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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 28, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the areas of the worlds biggest oil companies testify before congress at a historic hearing. before congress at a historic hearinu. . , before congress at a historic hearin.. . , . . ., , hearing. their answering allegations that their companies _ hearing. their answering allegations that their companies raged - hearing. their answering allegations | that their companies raged campaign of disinformation. about the impact of disinformation. about the impact of fossil fuels of disinformation. about the impact of fossilfuels on of disinformation. about the impact of fossil fuels on climate change something they denied. fiur of fossil fuels on climate change something they denied. our position in this space — something they denied. our position in this space has _ something they denied. our position in this space has been _ something they denied. our position in this space has been consistent - in this space has been consistent with the general consensus and the scientific community. the with the general consensus and the scientific community.— scientific community. the post brexit dispute _ scientific community. the post brexit dispute over _ scientific community. the post brexit dispute over fishing - scientific community. the post l brexit dispute over fishing rights heats up. facebook changes its corporate name to meta as part of a major revamp. to the beaches of the dominican republic, eight and all six of the of the remaining countries of england's travel red list are to be removed.
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the united states congress has begun a year—long investigation into whether or not major oil companies have deceived americans about the effects that burning fossil fuels has on the environment. today, for the first time, executives from exxon mobil, shell oil, bp america and chevron answered questions about climate change under oath, the hearing was chaired and had this question. in hearing was chaired and had this cuestion. "3 hearing was chaired and had this cuestion. "j~ ., ., �*, question. in 1982, && one exxon's most senior— question. in 1982, && one exxon's most senior scientists _ question. in 1982, && one exxon's most senior scientists wrote - question. in 1982, && one exxon's most senior scientists wrote a - most senior scientists wrote a private letter to the's management and put in the record he said there was a scientific consensus about the impact of increased dioxide on the climate. and there was unanimous
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agreement in the scientific community that dumping carbon dioxide would lead to significant climate change. so i am asking you to do you agree there is an inconsistency between what the exxon ceo told the public and what mr black and mr colin, both of exxon scientists told top executives? chairman, mel, ido scientists told top executives? chairman, mel, i do not agree that with an _ chairman, mel, i do not agree that with an inconsistency. if you look at the _ with an inconsistency. if you look at the full — with an inconsistency. if you look at the full extent of that report you will— at the full extent of that report you will find that the comments in that report — you will find that the comments in that report and that briefing which was not _ that report and that briefing which was not a — that report and that briefing which was not a secret meeting was entirely— was not a secret meeting was entirely consistent with what the intergovernmental panel on climate change _ intergovernmental panel on climate change was and the general consensus of the _ change was and the general consensus of the scientific community. let change was and the general consensus of the scientific community.— of the scientific community. let us brina in of the scientific community. let us bring in doctor— of the scientific community. let us bring in doctor edward _ of the scientific community. let us bring in doctor edward who - of the scientific community. let us bring in doctor edward who carried out climate research for exxon mobil
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in the 1970s. thank you forjoining us. you heard the exxon mobil boss saying there was no inconsistency. what is your response? exxon was very much involved in climate research back in the 70s and 80s. it basically stopped, i don't see a lot of consistency in how important the programme was and has not been any action on their part since that plan. action on their part since that ian. , action on their part since that ian, , ., , ., action on their part since that ian. , ., plan. tell us about your own experience _ plan. tell us about your own experience conducting - plan. tell us about your own l experience conducting climate research for exxon.— experience conducting climate research for exxon. ., ., . ., . research for exxon. leading academic institutions at _ research for exxon. leading academic institutions at the _ research for exxon. leading academic institutions at the time _ research for exxon. leading academic institutions at the time developing i institutions at the time developing research on exxon oil tankers and studying the involvement in global construct and a major undertaking they spent hundreds of thousands of dollars and it was an exciting time and exxon was really forward looking and exxon was really forward looking and a really exciting time to be at
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exxon and they were doing all kinds of things notjust in climate change. of things not 'ust in climate chance. ~ . , of things not 'ust in climate chance. ~ , ., . of things not 'ust in climate chance. ~ , .,. of things not 'ust in climate chane_ . , ., . ., change. was the research acted on? no, it was change. was the research acted on? no. it was not- _ change. was the research acted on? no, it was not. the _ change. was the research acted on? no, it was not. the research - change. was the research acted on? no, it was not. the research was - no, it was not. the research was stopped in 1983 ourselves and there was no action as far as i am aware of what i was there. i was no action as far as i am aware of what i was there.— of what i was there. i don't know about since _ of what i was there. i don't know about since then. _ of what i was there. i don't know about since then. looking - of what i was there. i don't know about since then. looking at - of what i was there. i don't know about since then. looking at this congressional investigation more widely, what do you hope to hear and learn from these chief executives? personally, i would not let the oil companies become part of the solution which is the problem. their infrastructure is so expensive in terms of energy delivery that to transfer part of the solution and i'm hoping that the oil companies can be but together in this. the institutions _ can be but together in this. the institutions have been wide—ranging on the hearing mentioned a new york times article take it in get to
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thousands suggesting there were still uncertainty on the science around climate change. how looking back should be look at that? i’m back should be look at that? i'm reall back should be look at that? in really confused by that statements made in the late 90s because in the early 80s we knew there was unequivocal evidence for climate change in things like the records and so on and we were on a path to be paid is the kind of conditions that exceed the chronic conditions in the past when the climate was warmer. d0 in the past when the climate was warmer. y ., in the past when the climate was warmer. i. , , ., ~ ., in the past when the climate was warmer. ,, .,~ ., , warmer. do you speak to people within the oil— warmer. do you speak to people within the oil industry _ warmer. do you speak to people within the oil industry at - warmer. do you speak to people within the oil industry at the - within the oil industry at the moment and if so what kind of conversations do you have? i moment and if so what kind of conversations do you have? i don't work with them _ conversations do you have? i don't work with them at _ conversations do you have? i don't work with them at all. _ conversations do you have? i don't work with them at all. not - work with them at all. not necessarily _ work with them at all. not necessarily exxon - work with them at all. not necessarily exxon but - work with them at all. not necessarily exxon but more people more wide—ranging in the industry itself. what kind of conversations you have about the commitment of big companies to change? i am you have about the commitment of big companies to change?— companies to change? i am skeptical. since i talk about _ companies to change? i am skeptical. since i talk about it _ companies to change? i am skeptical. since i talk about it if _ companies to change? i am skeptical. since i talk about it if people - companies to change? i am skeptical. since i talk about it if people like - since i talk about it if people like the same place and i'm skeptical
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about their commitment. it's essential to getting to the solution. ~ . ~ essential to getting to the solution-— essential to getting to the solution. ., ~ ., ., ., solution. what kind of action would ou like? i solution. what kind of action would you like? i would _ solution. what kind of action would you like? i would like _ solution. what kind of action would you like? i would like to _ solution. what kind of action would you like? i would like to see - solution. what kind of action would you like? i would like to see theml you like? i would like to see them ut you like? i would like to see them put significant _ you like? i would like to see them put significant financial _ you like? i would like to see them put significant financial effort - put significant financial effort into the redirection of our energy sourcing. and the delivery of nonfossil fuel types of energy. that's the direction the world needs to go in. because of their expensive infrastructure.— infrastructure. thank you for “oininu infrastructure. thank you for joining us- — infrastructure. thank you for joining us. we _ infrastructure. thank you for joining us. we have - infrastructure. thank you for. joining us. we have contacted infrastructure. thank you for - joining us. we have contacted exxon mobil to see if they wanted to appear on the programme instead they gave us the
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the us is not the only government trying to confront its carbon emissions, the european union if you add it all up is the worlds third biggest emitter of co2 gases but pledge to become carbon neutral by 2030. as of a european editor reports the eu is facing challenges of its own in meeting the climate goals for itself. the eu, it is the glow�*s third largest economy and also the third largest emitter of c02 gases worldwide. but it's got a plan to change that. the european commissions green deal, visits its promotion video once the eu to be carbon neutral by 2050. essen promotion video once the eu to be carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line _ carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line is _ carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line is 30 _ carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line is 30 years _ carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line is 30 years away - carbon neutral by 2050. even though the finish line is 30 years away the l the finish line is 30 years away the race starts now.— race starts now. targeting all sectors of — race starts now. targeting all sectors of the _ race starts now. targeting all sectors of the economy - race starts now. targeting all sectors of the economy and l race starts now. targeting all - sectors of the economy and trade,
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it's an ambitious world first but, there is no enforceable road map in place so in the end is the green new deal the best year? the european commission would have us believe. there's a lot of issues with it but may be the main ones are that the targets are not binding and they are not enforceable and it's been brainwashed and it's been watered down by the fossil fuel industry and they are lobbying. the down by the fossil fuel industry and they are lobbying.— they are lobbying. the eu denies facts but lobbyists _ they are lobbying. the eu denies facts but lobbyists are _ they are lobbying. the eu denies facts but lobbyists are familiar. facts but lobbyists are familiar faces and the creators of brussels, their activities listed in the eu denies facts but lobbyists are familiar faces denies facts but lobbyists are familiarfaces and denies facts but lobbyists are familiar faces and the corridors of brussels, their activities listed mbe use transparency register. using a mixture of money and methinks, subsidy sponsorships, five gas corporations and their lobby groups are estimated to have spent over a quarter of 1 are estimated to have spent over a quarter of1 billion euros targeting eu decision—makers of the last decade. as for eu member states, the aim is to go green or but the
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transition is proving tricky. for some more than others. big influential germany still burns a lot of coal. his plant helps to keep burning. here like across germany and the rest of the eu there are plans under way to reduce the reliance on fossil fuels. but all too often, political realities clash with environmental goals and the climate can is often caked just that much further down the road. germany is by far the biggest c02 emitter in europe. we is by far the biggest c02 emitter in euro e. ~ ., ., , ., europe. we would have been earlier in our climate _ europe. we would have been earlier in our climate action _ europe. we would have been earlier in our climate action but _ europe. we would have been earlier in our climate action but now - europe. we would have been earlier in our climate action but now it's - europe. we would have been earlier in our climate action but now it's a l in our climate action but now it's a priority. in our climate action but now it's a riori . �* ., ., , , priority. but, relations between fossilfuel priority. but, relations between fossil fuel groups, _ priority. but, relations between fossil fuel groups, industry, - priority. but, relations between| fossil fuel groups, industry, and mps fossilfuel groups, industry, and mps here are often described as too cozy. mps here are often described as too co . , , . ., . ., cozy. there is this conflict of interest with _ cozy. there is this conflict of interest with lawmakers - cozy. there is this conflict of| interest with lawmakers with cozy. there is this conflict of - interest with lawmakers with second jobs and big polluting industries. there is the fact that a lot of the gdp of this country comes from big polluting industries.— polluting industries. there is alwa s polluting industries. there is always the — polluting industries. there is always the trend _ polluting industries. there is always the trend of - polluting industries. there is
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always the trend of big - polluting industries. there is - always the trend of big industries to go and ask them what they think about for me and you will see at least in this building here there is no conflict of interest. as politicians haggle over a green deal details on the streets of europe there is a rising sense of fear that there is a rising sense of fear that the time for talk is over, their future is slipping away. for more than a century, britain and france have been united by and court which has seen them fight wars together and build the supersonic concorde jet. so you'll be forgiven for raising an eyebrow when you hear the issue threatening to torpedo post brexit anglo—french relations is fish. so he could has the dispute become that tonight big uk foreign secretary revealed the french ambassador to the uk has been summoned to the foreign office in
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london to explain paris's position. tensions are high right now after french authorities seized this scottish fishing boat which paris says was fishing without a license. the owners insisted it was operating legally. it comes as part of broader dispute of access to fishing waters. the french are angry some of their boats have been refused licenses to fishing uk waters and they threaten to block british vessels from the airport. a british boat in a french port. just the kind of vessel that will be banned from unloading here next week if the battle over fishing rights continues. this one is a warning shot. seized by french police yesterday, for allegedly fishing here without permission. its crew, still inside. they didn't want to talk. "at least the weather is nice today," i said. "it's about the only thing that is," one replied.
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the cornelis gert jan was fishing for scallop off the normandy coast when it was stopped by police. it has been told to stay in le havre for investigation. in a statement, the company said its activity was entirely legal. france says only half the british fishing licenses it expected after brexit have been issued. unless that changes by tuesday, it is threatening to begin systematic border checks on all british goods entering channel ports and ban british boats from unloading seafood there. if that doesn't work, it could target french electricity supplies to the channel islands. translation: now we need to speak the language of power, _ since that seems to be the only thing that this british government understands. downing street has said it will retaliate if france carries out its threats.
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it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. with both sides now threatening retaliation and cross—channel relations strained across a range of issues, fishing has become a battle ground for rules and agreements post brexit. whether that is driven by principle, pragmatism, or domestic political power. the cornelis gert jan is a message from france to its ally across the channel. when it comes to fishing rights, british boats need to follow the rules. and so does the british government. lucy williamson, bbc news, le havre. how serious is this dating? ? is
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this getting? — how serious is this dating? ? is this getting? when _ how serious is this dating? 3 this getting? when we heard the news this getting? when we heard the news this morning that there is going to be huge disruption to fishing vessels rounding and to the trade of fascia it was really disturbing and there is going to be huge uncertainty over the next coming months up to christmas we think of trying to get fish into the eu which is 60% of our market and this period “p is 60% of our market and this period up to christmas is normally we see really strong prices and for some industries like scallops and other shellfish that have a massive market overin shellfish that have a massive market over in europe for christmas they get a third to half of their annual income in the next couple of months so there is a lot of uncertainty about what's going to happen. [30 so there is a lot of uncertainty about what's going to happen. do the french have — about what's going to happen. do the french have a — about what's going to happen. do the french have a fair _ about what's going to happen. do the french have a fair point _ about what's going to happen. do the french have a fair point in _ about what's going to happen. do the french have a fair point in saying - french have a fair point in saying they have been denied fishing
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licenses making their lives much more difficult? it’s licenses making their lives much more difficult?— more difficult? it's very difficult to sa . more difficult? it's very difficult to say- our _ more difficult? it's very difficult to say. our government - more difficult? it's very difficult to say. our government is - more difficult? it's very difficult. to say. our government is asking more difficult? it's very difficult - to say. our government is asking for proof that they were fishing in the six 12 mile zone but because of the size of the vessels that they they were not my regulations did not have to have monitoring systems that they can't prove where they were so it's a bit of a tough situation and our government has issued the licenses that can prove they were there and the vessels that can't prove they were there have not been issued licenses so we have not been able to see what evidence that the french have shown to try to get these licenses but am sure the government has for a reason to say they can't prove they were there and this is just the 63 12 prove they were there and this is just the 6312 mile zone from our coasts. they are still able to fish
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up coasts. they are still able to fish up to him uk waters up to the mile zone. d0 up to him uk waters up to the mile zone. y ., up to him uk waters up to the mile zone. ,, ., up to him uk waters up to the mile zone. i. ., ., , ~ ., zone. do you have any kind of communication _ zone. do you have any kind of communication with - zone. do you have any kind of communication with your- zone. do you have any kind of. communication with your french counterparts?— communication with your french counterparts? communication with your french counterarts? , ., , ., counterparts? yes, we are trying to. i was over counterparts? yes, we are trying to. i was over in — counterparts? yes, we are trying to. i was over in france _ counterparts? yes, we are trying to. i was over in france a _ counterparts? yes, we are trying to. i was over in france a couple - counterparts? yes, we are trying to. i was over in france a couple of- i was over in france a couple of weeks ago to meet with them and be part of the panel and we always had good communication with them in the past and be patient in the same areas and we have joint management and big politics is trying to get into affect and we are trying to maintain the bridges that we have with them. at the end of the day there our colleagues and alongside them we don't want to see their businesses fail and we want to see good management of fishing in the channel and the ongoing economics of fishing working through businesses. thank you. still to come, i made a
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series of pr crisis, facebook re—brands itself as meta—. we will discuss what that means for the organizations future. researchers say that millions of people i set to be financially worse off next year. that's despite ways off next year. that's despite ways of wage increases and benefit changes and announced in yesterday's budget. the institute forfiscal studies says higher taxes will hit lower income households and they will feel real pain as the cost of living rises faster than benefits payments. the director pauljohnson said the story of yesterday's budget was of spending increases and a worrying outlook for living standards.— worrying outlook for living standards. a ., , ., . ., standards. actually the chancellor has been pretty — standards. actually the chancellor has been pretty generous - standards. actually the chancellor has been pretty generous to - standards. actually the chancellor has been pretty generous to a - standards. actually the chancellor| has been pretty generous to a very low earners in the national living wages going up. it was a genuinely big increased universal credit for people in work so they're going to
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be better off of the next year. a sort of average earners and above and they will be hit by a series of tax increases the national insurance rises an income tax rises and the invasion of course and so you'd expect people on some higher earnings to be worse off in the year is off than they are today. the worlds largest _ is off than they are today. the worlds largest social media site has a new name. speaking at its annual conference, the facebook chief executive mark zuckerberg announced the company would be rebranding as meta—, bringing togetherfacebooks meta—, bringing together facebooks different meta—, bringing togetherfacebooks different services like whatsapp and instagram under a new brand. the overhaul matters more than most and it's been a tough week for the firm as it faces criticism from us lawmakers and regulators and former employees of its market dominance and algorithmic decisions. it's focused now mark zuckerberg explained is building the meta verse. what is that? host of the
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podcast, what is the meta verse? what's in a name? it's still facebook. i don't know what to say. they are just doing this as a distraction. they may have been working on it but this particular set of weeks and including this week it's clear there are some real problems in menlo park and they are changing their name and they said that google did it and other business have done it and it's still the same company, nothing has changed. the same company, nothing has chanced. , , ., the same company, nothing has chanced. , ., ., the same company, nothing has chanced. , , ., ., , changed. does this mean a different role for mark— changed. does this mean a different role for mark zuckerberg? _ changed. does this mean a different role for mark zuckerberg? does - changed. does this mean a different role for mark zuckerberg? does he i role for mark zuckerberg? does he become a reclusive monarch now? i’m become a reclusive monarch now? i'm not sure. become a reclusive monarch now? i'm rrot sure- it — become a reclusive monarch now? i“n not sure. it looks like it's not but i think the other issues are dropping. i think they will probably be be someone running the facebook division if that's the way they're going and there's that head of all those different parts, google did a similar thing.
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those different parts, google did a similarthing. it's not those different parts, google did a similar thing. it's not clear. he seems to want to stay front and center and it's about apa because as i said earlier department is him. he become the personification of a brand and vice versa. and with all these revelations some of them, this is what's happening on the platform, it's not like there's some smoking gun but there is a lot of material of the damage that it does around the world especially and so they can change the name or carotid surety if they want to, whatever. you change the name or carotid surety if they want to, whatever.— they want to, whatever. you have written in the _ they want to, whatever. you have written in the new— they want to, whatever. you have written in the new york _ they want to, whatever. you have written in the new york times - they want to, whatever. you have | written in the new york times the best move would be to bring in someone who is not part of the suffocating inner circle to run the company. such as who?- suffocating inner circle to run the company. such as who? there's lots of --eole. company. such as who? there's lots of people- i— company. such as who? there's lots of people. i suggested _ company. such as who? there's lots of people. i suggested bransmith i of people. i suggested bransmith from microsoft to have been very integral to moving microsoft forward after its struggles with their monopoly decision by the courts. and anyone who has a little more distance from what's happening there, this could be people who been together for ten years and they
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celebrate it. ifind it's notjust a lack of diversity necessary because i think it's easy to use that term but it's a lack of diversity of thought or people who disagree and when you were to for ten years and you finish each other�*s thoughts and are in agreement with each other it produces a problem in making hard decisions. ., ., ., decisions. that would rule out in our decisions. that would rule out in your point _ decisions. that would rule out in your point of— decisions. that would rule out in your point of view _ decisions. that would rule out in your point of view the _ decisions. that would rule out in your point of view the chief - your point of view the chief operating officer?- your point of view the chief operating officer? your point of view the chief o eratin: officer? ., ., �* ,, operating officer? no, i don't think that would be _ operating officer? no, i don't think that would be the _ operating officer? no, i don't think that would be the case _ operating officer? no, i don't think that would be the case i _ operating officer? no, i don't think that would be the case i think - operating officer? no, i don't think that would be the case i think it. that would be the case i think it someone else. we will see, maybe he wants to continue to be the ceo of facebook and a ceo of meta. he can do that. he can do whatever he wants. he is not bearable, he controls the company so he can do what he wants.— controls the company so he can do what he wants. ., ., .., .,. ,., ., ~' what he wants. how long can facebook continue to dominate _ what he wants. how long can facebook continue to dominate its _ what he wants. how long can facebook continue to dominate its market? - continue to dominate its market? that's one of the most interesting things from some of this status showing that young people are using the products and facebook is in great fear of this happening and getting young people on the services and would of the difficulties if they can't really buy things in this
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country and be less right now because of the scrutiny and so it's innovative it's me out of a residence which is enormous and it takes a long time for a dinosaur to fall down i guess. they've got to continue to innovate and change themselves more or it may be where they were like lots of tech companies over the years. thank you. here are some _ companies over the years. thank you. here are some of _ companies over the years. thank you. here are some of the _ companies over the years. thank you. here are some of the other— companies over the years. thank you. here are some of the other means. i here are some of the other means. the world health organization appealed for more than $23 billion over the next year to address the unequaled global response to the pandemic and the who says the money would prevent 5 million deaths from covid—19 and they are giving until this weekend to finance the programme. america's most senior official says china's in your player capable hypersonic missile that orbited the earth. the general called the event significant because it had the military detention. the us issued a passport that has an x
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in the box that designates gender signaling the holder does not identify as male or female. signaling the holder does not identify as male orfemale. it signaling the holder does not identify as male or female. it was issued to a 63—year—old intersex activist who took legal action against the state department. the set to be removed. passengers arriving from columbia, peru, panama and the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela, and ecuador will soon no longer have to quarantine in a government run hotel for ten years. our correspondent has the story. ten days, four walls and many hours to kill. quarantine hotels were introduced by the government to slow the spread of variants of concern, but for many who stayed in them it was a trial. shyan had to stay in a quarantine hotel when she relocated from south africa with her young children and husband. it was absolutely dreadful. you felt like you were in a prison, you felt like you had committed a crime, meantime you had done nothing wrong and were left without a choice.
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we couldn't open a window. we had to sit in a bathroom when the kids were asleep so that we didn't disturb them. my husband would sit on a chairand i would sit on the toilet. today the government got rid of the final countries on the red list meaning everyone recognised as double vaccinated can come to the uk without quarantining from anywhere in the world. this is where it all began. back in february some of the first quarantine hotel guests came to stay here. since then more than 200,000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels from across the uk. from monday there will be no new quarantine arrivals but that doesn't mean the policy has gone altogether. the government will retain hundreds of hotel rooms in case the policy needs to be reintroduced. we will review it again in the new year but we don't have to set up a system again from scratch if a particular concern was seen in a particular country. but is it too soon for the change?
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epidemiologist professor ben cowling is currently on day 19 of 21 in quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for no cases in the community which means these hotels are the first line of defence, but in the uk you have a lot of cases in the community and you are aiming to get rid of all the public health measures eventually. so quarantine hotels are one of those measures i think won't be lee ? needed in the long term. others disagree. it's absolutely sending out the wrong message about where we are in the pandemic. right now we need to be adding restrictions, not easing them, and keep them in place. things will get worse before they get better. at the height of the pandemic, quarantine hotels aim to shut us off from the rest of the world. the decision today suggest the government no longer thinks the world is such a threat. caroline davies, bbc news.
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after a couple of days of incessant rain in southern scotland, cumbria, the result of flooding and flood warnings increasing in travel disruption as well, there is still an amberwarning for disruption as well, there is still an amber warning for the rain in cumbria and of course some flooding here but also across parts of southern and southwestern scotland as well. significant impacts from rain which hasjust as well. significant impacts from rain which has just kept on coming. there mayjust be a bit of a low in the rain and some of the worst hit areas as we get into the first part of the night. there will be some more rain on the way. it's been turning later across wales, more in northwest england in southwest england as well. there may be some as rain will mount here overnight
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and into the morning. night lescott and into the morning. night lescott and see some showers. parts of northern ireland see some rain as well. and it's staying dry with temperatures around nine, 13 celsius. a messy picture friday with outbreaks of rain across many areas. we will see rain pushing through the eastern parts of england as well. this area of rain will bring further downpours into parts of northwest england and it will last the longest in scotland. still wet across eastern parts of scotland coming into friday afternoon but many other areas will be turning dry and bright but remember when the rain has stopped we will continue to see what's falling on the hills flowing down into the rivers and streams so the impacts of fighting will continue even where it turns dry. he could go through friday evening and more downpours in western parts of the uk. the way the system pushes on and into saturday and in parts of southeast england as we go on for saturday. the ticket early in the
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afternoon but it will turn dry and bright once again getting to see some sunshine with a few showers around and it will feel cooler and fresher. the later day of the weekend will be on sunday. in developing area of low pressure will move in. another dose of heavy rain spreading north and east and also strong winds with the system as well. something with how far north the system will reach across scotland during sunday. we are going to be adding more rain into areas already seeing impacts from flooding. keep across the latest weather and flood warnings if you are in a wet part of the uk right now.
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oil executives are giving evidence to a us congressional panel responding to allegations that they have been misrepresenting the threat posed by climate change for decades. i need you to help me come up present by implores his fellow democrats but their differences aside and support is $1.5 trillion pan dominic planning congress. brushing is a new scam that many houses may fall victim to. when you're watching your favourite series, do you want to see the pandemic make an appearance would be best of show makers just pretended that 20/20 never happened?
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what do you do when you haven't yet sealed an agreement but need to suggest that you are getting really close? you call it a framework. in that spirit president biden says he has reached a framework on a social spending and climate change package. but that plane still needs to be approved by members of his own democratic party. they hold the majority in congress. the current plan offered by the president is a stripped—down version of his original $3.5 trillion plan. let's look at how today public framework compares the first ambition. first thing you will notice is the price tag. still a lot of money, $1.75 trillion but significantly less than the original plan. the white house has managed to hold onto a good
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number of its original provisions. these include free universal prekindergarten, tax credits for parents and a $555 billion fund to fight climate change. but other provisions are falling by the wayside. overthe provisions are falling by the wayside. over the course of negotiations. american say goodbye to the prospect of paid family and medical leave orfree to the prospect of paid family and medical leave or free community couege medical leave or free community college for example. and plant medicare to reduce the cost of prescriptions for senior citizens have been shelved lost to slow another proposal into something palatable to centrist members of the democratic party. here's what president biden had to say when he announced his new framework. framework that will create millions jobs, grow the economy, invest in our nation and our people. turn the climate crisis into an opportunity to put us on a path not only to compete but to win the economic competition for the 21st century against china and every other major country in the world. it's fiscally responsible, it's fully paid for. 17
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prize winners in economics as it will lower the inflationary pressures on the economy. over the next ten years it will not add to the deficit at all. it would actually reduce the deficit according to congress. i want to thank my colleagues in congress for the leadership, we spent hours and hours or months and months working on this. no one get everything you wanted including me. that's what compromises. that's consensus. and that's what i ran on.— that's what i ran on. let's bring in the bbc 's — that's what i ran on. let's bring in the bbc 's barbora. _ that's what i ran on. let's bring in - the bbc 's barbora. framework seems the bbc �*s barbora. framework seems to be the new word for proposal. will this ever become an actual agreement with democrats saying yes to it? , ., agreement with democrats saying yes to it? _, . agreement with democrats saying yes toit? _, . ., ., to it? they are closer now to saying es that to it? they are closer now to saying yes that may _ to it? they are closer now to saying yes that may have _ to it? they are closer now to saying yes that may have been _ to it? they are closer now to saying yes that may have been for - to it? they are closer now to saying yes that may have been for some i yes that may have been for some time. and they do want to get it done. so they might. but to this is more of an outline of a bill than it
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is a bill itself and there are ssdc still key elements. he was has to be to show when he goes to europe to the g20 meeting and also the climate summit in glasgow. he announces this framework to show that there is something in hand. the internal differences. not two factions against each other, to hold out democratic senators who are against pretty much everyone else. an extra near amount of power because congress is divided so narrowly that every some signal democratic vote is needed and so they are the ones to scale back his main centrepiece legislation. those negotiations are still happening although as mr biden said they are closer together than they have been.— said they are closer together than they have been. those two senators. who are they — they have been. those two senators. who are they and _ they have been. those two senators. who are they and what _ they have been. those two senators. who are they and what do _ they have been. those two senators.
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who are they and what do they - they have been. those two senators. who are they and what do they want | who are they and what do they want joe manchin is one of them, he's a senator in west virginia, coal country. so he has been working against her saying it did not want certain elements of the climate change package especially for the penalties for polluters. he has also politically you could call him centrist or centre—right. he was against the social service provisions especially paid family leave and he brought in some conditions for the child care subsidies. the other one, sinema is from arizona. her politics are not as clear as mr from arizona. her politics are not as clearas mr manchin, from arizona. her politics are not as clear as mr manchin, but she has very much for putting back about the way to fund this project, the revenue. for example he initially wanted to reverse donald trump public tax cuts on the wealthy, and that was how they're going to pay for it. she pushed back against that and there were other provisions as well that she has up including with
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pharmaceuticals. that's a big deal here. visions that would lead to bringing down pharmaceutical prices and she was not willing to go all the way. having said that there are two people who are having this power, but of course there are lobbies working very come in the fossilfuel lobbies working very come in the fossil fuel lobby lobbies working very come in the fossilfuel lobby in the fossil fuel lobby in the pharmaceutical lobby have been spending a lot of money and time on capitol hill lobbying senators. as always, thank you so much. on average, in america, 50 people are killed every day with guns. that number is rising. increasing distrust of the police one company believes that it has a solution. shot spider uses microphones in the local area and technology to listen out for gunshots and then alert the police. howeverthe out for gunshots and then alert the police. however the company has become controversial for some question whether or not its tech works as well as the company claims. i'm out on a night time right along
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with officer palomino in fresno, california. the city has a gun crime problem. california. the city has a gun crime roblem. �* , ~' ., california. the city has a gun crime roblem. . , ,, ., ., ':: :: problem. and 'ust like more than 100 other cities in — problem. and just like more than 100 other cities in america, _ problem. and just like more than 100 other cities in america, it _ problem. and just like more than 100 other cities in america, it turns - problem. and just like more than 100 other cities in america, it turns to - other cities in america, it turns to a tech company called shot spotter. microphones are placed around a neighbourhood. when a gun is fired the microphones translate the shot location before an algorithm classifies the sound as a possible gunshot which is then reviewed by human analysts before the police are alerted. we are listing to that, looking at how for the sound travels. shot spotter has a nibble of notable successes with police getting to gunshot victims and active shooters more quickly because of the attack. but there are worries that the system may not be as accurate as the company claims. a recent study in chicago found that only in 9% of shot spotter alerts because the police department find evidence of the gun related crime on the ground. the ceo says it's not
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that simple circular out what they are stating is that there's a 90% reported evidence of something being found. does that mean there was not evidence found. that leads to the next kind of obvious follow—up question. if it is so difficult to work out whether a shot has actually been fired on the ground how does shot spotter know with such confidence that it's 97% accurate? shot spotter told the bbc it works out its accuracy from police reports on the ground listening to gunshots, telling shot spotter when they got it wrong. we telling shot spotter when they got it wronu. ~ , ., ., it wrong. we rely on ground truth from agencies — it wrong. we rely on ground truth from agencies to _ it wrong. we rely on ground truth from agencies to tell _ it wrong. we rely on ground truth from agencies to tell us - it wrong. we rely on ground truth from agencies to tell us when - it wrong. we rely on ground truth from agencies to tell us when we | from agencies to tell us when we mess. missed detections are misclassified.— mess. missed detections are misclassified. ., , , ., misclassified. the worry is that if the olice misclassified. the worry is that if the police often _ misclassified. the worry is that if the police often don't _ misclassified. the worry is that if the police often don't know- misclassified. the worry is that if the police often don't know for. misclassified. the worry is that if i the police often don't know for sure whether shot spotter got it right than they are not always reporting when the company gets it wrong. random accident public defender that specialises in forensics, he leaves
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busy accuracy on police feedback is outrageous and can lead to wrongful arrests. to outrageous and can lead to wrongful arrests. ., , . , ., ., arrests. to use customer feedback or customer survey _ arrests. to use customer feedback or customer survey as _ arrests. to use customer feedback or customer survey as a _ arrests. to use customer feedback or customer survey as a way _ arrests. to use customer feedback or customer survey as a way to - arrests. to use customer feedback or customer survey as a way to validate | customer survey as a way to validate a scientitic— customer survey as a way to validate a scientific method is outrageous. customer— a scientific method is outrageous. customer feedback is used to decide whether— customer feedback is used to decide whether people like pepsi or coke better~ _ whether people like pepsi or coke better. it's not designed to determine whether a scientific method — determine whether a scientific method works. he determine whether a scientific method works.— determine whether a scientific method works. ., , ., method works. he argues that if the tech is not accurate _ method works. he argues that if the tech is not accurate he _ method works. he argues that if the tech is not accurate he could - method works. he argues that if the tech is not accurate he could have i tech is not accurate he could have huge consequences for american justice. in huge consequences for american 'ustice. . , huge consequences for american 'ustice. ., , ., ., justice. in the last four or five months i _ justice. in the last four or five months i know _ justice. in the last four or five months i know of _ justice. in the last four or five months i know of dozens - justice. in the last four or five months i know of dozens of l months i know of dozens of chicagoans arrested based on that evidence — chicagoans arrested based on that evidence. the chicagoans arrested based on that evidence. ,., . evidence. the police we were with in fresno said — evidence. the police we were with in fresno said that _ evidence. the police we were with in fresno said that technology - evidence. the police we were with in fresno said that technology works i fresno said that technology works and is effective.— and is effective. what if it only saves one _ and is effective. what if it only saves one life _ and is effective. what if it only saves one life in _ and is effective. what if it only saves one life in a _ and is effective. what if it only saves one life in a given - and is effective. what if it only saves one life in a given year? | saves one life in a given year? is it worth $1 million? i argue it is. and they will be a valuable tool for the police, however some believe
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there's something not enough evidence that the tech works as well as the company says it does. and if it doesn't, it could have huge ramifications for policing in america. james clayton, bbc news. today i found out the word brushing means more than just combing your hair. it's also become the word for something else, and innovative type of scam that you may have fallen victim to without realising. a brushing scam is a deceitful technique used by e—commerce sellers to boost their rankings on search results. sellers send orders of near worthless products to households that never even ordered them. too fake a sale and boost the company ranking on the search algorithm. according to a study it's a scam that more than a million uk households maybe have been targeted in. is that some of the items that numbers receive that never even were
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ordered. ninajoins me numbers receive that never even were ordered. nina joins me from bucking hampshire. what have people been receiving? bill hampshire. what have people been receivinu? . , receiving? all sorts of products in the sace receiving? all sorts of products in the space of— receiving? all sorts of products in the space of what _ receiving? all sorts of products in the space of what can _ receiving? all sorts of products in the space of what can just - receiving? all sorts of products in the space of what can just be - receiving? all sorts of products in the space of what can just be a i receiving? all sorts of products in l the space of what can just be a few weeks or a few months. and they usually come at low cost, light items that could be shipped in bulk. that's really so that the sellers can get into as many as possible so that they can say that they were falsely logging this is a sale and boost up their sales rankings and their positive reviews online. must be bafflin: their positive reviews online. must be baffling for _ their positive reviews online. must be baffling for people _ their positive reviews online. must be baffling for people when they receive this, do they know what to do? a , receive this, do they know what to do? ~ ., , , ., , receive this, do they know what to do? , , ., do? many people, as you can imagine will think this — do? many people, as you can imagine will think this is _ do? many people, as you can imagine will think this is a _ do? many people, as you can imagine will think this is a great _ do? many people, as you can imagine will think this is a great thing. - will think this is a great thing. i'm getting a free product sent to my door, did not pay for it did not even ask for it but it's great. we could get electronics, children's toys, even cosmetics have come through. many people think that's great but actually this is really concerning because of your personal
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details have been used by a seller oran details have been used by a seller or an agent or if the seller they have had no relationship or contact with. they are able to sale this to your homes and in some cases we've heard that they're also using people's personal details without their knowledge or consent to then set up fake accounts where they can purchase these items and then also leave fake reviews under their names and with their details. this is all being driven by the fact that they know if they can increase these purchase numbers they will help with an algorithm on market places to boost their search rankings and therefore end up with more sales. they are just gaming the system but it's quite worrying because as i said you don't know about your personal details and how they are being used but we have tested lots of products that come from on the market places and found lots of safety concerns with her at the risk
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of electrocution, and chemicals, and dangerous children's toys. they think i have got a free product and canjust use it think i have got a free product and can just use it but after there could be a safety concern there as well. . , could be a safety concern there as well. ., , r ., ., could be a safety concern there as well. .,, ~ ., ., , could be a safety concern there as well. ., , ~ ., ., , amazon well. has amazon responded? amazon sa s that it well. has amazon responded? amazon says that it does _ well. has amazon responded? amazon says that it does is _ well. has amazon responded? amazon says that it does is sanction _ says that it does is sanction sellers and in vesta getting into any reports that are being made. we don't think this is enough, some of the stories we have heard from individuals that have been a victim of a scam said that they have actually contacted amazon and said i have been receiving these products, and in their experience amazon has told them to carry on using it. don't worry, don't send it back and you can use if you like. we don't think necessarily that the platform is doing enough. it must investigate these sellers because not only is this worrying for an individual who might be contacted with these scams but it affects us all when we are shopping online because the information that we trust with the sales, how popular is this product, how much do people like it? that is
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really important information for us. and instead these sellers are distorting that information that we see online buying products that might not be as good or as popular and can be dangerous. we really think platforms need to crack down and investigate and then take stern action against the banning them from the site and making sure those products cannot be listed. anti—brushing, then. thank you so much. still to come. when you sit down in front of your favourite tv show, do you want to see the pandemic in the storyline? we will discuss. the men who organised the private plane that crashed killing the argentine footballer has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. david henderson arranged a pilot and the light aircraft which came down of the english channel injanuary 2019. ten who is the bbc�*s code book
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correspondent gives this update. this is a family that has really suffered. haiti was cut down in his prime, his father dropped dead three months later. those defects are surely connected. hardly surprising given that this family want answers and we are seeing some light being shown on perhaps the dubious hinterland of the beautiful game. the big story in argentina, even though at the time of his death he was not particularly well known in the country. that's because he made his career abroad, but his story is so easy for argentines to identify with, if such an argentine story. at football obsessed country, this is a young man who grew up in a small town in the middle of nowhere who followed a dream. and it up perhaps with more hard work and dedication and was really making that dream come true. hejust hit the really making that dream come true. he just hit the jackpot it seemed with this move to the premier
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league. it's also so easy to identify with that heartbreaking message that he recorded from the plane. you really get an insight into the different emotions swirling around the young man's head at that moment. he reflects tiredness, he also reflects exhilaration, excitement, and nerves. this is a big opportunity, he's got new team—mates to meet. how was it going to go? and great fear because he senses that he's being placed in a very precarious aeroplane. so all of these things, he story, the raw emotions of that message that he left makes it so easy for argentines to identify with him. this week romania close schools to introduce new tough restrictions for unvaccinated adults for soaring corona virus infection rates. the
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death rate is now one of the worst in the world, the situation been made worse by political infighting. it is an interim government. this is the epicentre of the remaining storm. the intensive care unit at this hospital in bucharest. all 2500 i see you beds in the country are full. critically ill people wait in emergency wards outside. one person dies every five minutes. romania spends barely half the eu average on health care and suffers a huge shortage of doctors and nurses. so many work abroad. last year the health system coped. this year it fell apart. why? unfortunately in the political turmoil of this year all the projects were slowed down despite the fact that he already launched,
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and here comes the main cause and more bureaucracy combined with the lack of authorities. in more bureaucracy combined with the lack of authorities.— lack of authorities. in june, the olitical lack of authorities. in june, the political leaders _ lack of authorities. in june, the political leaders declared - lack of authorities. in june, the | political leaders declared victory over the virus, restrictions were relaxed and vaccinations fell to a trickle. only 34% of the adult population are vaccinated. fear of the vaccines also played a role. even now the centre today i met an elderly lady. b. even now the centre today i met an elderly lady-— even now the centre today i met an elderly lady. a high-risk person who have been a — elderly lady. a high-risk person who have been a priority _ elderly lady. a high-risk person who have been a priority for _ have been a priority for vaccination from the very start. she told me that she was afraid to get vaccinated because she heard on tv you could die from it. or adverse effects. , ., , , , ., ., , effects. the virus has spread fast since mid september. _ effects. the virus has spread fast since mid september. in - effects. the virus has spread fast | since mid september. in response vaccination is now picking up dramatically. vaccination marathons like this one organised by the army are encouraging many. so is the
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lockdown. the high infection and death rate has panicked many romanians into getting the jab, but another important factor is convenience. it's getting harder and harder to leave a normal life without the vaccination certificate. i came here to get vaccinated. the main _ i came here to get vaccinated. the main thing — i came here to get vaccinated. the main thing is you cannot go to the malli _ main thing is you cannot go to the mall. or— main thing is you cannot go to the mall, or many crowded areas. many different— mall, or many crowded areas. many different places. so i like to be free as — different places. so i like to be free as much as possible. translation: | free as much as possible. translation:— free as much as possible. translation: i was hesitant because i was riiht translation: i was hesitant because i was right about _ translation: i was hesitant because i was right about the _ translation: i was hesitant because i was right about the adverse - i was right about the adverse effects the vaccines might have, i have a heart condition, you see. what convinced me was the current situation with so many getting sick. front line medical staff still cope somehow. they have little choice. 11i european countries have sent to help
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to romania, hungary is taking in critically ill patients. when this is all over many lessons will have to be drawn. nick thorpe, bbc news. now picture the scene, you've had a long day come you finally find time to sit down on the sofa from a switch on the tv and relax in front of your favourite tv show. but to your horror the pandemic has now caught up with the show and script writers are deciding to incorporate the deadly virus into the plot line. as a result of your favourite show is no longer the escape that it once was. this is the spectre haunting many of us and leaving television show makers in a quandary. leave the pandemic out that it's unrealistic and included in risk switching audiences. what to do, then? doctor pamela rutledge is here. thank you so much forjoining us. my amateur
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research shows this, curb your enthusiasm which has just started picked up at the end of lockdown. the morning show leads up to the first lockdown, how is shows doing it? ,, ., ., ., , first lockdown, how is shows doing it? ,, ., ., , first lockdown, how is shows doing it? ,, ., ., a it? shahzad to be very careful, it's too to really _ it? shahzad to be very careful, it's too to really address _ it? shahzad to be very careful, it's too to really address this - it? shahzad to be very careful, it's too to really address this for - too to really address this for too many people. i mean the last story you had really talks about the intensity and the fact that there is a collective trauma. it's not going away but humour, curb your enthusiasm is the perfect example of a reference to number one that is not totally realistic. it did not do masks but they made jokes about hand sanitiser which is something we can all relate to. sanitiser which is something we can all relate to-— all relate to. that was great to me when i all relate to. that was great to me when i watch _ all relate to. that was great to me when i watch that _ all relate to. that was great to me when i watch that i _ all relate to. that was great to me when i watch that i thought - all relate to. that was great to me when i watch that i thought i - all relate to. that was great to me when i watch that i thought i can l when i watch that i thought i can laugh a little bit about this. and it did somehow feel like escapism but i imagine a more serious dramas, hospital dramas for example don't have that choice. tito. hospital dramas for example don't have that choice.— have that choice. no, i would not think. have that choice. no, i would not think- the _ have that choice. no, i would not think. the smart _ have that choice. no, i would not think. the smart play _ have that choice. no, i would not think. the smart play right -
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have that choice. no, i would not think. the smart play right now. think. the smart play right now would be to have covid in a hospital drama. there's too much loss. in every country. but when we make fun of it like you said it allows you to say, oh i wasn't alone, everybody else was acting crazy as well because this was a terrible time and it gives you some distance and sense of psychological safety. hope it gives you some distance and sense of psychological safety.— of psychological safety. how do tv shows deal — of psychological safety. how do tv shows deal with _ of psychological safety. how do tv shows deal with 9/11, _ of psychological safety. how do tv shows deal with 9/11, the - of psychological safety. how do tv shows deal with 9/11, the most - shows deal with 9/11, the most recent traumatic event that defined a generation?— a generation? they left it alone for a generation? they left it alone for a loni a generation? they left it alone for a long time- _ a generation? they left it alone for a long time. there's _ a generation? they left it alone for a long time. there's a _ a generation? they left it alone for a long time. there's a really - a long time. there's a really interesting theories that say you have to be very careful about the time that you lead for people to heal after the magnitude of an event. the larger the event the more time you need to leave people before you put it back in their faces no matter how you do it. so this or what we see as little bits of things, curb your enthusiasm unlike 9/ii things, curb your enthusiasm unlike 9/11 covid is not over and there's so much uncertainty. this is going to be a much more diesel on so to
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speak. in society. flan to be a much more diesel on so to speak. in society.— speak. in society. can they 'ust iinore it speak. in society. can they 'ust ignore it altogether, �* speak. in society. can they 'ust ignore it altogether, some i speak. in society. can theyjust - ignore it altogether, some dramas? they can ignore the bulk of that, they can make reference to some of they can make reference to some of the difficulties, some of the social isolation. loss ofjobs, isolation. loss of jobs, disconnection isolation. loss ofjobs, disconnection and all of that will make people feel reassured but nobody wants to watch their loved ones die all over again. you talked about distance, _ ones die all over again. you talked about distance, so _ ones die all over again. you talked about distance, so thinking - ones die all over again. you talked about distance, so thinking to - ones die all over again. you talked about distance, so thinking to the | about distance, so thinking to the future, 2041. are we going to see a rash of dramas about covid, 2020, 2021 to get us through a might be the 40 or 50th lockdown if life in 2041 is like that?— the 40 or 50th lockdown if life in 2041 is like that? we will be seeing the covid version _ 2041 is like that? we will be seeing the covid version of _ 2041 is like that? we will be seeing the covid version of contagion - 2041 is like that? we will be seeing the covid version of contagion and i the covid version of contagion and we will be looking very heroic and we will be looking very heroic and we will be looking very heroic and we will survive and climb out the other end. we will survive and climb out the other end-— we will survive and climb out the other end. can you bear to watch contagion? _ other end. can you bear to watch contagion? i _ other end. can you bear to watch contagion? i watched _ other end. can you bear to watch contagion? i watched a _ other end. can you bear to watch contagion? i watched a few- other end. can you bear to watch j contagion? i watched a few years other end. can you bear to watch - contagion? i watched a few years ago
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i don't quite have the stomach to watch her right now. ht i don't quite have the stomach to watch her right now.— watch her right now. it was one of the most extreme _ watch her right now. it was one of the most extreme to _ watch her right now. it was one of the most extreme to movies - watch her right now. it was one of the most extreme to movies at i the most extreme to movies at the very beginning of covid and a lot of times movies like that actually give people hope because it sort of gives them a user manual on how to behave. so it's not getting streamed right now. ~ . ., so it's not getting streamed right now. . ., ., , , so it's not getting streamed right now. . ., , so it's not getting streamed right now. ., , ., now. what may be the most popular dramas for the _ now. what may be the most popular dramas for the moment _ now. what may be the most popular dramas for the moment in _ now. what may be the most popular dramas for the moment in terms - now. what may be the most popular dramas for the moment in terms of| dramas for the moment in terms of pure escapism? j dramas for the moment in terms of pure escapism?— pure escapism? i don't know if you would call a _ pure escapism? i don't know if you would call a drama _ pure escapism? i don't know if you would call a drama or _ pure escapism? i don't know if you would call a drama or not - pure escapism? i don't know if you would call a drama or not but - pure escapism? i don't know if you would call a drama or not but i - would call a drama or not but i think a tad wins hands down. ted lazo! the first _ think a tad wins hands down. ted lazo! the first series that don't mention it before are they going to get it football teams are banned from playing. j get it football teams are banned from playing-— from playing. i don't think so because their _ from playing. i don't think so because their charter - from playing. i don't think so because their charter with i from playing. i don't think so | because their charter with the public or with their audience is a completely different thing. it's really individual growth, it there's a warmth and expansion and an openness to that that is sorely needed. dealing with covid want to be a main plot line.—
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be a main plot line. every go, doctor thank— be a main plot line. every go, doctor thank you _ be a main plot line. every go, doctor thank you so _ be a main plot line. every go, doctor thank you so much i be a main plot line. every go, doctor thank you so much for| be a main plot line. every go, i doctor thank you so much forjoining us. that's it, see you in a bit. hello. it has been a wet couple of days for some parts of the uk, particularly in the south of scotland and the far northwest of england. this was the scene from a weather watcher in cumbria on thursday and it's no great surprise we've seen high river levels and flooding because, over the last 48 hours, this pipeline of cloud has just been ploughing in across the same areas so it has been raining for hour upon hour upon hour, the rivers and drains really struggling to cope. the weather system responsible still with us for friday. it is pushing eastwards but it is taking its time to do so. there will be some more heavy rain in places where we really could do without it. so friday morning starting off cloudy and wet in many places. this pulse of heavy rain will drift across parts of northwest england, into southern and then eastern portions of scotland but for most
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places by the afternoon it should be drier and brighter if a little fresher than it has been, highs of 11 to 16 degrees. showers developing out towards the west, they'll become quite widespread and quite heavy as we move through friday night because there is another frontal system pushing its way in. low pressure is dominating the scene. this low will be spinning well to the northwest of us but it'll be sending areas of rain in our direction. some wet weather to start saturday in many places. that rain should tend to clear eastwards but will cling on across the far southeast for a good part of the day. then we will see some sunshine but with one or two showers. those temperatures dropping away, 11 to 14 degrees at best. could be quite a chilly night in places on saturday night between weather systems but for sunday, yes, here comes some more rain, a frontal system bringing some pretty heavy rain which should drive its way north—eastwards as the day wears on. there's a bit of uncertainty about how far north this rain
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will get across scotland. northern scotland may well hold on to dry and fairly bright conditions. blustery showers following into the south and west and increasingly strong winds, 10 to 13 degrees. and that leaves us with low pressure firmly in charge, right on top of us as we move on into monday. there will be showers or longer spells of rain circulating around the low. could be some very wet weather to start off across eastern scotland, the far northeast of england. some of the showers will be heavy, potentially thundery, some sunny spells in—between, but the winds start to come down from the north so it's really going to start to feel quite a lot colder, 9 to 13 degrees. as we move out of monday into tuesday, as this low drifts eastwards, follow the white lines, the isobars, all the way up to the north. that shows where our air will be coming from. a northerly wind feeding decidedly cold air right across the country. there will be some sunshine, though, on tuesday but some showers blowing in on the northerly wind again. some of those showers could be heavy, possibly merging into longer spells of rain at times, and some of the showers could be
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wintry over high ground in scotland, just 8 or 9 degrees here, maybe 11 or 12 at best down towards the south. for the middle part of the week it looks like this little ridge of high pressure is going to try to build its way in but probably only temporarily. weather systems are then set to return from the atlantic through the end of the week and into the following weekend. so that brings the return of some wet weather. so next week looks like this. it will start off cool and quite showery, a little bit drier potentially through mid—week before more rain returns later. you can always check the latest weather warnings and flood warnings by logging on to the bbc weather website.
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tonight at ten... concerns millions will be worse off, despite the wage increases and benefit changes in yesterday's budget. with the cost of living set to rise, analysts warn some of the poorest will feel "real pain" and others on better wages will also be affected. average sort of earners and above are going to be hit by a series of tax increases, the national insurance rises, income tax rises, and inflation, of course. the chancellor rishi sunak says he hopes to cut taxes before the end of the current parliament. also tonight... a british trawler is impounded by france in the escalating row overfishing rights. no more quarantining for certain travellers — all the countries on england's travel red list are removed. starting today, our
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