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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  October 28, 2021 10:00pm-10:30pm BST

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tonight at ten... concerns millions will be worse off, despite the wage increases and benefit changes in yesterday's budget. with the cost of living set to rise, analysts warn some of the poorest will feel "real pain" and others on better wages will also be affected. average sort of earners and above are going to be hit by a series of tax increases, the national insurance rises, income tax rises, and inflation, of course. the chancellor rishi sunak says he hopes to cut taxes before the end of the current parliament. also tonight... a british trawler is impounded by france in the escalating row overfishing rights. no more quarantining for certain travellers — all the countries on england's travel red list are removed. starting today, our company is now meta.
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a rebrand for facebook�*s parent company, after a series of damning revelations about the online giant. and after heavy rains, flood warnings for some in scotland, well into the weekend. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel — there's a tasty tie to look forward to as england and northern ireland are drawn in the same group for next year's women's euros finals. good evening. researchers say millions of people are set to be financially worse off next year, despite wage increases and benefit changes announced in yesterday's budget. analysts from the independent body the institute for fiscal studies say inflation and higher taxes will cancel out small wage increases for average earners. and those who aren't in work
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could feel "real pain", as the cost of living rises faster than benefit payments. with more, here's our economics editor, faisal islam. 1.50, raspberry or blueberry. in doncaster, south yorkshire, the market's busy, but what the chancellor calls his new age of economic optimism hasn't quite arrived. with heating going up, gas going up, everything. i do agree with some of the budget, but not all of it, i mean obviously the wages are not going up as much as they should do, they need to take into consideration people that actually live in the real world. if they putting the minimum wage up, they're going to have to put _ everybody else's wages up, | otherwise it's not fair, is it? that reflects the picture of the post budget analyses. yes, the economy has rebounded, but, say the ifs, rising prices and taxes are leading to several further years of very slow growth in living standards. let's have a look at how all of this affects different types of worker over the coming year. a middle earner, someone on the minimum wage, and then someone also on universal credit.
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taking into account the rise in earnings and inflation, everybody�*s up, but it's the person on the living wage who is up the most, benefiting from the change yesterday. when you also take into account tax changes and the national insurance rise, this is the picture. the person on the living wage is up £180 over the next year, the person on the middle—income is down £180. also adding in the changes to universal credit yesterday, and you see that the recipient there is up over £1,000, but that merely reverses what was taken away last month. big choices made by the chancellor. the chancellor has been pretty generous to very low earners, the national living wage is going up, it was a genuinely big increase to universal credit for people in work, so they're going to get somewhat better off over the next year. somewhat higher earners, i don't mean particularly high earners, sort of average earners and above, they are going to be hit by a series of tax increases. after a busy week, the chancellor most definitely in bury market,
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was getting his lancashire market towns mixed up. bids like burnley market, world famous burnley market. and still regretful about having to hike taxes. i'm not happy about that, and i'm not comfortable about it, but it is the result of the country and the economy suffering an economic shock the likes of which we haven't seen in 300 years, and our response to that. but taxes can't go up so much without concrete consequences. for example, on the number of people paying the higher rate of tax. it is going to be one in nine of the population, or 5.9 million taxpayers by 2025. that's doubled since 2010 and it will be an extra 1.3 million in this parliament. the opposition say that the government's help is needed for longer. for people on the lowest incomes in our country, and on modest incomes, are seeing their incomes cut, at a time when gas and electricity bills are going up. everything's expensive. back in doncaster at a food bank, katie is one of those
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out of work not helped by the budget universal credit changes, and who last month lost the £20 a week emergency rise. it is quite a thing, a big thing, even though it sounds minimal, but it is. the treasury said it was spending over £4 billion a year to help families with rising costs. yesterday's budget having an impact on family budgets for years to come. faisal islam, bbc news. schools in england were given an extra £4] billion in the budget, taking government spending per pupil back to the levels of 2010. there was also an additional £1.8 billion for education recovery after the pandemic. however, sir kevan collins, the prime minister's former adviser, has told the bbc england still lags far behind other countries when it comes to education spending. branwen jeffreys now reports from leicester. this is the biggest cost of education — putting good teachers in front
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of every class. that's where some of the extra cash may go — recruiting and keeping teachers. for us it's all about making sure our children have a fair crack of the whip. an increase in baseline school budgets is welcome, but for this head teacher there are questions. if it means, as it says, an uplift of £1500 per pupil, that would be most welcome. however, the devil is in the detail, and we know that some of that money is earmarked for other projects such as the uplift to the starting salary for teachers. they put their profits and their revenues each year... dan's recently qualified as a teacher. by 2023, new teachers�* pay will start at 30,000. i think a £30,000 starting salary would have made a major difference to that security in terms of can i make that leap into that career, can i make the decision to commit to that career option? these boilers are saving us at least 12% a year. - heating the school, another big bill.
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how big is your energy bill for the school? about 56,000 combined, gas and electric. - so, any gains you can make through this and any other savings are significant? it's enormous, yes. so with all these rising costs, schools will end up just about back where they were in 2010 in terms of what they can spend per pupil. but they are also recovering from the largest disruption to education seen in generations. so the budget also had some separate funding for pandemic recovery. so, what does the prime minister's former adviser thinkjust of that catch—up cash? myjob as a recovery commissioner was to offer advice on how we could recover every child. that was the ambition, that was the ambition of the prime minister, and i know that it takes more money than we're currently allocating to it. why are you concerned that it's not enough? it's £a90—odd per child.
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take the example of holland and the netherlands and the usa. they're allocating £1800—2000 per child. i don't quite understand why our children are only receiving, if you like, 25% of what others might be receiving. rememberto do your revision this evening. the extra cash for england's schools will be reflected in funding allocated to the rest of the uk. branwen jeffreys, bbc news, leicester. the french ambassador has been summoned to the foreign office, after a british trawler was detained in the northern french port of le havre in the ongoing row over post—brexit fishing rights. the french authorities say the vessel was fishing without a licence, but the ship's owner denies this. lucy williamson has the latest. a british boat in a french port. just the kind of vessel that will be banned from unloading here next week if the battle over fishing rights continues.
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this one is a warning shot. seized by french police yesterday, for allegedly fishing here without permission. its crew, still inside. they didn't want to talk. "at least the weather's nice today," i said. "it's about the only thing that is," one replied. the cornelis gert jan was fishing for scallop off the normandy coast when it was stopped by police. it's been told to stay in le havre for investigation. in a statement, the company said its activity was entirely legal. "it appears our vessel is a pawn in the ongoing dispute between the uk and france," it said. france says only half the british fishing licences it expected after brexit have been issued. unless that changes by tuesday, it is threatening to begin systematic border checks on all british goods entering channel ports and ban british boats
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from unloading seafood there. if that doesn't work, it could target french electricity supplies to the channel islands. translation: now we need to speak the language of power, _ since that seems to be the only thing that this british government understands. downing street has said it will retaliate if france carries out its threats. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate and not what we'd expect from a close ally and partner. with both sides now threatening retaliation and cross—channel relations strained across a range of issues, fishing has become a battle ground for rules and agreements post—brexit, whether that's driven by principle, pragmatism, or domestic political power. the cornelis gert jan is a message from france to its ally across the channel. when it comes to fishing rights,
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british boats need to follow the rules, and so does the british government. lucy williamson, bbc news, le havre. the social media giant facebook has revealed its parent company has changed its name to �*meta'. facebook�*s founder, mark zuckerberg, made the announcement, during a virtual conference. our technology correspondent marc chislak is here. why are they doing this and will users notice a change? facebook, or meta, users notice a change? facebook, or meta. reflects _ users notice a change? facebook, or meta, reflects their _ users notice a change? facebook, or meta, reflects their ambition - users notice a change? facebook, or meta, reflects their ambition to - users notice a change? facebook, or meta, reflects their ambition to be l meta, reflects their ambition to be a a verse company. the meta verse has been described an intranet you are inside off rather than look at. it's not the first company to do this. google created a parent company called alphabet a couple of years ago but the name change comes after a turbulent few weeks for the social media giant as a result of
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damaging revelations made by a whistle—blower. she has accused the company of unquestionably making hate worse. facebook says it's invested $13 billion in online safety measures. for users it's not really going to make a difference. all of the platform is the company owns, facebook, instagram, oculus, they still exist and they are still going to keep their names. facebook is one of the biggest and most recognisable brands in the world. is a name change a good idea? we are going to have to wait and see. marc cieslak, many _ going to have to wait and see. marc cieslak, many thanks. _ the remaining seven countries on england's covid travel red list, are to be removed from monday. passengers arriving from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador, will soon no longer have to quarantine in a hotel for ten days. 0ur transport correspondent, caroline davies, has the story. ten days within four waltz, quarantine hotels were difficult for
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many not least those with small children, like shea and. it was dreadful. _ children, like shea and. it was dreadful, you _ children, like shea and. it was dreadful, you felt _ children, like shea and. it was dreadful, you felt like - children, like shea and. it was dreadful, you felt like you - children, like shea and. it was l dreadful, you felt like you are in a prison. you had to sit in the bathroom while the kids were asleep, you know, so that we didn't disturb them. my husband would sit on a chair and i would sit on the toilet. today, the government said the final seven countries on the red list, anyone double vaccinated can come to the uk without quarantining from anywhere in the world. this is where it began in february, some of the first quarantine hotel guests came to stay here. since then more than 200,000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels across the uk. from monday they will be no new quarantine arrivals. that doesn't mean the policy has gone altogether. the government has said it will retain hundreds of hotel rooms in case the policy needs to be reintroduced.— case the policy needs to be reintroduced. ~ �* ., ., reintroduced. we'll review it again in the new— reintroduced. we'll review it again in the new year _ reintroduced. we'll review it again in the new year but _ reintroduced. we'll review it again in the new year but we _ reintroduced. we'll review it again in the new year but we don't - reintroduced. we'll review it again j in the new year but we don't want reintroduced. we'll review it again i in the new year but we don't want to have to re—set up a system from scratch if a particular concern was
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seenin scratch if a particular concern was seen in a particular country. but it it too soon — seen in a particular country. but it it too soon for— seen in a particular country. but it it too soon for the _ seen in a particular country. but it it too soon for the change? - seen in a particular country. but it it too soon for the change? every| it too soon for the change? every professor ben cowling is currently on day 19 of 21 in quarantine in hong kong. in on day 19 of 21 in quarantine in hong kong-— on day 19 of 21 in quarantine in hon: kona. ., ., ., hong kong. in hong kong we are still aimin: for hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for no — hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for no cases _ hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for no cases in _ hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for no cases in the _ hong kong. in hong kong we are stillj aiming for no cases in the community which means quarantine in terms of the first line of defence. in the uk you've got a lot of cases in the community, you are aiming to get rid of all the public health measures eventually and so quarantine hotels are one of those measures that i think are not going to be needed in the long—term and now is probably a good time to relax that particular measure. but good time to relax that particular measure. �* ., , good time to relax that particular. measure-_ it's measure. but others disagree. it's absolutely sending _ measure. but others disagree. it's absolutely sending out _ measure. but others disagree. it's absolutely sending out the - measure. but others disagree. it's absolutely sending out the wrong l absolutely sending out the wrong message about wary are in the pandemic, so right now we need to be adding _ pandemic, so right now we need to be adding restrictions, not easing them and until_ adding restrictions, not easing them and until we adding restrictions, not easing them and untilwe are adding restrictions, not easing them and until we are through this winter we need _ and until we are through this winter we need to— and until we are through this winter we need to keep these restrictions in place _ we need to keep these restrictions in place. things are going to get worse _ in place. things are going to get worse before they get better. at the hei . ht of worse before they get better. at the height of the — worse before they get better. at the height of the pandemic _ worse before they get better. git ii�*ué height of the pandemic quarantine hotels aimed to shut as off from much of the world. today's decision suggests the government no longer thinks the world is such a threat.
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caroline davies, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were nearly 40,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average there were more than 42,000 new cases reported per day in the last week. there were nearly 9,000 people in hospital with covid as of yesterday. 165 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average, in the past week 151 related deaths were recorded every day. and nearly seven million people have received their boosterjab. this includes third doses for those with certain health conditions. a new study suggests there's strong evidence that some people who've been double jabbed are catching covid and passing it on to those they live with. 0ur health editor hugh pym is here. what does the study show? clive,
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this research _ what does the study show? clive, this research in _ what does the study show? clive, this research in the _ what does the study show? clive, this research in the publication i this research in the publication reminds us that household transmission of the virus is noteworthy source of spread of covid, and if you have had your two doses your risk of getting the virus is reduced but you can still get it and it concludes you are as infectious as someone who hasn't had the jab, the conclusion is within households you would have one member who has had both jab, who then spreads it to somebody who hasn't and the message is, if you haven't had the vaccine, don't think you are protected, just because another member of your household has had the vaccine, and that there is a member of your household has had the vaccine, and that there is a very good reason to go out and get jabbed. the research says there is waning protection a few months after the second dose, and that is an important reminder of how important the boosterjabs are, but of course underlying all this, it is still the case from all the research that has been done, that the vaccines offer
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significant protection against serious illness or death with covid. huw, many thanks. the man who arranged the flight in which the footballer emiliano sala died has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. david henderson, who's 67, arranged a pilot and booked the light aircraft, which came down over the english channel in january 2019. here's our wales correspondent, hywel griffith. it was a multi—million pound deal that should have brought emiliano sala to the premier league, but on the night he took off from nantes tojoin his new team in cardiff, the striker sensed something was wrong. he recorded a message saying, i'm now aboard a plane that seems like it's falling to pieces, i'm getting scared. minutes later, the plane disappeared from contact over the english channel. the wreckage was discovered two weeks later, along with emiliano sala's body, which contained high levels of carbon monoxide.
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the body of the pilot, david ibbotson, was neverfound, but it soon emerged that he should never have been in the air that night. he was hired by this man, david henderson, despite not being licensed to carry passengers or trained to fly at night. the jury saw text messages henderson sent to the plane's engineer, saying the malibu plane had gone missing on the way back from france. "don't say a word to anyone." another message read, "need to be very careful. "0pens up a whole can of worms. "keep very quiet." the court heard henderson ran a cowboy outfit, operating in a legal grey area. he'll be sentenced next month. itjust shows this was all done for greed. there's no real reason to use grey charter when normal charter, genuine, legitimate charter, is so readily available. emiliano sala's family has welcomed today's guilty verdict, but say they believe it's only one part in the puzzle of how the flight carrying him from france
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here to his new club in cardiff came to crash. they believe all the facts surrounding that flight are yet to be disclosed. they hope the full truth of how he came to die will become clear at his inquest, which takes place next year. hywel griffith, bbc news, cardiff. a 19—year—old man who murdered two sisters as part of what he believed was a satanic blood pact has been sentenced to life in prison, serving a minimum of 35 years. danyal hussein fatally stabbed bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a park in north—west london injune last year. their mother saysjustice has been done for her "beautiful girls". labour's deputy leader, angela rayner, has "unreservedly" apologised, for calling conservatives "scum" at her party's conference. she initially stood by the comments, but now says she's since reflected on the abuse that features in political debate, and wouldn't use, such language again.
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0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is in westminster. am lex, this is a marked change of tone, clearly? am lex, this is a marked change of tone. clearly?— tone, clearly? yes, clive, that is riuht. if tone, clearly? yes, clive, that is right- if you _ tone, clearly? yes, clive, that is right. if you cast _ tone, clearly? yes, clive, that is right. if you cast your _ tone, clearly? yes, clive, that is right. if you cast your mind - tone, clearly? yes, clive, that is right. if you cast your mind back| right. if you cast your mind back jessica raine's comments provoked a —— angela rayner�*s reaction, she did stand by them but tonight he is a hasissued stand by them but tonight he is a has issued a statement when she said during some time away from parliament due to bereavement she has reflected on her comments and political debate more broadly which she said often featured threats and abuse. while she would continue to speak her mind many future she would be more careful about her choice of language, she spoke about threats that she has received, today a man was sentenced for sending her an email which contained the line watch your back and your kids. angela rayner said it shakes you, you worry about the safety of your home,
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office and everything in your life. there has been renewed focus on the general climate of political debate since the death of sir david amess, there is real concern about it here in parliament, much harder though, is how to stop it. thank you. the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, says 60 countries, including britain, havejoined a pledge led by the eu and the us, to cut methane emissions, one of the most potent greenhouse gases, ahead of the cop26 climate summit in glasgow next week. the eu had already pledged to become climate—neutral by 2050, the first continental bloc to do so. but there are questions over how it will meet that target, as our europe editor, katya adler reports. the eu. it's the globe's third largest economy, and also the third largest emitter of c02 gases worldwide. but it's got a plan to change that. the european commission's green deal
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— this is its promotion video — wants the eu to be carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line is 30 years away, the race starts now. targeting all sectors of the economy and trade, it's an ambitious world first, but... there is actually no enforceable road map in place, so in the end, is the green deal the big deal the european commission would have us believe? there's a lot of issues with the green deal, but maybe the main ones are that the targets are not binding and they're not enforceable, and it's been green washed and watered—down by the fossil fuel industry and their lobbying. the eu denies that, but lobbyists are familiar faces in the corridors of brussels, their activities listed in the eu transparency register. using a mixture of money and meetings, subsidies and sponsorships, five oil and gas corporations and their lobby groups are estimated to have spent over a quarter of a billion euros, targeting eu decision makers over the last decade.
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as for eu member states, the aim is to go greener, but the transition is proving tricky. for some, more than others. big influential germany still burns a lot of coal. this plant helps heat berlin. here, like across germany and the rest of the eu, there are plans under way to reduce the reliance on fossil fuels, but all too often political realities clash with environmental goals, and the climate can is often kicked just that much further down the road. germany is by far the biggest c02 emitter in europe. we would have been earlier in our climate action, but now it is a priority. but relations between fossil fuel groups, industry and mps here, are often described as too cosy. there is this conflict of interest with law makers with second jobs in big polluting industries,
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there is the fact a lot of the gdp of this country comes from big polluting industries. there is always the attempt of big industries that go out and ask them what they think, for example about me, and you will see, at least in this building here, there is no conflict, conflict of interest. as politicians haggle now over green deal details, on the streets of europe there is a rising sense of fear — that the time for talk is over, their future is slipping away. katya adler, bbc news, brussels. heavy rain has forced the scottish borders council, to declare a major incident in the town of hawick, due to fears of flooding,
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and the environment agency is also warning people in cumbria, of the continuing risk of flooding, possibly well into the weekend. 0ur correspondent fiona trott reports from cockermouth in cumbria. wrestling with the water. they'd been pumping it out for hours, back into the river where it came from, fast flowing, and dangerous. the water breached the flat about 4:00am this morning. we've taken the carpet out, one of them we've thrown away over there. gillianjackson isn't ensured. that's because like many people here, she's been flooded before. and she's tired of it. i think the government need to look seriously at climate change, and try and work out ways that we can help people, support people and stop this kind of damage from happening in the future. today, the immediate support came from community volunteers like helen... we're doing alerts and making sure everyone is ok and trying to reassure people. ..going from door—to—door, making sure people were safe. cockermouth's flood barriers are another lifeline. in the scottish borders though, a different story. hawick�*s flood defences are not yet completed. a major incident was declared there today, at one point concern up to 500 properties could be needed.
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like hawick, the effect of the heavy rainfall in cumbria has been alarming. the amber weather warning is due to end tonight, but people like gillian still feel anxious. fiona trott, bbc news, cumbria. the us has the largest prison population in the world, with 60,000 inmates being held in solitary confinement. it's a practice that can lead to depression, anxiety and paranoia, and even cause some to take their own lives. the bbc�*s alan yentob, explains how one man found an unusual way of coping, by creating intricate works of art, out of whatever he can find, in his cell. this is donnyjohnson. found guilty of second degree murder at the age of second degree murder at the age of 19, of second degree murder at the age of19, he of second degree murder at the age of 19, he was sent to prison for ten
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to 15 years. that sentence was extended to life after he assaulted two prison 0fficers. donnyjohnson has spend 24 years in solitary confinement. he was locked his cell for 23 hours a day without access to any materials, he made his paintbrush with his own hair. and the paint paint made from the coloured pigments of m and m sweets. with them he created over 300 miniature paintings made on scraps of paper, none of them bigger than a postcard. the exhibition of his work at riverside studios in london will be touring the country there the coming months. as well as his art work, it includes his writings, in which he expresses sorrow and remorse for his crimes. after decades without any physical contact, his words have created a
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vital bond between donnyjohnson and his mother helenen. this vital bond between donny johnson and his mother helenen.— his mother helenen. this is the lace his mother helenen. this is the place where — his mother helenen. this is the place where a _ his mother helenen. this is the place where a man _ his mother helenen. this is the place where a man can't care i his mother helenen. this is the | place where a man can't care for fear of caring. this is the place where a man can't hear for fear of hearing. this is the police where a man can't see for fear of seeing. this is the place where a man can't live for fear of dying. donny live forfear of dying. donnyjohnson has live for fear of dying. donnyjohnson has committed serious crimes. he is an extreme example. but there are many others who have sought solace, relief and some kind of redemption through art. every year, the arts foundation has an annual exhibition of prisoners work. all this comes from people who have spent 23 hours a day in a cell. what is it that makes them do this? what is it that makes them do this? what is it that makes them do this? what is it about creativity? it is it that makes them do this? what is it about creativity?— is it about creativity? it mines i am notjust _ is it about creativity? it mines i am not just 517 _ is it about creativity? it mines i am notjust 517 harris, - is it about creativity? it mines i am notjust 517 harris, i - is it about creativity? it mines i am notjust 517 harris, i am - am notjust 517 harris, i am creating something. and that's,
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that's really powerful because you can feel invisible in prison, and you can feel you are just a number. it is also family member, prisoners make things for their mothers, partners and that shows them. look how much i thought about you. i am still thinking about you, i care about you, so there is an emotional elm, a huge emotional elm.- elm, a huge emotional elm. donny johnson has _ elm, a huge emotional elm. donny johnson has spent _ elm, a huge emotional elm. donny johnson has spent 43 _ elm, a huge emotional elm. donny johnson has spent 43 years - elm, a huge emotional elm. donny johnson has spent 43 years in - elm, a huge emotional elm. donny. johnson has spent 43 years in prison for his crimes. he is now out of solitary confinement, and is seeking parole. alan yentob there. you can see a film about donnyjohnson, on bbc4 this sunday night. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines — president biden says his democratic party has reached an historic agreement on economic reforms. the plan would see an investment of $2 trillion in health, social care and efforts to combat climate change. there's been a serious surge of covid—19 in russia, with more than 1100 deaths in the past 24 hours, an all—time high for the country. the government has imposed a partial lot and responsive in the capital non—essential have closed. romania is also seeing soaring coronavirus cases. it's had to close schools this week. the death rate in the country from covid is now one of the highest in the world. and after months of growing criticism about its business practices, facebook unveils a new name, meta. the company said it would better "encompass" what it does.

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