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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 28, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm maryam moshiri, this is outside source. the us president says his democratic party has reached an historic agreement on economic reforms — worth nearly two trillion dollars. it's a framework that will create millions ofjobs, grow the economy, invest in our nation and our people. over half a trillion dollars will be spent fighting climate change, in the deal dubbed �*build back better�*. we'll be live in washington to unpack it. also in washington — congress is grilling top oil executives over whether the industry deliberately misled the public about the dangers of climate change. stop spending money.
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that's on lies. ok, i take it that you don't want to take the pledge, all right. russia battles a record surge of covid — as the capital moscow goes into partial lockdown. and the battle escalates — overfishing rights between france and britain. the french authorities detain a british trawler. we start with two big stories developing in washington. first president biden says his democratic party has reached a framework agreement on economic reforms worth nearly two trillion dollars. the plan sets out investment in social care, affordable health and efforts to combat climate change. here's the us president. it's a framework that will create millions ofjobs, grow the economy,
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invested our nation and our people. turn the climate crisis into an opportunity and put us on a path not only to compete but to win the economic competition of the 21st century against china and every other major country in the world. it's fiscally responsible, it's fully paid for. 17 no belt prize winners in economics that it will lower the economic inflationary pressures on the economy. julia manchester from the hill is in washington. the president said this deal is very much about compromise in particular his own compromise.— his own compromise. absolutely. president biden _ his own compromise. absolutely. president biden as _ his own compromise. absolutely. president biden as well _ his own compromise. absolutely. president biden as well as - his own compromise. absolutely. - president biden as well as democrats on capitol hill have really been working with that divide in their own party over the past couple of weeks really between progressive democrats and moderate democrats. and like president biden said, neither side really got everything
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they wanted in this deal. however it's unclear what progressive house lawmakers particularly progressives like alexander of paris yellow cortez are going to do with this bill. obviously some work to be done but i think you have established the democrats really pushing this progressives to accept this bill and say look, we can focus on what we didn't get done in this legislation for another time. didn't get done in this legislation foranothertime. former didn't get done in this legislation for another time. former president obama also putting out a statement seemingly pushing progressives to accept this for the time being saying this is really the best chance the party has to get the reforms passed through congress. just explain for viewers are wondering about why does it matter? obviously $2,000,000,000,000 is a lot of money. there are a lot of things that could be potentially in the pipeline down the road that this money will be spent on. this piece of legislation _ money will be spent on. this piece of legislation matters _ money will be spent on. this piece of legislation matters in _ money will be spent on. this piece of legislation matters in particular| of legislation matters in particular because back in the summer after we saw president biden spied two
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bipartisan infrastructure package passes the senate you had a number of progressive lawmakers in the house saying wait a minute, we want to have their separate economic spending plan which was originally $3.5 trillion to pass alongside that infrastructure plan. the problem is you had moderate democrats in the senate essentially saying we don't want as much 3.5 trillion, that's too much, we want to start cutting. as a result you had a number of key progressive and sometimes pipe partisan priorities cut from this package for the sake of getting it down to a lower price point. that includes paid family leave for example. that's a major portion that has been cut. we could see in the future paid family leave as well as some other initiatives being worked on separately but it's unclear how these progressives are going to accept that. i don't think they're very happy at this point. this accept that. i don't think they're very happy at this point.- very happy at this point. this is a small hurdle, _ very happy at this point. this is a small hurdle, how _ very happy at this point. this is a small hurdle, how many - very happy at this point. this is a small hurdle, how many more i very happy at this point. this is a -
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small hurdle, how many more hurdles we have to go, where it this go next? i we have to go, where it this go next? ~ .,, ., , , we have to go, where it this go next? ~, ., _ ., _ we have to go, where it this go next? ., _ ., _ next? i think obviously nancy pelosi the house speaker— next? i think obviously nancy pelosi the house speaker is _ next? i think obviously nancy pelosi the house speaker is hoping - next? i think obviously nancy pelosi the house speaker is hoping to - next? i think obviously nancy pelosi the house speaker is hoping to get i next? i think obviously nancy pelosi| the house speaker is hoping to get a vote on that infrastructure package in the house sometime soon, maybe today. that could be rather unlikely at this point but i do think they're going to try to rally their caucus around these two pieces of legislation. nancy pelosi told democrats behind closed doors and house earlier today that she didn't want them to embarrass the president he oversees. president biden having to think that heading to rome and glasgow and the cut 26 while he's overseas. i think she's going to be trying her hardest along with other democratic established leaders in congress to whip their caucus together, to pass these two pieces of legislation. together, to pass these two pieces of legislation-— staying in washington. the top executives of major western oil companies are testifying in front of congress for the first time.
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they re accused of misleading the public about climate change. the hearing is being held by the house of representatives oversight committee and six oil industry leaders are testifying. they are the ceos of exxon, chevron and bp america, the president of shell and the heads of lobby firms the american petroleum institute and the us chamber of commerce. chairwoman carolyn maloney opened the hearing. after four decades of the deception and delay it is time for the fossil fuel industry to finally change its ways. thousands of companies have already recognised the imminent threat of climate change. and are working with community leaders and scientists to bring down emissions. it's time for big oil to finally join the rest of us in this fight. the timing of the hearing is significant. on sunday over 120 leaders will meet in glasgow for a major
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climate summit calld cop26. with this in mind, chairwoman maloney asked the executives to make a pledge. to commit not to spend money opposing efforts to tackle climate change. the ceo of bp america responded. what i would say is that we have stopped — what i would say is that we have stopped all reputational advertising at bp~ _ stopped all reputational advertising at bp. but stopped all reputational advertising at bp. �* , ., stopped all reputational advertising atbp. , at bp. but will you take the pledge? i know you've _ at bp. but will you take the pledge? i know you've taken _ at bp. but will you take the pledge? i know you've taken steps in - at bp. but will you take the pledge? i know you've taken steps in the - i know you've taken steps in the right direction, i heard that in your testimony, thank you will you take the pledge, yes or no? i4541431111 take the pledge, yes or no? well for our take the pledge, yes or no? well for your specific — take the pledge, yes or no? well for your specific pledge, _ take the pledge, yes or no? well for your specific pledge, what _ take the pledge, yes or no? well for your specific pledge, what we - take the pledge, yes or no? well for your specific pledge, what we are i your specific pledge, what we are pledging — your specific pledge, what we are pledging to do is advocate for low carbon_ pledging to do is advocate for low carbon policies are due in fact take the company and the world to net zero, _ the company and the world to net zero. thai's— the company and the world to net zero, that's the pledge and willing to commit— zero, that's the pledge and willing to commit to. zero, that's the pledge and willing to commit to— to commit to. well, i'm asking if ou'll to commit to. well, i'm asking if you'll stop _ to commit to. well, i'm asking if you'll stop spending _ to commit to. well, i'm asking if you'll stop spending money - to commit to. well, i'm asking if| you'll stop spending money either directly or indirectly to oppose efforts to reduce emissions and address climate change. just stop spending money. that's on lies. ok,
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i take it that you don't want to take the pledge, all right. as you might expect, the hearing is very much divided along party lines. republicans are using the opportunity to denounce president biden�*s climate change agenda. here's republican congressman ralph norman. members of this committee need to start focusing on the issues that are impacting everyday americans and the consequences of an overly ambitious and unrealistic climate agenda. i don't know about the rest of you all on this committee but the people of south carolina did not send me to washington to bankrupt our country. and even the phrase build back better needs to be changed to bankrupt america quicker. we should have a hearing about some of the proposals by democrats that spent hard—working american taxpayer money on liberal pipe dreams. the oil firms insisted that they want to shift from selling fossil fuels to renewables. but environmentalists accuse them of "greenwashing", and say that most of their focus
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is still on extracting fossil fuels. here's democratic congressman ro khanna. are you embarrassed is an american company that your production is going up while the european counterparts are going down? congressman, as we already heard, demand _ congressman, as we already heard, demand for— congressman, as we already heard, demand for energy is going up in the woridm _ demand for energy is going up in the world... dnd— demand for energy is going up in the world... �* ,., demand for energy is going up in the world... �* ,�* demand for energy is going up in the world... �* �* ., world... and so you're not embarrassed. _ world... and so you're not embarrassed. and - world... and so you're not embarrassed. and do - world... and so you're not embarrassed. and do you | world... and so you're not - embarrassed. and do you commit to world... and so you're not _ embarrassed. and do you commit to do anything? just an open question, not in i got your question, do you commit to doing anything of matching your european counterparts to try to bring the actual demand of oil production down? bring the actual demand of oil roduction down? ., , , ., production down? congressman, with all due respect _ production down? congressman, with all due respect and _ production down? congressman, with all due respect and very _ production down? congressman, with all due respect and very proud - production down? congressman, with all due respect and very proud of - all due respect and very proud of our company and what we do. i�*m our company and what we do. i'm roud of our company and what we do. i'm proud of the _ our company and what we do. i“n proud of the companies... no, you won't... samira hussain has been following the hearing in new york. how significant is this hearing? in those clips you really offered a pretty good summary ofjust what is been happening on capitol hill all throughout the day when it comes to this hearing. of course democrats
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are really pushing for oil executives to admit that in fact they were misleading people in america and around the world about the harmful effects of fossil fuels on the environment. in fact they did have more knowledge than they claim to have said that they did. from the point of view of the oil executives, what they are saying is that low, anything that we have said in the past was using the kind of information that we had at that time. research evolves, science evolves and we have evolved with that science and we are committing ourselves to try and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions recognising what we can do and that we play a role in doing that. hope what we can do and that we play a role in doing that.— role in doing that. how significant is all this? _ role in doing that. how significant is all this? i _ role in doing that. how significant is all this? i think _ role in doing that. how significant is all this? i think that's _ role in doing that. how significant is all this? i think that's very - is all this? i think that's very important- — is all this? i think that's very important. this _ is all this? i think that's very important. this is _ is all this? i think that's very important. this is the - is all this? i think that's very important. this is the first i is all this? i think that's very i important. this is the first time that you are seeing these oil execs making their way to capitol hill and testifying under oath. democrats were really billing this is something that was going to be
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history in the making and would often refer back to the very famous hearing in which the executives of big tobacco went and testified on capitol hill. i think most people can remember the photo of the seven dwarves that they called him at the time, the seven leaders of big tobacco who all stood with their right hand raised as they were taken the oath on capitol hill. and democrats actually went on to make mention of that hearing several times. they were hoping that this would have that same kind of impact. but it really didn't for a few reasons and one of course is really just sheer visuals without you and i know a lot about sheer visuals and that we work in television, everyone is repairing blue neck appearing remotely. that stark image that you saw back in the �*90s thatjust didn't exist. you also didn't have a
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lot of bipartisan support. in fact republicans were not supportive of this hearing at all. lets turn to the ongoing row between the uk and france over post—brexit fishing rights — which has escalated. in the past i thought that french ambassador will be summoned. the flash point this vessel. last night it was detained by the french authorities. and taken to le havre port. france says it seized it because it was operating in its waters without a fishing license. another vessel was also fined. this was the response of the uk home secretary. i think it's important to say obviously that it's disappointing and we as a country have filled all our obligations under the tca. at the same time government and cross
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government discussions will continue. both at commission level but also with counterparts within the french administration. this dispute hasn't come out of the blue. tensions have been simmering after the uk rejected requests by french boats to continue fishing in british waters under their post—brexit fishing rights deal — which set out the rules on who can fish in the english channel. this is where they want to fish. in waters six to 12 nautical miles off britain's shores. lets hear from two french fishermen. translation: the goal is to recover the rights that we had. when he breaks a deal was made the french had to keep their fishing breaks a deal was made the french had to keep theirfishing rights had to keep their fishing rights so we would like to keep our fishing rights and not lose them but the british are getting us to do. translation: it's all talk, it's all talk. today some things were said
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and that's— talk. today some things were said and that's it. at the moment we don't know_ and that's it. at the moment we don't know anything, we don't know if we _ don't know anything, we don't know if we have _ don't know anything, we don't know if we have a — don't know anything, we don't know if we have a licence or not. we don't _ if we have a licence or not. we don't know_ if we have a licence or not. we don't know if that people and i have next month— don't know if that people and i have next month we are at a complete standstill — this latest row came to head on tuesday — when the uk government announced it would allow only a handful of smaller french boats to fish in uk coastal waters. then on wednesday — paris threatened to block british fishing boats from unloading their catch at french ports and increase checks on british goods arriving in france from next tuesday. french maritime minister, annick girardin tweeted... the french secretary of state for european affairs repeated that warning. translation: the first measures that we will apply from the beginning of next week could be completed if
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there is no justice next week could be completed if there is nojustice for britain. because our objective is not to oppose these measures it's to get the licenses. as britain does not respect britain ratified commitments concerning ourfish meant we respect britain ratified commitments concerning our fish meant we will strictly limit the docking in french part two ports of british marine products was up we will carry out systemic, veterinary and customs checks and we will even put in place checks and we will even put in place checks of other products head into the directions of the united kingdom next week reinforcing our current procedures on border checks. we know what happened next. this vessel was seized and taken to le havre. france says the trawler was found to be fishing in the bay of seine without the proper licences. well the uk has threatened to retaliate. here's the uk environment secretary george eustice. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate and not what we would expect from a
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close ally and partner. the measures being threatened do not appear to be compatible with the trade and cooperation agreement or wider international law. and it carried through will be met with an appropriate and calibrated response. i am aware of reports of enforcement activity being undertaken by the french authorities in respect of two vessels and we are looking into these matters urgently. so that was the view from the uk. and here's the french prime minister for the view there. translation: i would like nothing more than for de—escalation to take place _ more than for de—escalation to take place was _ more than for de—escalation to take place was that the british, the government in london has all the keys to _ government in london has all the keys to achieve it. we are always open _ keys to achieve it. we are always open to— keys to achieve it. we are always open to discussion morning, noon and night _ open to discussion morning, noon and night. ministers are on board but at the same _ night. ministers are on board but at the same time i want to say to the british— the same time i want to say to the british government that we will ensure — british government that we will ensure our interests, our words are respected — today the captain of the detained
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vessel, jan dumfries was taken in for questioning — you can see him here in the back of the police car, wearing a red jacket. he was later released. the company that owns the boat, macduff, said... hugh schofield is in paris. he says the french are playing hardball. they had an opportunity of the last few weeks to come at some very strong language towards the british government and we heard yesterday salt one minister describing what the british would do as wiping their feet on the brexit treaty. they have not been holding back at all and there rhetoric recently. and now we see this
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translated into action with the planned next week to institute the new checks at the border, stop british ships, british fishing boats their catch at french ports. and likewise there is ahead all this against the trawler or the scalper off the coast. dave worn for weeks now that this is been brewing. they been making in france there planning retaliatory against the british and now it's gone. between now and tuesday there is a strong risk of severe disruption at the border at calais. look at the british media and this is another big post brexit clash with europe. and as with all theseissuesit clash with europe. and as with all these issues it seems for britain they loom very, very large because it is britain's destiny at stake. from the european perspective it's
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one of many things going on in the world. is not the most important. in france this has come up to the surface in the last day and has been leading the news. one of the items leading the news. one of the items leading the news we said before here remains true that fishing remains a totemic industry in france for the people are very attached to their fishing boats, fishing industry, its part of the image that france it's part of the image that france cultivates as a nation that a lot of fishing, consumes a lot of fish and prides itself on the fishing communities it has long is long, long closed. so when that is in danger people feel strongly about it and governments feel they have to act on it. it's of course not lost on anyone that there are elections approaching here in france. in five months there are presidential elections. this is giving the british the opportunity to say well this is alljust politics. emmanuel macron has to play a hard game
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because he can't afford to be seen as being soft on fishing. which is partly true. certainly the election will make it easier to find a compromise would this have happened anyway even if they weren't elections coming here want us to ask themselves. and i think the answer is yes. and in the past few minutes — we've had this statement from a uk government spokesman. lets turn to to russia, where new lockdown restrictions have come into force in moscow, as the country experiences a record surge in covid deaths and infections. russia has reported a record number of covid deaths in the past 2a hours — more than 1,100. the data also reveals more
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than 40,000 new infections in the past 2a hours — another record. that's having a direct effect on hospitals. here's a doctor in the south of the country. translation: the hospital is completely full. about 10% of patients discharged every day and an equal number admitted to hospital on the same day. there are many more patients than in the previous coronavirus way. convincing the broader russian population to vaccinate is a challenge. only around 33% of the population is fully vaccinated. on that, here's our moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg. i think it's a combination of issues with some of them on hand many russians have a fatalistic attitude to life. that is affecting things. also many russians simply don't believe what the authorities tell them. there was a lot of the
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authorities, towards the authorities. even when the prime minister of the president of russia goes on television and says look, you need to get yourselves vaccinated, vaccination saves lives, it will protect you, it will protect your loved ones for that many people just ignore that. they don't believe it. i was having a taxi ride about a month ago and got talking to a taxi driver and he told me he hadn't been vaccinated. i said, driver and he told me he hadn't been vaccinated. isaid, "why driver and he told me he hadn't been vaccinated. i said, "why not? driver and he told me he hadn't been vaccinated. isaid, "why not? he said he read a lot of things on social media, a lot of warring things about vaccination. he thought that ships were being implanted secretly during the vaccination for that i said, "you have any evidence to is that? "he said, "not at all. was that it got him thinking. i think that has been a lot of disinformation about vaccination not only in russia but across the world. all of these issues are affecting the pace of vaccination in russia. and until the authorities can find a way of getting people out to get
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those vaccinations, to increase the number of people who are protected then this is going to remain a problem, a big problem in russia. here in england the seven countries on the covid travel red list, are set to be removed. passengers arriving from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador, will soon no longer have to quarantine in a hotel for 10 days. our transport correspondent, caroline davies, has the story. ten days, for walls and many hours to kill. quarantine hotels were introduced by the government to slow the spread of barons of concern but for many who stayed in them it was a trial. ok, and that is? cheyenne had to stay in a quarantine hotels when she relocated from south africa with her two young children and husband. it was absolutely dreadful. you felt like you were in a prison you thought you felt you committed a crime and you were left without a choice. you can open a window. you
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had to sit in the bathroom while the kids were asleep. so that we didn't disturb them, my husband was set on a chair and i would sit on the toilet. ., ., a chair and i would sit on the toilet. ., ._ ., a chair and i would sit on the toilet. ., .,y ., ., toilet. today the government got rid ofthe toilet. today the government got rid of the final seven _ toilet. today the government got rid of the final seven countries - toilet. today the government got rid of the final seven countries on - toilet. today the government got rid of the final seven countries on the l of the final seven countries on the red letters. it means that anyone who is recognised as double vaccinated can come to the uk without quarantining from anywhere in the world. this is where it all began for the back in february some of the first quarantine hotel guest came to stay here. since then more than 200,000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels across the uk. from monday there will be no new quarantine arrivals but that doesn't mean the policy has gone altogether. the government is said that it will retain hundreds of hotel rooms in case the policy needs to be reintroduced. taste case the policy needs to be reintroduced.— case the policy needs to be reintroduced. we will review it a . ain in reintroduced. we will review it again in the — reintroduced. we will review it again in the new _ reintroduced. we will review it again in the new year - reintroduced. we will review it again in the new year but - reintroduced. we will review it again in the new year but we l reintroduced. we will review it - again in the new year but we don't want _ again in the new year but we don't want to— again in the new year but we don't want to have to reset up a system from — want to have to reset up a system from scratch if a particular concern was seen — from scratch if a particular concern was seen in — from scratch if a particular concern was seen in a particular country. but is _ was seen in a particular country. but is it— was seen in a particular country. but is it too— was seen in a particular country. but is it too soon for the change?
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epidemiologist professor is currently on date 19 of 21 in quarantine in hong kong. in hong kona we quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are _ quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are still _ quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming - quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for - quarantine in hong kong. in hong kong we are still aiming for are i quarantine in hong kong. in hong| kong we are still aiming for are no cases in the community which means quarantine as a 1st—line of defence was up in the uk is that a lot of cases in the community, you're aiming to get rid of the health public two measures eventually. so quarantine hotels are one of those measures that i think ought to be neededin measures that i think ought to be needed in the long term. and now is probably a good time to relax a particular measure. but probably a good time to relax a particular measure.— particular measure. but others disa . ree. particular measure. but others disagree- it — particular measure. but others disagree. it is _ particular measure. but others disagree. it is absolutely - particular measure. but others i disagree. it is absolutely sending out the _ disagree. it is absolutely sending out the wrong message about where we are in the _ out the wrong message about where we are in the pandemic. right now we need _ are in the pandemic. right now we need to— are in the pandemic. right now we need to he — are in the pandemic. right now we need to be having restrictions, not easing _ need to be having restrictions, not easing them. in two went through this winter— easing them. in two went through this winter we need to keep these restrictions in place. thanks again to get— restrictions in place. thanks again to get worse before they get better. and just before we go — in the past few minutes facebook has announced its new name. it's called meta. in the next half an hour we'll be speaking to a former facebook adviser to mark zuckerberg and giving you the latest on the breaking news story. more in
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a couple of minutes. stay with us on outside source. hello. after a couple of days of incessant rain in southern scotland, cumbria, the inevitable result, flooding, flood warnings increasing, travel disruption as well. there is still a met office amber warning for the rain in cumbria and, of course, we are seeing some flooding here, but also across parts of southern southwest scotland as well. so, significant impacts from rain, which has just kept on coming. now, there mayjust be a little bit of a lull in the rain in some of the worst hit areas as we go into the first part of the night, but there is going to be another pulse of rain on the way. it's also been turning wetter across wales, more widely northwest england, southwest england as well, so there may be some impacts as rain totals begin to mount here as we go through the night and into the morning. northwest scotland seeing some showers, as will parts of northern
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ireland, seeing a bit of showery rain, easternmost parts of england overnight staying — still — mainly dry with temperatures across the uk mainly around 9—13 celsius. so, a messy picture to start friday with outbreaks of rain across many areas, and we will see some rain pushing through eastern parts of england as well, but it is this area of rain which will bring further downpours into parts of northwest england and cumbria and at last the longest in scotland. still quite wet across eastern parts of scotland going through friday afternoon, whereas many other areas are going to be turning drier and brighter. but remember when the rain has stopped, we will continue to see what has fallen in the hills flowing down into the rivers and streams, so the impacts of flooding will continue even where it turns drier. and look at this going to friday evening, more downpours arriving across southwestern parts of the uk from a weather system which pushes on north and east overnight and into saturday. lingering across parts of southeast england as we go on through saturday, particularly by the afternoon into kent, whereas many other places will be turning drier and brighter once again,
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getting to see some sunny spells with a few showers around, it will feel a bit cooler and fresher. looks like the wetter day of the weekend will be on sunday, as another developing area of low pressure will move in. another dose of heavy rain spreading its way north and east. and also stronger winds with this system as well. still something to pay for in how far north this system will reach across scotland during sunday. of course, we are going to be adding more rain into areas that are already seeing some impacts from flooding. so absolutely keep across the latest weather and flood warnings if you are in a particularly wet part of the uk right now.
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hello, i'm maryam moshiri, this is outside source. the us president says his democratic party has reached an historic agreement on economic reforms — worth nearly two trillion dollars. it's a framework that will create millions ofjobs, grow the economy, invest in our nation and our people. nearly half a billion dollars will be spent fighting climate change — in the deal dubbed "build back better". and after france detains a british trawler — the uk summons the french ambassador in a growing row over post—brexit fishing rights.
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after months of growing criticism about its business practices, facebook unveils a new name. iam i am proud to announce that starting today, our company is now meta. we'll speak to a former adviser to mark zuckerberg. in three days, over 120 world leaders will meet for a major climate summit in glasgow. it's called co p26. and ahead of it — more nations have been outlining ways they plan to cut their emissions. the european union is the latest. today several proposals were announced. they will be presented at the conference over the coming weeks. here's the commission president president ursula von der leyen. but what we also need now is not only targets, but we need very concrete plans
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and immediate action on the ground. we need to show in detail how we are going to reach those targets within this decade. the longer we wait, the more expensive it will become, and therefore, its about action now. one of those concrete pledges is to cut emissions of methane gas. eu countries will commit to reduce their methane emissions by 30%. methane is a greenhouse gas that's emitted from leakages from natural gas systems — but perhaps more infamously it come from livestock, like cows. 60% of methane emissions are due to human activity. here's ursula von der leyen again. me saying if you look at the greenhouse gas emissions, greenhouse gases is the lowest hanging fruit. it is 80 times more warming than co2, so there is an urgent need to do something, and there is a lot we can do,
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and therefore, i am glad that by now 60 countries joined us so far, and of course, we are encouraging others to join this ambition. i am joined now by professor myles allen — he's a specialist in how human and natural influences contribute to climate change. he was also one of the lead authors on the un's report on climate change. zist 21st of about methane. what do you think —— do you think these proposals will make some sort of difference? it’s proposals will make some sort of difference?— proposals will make some sort of difference? �*, . ., , ., ., difference? it's clearly a good idea to cut these _ difference? it's clearly a good idea to cut these emissions. _ difference? it's clearly a good idea to cut these emissions. methane l difference? it's clearly a good idea| to cut these emissions. methane is driving global warming everfaster at the moment. our people may not realise it, but the world is warming faster right now than it has ever warmed in the past due to human influence, and part of that acceleration is driven by methane emissions. we have got to stop them rising, which is what they are doing at the moment, and get them onto the opposite direction, get them following. you've also got to keep this in perspective. i mean, the most optimistic estimate to be had
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of what we can gain by cutting methane emissions might shave attend a degree or two off global temperatures by mid century. now, right now, carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels are driving up global temperatures by two tenths of a degree per decade. so you have to keep these things in perspective, yes, we should act on methane, yes it's perspective, yes, we should act on methane, yes its low hanging fruit, but it doesn't mean we can afford to take our eye off the ball of giving —— getting carbon dioxide emissions down as soon as possible. -- getting carbon dioxide emissions down as soon as possible.— down as soon as possible. explain more clearly _ down as soon as possible. explain more clearly where _ down as soon as possible. explain more clearly where methane - down as soon as possible. explain i more clearly where methane comes from. a lot of vets comes from cows. who are the main culprits behind, you know, the methane emissions in the world. ~ , , . the world. well, in the big picture, its agriculture _ the world. well, in the big picture, its agriculture and _ the world. well, in the big picture, its agriculture and it's _ the world. well, in the big picture, its agriculture and it's the - the world. well, in the big picture, its agriculture and it's the energy l its agriculture and it's the energy sector. methane is natural gas. it's what you burn when you switch on your gas cooker. and if any of the pipes leak between the gas field in russia and your plants, whatever is
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transporting into uk and your cooker, that methane is going to end “p cooker, that methane is going to end up in the atmosphere and methane is a very powerful greenhouse gas that will cause global warming. likewise, livestock generate methane just from, well, particular kinds of livestock, cows and sheep, they generate methane because of the way they digest their food. that is another important source, and put these two things to get a command thatis these two things to get a command that is what is driving, we have been increasing livestock numbers around the world recently, we are also increasing our use of natural gas, particularly unconventional natural gas, fracking, people have heard of, that process does often result in release of methane. so put these two things together and we are seeing the very rapid acceleration and methane trends that we have seen recently which we have got to reverse stop a professor can be said to me earlier that the world, global warming is happening at a much faster rate. we have kept 26 coming
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up. what do you hope to get out of that conference which i know that you are going to be attending? the main thing is an acknowledgement from politicians about what net zero really means. they are all talking about net zero, but i think a lot of them are seeing it as the net and that the in net zero is a way to wriggle out of their applications. for a net zero world to be durable, to be
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——reports suggest that facebook founder mark zuckerberg our mission remains the same is still about bringing people together. the absent brands, they are not changing. and we are still the company that designs technology around people. let's get more on
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that story. an facebooks journey to get to this point. let's talk now to our north american technology james, talk me through the name. what do we think of it? it's greek far loeyond- _ what do we think of it? it's greek far beyond. essentially _ what do we think of it? it's greek far beyond. essentially mark - far beyond. essentially mark zuckerberg is saying that facebook, which is initially the platform that everyone knows is basically grown so much since it was found dead 15— 16 years ago, it has a whole be our department. mark zuckerberg wants to create something called the meta— various command facebook is confusing and reporting on facebook and i get this quite regularly, i am talking about instagram and then i'm going to facebook, i'm having to explain how facebook actually owns instagram. so this is trying to avoid confusion and it's trying to better reflect facebook�*s calls. but, of course, in a week that facebook has been under scrutiny a lot recently, it's had terrible headlines this week, and i think
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facebook�*s brand is seen to be toxic, and this was seen by many as a way to detoxify facebook. it detoxifies facebook and one way, but also facebook�*s brand is what it makes its money. the brand has been around for ages. some might say it's around for ages. some might say it's a good thing to change her mind come if you want to detoxify itself in other ways, if you want to detoxify itself in otherways, may if you want to detoxify itself in other ways, may be difficult to rebuild a new brand. can other ways, may be difficult to rebuild a new brand.— other ways, may be difficult to rebuild a new brand. can be really difficult to rebuild _ rebuild a new brand. can be really difficult to rebuild the _ rebuild a new brand. can be really difficult to rebuild the brand. - difficult to rebuild the brand. facebook has spent a lot of time building this brand out. it's difficult to make brands stick. google changed its name to alphabets, literally no one tell that neck because google alphabets. it remains to be seen whether people will actually call facebook meta. it's vexing that the platform facebook, that's not changing. it's the overall parent company that's the overall parent company that's the name that's changing here. james, how difficult has light been for facebook recently, bring the receptive date... up to date on why
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we are seeing this change. she decided to _ we are seeing this change. she decided to leave _ we are seeing this change. 51a: decided to leave facebook and we are seeing this change. §i2 decided to leave facebook and she took with her a cache of leaked documents, and from those, we have seen at dozens and dozens of stories about facebook on the negative stories that they essentially put profits over customer safety. francis was hitting testimony in the senate and congress and she has also given testimony in london and westminster, and she has criticised the company to no end. honestly, i could pick dozens and dozens of negative stories over the past few weeks. facebook will say it has nothing to do at that, that they have been planning this for months, if not years, bikes, of course my people will inevitably conclude that that was part of the reason why facebook has decided to act in this way. i facebook has decided to act in this wa . ., �* 4' ., facebook has decided to act in this wa. ~ ., ., ., way. i don't know if you had a chance to _ way. i don't know if you had a chance to look _ way. i don't know if you had a chance to look at _ way. i don't know if you had a chance to look at social - way. i don't know if you had a. chance to look at social media, way. i don't know if you had a - chance to look at social media, but what has the reaction been? ads, lat chance to look at social media, but what has the reaction been? a lot of
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comments that _ what has the reaction been? a lot of comments that simply _ what has the reaction been? a lot of comments that simply don't - what has the reaction been? a lot of comments that simply don't believe | comments that simply don't believe it. i thought it was a joke. it is real. they really are rebranding themselves. they are calling themselves. they are calling themselves meta. you know, i think a lot of people simply won't use that name, at least in the short term. it's possible people will begin to use it, but i think the word meta kind of seems like a running joke at the moment. that's the initial reaction on twitter stuff i do think facebook is hoping that meta is better. it was that a really bad joke? better. it was that a really bad 'oke? ., �* better. it was that a really bad 'oke? .,�* , , ., ., joke? you're supposed to laugh, james, joke? you're supposed to laugh, james. you _ joke? you're supposed to laugh, james. you are _ joke? you're supposed to laugh, james, you are on _ joke? you're supposed to laugh, james, you are on my— joke? you're supposed to laugh, james, you are on my side. - joke? you're supposed to laugh, james, you are on my side. you | joke? you're supposed to laugh, i james, you are on my side. you are the only one who is laughing. james, our technology correspondent. here in the uk, the man who organised the flight that killed argentine footballer, emiliano sala, has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. 67 year old david henderson arranged a pilot and booked the light airplane which crashed into the english channel in january 2019. over the course of the trial,
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thejury heard mr henderson was aware that the pilot, david ibbotson — who also died — was unfit to fly. hywel griffith reports. it was a multi—million pound deal that should have brought emiliano sala to the premier league, but on the night he took off from nantes tojoin his new team in cardiff, the striker sensed something was wrong. he recorded a message saying i am now a board a plane that seems like it is falling to pieces, i'm getting scared. minutes later, the plane disappeared from contact over the english channel. the wreckage was discovered two weeks later, along with emiliano sala's body, which contained high levels of carbon monoxide. the body of the pilot, david ibbotson, was neverfound but it soon emerged that he should never have been in the air that night. he was hired by david henderson, despite not being licensed to carry passengers or trained to fly at night. the jury saw text messages henderson
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sent to the plane's engineer shortly after it went missing, telling him not to say a word to anyone. another message read, "need to be very careful, opens up a whole can of worms, keep very quiet." the court heard henderson ran a cowboy outfit, operating in a legal grey area. he will be sentenced next month. it just shows that this was all done for greed. there is no real reason to use gray charter when normal charter, genuine, legitimate charter, is so readily available. emiliano sala's family has welcomed today's guilty verdict but say they believe it is only one part in the puzzle of how the flight carrying him from france here to his new club in cardiff came to crash. they believe all the facts surrounding that flight are yet to be disclosed. they hope the full truth of how he came to die will become clear at his inquest, which takes place next year. hywel griffith, bbc news, cardiff.
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marcela mora y araujo is a argentine sportsjournalists in london. thank you so much forjoining us on an outside source. let me ask you first of all, what has the reaction ban in argentina to the events leading up to and after this trial? well, i think it's a really unusual case in terms of that fame or popularity as in sala, because the really became known after the tragedy. hundreds of players in argentina train as children in quite a sophisticated child and adolescent development of the ball of football, and then maybe move abroad while young teens —— in their young teens, and that was the case for him as he moved to france as a very young
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teenager. and they are, in a way, the bloodline of the football industry, they are what i like to call the get enough players. they are not the superstars are the perfect player is that everyone knows, they don't become household names, but every team has them and they are heartbreaking and emiliano sala was a very happy story. he had beenin sala was a very happy story. he had been in a kiddie academy in his small town in the province of... which had links to france and he had moved in his early teens and had gone up the ranks and become a professional. the move to the penmanship was an absolute dream come true. there are so many young players in this situation, and unless they may get called for an international game or play particularly well, he had become the lead goal—scorer in the french late that season, so that's on his name first popped up. it was the move to
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cardiff and the goal scoring, but it was really interesting as the plane disappeared and before he was found when the search was signed, which is when the search was signed, which is when we were all alerted to this potential tragedy that the news reaction in argentina and the people's reaction was we didn't know him. we didn't know him but we are getting to know him and love him now, and that's been the consistent lying, even in the very tragic when the body was found, and eventually repatriated command there was a massive almost state like funeral for him. the press was still saying this young man who we are just getting to know and we didn't know him, but he acquired fame and became a household name in a matter of hours from anonymity to bats, which echoes the kind of fans that also put banners that said we don't know you yet, you hadn't scored for us yet, but we already love you. so
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it's unusual and tragic, kind of... you know, the establishment to fame was posthumous. it’s you know, the establishment to fame was posthumous.— was posthumous. it's been good to net our was posthumous. it's been good to get your insight- — thank you very much. stay with us on outside sites. still to come... after months of growing criticism, facebook unveils a new name. we will speak to a former adviser to mark zuckerberg and ask him what he thinks of it. researchers say millions of people are set to be finacially worse off next year — following yesterday's budget announcement in the uk. that's despite wage increases and benefit changes.analysts from the independent body, the institute for fiscal studies, say inflation and higher taxes, will hit low—income households, who'll feel "real pain," as the cost of living rises faster
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than benefit payments. here's our economics editor, faisal islam. raspberries and blueberries! in doncaster in south yorkshire, the market is busy but what the chancellor called his new age of economic optimism hasn't quite arrived. eating going up, gas going up, everything. they don't put enough up! for your living wage. i agree with some of the budget but not all, the weight is not. going up as much as they should do, the situation people _ living in the real world. they are going to have to put the wages up if they're putting the minimum wage up, they will have to put everybody else's up otherwise it's not fair. that reflects the picture of the post—budget analysis, despite growth having returned and joblessness are lower than expected, it is rising prices and taxes that, according to leading analyst, will lead to several further years of very slow growth in living standards. let's look at how all of this effect different types of work in the coming year.
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a middle earner, someone on the minimum wage, and someone on universal credit. taking into account the rise in earnings and inflation, everybody is up but it is the person on the living wage it was up to most, benefiting from the change yesterday. when you also take into account tax changes and the national insurance rise, this is the picture. at the person on the living wage is up £180 over the next year, on the middle income they are down £180. also adding in changes to universal credit, you see the recipient there is up over £1000 but that merely reverses what was taken away last month. big choices made by the chancellor. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... the us president says his democratic party has reached an historic agreement
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on economic reforms — worth nearly two trillion dollars. after france detains a british trawler — the uk summons the french ambassador in a growing row over post—brexit fishing rights. lets turn to ghana. parliament is debating a bill which seeks to introduce some of the harshest laws in africa against the lgbtq community. the bill would increase jail terms to up to a decade and force some to undergo conversion therapy, whereby attempts are made to change people's sexuality. first — let's hear from the mp who introduced the so—called family values�* bill. feel that enjoys the support of the research that was carried out by a private civil society organisation. 93% of ghanaians support this position. laws are a reflection of what society desires. rights groups say the bill is the "worst homophobic document ever".
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we spoke to a member of the gay community in ghana and asked him about his fears regarding the new law. we�*ve concealed his identity. i'm scared because the law will embolden such people to continue abusing us, to continue targeting us. many more people will have a beating in the streets. now people feel legitimised to continue discriminating against us, and we feel it is also proposing a duty to report. that means that queer people, lgbt people who may be at risk of hiv cannot go to the clinic because when they go to the clinic and disclose that they are men who are having sex with men or another identity, then the nurse or the health worker is being forced by this bill.
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let�*s return to the us. after months of growing criticism about its business practices, facebook unveils a new name: meta. let�*s speak to roger —— let�*s speak to roger mcnamee, the co—founder of the private—equity firm, elevation partners and a former adviser to mark zuckerberg. he was an early investor in facebook. thank you so much forjoining us. i�*ve got to ask you, what do you think of the new name? i i've got to ask you, what do you think of the new name?- i've got to ask you, what do you think of the new name? i think it's ridiculous- — think of the new name? i think it's ridiculous- i— think of the new name? i think it's ridiculous. i think— think of the new name? i think it's ridiculous. i think facebook- think of the new name? i think it's ridiculous. i think facebook is i ridiculous. i think facebook is trying to change the subject and they are trained to create a new corporate structure that will protect mark zuckerberg from liability for all the harms his company has done over the last ten years. it�*s not going to work and we should alljust simply recognise that the name can change but the facts don�*t. this company has done a great deal of harm and should be held accountable for all of it. you don't think— held accountable for all of it. you don't think it — held accountable for all of it. you don't think it will _ held accountable for all of it. you don't think it will detoxify the don�*t think it will detoxify the brand at all moving forward in this way with a new name?— way with a new name? now, if anything. _ way with a new name? now, if anything. i _ way with a new name? now, if anything, ithink— way with a new name? now, if anything, i think it's _ way with a new name? now, if anything, i think it's going i way with a new name? now, if anything, i think it's going to l way with a new name? now, if- anything, i think it's going to make anything, i think it�*s going to make people laugh at it. the product that
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they are positioning four, which is a virtual reality experience can is nowhere near ready to be the transformational experience they are talking about. the vision they have for it is just truly dystopian. it�*s really all about tracking us through every aspect of our lives in order to manipulate human behaviour, and thatis to manipulate human behaviour, and that is just incredibly unhealthy for democracy, it�*s unhealthy fire public health. the whole thing is really disturbing. you public health. the whole thing is really disturbing.— really disturbing. you are not holdin: really disturbing. you are not holding back _ really disturbing. you are not holding back at _ really disturbing. you are not holding back at all, _ really disturbing. you are not holding back at all, are i really disturbing. you are not holding back at all, are you? | really disturbing. you are not i holding back at all, are you? let's holding back at all, are you? let�*s ask you then if you wear a... actually... ask you then if you wear a... actually- - -— ask you then if you wear a... actually... ask you then if you wear a... actuall ...~ ., ., ., actually... what would you say to mark zuckerberg? _ actually... what would you say to mark zuckerberg? very _ actually... what would you say to mark zuckerberg? very simple. i | mark zuckerberg? very simple. i think the business _ mark zuckerberg? very simple. i think the business model - mark zuckerberg? very simple. i think the business model of i mark zuckerberg? very simple. i think the business model of a i mark zuckerberg? very simple. i i think the business model of a spec has to change. the problem is not social media. social media has so many good aspects. as part of it that we love. but this notion of collecting data on absolutely everything in society, converting it into models that allow you to both protect and manipulate human behaviour and been creating this global network of 3,000,000,000 people with no barriers and no protections. that has brought all of these really dangerous ideas that
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normallyjust these really dangerous ideas that normally just exist at the fringes of society. it�*s about them all into the mainstream, and you can see this in the united states, united kingdom, around the world. facebook has been at the heart of undermining response to the covert pandemic, at the heart of undermining democracy and expend taking away the human autonomy of half the roads people. —— covid pandemic. no company should be allowed to do that. is it -- covid pandemic. no company should be allowed to do that.— be allowed to do that. is it the case that _ be allowed to do that. is it the case that we — be allowed to do that. is it the case that we need _ be allowed to do that. is it the case that we need more i case that we need more regulation then? , , . then? definitely. we need regulations _ then? definitely. we need regulations of _ then? definitely. we need regulations of three i then? definitely. we need| regulations of three kinds, then? definitely. we need - regulations of three kinds, safety, because these products, and it�*s not just a speck, it�*s the whole tech industry�*s culture makes unsafe products, we need something like the food and drug administration to decide which products are eligible to go to markets and under what circumstances. we need privacy, because we need to end this thing where corporations are allowed to use data to manipulate human behaviour. it�*s not fair. we need new tech lies to update antitrust, and governments around the world
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have the opportunity to make the changes that are right for the country. we don�*t need a quite needed global response to this because these companies automate everything, so if each country does their own thing in aggregate it will be protective of everyone to stop by tablet companies like facebook going forward make their money then? personally, i don�*t think that�*s our concern. that�*s their issue. facebook made money before it adopted this business model in 2013. that will make a lot less money, but again, ithink that will make a lot less money, but again, i think this is a trade—off between democracy, public health, privacy and the rights of all citizens, versus the profits of one company. it doesn�*t seem to me to we should be prioritising facebooks profits stopping to think today has been a public relations disaster then? well, i don�*t think it�*s a disaster or not, but i know that it�*s meaningless. disaster or not, but i know that it's meaningless.— disaster or not, but i know that it's meaningless. 0k, roger, it's been really _ it's meaningless. 0k, roger, it's been really get _ it's meaningless. 0k, roger, it's been really get to _ it's meaningless. 0k, roger, it's been really get to talk _ it's meaningless. 0k, roger, it's been really get to talk to - it's meaningless. 0k, roger, it's been really get to talk to you. i been really get to talk to you. thank you so much for talking to us. that�*s it from me and outside source. from the bbc news room, more as always on our website. thank you for your company. goodbye.
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hello. after a couple of days of incessant rain in southern scotland, cumbria, the inevitable result, flooding, flood warnings increasing, travel disruption as well. there is still a met office amber warning for the rain in cumbria and, of course, we are seeing some flooding here, but also across parts of southern southwest scotland as well. so, significant impacts from rain, which has just kept on coming. now, there mayjust be a little bit of a lull in the rain in some of the worst hit areas as we go into the first part of the night, but there is going to be another pulse of rain on the way. it�*s also been turning wetter across wales, more widely northwest england, southwest england as well, so there may be some impacts as rain totals begin to mount here as we go through the night and into the morning. northwest scotland seeing some showers, as will parts of northern ireland, seeing a bit of showery rain, easternmost parts
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of england overnight staying — still — mainly dry with temperatures across the uk mainly around 9—13 celsius. so, a messy picture to start friday with outbreaks of rain across many areas, and we will see some rain pushing through eastern parts of england as well, but it is this area of rain which will bring further downpours into parts of northwest england and cumbria and at last the longest in scotland. still quite wet across eastern parts of scotland going through friday afternoon, whereas many other areas are going to be turning drier and brighter. but remember when the rain has stopped, we will continue to see what has fallen in the hills flowing down into the rivers and streams, so the impacts of flooding will continue even where it turns drier. and look at this going to friday evening, more downpours arriving across southwestern parts of the uk from a weather system which pushes on north and east overnight and into saturday. lingering across parts of southeast england as we go on through saturday, particularly by the afternoon into kent, whereas many other places will be turning drier and brighter once again, getting to see some sunny spells with a few showers around,
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it will feel a bit cooler and fresher. looks like the wetter day of the weekend will be on sunday, as another developing area of low pressure will move in. another dose of heavy rain spreading its way north and east. and also stronger winds with this system as well. still something to pay for in how far north this system will reach across scotland during sunday. of course, we are going to be adding more rain into areas that are already seeing some impacts from flooding. so absolutely keep across the latest weather and flood warnings if you are in a particularly wet part of the uk right now.
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this is bbc news. i�*m lukwesa burak. the headlines: millions will be financially worse off, despite the benefit changes and small wage rises, in yesterday�*s budget. analysts say next year, some households, will feel "real pain." they are going to be hit by a series of tax increases and national insurance rises, income tax rises and inflation of course. the foreign office summons the french ambassador — following the seizure of a british trawler in the escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. the remaining seven countries on uk�*s travel �*red list�* will be removed from monday. arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuala and ecuador, will not need to quarantine in a hotel.

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