is willing to listen
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to concerns and will conduct a review of its owners and directors as it often does after a takeover. it was a thrilling finish to the first match of the day at the men's t20 world cup and england's group. the west indies sneaking home for theirfirst win of the west indies sneaking home for their first win of the competition. bangladesh won the toss and put the west indies into batter. just 48 from ten overs before hitting 94 off the bat. the top scorer, 40. bangladesh, 43 to win the fourth of it look like they may make it. both sides are guilty of some poor fielding. they took it to the final ball. they needed for to get bangladesh to win. the west indies got the win they needed by three runs to keep alive their hopes of making the semifinals. in the other group, having beaten india, and new zealand, pakistan looking to make it three wins from three. they are
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playing afghanistan who won the toss and chose to bat. they beat scotland in their opening match. this is going to be tough, 127— six. the 19th over. they have been piling on the runs, afghanistan, late on in this one. it looked like pakistan would have then restricted to a far lower score than that. what seem a couple of pakistani wickets but afghanistan enjoying themselves with the bat at the moment. they are looking to add on more runs. 127— six in the 19th over. holly aitchison will make a 15 a side debut for england's women when she starts against new zealand in their rugby union test on sunday. she was part of team gb at the tokyo olympics in the summer and will take the place of emily scarab. she was vice captain the side in sandy park.
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that is all the sport for now and i would back an hour but for back to you. thank you very much. for the first time, journalists are to be allowed to report family court hearings in england and wales. the most seniorjudge in the family division, sir andrew mcfarlane, says a perception of excessive secrecy is harming the reputation of the courts, but stressed that identities would still be protected. here with me now is anthony dhadwal representing the british association of soical workers. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. do you agree with this move to make the whole process more open, more transparent? trgfett. move to make the whole process more open, more transparent?— open, more transparent? well, we cautiously welcomed _ open, more transparent? well, we cautiously welcomed the _ open, more transparent? well, we cautiously welcomed the reports i cautiously welcomed the reports recommendations because we are well aware the family courts do suffer from a lack of confidence from the public and we are hoping greater transparency will lead to greater accountability and hopefully that
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should restore some of the lack of confidence in the public has. however, it would be remiss of me to not mention some of the big concerns social workers have about the media is a role in reporting some of these details. we are talking about sometimes children's lives in family courts, and families lives, traumatic details, so there are some ethical considerations here. if i canjust start though, ethical considerations here. if i can just start though, talking about may be the benefits. i think that greater transparency of the family courts should allow for greater understanding of the role of social workers, because we think there is a bit of a misunderstanding of the role of social work across the nation injust role of social work across the nation in just the general public knowledge. if you talk to people about, say, children going into an optional care, they may think a social worker makes a decision but they don't, a family courtjudge will make that decision, and what
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they probably don't know is that the great work of social workers do with families, often vulnerable families, mothers and children, the therapeutic work they do, the support they give, throughout the court process which can be very intimidating as an environment, so we are hoping it creates a greater transparency and lead to greater understanding of social work but, as i said at the top, there are some ethical concerns to consider. tt ethical concerns to consider. it does sound as if their blue measures put in place to protect the identity of children. however, you were saying that, you know, a lot of the time the details are not properly reported. surely this will allow that to be reported better because journalists will be there in court? yes, you would hope so. we do hope so. however, if we look back at why journalists were barred from reporting these incidences in the first place, it was because putting
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the child's best interest of the centre of everything which is what social workers do, and what we need to think about is, ok, yes, there are details which identify, they won't be revealed, but we now live in the internet age, social media age, so there was a great amount of scepticism in social workers. that is leading to a concern about well be reporting be balanced? it can go down the salacious route we've seen before in the criminal courts. if we come back to the child, putting children at the centre of this, you know, children often go to the family courts, a traumatic time, they may have had some traumatic events happen to them, and these children turn into adults and if their stories have been reported on,
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those details stay alive on the internet, you know. if that child, anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the internet or social media, will be able to probably put together some of these details. you talk about maintaining the dignity of his children. it can traumatise them in adult life. if their details and stories are still alive. on the internet. ., ., and stories are still alive. on the internet. ., ,, , ., , . internet. ok, thank you very much indeed. thank— internet. ok, thank you very much indeed. thank you. _ a former facebook employee turned whistle—blower has told the bbc that the social networking giant's rebrand is an attempt to save its image and sweep structural problems under the carpet. facebook has changed its corporate name to meta, with founder mark zuckerberg saying it broaden's the company's reach from social media into areas like virtual reality. she's been speaking to our specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring whojoins me now.
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what has she been saying to you? she has what has she been saying to you? the: has been what has she been saying to you? me: has been in what has she been saying to you? tt9 has been in the uk speaking to mps about her concerns that the social media site facebook is putting users, profit over user safety, media site facebook is putting users, profit over usersafety, but today was users, profit over user safety, but today was the first time when she spoke to me she has reacted to this name change and this venture from facebook, now called meta, into the matter verse, this new video game world they are announcing and launching. she explained to me her concerns about the decision to focus and invest in this as opposed to user safety which she has been raising the alarm about. t user safety which she has been raising the alarm about.- raising the alarm about. i was really shocked _ raising the alarm about. i was really shocked to _ raising the alarm about. i was really shocked to see - raising the alarm about. i was really shocked to see the - raising the alarm about. i was - really shocked to see the rebrand raising the alarm about. i was really shocked to see the rebrand in the last— really shocked to see the rebrand in the last couple of days. yesterday. a big _ the last couple of days. yesterday. a big reason why they have tackled and tie _ a big reason why they have tackled and tie backs content but not misogyny content is theyjust don't have enough people working on safety — have enough people working on safety. and i was shocked they could
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afford _ safety. and i was shocked they could afford 10,000 new engineers working on video— afford 10,000 new engineers working on video games but not keeping women safe. ~ , on video games but not keeping women safe. 9 , ., , ., ,, on video games but not keeping women safe. 9 , .,, ., ,, ., ,:, safe. when she was talking about tarttetin safe. when she was talking about targeting women _ safe. when she was talking about targeting women she _ safe. when she was talking about targeting women she was - safe. when she was talking about. targeting women she was referring safe. when she was talking about - targeting women she was referring to a panorama investigation where we had looked into it misogynistic eight online and what we find what they damage shell account we set up was pushed more and more anti— contact on instagram and facebook and they told us that they try to not promote harmful content and tackle hate but she is concerned this investment is going into software engineers, video games, as opposed to protecting users on their platforms. she also spoke extensively about her concerns to do with the new technology and the meta verse and transparency and privacy and she explained that to me. everything i've seen so far about the switch — everything i've seen so far about the switch towards video games has given— the switch towards video games has given me _ the switch towards video games has given me great pause because a core part of— given me great pause because a core part of what— given me great pause because a core part of what has allowed facebook to id part of what has allowed facebook to go off— part of what has allowed facebook to go off the _ part of what has allowed facebook to go off the rails is a lack of transparency. i've seen nothing from them _ transparency. i've seen nothing from them committing to public data,
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giving _ them committing to public data, giving access to academics, and yet they are _ giving access to academics, and yet they are asking us to reveal even more _ they are asking us to reveal even more personal data than they do today— more personal data than they do today because they want us to fill our homes — today because they want us to fill our homes with microphones and sensors — our homes with microphones and sensors. they will have complete access _ sensors. they will have complete access to — sensors. they will have complete access to you. and then just say, trust _ access to you. and then just say, trust us — access to you. and then just say, trust us i— access to you. and then just say, trust us. i don't understand why we would _ trust us. i don't understand why we would want — trust us. i don't understand why we would want facebook to penetrate further _ would want facebook to penetrate further into our lives when they haven't — further into our lives when they haven't demonstrated a commitment to keeping _ haven't demonstrated a commitment to keeping us _ haven't demonstrated a commitment to keeping us safe. i don't want facebook— keeping us safe. i don't want facebook to microphones in my home. she also— facebook to microphones in my home. she also praised what's happening in the uk with online safely legislation. this could enforce a duty of care on the social media sites to their users and it's something she is encouraging particularly because of more advanced in the uk than in the usa. but she does have concerns about loopholes in that bill that she fears facebook could be prepared to exploit in order to protect itself and regulation. t exploit in order to protect itself and regulation.— exploit in order to protect itself and regulation. i think it's really im-ortant and regulation. i think it's really important for— and regulation. i think it's really important for us _ and regulation. i think it's really important for us to _ and regulation. i think it's really important for us to make - and regulation. i think it's really important for us to make sure i and regulation. i think it's really. important for us to make sure we close _ important for us to make sure we close the — important for us to make sure we close the loopholes in regulations, so for— close the loopholes in regulations, so for example, if we have an
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exemption for political speech, i think— exemption for political speech, i think it's — exemption for political speech, i think it's going to be used to exempt— think it's going to be used to exempt basically any bad behaviour like somebody calling for the death of an mp _ like somebody calling for the death of an mp will be considered political— of an mp will be considered political speech. i think it's really— political speech. i think it's really important for us to stand our ground _ really important for us to stand our ground and — really important for us to stand our ground and make sure we have regulations which have enough teeth in them _ regulations which have enough teeth in them to— regulations which have enough teeth in them to make sure we hold facebook— in them to make sure we hold facebook responsible. i think the uk has an— facebook responsible. i think the uk has an amazing advantage is that you are paying _ has an amazing advantage is that you are paying attention to this on blowing — are paying attention to this on blowing a huge amount of ground work over years _ blowing a huge amount of ground work over years of _ blowing a huge amount of ground work over years of the usa isjust not as far along _ over years of the usa isjust not as far along on — over years of the usa isjust not as far along on a journey. i think unquestionably, whatever you guys passr _ unquestionably, whatever you guys pass, is— unquestionably, whatever you guys pass, is going to be a light in the darkness— pass, is going to be a light in the darkness and will give us scaffolding whatever the united states — scaffolding whatever the united states will do. in scaffolding whatever the united states will do.— states will do. in response, facebook — states will do. in response, facebook told _ states will do. in response, facebook told us _ states will do. in response, facebook told us they - states will do. in response, facebook told us they have | states will do. in response, i facebook told us they have no commercial or moral incentive in providing anything other than a positive experience to lots of their users and also they are committed to both privacy and safety when it comes to the new meta verse but now she's visiting other european countries where she will be talking
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to policymakers about her fears user safety is not being prioritised by facebook. 9, ., safety is not being prioritised by facebook. :, ,, , :, , . safety is not being prioritised by facebook. 9, ,, , :, , : :, facebook. thank you very much for that. facebook. thank you very much for that- thank — facebook. thank you very much for that. thank you. _ the pope has called on leaders at next week's climate summit in glasgow to make radical decisions, to offer hope to the world. in a message recorded for the bbc, he called on all those gathering at cop—26 to act now to tackle the looming crisis of global warming and rising emissions. this morning pope francis also met the us presidentjoe biden, who's in rome for a summit of g20 leaders. from rome, mark lowen reports. a rare papal media message for an urgent crisis. the environmentalist pope francis taking to the bbc airwaves just before glasgow's climate conference. he evoked the world's multiple challenges, but urged against turning inwards, seeing them instead as a chance for change.
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the pope himself won't be in glasgow, despite expectations he would, but he hopes his voice will be heard there, telling world leaders the time to act is now.
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from extreme weather to forest fires, to rising sea—levels, the climate emergency is critical, and tackling it is at the centre of francis's papacy. and he's using all means before glasgow to raise it. including today, meeting the american president at the vatican. joe biden shares the pope's views on climate change, and it will be a focus of their discussions. the president and the pontiff eye—to—eye on the key issue of our times. the leader of the 1.3 billion catholics of course carries huge moral weight, and by meeting key leaders before glasgow
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and by spreading his message on air, pope francis will hope to coax those at the summit towards an agreement. the political, the spiritual, the ecological all coming together in these crucial few days. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is in rome for the g20 meeting and he told us why it is so important. it's a huge, huge challenge for them because they've got a lot of things to deal with. as you've heard, climate change is top of the agenda. this is very much a stepping stone summit before the cop26 meeting in glasgow. the leaders meeting here at the g20, their economies produce 80% of global emissions. how much will they commit to cutting emissions and by when? they will also be discussing how much money to give poorer countries to adapt to climate change, and will it be enough? they have also got to talk about the covid pandemic. in the longer term, there's the issue of recovering their economies from the pandemic.
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how do they fix those broken supply chains? how do they deal with rising energy prices? and in the shorter term, there's the question of how do you deal with that issue of vaccine inequality? the fact that 60%, 70% of the richer countries have produced... have got all their populations vaccinated but that number is probably about 2% for many, many poor developing countries. how would they address that? gordon brown, the former prime minister, is calling for an emergency airlift of surplus vaccines. so two big issues for this summit to deal with, and it's a big test of multilateral cooperation. on both climate and on covid, many countries have addressed those issues unilaterally, by themselves. this weekend is a test to see if they can act more collectively. treatment for the menopause is to be made cheaper in england with the government announcing that prescription charges will be significantly reduced. the announcement follows a campaign from labour mp carolyn harris. she had put forward a bill
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to make hrt treatment free. the government said they would not go that far, but that women would only have to pay for the prescription once a year, saving around £200. our political correspondent helen catt reports. they're menopausal and they're in parliament square to shout about what that means. among them, some famous faces. the night sweats prevent you from sleeping, so you can't even begin your day properly, and every amount of anxiety, every decision you have to make, is not in your control any more, and then you feel like you're having a nervous breakdown. someone who knows that all too well is adelle martin, who runs this pub in kent and helps other women through menopause. i felt like i just completely lost myself. and at the time ijust didn't know what it was. sorry. no. it was menopause. and this is why i do what i do,
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because ijust didn't want another woman... ..to look in the mirror and lose themselves like i did. adelle says hormone replacement therapy helped her. it's free on the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland, but has to be paid for in england. adelle's patches cost £9.35 a month on the nhs, but many other treatments that also use two hormones cost double that. in the house of commons, a labour mp pushed for change. the menopause doesn't discriminate, so the cost to treat it shouldn't either. we have got women struggling to find almost £20 a month, and itjust isn't right when this is a time in their life that women will reach. there's no avoiding the menopause for half of the population. the minister agreed. she announced doctors will now be able to prescribe 12 month's worth of hrt for the cost a woman would usually pay for one batch. i can tell the house that we will amend the regulations to reduce the cost and improve
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access to hrt. we will do this by reducing the cost of repeatable prescriptions for hrt for women experiencing menopausal symptoms. that is a saving too for those who already pay less than that, £108 a year, because they have chosen to prepay for their prescription. the reaction from carolyn harris was evident. can i thank the minister, can i thank the clerks... wonderful women, thank you. so hrt won't be free in england, but it will soon cost less. another step in what seems to be a growing move to make real changes for women, at a crucial stage of their lives. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. archaeologists digging on the route of the hs2 high—speed rail link have uncovered what they've described as an "astounding" set of roman statues. two complete sculptures of what appear to be a man
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and a woman, were found at an abandoned medieval church in buckinghamshire. simonjones reports. a dig with a difference, unearthing statues described as rare, remarkable, incredible. the head and shoulders of a woman. a bust of a man. plus the head from the statue of a child. in such good condition that archaeologists say it's like looking into the faces of the past. the team that found them cannot disguise their excitement or the smiles on their faces. pretty much a giant grin. everybody was really, really astounded to find them. they're just so unusual and so well preserved as well. really, really good condition. the only problem is the heads are no longer on the shoulders. we found the female head first. and what turned out to be the male shoulders. so we could tell the head did not quite fit that set of shoulders. and then the following day, we found the male head and the other set of shoulders. there used to be a norman church
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on the site built in 1080. this is what it would have looked like. it was when the team were excavating the remains of that, that they discovered another building underneath. it was a mausoleum, a roman tomb. a hexagonal glass jug was also uncovered with large pieces intact. these are the latest finds along the route of the hs2 line. at london euston, thousands of skeletons are being moved from an ancient burial site. back in buckinghamshire, these statues will now be cleaned up and heads reunited with shoulders. we may never know who these people actually were. but the hope is the statues will eventually go on display, the first time they would have been seen in public for more than 1,000 years. while experts are left wondering what else might be buried beneath england's mediaeval village churches. simon jones, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich.
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i see something wet behind you. oh, dear. there's been plenty of this week. we've seen some really heavy rain across some parts the uk. over the last few days. in all seriousness, there are some places which could do with a chance to dry out this weekend. well, they're not really going to get it because there are some more wet weather in the forecast. more rain the police the bands of rain, as they move through, should clear quite quickly, so there will be some decent dry sunny gaps in between. this is how things shape up in between. this is how things shape up today. still some heavy rain drifting north—eastward across scotland. showers following behind. also drifting towards the west. we are looking at gaps between weather systems. where we have a gap tonight, eastern scotland, eastern england, it will turn chilly, but turning wet again by the end of the night. 11 for cardiff, plymouth, st helier but in the north—east of
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scotland, maybe 4— five in aberdeen. into tomorrow, this frontal system in place to start off bringing cloud, outbreaks of rain, but it's moving eastwards, so there is the promise of something a little bit drier following on from the west. this is where it starts off work tomorrow. scotland, northern england, parts of wales, the midlands, the rain getting in to the south—east of northern ireland will start off with some sunshine and there sunny skies and edged eastward through the day. albeit with a scattering of showers. top temperatures tomorrow, 11— 15. it may feel just a little cooler and fresher. into tomorrow evening, one of those clear slots allowing us to get chilly and then another weather system hot on its heel pushing in from the west but don't forget the early hours of sunday got to turn the clock back an hour which means you get an extra hour in bed but while the clocks change, the weather doesn't really. it looks unsettled again and this alone could become quite a deep affair on sunday, so not only rain in the forecast, some
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strong winds, as well. let's tackle lorraine first of all. it moves north—eastward through the day, some of it heavy, with gusty winds following into western coasts and we can see dale is developing through the afternoon with a scattering of blustery showers. some sunny intervals. temperatures get a degree knocked off them, 10— 14 at best. as we move into the start of next week, and low pressure lumber in a degree knocked off them, 10— 14 at best. as we move into the start of next week and low pressure lumbering away north—eastward, we developed a northerly wind, this is wednesday. some really cold air pushing down into the picture. showers to start the week, the promise of something dryerfor a time from mid week onwards but it's not going to feel particularly warm. 9— 13. more weather in half an hour. that's all from me.
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today at five — a woman found guilty of murdering her husband after a row over a family meal has been sentenced to life with a minimum term of 18 years. the french government says it could block british the government warns it may retaliate if france blocks british fishing boats in the row over post—brexit fishing rights we will see what they do on tuesday but obviously we reserve the right to respond in a proportionate way. the uk saw the highest level of coronavirus infections since the pandemic began last week — officialfigures suggest 1.3 million people would have tested positive. treatment for menopause symptoms is to be made cheaper in england — as the government announces women will only need to pay for their prescription once a year, following a campaign led by labour
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mp carolyn harris.

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