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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 28, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines: millions will be financially worse off, despite the benefit changes and small wage rises, in yesterday's budget. analysts say next year, some households, will feel "real pain." they are going to be hit by a series of tax increases and national insurance rises, income tax rises and inflation of course. the foreign office summons the french ambassador — following the seizure of a british trawler in the escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. the remaining seven countries on uk's travel �*red list�* will be removed from monday. arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuala and ecuador, will not need to quarantine in a hotel.
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the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the man who organised the plane that crashed — killing footballer, emiliano sala, is found guilty, of endangering the safety of an aircraft. a major incident is declared in the scottish town of hoik, over fears of widespread flooding. and coming up —— wrexham's new hollywood owners, vow to take the club, all the way to the premier league.
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researchers say millions of people are set to be finacially worse off next year, despite wage increases and benefit changes announced in yesterday's budget. analysts from the independent body, the institute for fiscal studies, say inflation and higher taxes will hit low—income households, who'll feel "real pain," as the cost of living rises faster than benefit payments. the ifs also says the number of higher rate tax payers, is set to dramatically increase. here's our economics editor, faisal islam. raspberries and blueberries! in doncaster in south yorkshire, the market is busy but what the chancellor called his new age of economic optimism hasn't quite arrived. eating going up, gas going up, everything. they don't put enough up! for your living wage. i agree with some of the budget
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but not all, the weight is not going up as much as they should do, the situation people living in the real world. they are going to have to put the wages up i if they're putting the minimum wage up, they will have - to put everybody else's up otherwise it's not fair. - that reflects the picture of the post—budget analysis, despite growth having returned and joblessness are lower than expected, it is rising prices and taxes that, according to leading analyst, will lead to several further years of very slow growth in living standards. let's look at how all of this effect different types of work in the coming year. a middle earner, someone on the minimum wage, and someone on universal credit. taking into account the rise in earnings and inflation, everybody is up but it is the person on the living wage it was up to most, benefiting from the change yesterday. when you also take into account tax changes and the national insurance rise, this is the picture. at the person on the living wage is up £180 over the next year, on the middle income
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they are down £180. also adding in changes to universal credit, you see the recipient there is up over £1000 but that merely reverses what was taken away last month. big choices made by the chancellor. the chancellor has been pretty generous to very low earners, the national living wage is going up, it was a genuinely big increase to universal credit for people in work so they are going to get somewhat better deal over the next year. somewhat higher earners, i don't mean particular high, average earners and above, they are going to be hit by a series of tax increases. after a busy week, the chancellor most definitely in berry market was getting his market towns mixed up. places like burnley market... and still regretful about having to hike taxes. i'm not happy about that and not comfortable with it but it's the result of the country and economy suffering and economic shock the likes of which we have not seen in 300
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years, and our response to that, to help get the country through it. but taxes cannot go up so much without concrete consequences, for example on the number of people paying the higher rate of tax. it will be one in nine of the population, or 5.9 million taxpayers, by 2025 which has doubled since 2010 and it will be an extra 1.3 million in this parliament. at the opposition say the government's help is needed for longer. for people on the lowest incomes in our country and on modest incomes, they are seeing their incomes cut at a time when gas and electricity bills are going up. i think it's expensive. back in doncaster at a food bank, kt, one of the family's most under pressure, those without work who weren't helped by the universal credit changes yesterday, and lost the 20 a week emergency rise last month. it will affect me, and i'm trying to be prepared for
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that. it is quite a thing, a big thing, even though it sounds minimal, but it is. the treasury said it was spending over £4 billion a year to help families with rising costs. the budget yesterday is having an impact on family budgets for years to come. faisal islam, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, said the chancellor's decision to spend — rather than cut taxes, will be judged on whether or not people feel the benefit of the investment. budgets are a moment of choice for chancellors and this chancellor had more choice than many thought because the economy did slightly better after the pandemic than some have predicted. he might have chosen to cut taxes. instead, he chose to spend. the treasury says that is investment that will help the economy grow and it would improve public services and it says there are measures in place to help those families on the very lowest incomes. it's worth remembering a couple of things. government departments are getting more money but for some of them that will not undo years
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of austerity that took place under conservative governments. secondly and most importantly the verdict of the economists and analysts today is that despite the spending many families will still be worse off because of price rises and tax rises. the chancellor said he does not like like high taxes and he wants to bring them down. don't be surprised if there is a tax cut if it comes close to the next election but for now he has made a political choice he thinks will help the economy and the political test would be if people really feel the benefit. let's talk to jason and simone shoffman, who live in north west london. they've been looking at the budget and how it will impact them as a family in the months and years to come. thank you forjoining us this evening. as you are watching the budget being announced yesterday and
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obviously going to those numbers, what is your assessment? just obviously going to those numbers, what is your assessment?- obviously going to those numbers, what is your assessment? just as a aeneral what is your assessment? just as a general overview _ what is your assessment? just as a general overview the _ what is your assessment? just as a general overview the rising - what is your assessment? just as a general overview the rising energy| general overview the rising energy costs as well as national insurance does not help people like us out. i looked at a plan today and if they have any such ups available in terms of the hike in energy costs and national insurance affects our wages. we have a 1a—month—old who will be put in childcare for times a week because of we work full—time and that's like having a second mortgage and mortgage rates are going to rise. as they race in the interest rates so it seems like a never—ending hold for taxation. you never-ending hold for taxation. you as a coume — never-ending hold for taxation. you as a coume fall _ never—ending hold for taxation. you as a couple fall into the middle income bracket. you mentioned childcare and i have to agree with you, it is one of the biggest and most crippling costs for a family. was there anything in the budget
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that was going to help with that? i think anything it's become more challenging. nothing is going to help in— challenging. nothing is going to help in terms of where we slept in terms _ help in terms of where we slept in terms of— help in terms of where we slept in terms of what we need. they are not entitled _ terms of what we need. they are not entitled to _ terms of what we need. they are not entitled to anything when it comes to childcare so it's kind of the cost — to childcare so it's kind of the cost is — to childcare so it's kind of the cost is going to go up and we are going _ cost is going to go up and we are going to — cost is going to go up and we are going to be — cost is going to go up and we are going to be in this hard situation when _ going to be in this hard situation when it— going to be in this hard situation when it comes to making sure we can -et when it comes to making sure we can get our— when it comes to making sure we can get our full—time childcare as well as working — get our full—time childcare as well as working as hard as we do. what get our full-time childcare as well as working as hard as we do. what is our as working as hard as we do. what is your biggest — as working as hard as we do. what is your biggest outgoing _ as working as hard as we do. what is your biggest outgoing bill _ as working as hard as we do. what is your biggest outgoing bill after - your biggest outgoing bill after your biggest outgoing bill after your mortgage? it is your biggest outgoing bill after your mortgage?— your mortgage? it is childcare. after our mortgage _ your mortgage? it is childcare. after our mortgage definitely. | your mortgage? it is childcare. - after our mortgage definitely. and it's probably more, it's like having another mortgage. it's more than our average income a month. what another mortgage. it's more than our average income a month. what would have helped — average income a month. what would have helped you _ average income a month. what would have helped you both? _ average income a month. what would have helped you both? next - average income a month. what would have helped you both? next we - average income a month. what would have helped you both? next we were| have helped you both? next we were seen before — have helped you both? next we were seen before hand, _ have helped you both? next we were seen before hand, tax _ have helped you both? next we were seen before hand, tax cuts _ have helped you both? next we were seen before hand, tax cuts rather - seen before hand, tax cuts rather than tax rises and i have seen some tweets from certain of the super
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wealthy saying why don't you tax us instead becausejust wealthy saying why don't you tax us instead because just texting that portion of people would help the average family like ourselves get by whereas things back rising cost and stuff like that are small to them which every sort of penny candy a bit more frugal now get to everything that's happening during the pandemic and brexit and the situation we find ourselves in now. we have been hearing all of these from the iss and they are saying that families are going to really be challenged come next year. have you already started thinking about lifestyle changes? he is there anything you can look at? you're shaking her head already? it’s shaking her head already? it's frustrating _ shaking her head already? it's frustrating because he worked so hard and — frustrating because he worked so hard and we want, we work as hard as we do _ hard and we want, we work as hard as we do to— hard and we want, we work as hard as we do to give — hard and we want, we work as hard as we do to give our son the best possible — we do to give our son the best possible life that we want him to have _ possible life that we want him to have an — possible life that we want him to have an things he deserves and it feels _ have an things he deserves and it feels like — have an things he deserves and it feels like it's never ending and we
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are to _ feels like it's never ending and we are to continuously, it's, the costs keep— are to continuously, it's, the costs keep coming up the matter where you turn it— keep coming up the matter where you turn it does— keep coming up the matter where you turn it does not matter how hard you are working — turn it does not matter how hard you are working we are penalized. jason is a good _ are working we are penalized. jason is a good example of that because he was not _ is a good example of that because he was not actually entitled to any form _ was not actually entitled to any form of — was not actually entitled to any form of anything like that so we had to take _ form of anything like that so we had to take a _ form of anything like that so we had to take a hit on that so he was working — to take a hit on that so he was working two days after i gave birth so we _ working two days after i gave birth so we feel— working two days after i gave birth so we feel like we are working really — so we feel like we are working really hard and it's amazing and getting — really hard and it's amazing and getting us nowhere and they are like hamsters _ getting us nowhere and they are like hamsters on a wheel.— getting us nowhere and they are like hamsters on a wheel. thank you very much for sterry _ hamsters on a wheel. thank you very much for sterry ? _ hamsters on a wheel. thank you very much for sterry ? sharing _ hamsters on a wheel. thank you very much for sterry ? sharing your- hamsters on a wheel. thank you very much for sterry ? sharing your story | much for sterry ? sharing your story with us. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are liam thorp who's
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the political editor of the liverpool echo and kate proctor, political editor of politicshome and the house magazine. the government has this evening condemned what it called "unjustified threats" and summoned the french ambassador to the foreign office in the escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. 0ne britishish trawler has been seized by the french authorities, and another has been fined. france says they were fishing without a licence, while the company that owns the trawler, claims it was operating legally. the french are angry that some of their boats, have been refused licences to fish in uk waters. 0ur correspondent, lucy williamson, reports from le harve. a british boat in a french port. just the kind of vessel that will be banned from unloading here next week if the battle over fishing rights continues.
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this one is a warning shot. seized by french police yesterday, for allegedly fishing here without permission. its crew, still inside. they didn't want to talk. "at least the weather is nice today," i said. "it's about the only thing that is," one replied. the cornelis gert jan was fishing for scallop off the normandy coast when it was stopped by police. it has been told to stay in le havre for investigation. in a statement, the company said its activity was entirely legal. france says only half the british fishing licenses it expected after brexit have been issued. unless that changes by tuesday, it is threatening to begin systematic border checks on all british goods entering
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channel ports and ban british boats from unloading seafood there. if that doesn't work, it could target french electricity supplies to the channel islands. translation: now we need to speak the language of power, _ since that seems to be the only thing that this british government understands. downing street has said it will retaliate if france carries out its threats. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. with both sides now threatening retaliation and cross—channel relations strained across a range of issues, fishing has become a battle ground for rules and agreements post brexit. whether that is driven by principle, pragmatism, or domestic political power. the cornelis gert jan is a message from france to its ally across the channel.
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when it comes to fishing rights, british boats need to follow the rules. and so does the british government. lucy williamson, bbc news, le havre. all the countries still left on the covid �*red list�* for travel to the uk are to be removed from monday. passengers arriving from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador, will no longer have to quarantine in a hotel for ten days. it means there will be no restrictions on fully vaccinated people arriving in the uk. 0ur transport correspondent, caroline davies, has the story. ten days, four walls and many hours to kill. quarantine hotels were introduced by the government to slow the spread of variants of concern, but for many who stayed in them it was a trial.
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shyan had to stay in a quarantine hotel when she relocated from south africa with her young children and husband. it was absolutely dreadful. you felt like you were in a prison, you felt like you had committed a crime, meantime you had done nothing wrong and were left without a choice. we couldn't open a window. we had to sit in a bathroom when the kids were asleep so that we didn't disturb them. my husband would sit on a chairand i would sit on the toilet. today the government got rid of the final countries on the red list meaning everyone recognised as double vaccinated can come to the uk without quarantining from anywhere in the world. this is where it all began. back in february some of the first quarantine hotel guests came to stay here. since then more than 200,000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels from across the uk. from monday there will be no new quarantine arrivals but that doesn't mean the policy has gone altogether. the government will retain hundreds of hotel rooms in case the policy needs to be reintroduced.
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we will review it again in the new year but we don't have to set up a system again from scratch if a particular concern was seen in a particular country. but is it too soon for the change? epidemiologist professor ben cowling is currently on day 19 of 21 in quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for no cases in the community which means these hotels are the first line of defence, but in the uk you have a lot of cases in the community and you are aiming to get rid of all the public health measures eventually. so quarantine hotels are one of those measures i think won't be needed in the long term. 0thers disagree. it's absolutely sending out the wrong message about where we are in the pandemic. right now we need to be adding restrictions, not easing them, and keep them in place. things will get worse before they get better.
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at the height of the pandemic, quarantine hotels aim to shut us off from the rest of the world. the decision today suggest the government no longer thinks the world is such a threat. caroline davies, bbc news. and we'll get more on that story in a few minutes' time with the traveljournalist simon calder. first, it's time for sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mark edwards england and northern ireland have been facing each other in the group stage of next year is one an zeros finals. the pair in green bay along with norway and austria and we will go head—to—head in the third round of fixtures. the irish side are making their training debut with england now under the management of serena. they have made a start going 32 goals conceding none in four qualifiers for the 2020 ? 2023 world
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cup. it’s qualifiers for the 2020 ? 2023 world cu -. �* , ., qualifiers for the 2020 ? 2023 world cu . _ �* , ~' ., ., qualifiers for the 2020 ? 2023 world cu. 3 ~' ., ., qualifiers for the 2020 ? 2023 world cup. it's like one of the top ranked teams in austria _ cup. it's like one of the top ranked teams in austria and _ cup. it's like one of the top ranked teams in austria and they - cup. it's like one of the top ranked| teams in austria and they remained lower than that but in a tournament things can happen. you just have to make sure you are prepared and have a very good approach to every game you play. we a very good approach to every game ou .[a _ . ., a very good approach to every game ou -la . ~ . ., , you play. we are underdogs obviously- _ you play. we are underdogs obviously. but _ you play. we are underdogs obviously. but we _ you play. we are underdogs obviously. but we paid - you play. we are underdogs obviously. but we paid all. you play. we are underdogs| obviously. but we paid all of you play. we are underdogs - obviously. but we paid all of the themes — obviously. but we paid all of the themes since kathy has come in which is an added _ themes since kathy has come in which is an added advantage for us. we are familiar— is an added advantage for us. we are familiar with — is an added advantage for us. we are familiar with these themes and even norway— familiar with these themes and even norway we _ familiar with these themes and even norway we played them in the first game _ norway we played them in the first game and — norway we played them in the first game and how far we have come since then _ game and how far we have come since then we _ game and how far we have come since then we are — game and how far we have come since then. we are going to go into these games— then. we are going to go into these games with — then. we are going to go into these games with no fear. we are underdogs and we _ games with no fear. we are underdogs and we will— games with no fear. we are underdogs and we will give it everything and who knows what can happen. here and we will give it everything and who knows what can happen. here is a look at all four _ who knows what can happen. here is a look at all four groups. _ who knows what can happen. here is a look at all four groups. germany, - look at all four groups. germany, the worlds number three rank side will face spain in group b while sweden ranked second in the world are in the same group as netherlands. england's game with austria on the 6th ofjuly and the
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final at wimpy on the 13th ofjuly. in tennis, and ssg fighting herfeet but is learning in every match. she stood to the quarterfinals at the chance of any open after beating anna in straight sets. the 18—year—old has two wins in romania so far, herfirst 18—year—old has two wins in romania so far, her first on the one app tour. she is a third feed and while there are no crowds at the tournaments, she's enjoyed plenty of support that her father is running in and her grandmother lives in bucharest. the world number 23 producing a compose that this cameron neri is out of the be open at the second round stage. he took the first step but lost in three sets to the canadian. yorkshire cricket club state no action will be taken against any of its staff following allegations of racism made by their former player. despite the club apologizing to him last month and accepting an independent
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investigation findings that he had been a victim of racial harassment of and bullying in his two spells at the club between 2008 and 2018. today following an internal inquiry, the club say that they have concluded there is no conduct or action taken by any of its employees, players, or executives that warrants disciplinary action. a spokesman has called on the yorkshire board to do the decent thing and resign. australia made it two wins out of two at the cricket the 20 world cup. the restricted trunk up to 54-6. they knocked off the runs with seven wickets with 18 balls to spare in dubai. next up, england on saturday. both sides are unbeaten so far. australia is top of the group. rugby union alton international start this weekend and again on saturday whales have made their team to face in cardiff. he
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gets his first start. he will play against the country where he was born while the captain blood play his 149th international passing the previous record set by richie mccoury. wells selection has been hampered by injuries and the game is outside the international window. many players are unable to feature. that's the sports for now. let's get more on this with simon calder, travel editor of the independent. the government has confirmed that the last seven countries on that red list will it be removed from monday and salmon, the travel editor of the independentjoins me now. hello. what does this mean for the red list? let's start there. the what does this mean for the red list? let's start there.— list? let's start there. the red list? let's start there. the red list still exists _ list? let's start there. the red list still exists and _ list? let's start there. the red list still exists and as - list? let's start there. the red list still exists and as he - list? let's start there. the red| list still exists and as he heard the government is keeping some rooms on standby through the new yearjust in case for example there are
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variants of concern that appear but unfortunately for anybody watching this from a quarantine hotel you will be expected to finish your entire sentence. but for anybody coming in from those seven a countries from monday morning and let's see if i can remember them. colombia, ecuador, panama, peru, dominican republic, haiti, and venezuela they will have a much easier time. they will need to follow the rules for everybody else which means if you have been fully vaccinated and all you need to do is take a test on the day you come back or one of the two following days if you are going into self adulation but at home so you wont be spending over £2000 for the privilege of 11 nights in hotels ? hotel quarantine. i'm intrigued by the fact that you used the term serving a sentence.
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the reason i say that is when you look at this. many people will be saying isn't this just a case of a vaccine passport that is being invented by the back door and everything but name, you will need to get vaccinated in order to travel freely? to get vaccinated in order to travel freel ? ~ , ,., , to get vaccinated in order to travel freel? , ~ to get vaccinated in order to travel freel? , . ., to get vaccinated in order to travel freel ? ~ , . ., ., freely? absolutely. we are in a world of the — freely? absolutely. we are in a world of the vaccinated - freely? absolutely. we are in a world of the vaccinated and - world of the vaccinated and unvaccinated. this is taking shape right around the world. for example, the us opens on the 11th, sorry on the us opens on the 11th, sorry on the 8th of november. their only opening up to vaccinated british travelers. 0f opening up to vaccinated british travelers. of course, there are a few very, very minor exceptions but the vast majority of us aren't going to be getting in on this eve had both vaccines and that's replicated pretty much across europe and europe got rid of the red list hotel quarantine months ago. the last one i think was ireland which last month
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tore up their red list and let everybody out of their current in hotels because they said this is doing no good at all. but yes, you have to get used to the fact that if you've been vaccinated than the world is opening up to you in a pretty steady pace. if you have not for whatever reason when you are going to find travel internationally increasingly difficult and afraid to say. increasingly difficult and afraid to sa . , , , increasingly difficult and afraid to sa. , ,, ., increasingly difficult and afraid to sa , , , , ., ., , . , increasingly difficult and afraid to say. this must be fantastic news for the travel industry. _ say. this must be fantastic news for the travel industry. is _ say. this must be fantastic news for the travel industry. is there - the travel industry. is there anything about the timing as we head into christmas at all? he. anything about the timing as we head into christmas at all?— into christmas at all? no, the travel industry _ into christmas at all? no, the travel industry is _ into christmas at all? no, the travel industry is smiting - into christmas at all? no, the. travel industry is smiting about this particularly anybody who's a in latin america. a wonderful country like the galapagos of course peru, colombia, sadly at the moment venezuela is set on the no go list from the foreign office because it's simply going through a terrible, terrible crisis. the dominican republic is going to open up but of course the travel industry cannot suddenly switch on flights. you will not fly from your local airport oh
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look there a flight to leaving tomorrow. so they are glad that the red list has ended and they hope it will increase consumer confidence but it's not going to be revolutionary, not least because november when it starts is by tradition about the littlest demand month in the entire book ? entire calendar. holiday companies will be losing money from monday onwards and the fact that you can now get to the beautiful haiti for example is not going to change their fortunes. it’s going to change their fortunes. it's important to stress that depending on where you are traveling the uk red tribalist you still need to track the conditions of which of a country year traveling to. absolutely. the uk has cornered the market in really tricky travel restrictions but that does not mean they do not exist for other countries with them of course wherever you are going you can find out whether they are going to
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welcome you increasingly right across europe and the caribbean, the americas now, you will be invited and welcomed but asia, i'm afraid you could be waiting a while and frankly press that he cannot wait to africa which thankfully is now opened up and of course a wonderful winter destination from the great countries in the north of africa all the way down to south africa. and the way down to south africa. and all those in _ the way down to south africa. and all those in between. thank you very much. a 19 year old man who murdered two sisters, as part of what he believed was a satanic blood pact, has been sentenced to life in prison. danyal hussein, fatally stabbed bibaa henry and nicole smallman, in a park in north west london injune last year. he'll serve a minimum of 35 years. the sisters' mother, mina smallman, said justice had been done for her "beautiful girls". here's june kelly.
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bibaa henry on the left and nicole smallman in what would be the last few hours of their lives. after a picnic with friends, they continued celebrating bibaa's 46th birthday together, and they died side—by—side. danyal hussein was watching them. in his words, his intention was to "sacrifice women". he stabbed bibaa eight times. nicole saw what he had done to her sister and put up a fight. she was stabbed 28 times. after hussein was arrested, police found evidence of his internet—inspired fascination with satanic ideology — including a note in which he outlined his plan to kill, and it was signed in his own blood. his victims' bodies were found after their friends — frustrated by the initial police response — launched a search. their mother has been highly critical of the met police,
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but she was full of praise for the murder team. today we are celebrating what is wonderful about the metropolitan police. she was asked about the killer. he isjust an obnoxious human being. come 35 years' time, they won't let him out. they won't let him out. i won't let them let him out. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn't in court. he appeared via video link from belmarsh top security prison. he showed little respect for the legal process. before the hearing began, he kept throwing his facemask in the air, and when the judge began sentencing him, he turned his chair sideways so he was not facing the camera. since bibaa henry's death, her daughter has had a son. the sister's mother described the baby as a legacy. june kelly, bbc news, the old bailey. labour's deputy leader
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angela rayner has apologised �*unreservedly�* for comments she made at her party's annual conference, where she described conservative members as �*tory scum', saying she will in future be more careful in the language she uses. it comes as a 36 year old man from cambridgeshire was given an 18 month suspended sentence and two year restraining order, after sending threats to ms rayner. she described the incident as �*terrifying' and thanked police for handling the threats she received. ms rayner also paid tribute to sir david amess, who was stabbed to death in his constituency earlier this month. the latest government figures for coronavirus in the uk show that 39,842 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period, along with 165 deaths, that's of people who died, within 28 days, of a positive covid test.
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a further 962 people were admitted to hospital in the same period. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. flooding and travel disruption increasing in southern scotland, especially the scottish borders and into dumfries and galloway. from northwest england and cumbria where there is still a met office amber warning and for us here, and even where there may be a little bit of a lull in the rain in some areas, there is marine on the way. also been turning wetter through today across wales, more widely marked lasting than in southwest england, so it may start to cease and intact out of the rain fell here, certainly some difficult travel conditions. looks like it will turn wetter again across cumbria as we go through the night. some outbreaks of rain developing in northern ireland as well, tomorrow we will see some rain pushing in across eastern parts of england after what's been a mainly dry week. and whilst most places will turn drier and brighter through the
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afternoon tomorrow, this next area of rain will be lingering in parts of rain will be lingering in parts of scotland and particularly during the afternoon across eastern areas. remember, even where the rain is easing, the water starts to feed to the rivers and streams, so the risk of flooding continues. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... millions will be financially worse off, despite the benefit changes and small wage rises, in yesterday's budget. analysts say next year, some households, will feel "real pain." the foreign office summons the french ambassador — following the seizure of a british trawler in the escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. all the remaining countries on uk's travel red list will be removed from monday — meaning that anyone who's fully vaccinated will face no restrictions when entering the uk
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the teenager who murdered 2 sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the man who organised the plane that crashed, killing footballer, emiliano sala, is found guilty, of endangering the safety of an aircraft. a major incident is declared in the scottish town of hoik, over fears, of widespread flooding. and coming up — wrexham's new hollywood owners get to see their football club live for the first time since they took control. millions of people are set to be worse off next year amid spiralling costs and tax rises, says an economic think tank. the institute for fiscal studies said that inflation and higher taxes
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on incomes would negate small wage increases for middle earners. the chancellor acknowledged in his budget that families are understrain — but could he have done more to help them? let's talk to vicky pryce, chief economic adviser at the centre for economic and business research in london. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. could he have done more? well. news. could he have done more? well, es. ithink news. could he have done more? well, yes. i think there _ news. could he have done more? well, yes. i think there is _ news. could he have done more? well, yes. i think there is a _ news. could he have done more? well, yes. i think there is a real— news. could he have done more? it yes. i think there is a real worry that quite a lot of people are not going to feel at all richer over the next year, the interesting thing is that if disposable income fell significantly during the pandemic, all the lockdowns that we've seen causing all sorts of parts of the economy obviously affected income vary significantly, and what we have seen since is that taxes have been going up in a strange way, they
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haven't been affecting people quite yet because many of them are happening as of next year, particularly the increase in national insurance contributions, which is affecting employers and employees alike. that of course means that with inflation rising, it is doing already, much much higher than anyone had anticipated originally and likely to even reach five or 6% through the course of 2022. we can see those disposable incomes not really recovering at all over the next year, and that's the real problem, in fact, if anything according to the fiscal studies, those disposable incomes may fall by an extra 1% over the course of the next 12 months.— an extra 1% over the course of the next 12 months. what do you think is auoin to next 12 months. what do you think is aoian to be next 12 months. what do you think is going to be the _ next 12 months. what do you think is going to be the most _ next 12 months. what do you think is going to be the most hard-hitting . going to be the most hard—hitting bill for households? we are seeing so much, army? particularly the aspect of national insurance, universal credits, this tax, yes,
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that has been put on hold, but we also have rising energy bills. what should we be looking at very carefully as consumers? prices, reall . carefully as consumers? prices, really- they _ carefully as consumers? prices, really. they are _ carefully as consumers? prices, really. they are going _ carefully as consumers? prices, really. they are going up - really. they are going up significantly, we have seen the food prices rising over the past year. we have seen fuel costs going up. we see what wright has been going on with petrol prices committee when trying to fill their car know that it's much more expensive now than it was just a year it's much more expensive now than it wasjust a year ago. in it's much more expensive now than it was just a year ago. in fact, it's much more expensive now than it wasjust a year ago. in fact, than it wasjust a wasjust a year ago. in fact, than it was just a few weeks ago, frankly. so it is creeping bells. 0f frankly. so it is creeping bells. of course, the electricity costs that are going up, gas bills going up more generally, so despite the fact that there has been a cap on increases in those costs by the government, nevertheless, most people are seeing increases in their bales of 12% already. they are going to see mark coming next april. so thatis to see mark coming next april. so that is of course all adding to quite a pain for many people who are likely to be losing at the end of
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today with quite a significant part of any wage increase that they are going to see, in other words, they may get more wages on a basis in part to get if you are in the construction sector, he probably you see that they is gone up by something like 18%, maybe 20%, if you are a lorry driver, you have probably seen your income also going up, but a lot of it will still be eaten up by inflation and tax increases. eaten up by inflation and tax increases-— eaten up by inflation and tax increases. ., ., ., , ., increases. how long-term do you think this is _ increases. how long-term do you think this is going _ increases. how long-term do you think this is going to _ increases. how long-term do you think this is going to be? - increases. how long-term do you think this is going to be? i - increases. how long-term do youj think this is going to be? i mean, at the where is, is this a return of austerity? at the where is, is this a return of austeri ? ., ., at the where is, is this a return of austerity?— austerity? the good news for everyone _ austerity? the good news for everyone is _ austerity? the good news for everyone is that _ austerity? the good news for everyone is that at _ austerity? the good news for everyone is that at least - austerity? the good news for. everyone is that at least they're probably going to have a job because the unemployment rate is considerably better than anyone had anticipated, so the forecast earlier was that we might see an unemployment rate of seven and a half % at this stage, but it's actually more like four and half %, maybe 5% once all furlough numbers are worked out, in other words, the people that left the furlough scheme
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probably will be getting jobs, lots of vacancies around, so from that side, it is good news, but on the inflation side, not such good news, because there's been such an increase in demand when we came out of the lockdowns with restrictions and so on, and supply hasn't kept up with that. there are loads of international pressures out there, and of course, we have made it slightly worries by using quite a lot of people in —— losing quite a lot of people in —— losing quite a lot of people in —— losing quite a lot of people in the labour pricing costs going up more generally for businesses. the question is can they pass them onto the consumer? they may be limited in doing so, so the limitation is that maybe the inflation increase that we are going be seeing is not going to be huge, but it will be considerably higher than we have seen for a while. interest rates may go up and that is going to affect him again, what people are paying for their mortgage is, what they are paying for any borrowing that they are doing to affect him again, what people are paying for their mortgage is, what they are paying for any borrowing that they are doing, and that is going to be an added burden for everyone to bear.— everyone to bear. vicki, very quickly. _ everyone to bear. vicki, very quickly. are _ everyone to bear. vicki, very quickly, are there _ everyone to bear. vicki, very quickly, are there any - everyone to bear. vicki, very - quickly, are there any comparisons from the past, you know, we are
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saying that this is the biggest tax burden since the 1950s, postwar, we had the marshall plan, 1950s, we had the �*80s. are there any lessons from the �*80s. are there any lessons from the past that could be used today? the lessons are that you have got to watch it and not allow that to take, you know, too long a time before it gets better, because then the economy suffers. he cannot stand enough money to buy the goods that you want, then obviously you will demand less and businesses will suffer, and that will be bad news. so what we have learned as periods of austerity that we had after the financial crisis have to be watched very carefully, because you could harm the economy over a long period of time, and i think therefore you asked at the beginning what should the chancellor have done? i think they have to absolutely watch that space. pa. fascinating chat with you. thank you very much. the man who organised the private plane that crashed killing the argentine footballer,
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emiliano sala, has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. david henderson, who's 67, arranged a pilot and booked the light aircraft, which came down over the english channel in january 2019. hywel griffith reports. it was a multi—million pound deal that should have brought emiliano sala to the premier league, but on the night he took off from nantes tojoin his new team in cardiff, the striker sensed something was wrong. he recorded a message saying i am now a board a plane that seems like it is falling to pieces, i'm getting scared. minutes later, the plane disappeared from contact over the english channel. the wreckage was discovered two weeks later, along with emiliano sala's body, which contained high levels of carbon monoxide. the body of the pilot, david ibbotson, was neverfound but it soon emerged that he should never have been in the air that night. he was hired by david henderson,
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despite not being licensed to carry passengers or trained to fly at night. the jury saw text messages henderson sent to the plane's engineer shortly after it went missing, telling him not to say a word to anyone. another message read, "need to be very careful, opens up a whole can of worms, keep very quiet." the court heard henderson ran a cowboy outfit, operating in a legal grey area. he will be sentenced next month. it just shows that this was all done for greed. there is no real reason to use gray charter when normal charter, genuine, legitimate charter, is so readily available. emiliano sala's family has welcomed today's guilty verdict but say they believe it is only one part in the puzzle of how the flight carrying him from france here to his new club in cardiff came to crash. they believe all the facts surrounding that flight are yet to be disclosed.
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they hope the full truth of how he came to die will become clear at his inquest, which takes place next year. hywel griffith, bbc news, cardiff. well, we can speak now to tim vickery, who's the bbc�*s south american football correspondent. hello there, ten. all of this coming just days before what would have been his 31st birthday. i mean, how is this news being received in his home argentina?— is this news being received in his home argentina? is this news being received in his home araentina? , , , ., home argentina? remember, this is a famil that home argentina? remember, this is a family that has — home argentina? remember, this is a family that has really _ home argentina? remember, this is a family that has really suffered, - home argentina? remember, this is a family that has really suffered, cut - family that has really suffered, cut down in his prime, his father dropped dead three months later of a heart attack, those two facts are surely connected, hardly surprising that this family want answer is. we are seeing some lights being shown on perhaps the dubious hinterland of the beautiful game. it's a big story in argentina, even though at the time of his death, he wasn't
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particularly well known in the country. that's because he had made his career abroad. but his story is so easy for argentines to identify with. at such an argentine story. a football obsessed country, this is a young man who grew up in a small town in the middle of nowhere who followed dream. perhaps with more hard work and dedication was really making that dream come true, and he just hit the jackpot, it seemed, but this move to the premier league. so so many argentines can identify with the dream and the journey of ten and it's also so easy to identify with that heartbreaking message that he recorded from the plane. you really get an insight into the different emotions swirling around the young man's had at that moment. in part, he was tired, and as a result of the move from france to cardiff, he had been running here and there, organising this and that, so he
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reflected tiredness can be also reflected tiredness can be also reflected exhilaration, excitement, nerves, this is his big opportunity, new team—mates to meet, how's it going to go? and as we heard there, great fear because he senses that he's been placed in a very precarious aeroplane. so all of these things, his story, the right emotions of that message that he laughed, it makes it so easy for argentines to identify with him. there is a lot of wrangling still attached to it that's really tragic case. one of those is this transfer fee between france and cardiff. and i went to quickly focus on this upcoming inquest. this is hopefully going to answer some of the family. what do they want to know? thea;r going to answer some of the family. what do they want to know? they want to know much — what do they want to know? they want to know much more _ what do they want to know? they want to know much more about _ what do they want to know? they want to know much more about the - what do they want to know? they want to know much more about the state - what do they want to know? they want to know much more about the state of| to know much more about the state of maintenance of that aircraft. they really want to know who is responsible, why was there sign in that plane when he clearly shouldn't have been? who is responsible? what
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is the responsibility of france, cardiff, if any. what they have had todayis cardiff, if any. what they have had today is partial closure. they want a lot more, and we want to find out the facts and that inquiry in february. the facts and that inquiry in february-— the facts and that inquiry in februa . ., ,, , ., , . in the next few days tens of thousands of delegates, including world leaders, will arrive in glasgow for cop26 — the un climate change conference. countries will be asked to set out their plans for cutting emissions and rising global temperatures. let's take a look at some of the climate change stories making the news today. one of the world leaders on his way to glasgow is the us presidentjoe biden. he's currently en route to europe, travelling first to rome for the g20 summit and then to glasgow for cop26. earlier at the white house he said his democratic party had reached agreement on an economic reform plan which includes efforts to combat global warming.
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the president described it as the greatest investment ever made in fighting climate change. this framework also makes the most significant investment to deal with the climate crisis ever ever happened, beyond any other advanced nation in the world, over a metric tonnes of emission —— nation in the world, over a billion metric tonnes of emission reductions, at least ten times bigger on climate than any bill that has ever passed before and enough to position us for a 50 to 52% emissions reduction by the year 2030. president biden wasn't the only one today showing off the policy moves the big players are bringing to the table in glasgow. earlier, the european commission president — ursula von der leyen — said the eu would donate a billion euros to protect the world's forests. and she said that 60 countries have now signed up to a global pledge, to reduce methane emissions.
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me saying if you look at the greenhouse gas emissions, greenhouse gases is the lowest hanging fruit. it is 80 times more warming than c02, so there is an urgent need to do something, and there is a lot we can do, and therefore, i am glad that by now 60 countries joined us so far, and of course, we are encouraging others to join this ambition. back in the us, meanwhile, oil company executives have been coming under intense questioning from a congressional committee which is investigating whether the industry misled the public for years over its responsibility for global warming. our business reporter in new york samira hussain has been following events. of course, democrats are really pushing for oil executives to admit
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that in fact they were misleading people in america and around the world about the harmful effects of fossil fuels on the environment, that in fact, they did have more knowledge than they claim to have said that they did. from the point of view of the oil executives, what they are saying is, love, anything that we have set —— what they are saying is, look, anything that we have set in the past was using the kind of information that we had at that time, research evolves. science evolves. and we have evolved with that science, and now we are committing ourselves to try and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, recognising what we can do and that we play a role in doing that. a new poll commissioned by the bbc suggests that the majority of people around the world want their governments to take strong action on climate change. more than 30,000 people were surveyed — across 31 countries — about their attitudes to climate change policies. 56% said they want their governments to play a key leadership role. 0ur environment correspondent
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matt mcgrath explained that this figure represents a significant increase from earlier surveys. the opinion polls for us here carried out a very similar surveyjust before the paris climate talks back in 2015, six years ago, and the difference between then and now is quite remarkable. people looking for strong action from their government, strong leadership was... it's increased by 25%, essentially, over that period. and it's increased in a lot of interesting countries, in india and in china. in china, back in 2015, only 18% of people wanted to see their governments take strong action. that has gone up to nearly half of respondents now. so, it's an opinion poll, it's a snapshot of opinion, but it does show that people are more serious about climate change and want their governments to take more serious action on it. final preparations for the cop26 summit are under way in glasgow. 0ur scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, reports.
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glasgow has been getting ready — cleaning, painting, putting up a ring of steel around where the climate conference will be taking place, closing roads and bridges nearby. the only issue for me is travel. because i'm a uni student. other than that i think, everything that comes from it is great. absolute pain. i feel as if it's causing more climate problems then it's actually solving. it could have been done through an e—mail instead of this rubbish. and it means keira has been left sleeping on this over at herfriends. we are actually struggling to find a flat at the moment because of cop26. there was a flat the other day in the west end going for, like, six grand a week. £6,000 a week?! yes. it's ridiculous. the event is unprecedented for scotland in size and scale as well as duration. there will be up to 10,000 police on duty on any one day, 120 world leaders, thousands of delegates, protesters expected too. demonstrations are planned and the climate change protest group
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extinction rebellion is also warning of deliberate disruption. for those who wish to come and protest, the united nations encourage that protest so we will enable it. but if people are here to cause damage and people are here for violence or to disrupt the conference itself, we will take swift and robust action. this is one of the largest international gatherings since the pandemic began. the sheer number of people descending on glasgow means even with rigorous controls such as daily testing and face coverings, there is a risk that covid could spike. i think of course whenever you have people mixing, it's clear i think there will be some kind of bump of cases. the question is will it be just a bump or a wave? and will that put pressure on health services? so i think we will know the full extent of it probably by november. for people here, this huge global climate conference will bring disruption and delays. but the message is clear
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and the aims are big. glasgow is in the spotlight for the next two weeks and the world is watching what happens. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. at half past 11 tomorrow morning, we will be answering your questions about climate change and of course, 26. we will be joined by two leading climate change and experience. get in touch, you can use the hashtag... 0r and experience. get in touch, you can use the hashtag... or you can email us your questions to our email. heavy rain has forced the scottish borders council, to declare a major incident in the town of hoik, due to fears of severe flooding following heavy rain. the environment agency is also warning people in cumbria, of the continuing risk of flooding, well into the weekend. 0ur correspondent, fiona trott, sent update from cockermouth, in cumbria.
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you can see this fast flowing river behind me, that's what happens after predicted months worth of rain falls in just 36 hours. predicted months worth of rain falls injust 36 hours. it's predicted months worth of rain falls in just 36 hours. it's why since last night, 60 volunteers here have been working around the clock going from door to door checking vulnerable people are safe, helping homeowners who have been pumping floodwater from their homes, around 40 properties affected in cumbria, mainly in places where flood warnings are in place, like here and also angry months. further north, a more serious picture, though, like you say, a major incident declared in the scottish border is, up to 500 properties concerned they are that may be flooded. many have already been evacuated, including local schools. the difference, though, like weight, this area has seen
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serious flooding before coming here, though, after storm desmond in 2015, new flood defences were put in, and they seem to be helping. here tonight, that flood defence wreck is still ongoing, and on the part of the town is defended. that is by the emergency service as they are right now working very, very hard command for the residents there, and anxious er is ahead this evening. fiona there. facebook is changing its name — or rather, the name of its overall company is changing. it'll now be called meta — but its flagship social media platform will still be known as facebook. the move is designed to represent the firm's wider business portfolio beyond social networking, and its push into virtual online spaces. the company also owns instagram and whatsapp. in a video release, the company's chief executive mark zuckerberg explained the move. it is time for us to adopt a new company brand to encompass everything that we do, to reflect who we are
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and what we hope to build, i am proud to announce that starting today, our company is now meta. our mission remains the same, it's still about bringing people together. 0ur apps and their brands, they are not changing either, and we are still the company that designs technology around people. to explain a bit more on this decision — here's our north american technology correspondent james clayton essentially, he is saying that facebook, which was a platform that everyone knows, has basically grown so much since it was founded 15 or 16 years ago, it owns instagram, it owns whatsapp, it has its own pr department, he wants to create something called the med avarice and basically facebook is confusing and actually reporting on facebook, i get this quite regularly, i'm talking about instagram and i'm going to face the command having to explain that facebook actually owns
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instagram or whatsapp, so this is trying to avoid confusion and trying to better reflect facebook�*s calls, bites, of course, in a week that facebook has been under scrutiny a lot recently, terrible headlines this week, and i think facebook�*s brand has seemed to be ataxic by many in this will be seen by many as a way to try to detoxify facebook. it was the hollywood plot no one saw coming, two celebrity actors from north america, buying a welsh non—league football club earlier this year. ryan reynolds and rob mce—lhenny are now getting their first real taste of life as owners of wrexham afc our sports correspondent, laura scott reports. there are lights, cameras and action. what a goal! not like ryan reynolds and rob mcelhenney are used to though, it's a far cry from hollywood, but the actors are soaking in their welcome as owners of the team and say this guy isn't even the limit of their ambitions. most people would want
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to say we want to get to the premier league, but actually we want to take it to space. will of the idea of telling the story of working—class club because we feel like people around the world can identify with that. ryan reynolds is one of the world's biggest movie stars and has forces with rob mcelhenney in this extraordinary plotline. despite completing their takeover in february, the pandemic and filming commitments have meant the owners have had to wait until this week to visit the historic racecourse ground. but the pair have already had a first taste of this new life, witnessing a loss away to maidenhead earlier this week which reynolds said highlighted how football is soul deadening, evil and gorgeous. it has been 13 years since wrexham were last in the football league and the future of the club was uncertain. fans say the arrival of megastar owners was not the plot twist they were expecting.
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i think every fan in wrexham would say it's a joke. it's really exciting. to any fans still doubting your motivation, what would you say to them? i would love to revisit that question in a few years and see where we are at but our commitment is 110%. while this might still feel like fiction for some supporters, for others this is a real blockbuster is all they have ever known. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. flooding and travel disruption increasing in southern scotland, especially the scottish border and into dumfries and galloway. in requesting then, cumbria, where there is still in that office amber warning and fresh air, and even where there may be held that of a lull in the rain in some areas, there is moraine on the way. there has also been training better through the day across males, more by the north testing and even where there may be held that of a lull in the rain in some areas,
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there is moraine on the way. there has also been training better through the day across males, more by the northwest england in summer breaks a brain developing in northern ireland as well, and tomorrow we will see some rain pushing across eastern parts of england after what's been a mainly dry week, and whilst most places will turn drier and brighter through the afternoon tomorrow, this next area of rain will be lingering in parts of scotland, particularly during the afternoon across eastern areas, remember, even where the rain is easing, the water starts to feed to the rivers and streams, so the risk of flooding continues.
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this is bbc news. the areas of the worlds biggest oil companies testify before congress at a historic hearing. before congress at a historic hearina. . , before congress at a historic hearin. ., , ., ., ., , hearing. their answering allegations that their companies _ hearing. their answering allegations that their companies raged - hearing. their answering allegations | that their companies raged campaign of disinformation. about the impact of disinformation. about the impact of fossil fuels of disinformation. about the impact of fossilfuels on of disinformation. about the impact of fossil fuels on climate change something they denied. £311" of fossil fuels on climate change something they denied. our position in this space — something they denied. our position in this space has _ something they denied. our position in this space has been _ something they denied. our position in this space has been consistent - in this space has been consistent with the general consensus and the scientific community. the with the general consensus and the scientific community.— scientific community. the post brexit dispute _ scientific community. the post brexit dispute over _ scientific community. the post brexit dispute over fishing - scientific community. the post l brexit dispute over fishing rights heats up. facebook changes its corporate name to meta as part of a major revamp. to the beaches of the dominican republic, eight and all six of the of the remaining countries of england's travel red list are to be removed.

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