Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 28, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman says he should never be released... in 35 years�* time, they won�*t let him out. they won�*t let him out. i won�*t let them let him out. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. people should have reassurance that
2:01 pm
because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. the man who organised the flight in which footballer emiliano sala was killed is found guilty on a safety charge. and the polar research ship almost known as boaty mcboatface — but eventually named after sir david attenborough — prepares to leave on its maiden voyage to the antarctic. a man has beeen sentenced to life in prison for killing two sisters in a london park. in prison for killing two 19—year—old danyal hussein must serve a minimum of 35 years, after he was found guilty
2:02 pm
of the murder of sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death injune last year as part of a satanic blood pact. an investigation by the police watchdog criticised the response of officers when the sisters were reported missing — their mother has dismissed an apology from the metropolitan police. june kelly reports. nina smallman has been highly critical of the metropolitan police�*s response when her daughters were reported missing, but today she and her husband chris walked into court with simon harding, the senior met detective who led the murder investigation. a sign of the family�*s closeness to his team. such a vivacious shot of her daughters, but this was bibaa henry and nicole smallman in what would be the last few hours of their lives. after a picnic with friends during the first lockdown, the sisters stayed on in the park. they were celebrating bibaa�*s birthday together
2:03 pm
and died side—by—side. a stranger, danyal hussein, was lying in wait watching them, and he was armed with a knife. he�*s believed to have attacked bibaa first. he stabbed her eight times. nicole saw what he had done to her sister and put up a fight. she was stabbed 28 times. because of the initial poor police response, it was the sisters�* friends who launched a search and it was nicole�*s boyfriend who discovered the bodies. danyal hussein was arrested after his dna was found at the scene. he had developed a fascination with satanic ideology, and he had drawn up a plan to sacrifice women in a note signed in his own blood. after seeing him sentenced to a minimum of 35 years, mina smallman shared her thoughts. today we�*re celebrating what is wonderful about the metropolitan police. i�*ve never been one to cast
2:04 pm
a whole organisation by one particular sort of incident. but we do have a problem. we do have an underground that is infiltrated and growing in our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn�*t in court. he appeared by video link from belmarsh top security prison. he showed little respect for the legal process. before the hearing began, he kept throwing his facemask in the air and when the judge began sentencing him, he turned his chair sideways so he was not facing the camera. since the murders, bibaa�*s daughter has had a baby boy. he will learn about everything that was lost when bibaa and nicole were taken from their family. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. our correspondent helena wilkinson is at the old bailey. we heard from the girls mother after this verdict, after we saw the
2:05 pm
sentencing, and she talked of course about the police but also the degree of media coverage and the nature of coverage that the family have received. , ,, , coverage that the family have received. , ,, ., , received. yes. she spoke outside the old bailey and _ received. yes. she spoke outside the old bailey and she _ received. yes. she spoke outside the old bailey and she touched _ received. yes. she spoke outside the old bailey and she touched on - received. yes. she spoke outside the old bailey and she touched on that. l old bailey and she touched on that. she said that she was thankful that the media had picked up on the story and in terms of the coverage that it had been receiving previously, i think she has felt that it hasn�*t got the same coverage as other cases we have seen recently. but she thanked the metropolitan police, the investigating team in particular, outside court for their tireless work, she said, in terms of this investigation. thejudge in her sentencing remarks and as you heard in that report, the judge said that to lose two treasured family members
2:06 pm
and friends in this way is unimaginable. thejudge said to danyal hussein, who was watching proceedings via video link from belmarsh prison, she said to him, you made that loss worse by your refusal to acknowledge your actions and you made those family members and you made those family members and friends sit through day after day of evidence at this trial and you admitted nothing. she added that anyone following this trial would have found those details harrowing in the extreme. for nicole and bibaa�*s family, the horrific details they had to sit through during the trial, the ferocious attack that danyal hussein carried out on them, a random attack, he was lying in wait for them in the early hours of the night. they had been celebrating a birthday. thejudge also the night. they had been celebrating a birthday. the judge also said that
2:07 pm
his dna was all over the crime scene and there was also a vast amount of cctv footage against him but danyal hussein, he was watching via video link and at times he was crouching on the chairfrom link and at times he was crouching on the chair from a room link and at times he was crouching on the chairfrom a room in belmarsh prison where he was watching proceedings and he deliberately moved his chair as the judge proceedings and he deliberately moved his chair as thejudge began her sentencing remarks and she was addressing him directly. he moved his chair deliberately so he could only be seen by his profile. mina smallman sat in court and ignored his antics as he was doing that and she sat dignified in court but as we have heard from her outside of court, she said today is not a day of celebration, justice has been done, but if she has her way, he will never ever be released from prison. thejudge will never ever be released from prison. the judge sentencing will never ever be released from prison. thejudge sentencing danyal hussein today to life imprisonment
2:08 pm
and a minimum of 35 years, that is a point when he will not be released but when he could be considered for release. so, a life sentence of 35 years for da nyal release. so, a life sentence of 35 years for danyal hussein who was 18 at the time when he murdered the sisters in a park in london last yearin sisters in a park in london last year in a ferocious attack. what about the _ year in a ferocious attack. what about the criticism _ year in a ferocious attack. what about the criticism of _ year in a ferocious attack. what about the criticism of the - year in a ferocious attack. what about the criticism of the police in this case? any further implications from that? we this case? any further implications from that? ~ ~' ., . this case? any further implications from that? ~ ~ ., ., ., , from that? we know that earlier this week we heard _ from that? we know that earlier this week we heard from _ from that? we know that earlier this week we heard from the _ from that? we know that earlier this| week we heard from the independent office for police conduct, the watchdog, and they were brought in to look at how the metropolitan police investigated when the sisters were reported missing and how that investigation was carried out and how that missing persons inquiry was conducted by the met on the weekend. we know family and friends ended up searching for the sisters and it was a close friend of one of the sisters
2:09 pm
who found their bodies in a london park. the report by the police watchdog released its findings a matter of days ago and it said that the metropolitan police had fell below the standard that it should have been when it came to that missing persons report and in reaction to that we heard from mina smallman and she said that the met police had shown incompetent, reprehensible and blatant disregard of procedures regarding missing persons during the investigation. the commissioner after those findings apologised to the family and also offered to meet the sisters mother. ., and also offered to meet the sisters mother. . ., ., , i�*m joined by former chief superintendent of the metropolitan police, dal babu. your reaction to what we have heard emerge from the court today? it is
2:10 pm
absolutel emerge from the court today? it 3 absolutely shocking, the way the family were treated in the run up to the discovery of the bodies, and the family actually found the murder weapon and the bodies. the police did not conduct a search for 13 hours after they had been reported missing and the police watchdog criticised the police for not following the processes and procedures and there were multiple failings in the whole missing person inquiry. failings in the whole missing person inuui . ~ ., ., failings in the whole missing person inuui .~ ., ., , failings in the whole missing person inuui .~ ., , ., failings in the whole missing person inuui .~ ., ., , ., ., inquiry. what do you put that down to? sometimes _ inquiry. what do you put that down to? sometimes you _ inquiry. what do you put that down to? sometimes you have _ inquiry. what do you put that down to? sometimes you have got - inquiry. what do you put that down to? sometimes you have got to - inquiry. what do you put that down | to? sometimes you have got to look at the facts, — to? sometimes you have got to look at the facts. you _ to? sometimes you have got to look at the facts, you have _ to? sometimes you have got to look at the facts, you have a _ to? sometimes you have got to lookj at the facts, you have a 46-year-old at the facts, you have a 46—year—old woman who is a professional, social worker, she worked in harrow, she had a very good reputation, she did not, she had not gone missing previously and had not been in a position where she was travelling, a chaotic lifestyle, then her sister who was 28, basically ended up going missing. multiple members of the family raised it and it wasn�*t
2:11 pm
followed up by the police for 13 hours and i wonder if that had been a white woman, a professional white woman, whether the same would have happened. d0 woman, whether the same would have ha ened. ,, ., woman, whether the same would have ha ened. ,, . ., woman, whether the same would have ha ened. . ., ., woman, whether the same would have hauened. . ., ., . , happened. do you want to go any further than _ happened. do you want to go any further than wondering? - happened. do you want to go any further than wondering? the - happened. do you want to go any - further than wondering? the question of institutional racism has been raised over decades now. i believe race played _ raised over decades now. i believe race played a _ raised over decades now. i believe race played a significant _ raised over decades now. i believe race played a significant part - raised over decades now. i believe race played a significant part in - race played a significant part in the decision—making and if you look at the comments that were made, people described the birthday party is chaotic and there were references to black lives matter demonstrations, and there was a catalogue of things where people had shown their own prejudice, individual police officers and individual police officers and individual police officers and individual police staff.- individual police officers and individual police staff. what should ha - en individual police staff. what should happen now? _ individual police staff. what should happen now? time _ individual police staff. what should happen now? time and _ individual police staff. what should happen now? time and again - individual police staff. what should happen now? time and again not l individual police staff. what should i happen now? time and again not only the question of race but also of investigating women�*s safety, that the police are found wanting, and obviously everyone knows they are facing huge challenges in everyday
2:12 pm
work but realistically beyond people condemning and calling for change, is there anything anyone can do to bring about change? we is there anything anyone can do to bring about change?— is there anything anyone can do to bring about change? we have got a coule of bring about change? we have got a couple of investigations _ bring about change? we have got a couple of investigations running - bring about change? we have got a couple of investigations running at| couple of investigations running at the moment, the home secretary has announced one and the commissioner has announced one. quite frankly, we have had so many investigations and i�*m old enough to remember the 1981 report, and the lawrence inquiry, a whole range of different reports which have been put forward but what we don�*t seem to do is follow up on recommendations. in some ways we don�*t need any more reports because we know the police services is not representative of the communities it pleases and the hierarchy is full of white men and women but it doesn�*t represent the community. almost half of the london population is from minority and ethnic backgrounds. former chief superintendent of the met police, thanks forjoining us. we have some breaking news.
2:13 pm
a man has been charged with malicious communications, greater manchester police have said, after deputy labour leader angela rayner received a series of threats. the man who�*s been charged is benjamin iliffe, who is 36, of chatteris in cambridgeshire. we know angela rayner has had a number of threats over a period of time and we are now hearing that one person has been charged in connection with that. france has seized a british trawler as the row over post brexit fishing rights escalates. the french claim the boat was fishing in their waters without a licence and it�*s been taken to the port of le havre. the french are angry that some of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters — and they�*ve threatened to block british vessels from their ports.
2:14 pm
one french minister has said, "we need to speak the language of force because that seems to be the only thing this british government understands". and we can speak to hugh now — the french clearly extremely angry and as you outlined there — a series of reprisals threatened next week. is it possible to say who is in the right and who is in the wrong? he. right and who is in the wrong? no, not really- — right and who is in the wrong? no, not really- it _ right and who is in the wrong? no, not really. it is _ right and who is in the wrong? no, not really. it is a _ right and who is in the wrong? idrr, not really. it is a classic example of something which arises out of a compromised agreement in a treaty which works because both sides see different things in the wording. there was disagreement on fishing at the end of last year which allowed brexit to go ahead and for everyone to say we can now move ahead but of course the devil is always in the detail and when it came to actually applying this agreement, that means giving licences to eu, especially french fishing boats in british waters, both sides have a different
2:15 pm
interpretation, and it was predicted, the french went away saying one thing in the text and the british and other thing in the text. that has now come to light and the british say they have given all the licences under the terms of the agreement, that the french deserve, but the french are saying, they are still 200 who can show they were fishing in the waters in the period in question in the 2010s they still need licences. the question of 200 boats which the french say need licences and deserve licences and it should have them under the terms of the agreement but the british say, they have not agreed what you said they have not agreed what you said they would produce in terms of proof that they were fishing here before. there are two sites here and all i can say is that tempers are very hot over here ? two sides. they feel the french dip british are using french bashing as an excuse for their problems and vice versa ? they feel
2:16 pm
the british are using french bashing. the mood music is not good. for now, thanks forjoining us. the businessman who arranged a flight for footballer emiliano sala to travel to cardiff has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. the plane carrying sala, flown by pilot david ibbotson, crashed into the sea near guernsey in 2019, killing both men. sala had just been sold to cardiff city for £15 million. over the course of the trial the jury heard evidence showing that david henderson was aware that the pilot he chose was unfit to fly. tomos morgan reports from outside the court in cardiff. on the 21st of january 2019, cardiff city�*s new signing, argentinian footballer emiliano sala, was on his way to the welsh capital from nantes. the flight took place at night in bad weather and crashed into the english channel.
2:17 pm
67—year—old david henderson has been the man on trial here. he was the operator of that plane and also, crucially, the man responsible for choosing pilots, and over the course of this two week trial the jury has heard several pieces of evidence to suggest that mr henderson knew that pilot david ibbotson wasn�*t fit to fly sala that evening. footballer emiliano sala�*s last message before his night—time flight on the 21st of january 2019, from nantes to cardiff, crashed into the english channel. after an extensive public and private search the wreckage and the argentine�*s body was found, but the pilot�*s, david ibbotson, was never recovered. on trial for endangering the safety of an aircraft has been 67—year—old david henderson, the plane�*s operator, and crucially the one in charge
2:18 pm
of choosing pilots on behalf of the owner. the jury here in cardiff has heard several pieces of evidence to suggest that mr henderson knew that his pilot was not fit to fly sala. in a series of text messages which started in august 2018, night flying was discussed, a qualification it appeared mr ibbotson did not have. then in october the operator asked the pilot to acquire his night rating. the reply was, it didn�*t seem possible any time soon. and in a message a month before the crash, david henderson was made aware that the qualification still hadn�*t been achieved. realising that the weather could be treacherous on the 21st of january 2019 and knowing that mr ibbotson didn�*t have the qualifications to fly in those conditions, david henderson texted the pilot, asking him to blag the rating required to fly in bad weather outside of uk airspace, to which the reply was, "yes, done it before."
2:19 pm
after hearing of the accident mr henderson sent a series of messages. in one text, to the plane�*s engineer, he said not to say a word to anyone. responding to another the following morning, he wrote, "need to be very careful. "opens up a whole can of worms. keep very quiet." and, "questions may be asked about his flying." mr ibbotson�*s license to fly a piper malibu aircraft had also expired two months before the incident. when asked by the prosecution, isn�*t the true situation that you didn�*t want anyone looking at how you were running these flights because you knew you were running them illegally, david henderson replied, "there�*s probably some "element of that, yes." today, david henderson has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft, an aircraft in which footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson were killed. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff crown court.
2:20 pm
the jury deliberated here forjust over a day and a half and a majority verdict was accepted of 10—2 by thejudge. david henderson will be sentenced on 12th of november and early next year there will be full jury inquests into the death of footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. the bbc understands that the remaining seven countries on england�*s red list will be removed. that means that arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador will not need to quarantine in a hotel. our transport correspondent caroline davies is at heathrow airport. what is likely to be announced, any further details? that what is likely to be announced, any further details?— further details? at the moment we don't have official _ further details? at the moment we don't have official confirmation - don�*t have official confirmation from the government, this is speculation, from inside sources about what is likely to happen. we don�*t have it confirmed dates of when the policy might happen but
2:21 pm
given previous policies, quite often the amounts might dip ? announcement might come at the end of the week and then it comes into effect the next. this policy has been going on now for eight months and we know over 2000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels since the policy was introduced butjust because there happens to be no country is on there happens to be no country is on the red list does not mean that the red list policy is scrapped and it could be that the government decides to keep the policy and save the opportunity to add countries to the list if it feels the global situation has changed. thanks for “oininr situation has changed. thanks for joining us- _ the chancellor has been defending his budget, saying the government was investing in public services, future growth and people�*s skills and prioritising those on the lowest incomes. but a leading economic think tank has predicted that millions of people in the uk will be worse off in the short term due to tax increases and the rising cost of living. the institute of fiscal studies predicts that for many middle income families,
2:22 pm
living standards will fall over the coming year. here�*s our political correspondent nick eardley hi, how are you? really nice to see you. he�*s enthusiastic, but how will the public feel about rishi sunak�*s budget? after the treasury�*s big pitch yesterday, today is about the detail. oh, i do, it�*s controversial. mr sunak was spending his cash at bury market this morning, but over the next few years he�*s going to be spending a lot of taxpayer money, too, funded by the biggest tax burden since the �*50s. so, will it be worth it? people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. and yesterday we did take action and noticeably we froze fuel duty, especially when fuel prices are at almost a ten—year high, but also we cut the tax on the lowest paid people, which i think will make an enormous difference. that�*s a reference to
2:23 pm
universal credit changes which will allow in—work claimants to keep more of their benefits. wages are set to go up from april for public sector workers, and those on the minimum wage, but the cost of living is going up too. inflation could make household budgets even tighter. labour says the chancellor should have done more to help with the cost of living. if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth, that by the end of this parliament is set to be just 1.3%, it's certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the big political theme of this budget was that the government is still going to spend money. there were a number of announcements designed to be voter—friendly which mean the state is still going to play a big role in our lives. but many families and many households are facing a tough winter and when the numbers are crunched there are questions over what benefits we�*ll all feel.
2:24 pm
experts say millions of people will actually be worse off because of rising costs, higher energy bills, fuel bills, higherfood prices and increases in tax. the worry for the government is for all the chancellor�*s upbeat delivery, the voters may not get much feel—good factor. high inflation, rising taxes, poor growth, still undermined more by brexit than by the pandemic, will see real living standards barely rising and for many falling over the next year. he�*s got a bit more money to spend... wait, sorry... ..because the economy is in better shape than many expected, but that doesn�*t mean that there aren�*t challenging times ahead for many. so what about the effect on middle—income families? let�*s talk to our guest from the institute for fiscal studies.
2:25 pm
what do we mean by middle income families? who does that cover? we mean families? who does that cover? - mean families in the middle of the income distribution, so the fall in living standards that we predict will really bite for those in the middle of the distribution or further up. we think that someone earning the median earnings of about £25,000 per year, they will see their living standards fall in real terms. br; their living standards fall in real terms. �* , ., their living standards fall in real terms. j ., . ., . ., terms. by how much? how much would the lose? terms. by how much? how much would they lose? the — terms. by how much? how much would they lose? the combination _ terms. by how much? how much would they lose? the combination of- terms. by how much? how much would they lose? the combination of rising i they lose? the combination of rising livin: costs they lose? the combination of rising living costs almost _ they lose? the combination of rising living costs almost eating _ they lose? the combination of rising living costs almost eating up - they lose? the combination of rising living costs almost eating up the - living costs almost eating up the modest earnings growth that the obr is predicting, on top of rises to income tax this means that someone on median earnings would lose about £180 per year in terms of their net take—home income, so that is a loss
2:26 pm
of around 1%. take-home income, so that is a loss of around 196-— of around 1%. obviously, the chancellor _ of around 1%. obviously, the chancellor has _ of around 1%. obviously, the chancellor has been - of around 1%. obviously, the chancellor has been at - of around 1%. obviously, the chancellor has been at painsj of around 1%. obviously, the i chancellor has been at pains to of around 1%. obviously, the - chancellor has been at pains to say that he can�*t solve everything, was there something he missed that would have helped with rising living costs? i have helped with rising living costs? ~' ., . ., ., , costs? i think the chancellor has certainly acknowledged - costs? i think the chancellor has certainly acknowledged the - costs? i think the chancellor has . certainly acknowledged the squeeze on living standards and raised the line for universal credit for those who are in work by reducing the taper which means they will get to keep more of what they earn. he has also increased the national living wage which will also boost the earnings of low—paid households as well. however, what was missing from the budget yesterday was any support for low income households who don�*t have anyone in work and who may really struggle over the next couple of years. they have just lost the £1000 uplift to universal credit which was temporarily put in place over the pandemic and in addition they will see the value of their
2:27 pm
benefits eroded by inflation because benefits eroded by inflation because benefits are only operated with that. 7 benefits are only operated with that. ? upgraded.— benefits are only operated with that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 4%, ma that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, may be _ that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, may be rising _ that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, may be rising to _ that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, may be rising to 596, - that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, may be rising to 596, is - that. ? upgraded. given inflation, 496, may be rising to 596, is an - 4%, may be rising to 5%, is an interest rate rise on the horizon and what will that do? for anyone who has a mortgage, that will affect them? .,. , who has a mortgage, that will affect them? .. , ., who has a mortgage, that will affect them? , ., ., them? exactly. that will have effects, them? exactly. that will have effects. the — them? exactly. that will have effects, the rising _ them? exactly. that will have effects, the rising interest - them? exactly. that will have i effects, the rising interest rates will affect savers as well as borrowers. i5 will affect savers as well as borrowers-_ will affect savers as well as borrowers. , ., ., ., borrowers. is that what you would exect, borrowers. is that what you would expect. the _ borrowers. is that what you would expect, the interest _ borrowers. is that what you would expect, the interest rate - borrowers. is that what you would expect, the interest rate rise? - borrowers. is that what you would j expect, the interest rate rise? i'm not sure, expect, the interest rate rise? i“n not sure, given that the cost of living rise appears to be from a number of supply chain pressures, i don�*t know that an interest rate rise would be the correct response.
2:28 pm
understood. we don�*t want to push you into speculating too far in the future but we appreciate your time today. thanks forjoining us. taxes on sparkling wine, draught beer and cider are to be cut, but will rise for stronger drinks such as red wine following a shake—up of alcohol duty. the new system, due to start in 2023, will mean higher duty for stronger alcohol, the chancellor said yesterday. the duty premium on sparkling wines will end and the duty on draught beer and cider served in pubs will be cut. with me now is sarah mcnena, director of finance & operations, drop bear beer co. — a swansea—based low alcohol beer producer. thanks forjoining us. did you welcome the announcement yesterday? surprised? b5 welcome the announcement yesterday? surrised? �* , . welcome the announcement yesterday? surrised? a ., ., ., ., . welcome the announcement yesterday? surrised? ., ., ., . , , surprised? as a nonalcoholic brewery we actually are _ surprised? as a nonalcoholic brewery we actually are not _ surprised? as a nonalcoholic brewery we actually are not affected - surprised? as a nonalcoholic brewery we actually are not affected by - surprised? as a nonalcoholic brewery we actually are not affected by the i we actually are not affected by the duty cut because we don�*t pay duty.
2:29 pm
unfortunately that duty cut only applies to brewers who are packaging the beer into 40 litre kegs and that leaves out a lot of craft brewers, the vast majority of small craft brewers who package their be in 30 litre kegs, so that was a bit of a snub to the craft brewing industry which we are not too happy about. how much are you feeling the pinch at the moment? we how much are you feeling the pinch at the moment?— at the moment? we are feeling the inch from at the moment? we are feeling the pinch from everywhere, _ at the moment? we are feeling the pinch from everywhere, it - at the moment? we are feeling the pinch from everywhere, it seems. l at the moment? we are feeling the | pinch from everywhere, it seems. it is notjust rising gas prices but also the lack of hgv and increasing packaging prices, it is coming from everywhere. as a small business it is really, really difficult, a really difficult time to be upgrading. in really difficult time to be upgrading-— really difficult time to be u-uuradin. ,., ., upgrading. in terms of your own business. _ upgrading. in terms of your own business. you — upgrading. in terms of your own business, you employ _ upgrading. in terms of your own business, you employ about - upgrading. in terms of your own | business, you employ about four people? business, you employ about four --eole? . , business, you employ about four n-eole? ., , . business, you employ about four people?_ are - business, you employ about four people?_ are you i people? that is correct. are you worried about _ people? that is correct. are you worried about the _ people? that is correct. are you worried about the next - people? that is correct. are you worried about the next few - people? that is correct. are you -
2:30 pm
worried about the next few months? we are in a fortunate position. as a start—up we are quite flexible so we don�*t have premises and we don�*t have massive overheads like a lot of other small businesses. like those in retail and other sectors. we will get through the next few months but it is going to be painful. i�*m sure that there are businesses who won�*t get through, unfortunately. what that there are businesses who won't get through, unfortunately.- get through, unfortunately. what is the bi est get through, unfortunately. what is the biggest worry — get through, unfortunately. what is the biggest worry for _ get through, unfortunately. what is the biggest worry for you _ get through, unfortunately. what is the biggest worry for you in - get through, unfortunately. what is the biggest worry for you in the - the biggest worry for you in the coming months? the the biggest worry for you in the coming months?— the biggest worry for you in the coming months? the biggest worry for you in the cominu months? , , ., , , coming months? the biggest worry is the increase — coming months? the biggest worry is the increase in _ coming months? the biggest worry is the increase in brewing _ coming months? the biggest worry is the increase in brewing that - coming months? the biggest worry is the increase in brewing that we - coming months? the biggest worry is the increase in brewing that we are i the increase in brewing that we are going to see so we are in the middle of building the uk�*s biggest alcohol free craft brewery but we are contracting out and speaking to my brewers, they are increases coming down the road they won�*t be able to stop. and in building the brewery we actually don�*t know what our costs are going to be next year when we will be operational so it is hard to plan, hard to forecast and as a business you need the hard facts in
2:31 pm
front of you to make the decisions you need to make, so that is quite challenging. you need to make, so that is quite challenging-— you need to make, so that is quite challenauin. ., ., ., ., challenging. sarah, for now, thanks for “oininr challenging. sarah, for now, thanks forjoining us- _ challenging. sarah, for now, thanks forjoining us. good _ challenging. sarah, for now, thanks forjoining us. good luck— challenging. sarah, for now, thanks forjoining us. good luck for- challenging. sarah, for now, thanks forjoining us. good luck for the - forjoining us. good luck for the coming months. the chancellor appeared to mix up the name of the greater manchester town he was conducting his broadcast interviews in this morning, referring to bury market as the "world famous burnley market". it came after bbc breakfast presenter ben thompson told rishi sunak he originated from burnley, in lancashire. is not just about is notjust about being in the north, in burnley, it is if you are growing up in a village on the south west or the coast. people want to feel opportunity is there for them, i put it down to two things, one is having pride in the place you�*ll home and a lot of what we announced yesterday, the levelling up fund, bids like burnley market, world famous burnley market benefitting, that will create job, it is about improving every day infrastructure off our that will create job, it is about improving every day infrastructure
2:32 pm
off our communities. compere that is a very interesting gav, but he is a busy chap, so maybe he is forgiven. let us catch up with the sport. i am sure burnley has a fine market as well. we will start with this really important news in football, england�*s leading authorities have provisionally agreed to an industry wide fund to support players living with dementia and other neurodegenerative condition, the professional footballers�* association which has been criticised recently for its approach to brain injuries in the game has told the bbc that the level of support hasn�*t been decided by all parties are aware of the urgency. what i sense is they acknowledge this is urgent, because again, you know, when you see the way that some of those members just deteriorate, day after day because of this terrible disease, think you cannot wait and i think everyone is
2:33 pm
conscious of that so again, the sooner the better, you know, so, we will push for this to happen as soon as possible. rugby union�*s autumn internationals get going this weekend. wales have named their team to face new zealand in cardiff on saturday. fly—half gareth answer come is going to make his first start since 2019, a long road back from a serious knee injury. wales�* selection has been hampered —— hampered by injuries, many players are unable to feature next weekend, so captain alun wyn jones is going to play his 149th international for wales, that surpasses the previous record. yorkshire cricket club say they will take no action against any of its staff following allegation of racism made by their former player, staff following allegation of racism made by theirformer player, that staff following allegation of racism made by their former player, that is despite the club apologising to him last month and accepting an
2:34 pm
independent investigation�*s findings, that he had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying in his two spells at the club between 2008 and 2018. today following an internal inquiry the club say they have concluded there is no conduct or action taken by any of its employees, player or executives that warrants disciplinary action, on twitter rafiq has said just when you think this club couldn�*t get more embarrassing you find a way. staying with cacti. de kock has held clear the air talk, he says he wants to play for his country again and will take a knee before matches. the opening batsman withdrew from the tournament after being told just a few hours before the match that he had to take a knee, with the rest of the squad in a show of unity against racism. something he had not done before. cricket south africa say they regret the timing of that directive, he has apologised to his teammates and fans and in a lengthy
2:35 pm
statement says he is not racist and coming from a dual heritage family and black lives have always mattered to him before any international movement came to the fore. the england world cup winner fran wilson has retired from international cricket. she says the time feels right to step away after ten years playing for her countryer, she made her debut at the age of 19. she played at three world cups and one in the england team that became champions at lord�*s in 2017. the batter will continue to play domestic cricket. emma raducanu is in action at the trans reina opening, she is in the second round there and facing the romanian, she is doing really well. us open champion, won the first set 6-2, us open champion, won the first set 6—2, and as you can see they are into the second, i can�*t quite see the score there but emma raducanu is 2-1 the score there but emma raducanu is 2—1 up in the second. the men�*s tour
2:36 pm
is in silence that. cameron norrie is in silence that. cameron norrie is playing the canadian, a tough one this. norrie won the first set 6—2. the canadian took the second on a tie—break and he is 4—3 up in the last, the canadian, so that is going the distance. . you can keep across that on the bbc sport website, also on there voting the live for the bbc women�*s footballer of the year, the shortlist includes sam kerr, ashley lawrence. voting closes on the 8th november, you find out about all those nominees on the bbc sport website. i will have an update in the next hour for you. a small number of properties have been hit by flooding in cumbria today, as a month�*s worth of rain is expected to fall in just 36 hours. some holiday lets in cockermouth have been affected, but defences installed after 2009 have helped spare the kind of scenes witnessed during storm desmond in 2015. mark mcalindon reports.
2:37 pm
we are standing at the very point weathercock meets the derwent, that run through cockermouth and you can see the height the figures now even at the peak has passed at one point this town came close to devastation. by and large, the flood defences here have protected most of the people here but there have been one or two properties where water got in. we�*ve been through this before so it�*s get up, get on with it. yes, it�*s upsetting that we kind of got a bit hardened to it, that used to it, and we just have to crack on and sort it out. of course, back in 20,009 in 2015 anyone he was here cannot forget pictures of water running waist deep in the worst on main street saint last night of course was an anxious night for people who own businesses in this town. since the 20092015 floods, 90% of us haven�*t got insurance, so if we get flooded this time we have to pay for rebuild an everything, which, you
2:38 pm
know, goes into hundreds of thousands. we know, goes into hundreds of thousands.— know, goes into hundreds of thousands. ~ ., �* ., ., thousands. we will don't monitor the situation, thousands. we will don't monitor the situation. we — thousands. we will don't monitor the situation, we will _ thousands. we will don't monitor the situation, we will continue _ thousands. we will don't monitor the situation, we will continue to - thousands. we will don't monitor the situation, we will continue to work. situation, we will continue to work with the council— situation, we will continue to work with the council and _ situation, we will continue to work with the council and the _ situation, we will continue to work. with the council and the environment agency, and monitor the river levels and if people need help, then we will mobilise our volunteers to provide that help.— will mobilise our volunteers to rovide that hel. , , ., provide that help. further up stream in the derwent— provide that help. further up stream in the derwent it _ provide that help. further up stream in the derwent it is _ provide that help. further up stream in the derwent it is hoped _ provide that help. further up stream in the derwent it is hoped that - in the derwent it is hoped that keswick has survived the worst of last night�*s water, but everyone will be keeping an anxious watch on the forecast over days to come. in the next few days tens of thousands of delegates, including world leaders, will arrive in glasgow for cop26, the un climate change conference. countries will be asked to set out their plans for cutting emissions and rising global temperatures. the uk government�*s chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance, says it�*s vital that we take action now to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees. absolutely make sure that the technologies we have today and the natural solutions we have
2:39 pm
today are implemented as fast as possible. that is critical. and there is a way to do that and there is a lot of r&d needed for that. second thing we need to do is invest in the technologies for the future that will continue that make certain parts of that easier. and we also need to accept that there�*s got to be some change in society and the way that we consume and contribute to emissions. those things together, i think, are really, really important. if there are done and there are clear plans, 1.5 is achievable but not achievable without specific action. and there are the little things that we can all do that may seem tiny individually but you aggregate them across millions and it makes a difference. so, i cycle to work, i have reduced my meat consumption. i don�*t fly as much as i used to. it doesn�*t mean i have stopped meat consumption or i will never fly again. i will.
2:40 pm
but i will reduce those things. but those actions across millions make a difference as well. on their own, they are not sufficient. we need to get technologies in place and need to invest in technologies in the future. people around the world want their governments to take strong action on climate change, according to a new poll commissioned by the bbc. more than 30 thousand people were surveyed — across 31 countries — about their attitudes to climate change policies. more than half? 56% — say they want their governments to play a key leadership role. earlier, our environment correspondent matt mcgrath explained whilst 56% might not sound like a huge majority, it is a significant increase. the opinion polls for us here carried out a very similar surveyjust before the paris climate talks back in 2015, six years ago. and the difference between then and now is quite remarkable. people looking for strong action from their government, strong leadership was... it�*s increased by 25%, essentially, over that period. and it�*s increased in a lot
2:41 pm
of interesting countries, in india and in china. in china, back in 2015, only 18% of people wanted to see their governments take strong action. that has gone up to nearly half of respondents now. so, it�*s an opinion poll, it�*s a snapshot of opinion, but it does show that people are more serious about climate change and want their governments to take more serious action on it. well, key to the discussions at cop26 will be money — how will the pledges be financed? let�*s discuss some of those issues with dr megan bowman — she�*s director of the climate law and governance centre at kings college london. thank you forjoining us, when we say climate finance what do we mean? i think the best place to begin is really to put it into context, to put it incontext, what are the goal, what are we tracking against? how will we know when we have made it? it is three goals for the paris
2:42 pm
agreement and the first temperature, to ensure that global temperatures are well below two degrees, but within 1.5. are well below two degrees, but within1.5. the second is to a adaptation goal that we need to give much more atennion to the effects of climate change, so that is the fire, the floods, the droughts we are expensing already, the third goal is the finance goal and that is all finance must flow in a consistent direction, towards low carbon climate resilient world, so, cop26 is going to be superimportant for discussing all of those goals, and particularly that third goal because this is the place in space where governments come together, it is most important climb summit since paris. , , , ., most important climb summit since paris. , , ., , most important climb summit since paris. , , ., paris. just, 'ust to focus on the finance paris. just, just to focus on the finance aspect, _ paris. just, just to focus on the finance aspect, banks - paris. just, just to focus on the finance aspect, banks for- paris. just, just to focus on the i finance aspect, banks for example can lend money, can�*t they, to companies and say, these are the stipulations, the based op which we
2:43 pm
will lend it you have to have a certain amount of, you know, green governance, etc, but they are still commercial entities so how far really can finance help with this? this? how fayer can it go? so there is two different _ this? how fayer can it go? so there is two different types _ this? how fayer can it go? so there is two different types of _ this? how fayer can it go? so there is two different types of finance, i is two different types of finance, public and private sector finance. that will be critical, because public sector finance, the that will be critical, because public sectorfinance, the promise is that was given back in 2009, to help developing countries meet their obligation, was 100 billion by 2020. 2000 has been and gone and that promise was not delivered. and we need to also juxtapose that against the actual amount required to implement the paris agreement and move us to a low carbon climate resilient to meet the goal, that second thing is the private sector finance and the gap between the 100 billion promised by developed
2:44 pm
countries and the amount needed to implement the paris agreement is huge. the amount needed is in the multiple trills, so, no government has that kind of cash in its purse so that is where the private sector comes in, that is market finance, and it will be critical, it will be critical. �* ., ., , , critical. and how far is it behind where it needs _ critical. and how far is it behind where it needs to _ critical. and how far is it behind where it needs to be? - critical. and how far is it behind where it needs to be? so, i critical. and how far is it behind where it needs to be? so, this| critical. and how far is it behind l where it needs to be? so, this is one of the _ where it needs to be? so, this is one of the things _ where it needs to be? so, this is one of the things that _ where it needs to be? so, this is one of the things that will - where it needs to be? so, this is one of the things that will be i where it needs to be? so, this is i one of the things that will be front and centre at the cop26 discussion, the first is meeting the gap of that 100 billion that promise that was meant to be delivered by developed countries to developing countries and hasn�*t, the last estimate was in 2019 and it was round 80 billion. so is 20 billion short of what the promise was, and that gap is not just a monetary gap but a trust gap between the parties, to the paris agreement, at cop26, so that will be a recurring theme and throughout the negotiation, the private sector gap still needs a lot attention, a lot
2:45 pm
of work there, is great examples of private sector businesses that are leading on this. sojust private sector businesses that are leading on this. so just give you a couple, so for example the aviva investment led coalition that will be pushing for reform, with the international financial architecture at cop26 international financial architecture at c0 p26 and international financial architecture at cop26 and a new entity called the international platform for climate finance which will help raise ambition for developing country, a group of financial activists from round the world with assets under management, in the multi—temperature trillians they have been loud and proud about the willingness they will provide to help bridge that gap, but we also still of course have lags and businesses that are pursuing business as usual, and business as usual for future can, doesn�*t have a place, you know as it
2:46 pm
is currently conceived. it is the past not the future.— is currently conceived. it is the past not the future. isn't it, isn't this going _ past not the future. isn't it, isn't this going to _ past not the future. isn't it, isn't this going to change _ past not the future. isn't it, isn't this going to change in _ past not the future. isn't it, isn't this going to change in a - past not the future. isn't it, isn't this going to change in a sense l this going to change in a sense because the market drives it, so consumers and governments to a degree shape the direction of travel, in private investment, because ultimately london, huge financial centre but it serves people, it severs profit, you know, it services all sorts of government, ewe can�*t expect private companies only to operate on a ethical basis can you, because they would go bust? this is one of the debates be are having at the moment, what is business as usual, what does that allow for? so there is no doubt that we have the examples of leaders in this space but we also have examples for example, many private sector bank also be lending to for green, at the same time as they are lending for inappropriate and fossil fuels and that is a business case decision
2:47 pm
in action there, the fact of the matter is that you need strong government policy, you need robust law and regulation to regulate markets, to steer them in the right direction, they won�*t do it themselves. i5 direction, they won't do it themselves.— direction, they won't do it themselves. , , themselves. is this government re . ulatin: themselves. is this government regulating as — themselves. is this government regulating as far _ themselves. is this government regulating as far as _ themselves. is this government regulating as far as it _ themselves. is this government regulating as far as it could? i themselves. is this government regulating as far as it could? so j regulating as far as it could? so there regulating as far as it could? if there is regulating as far as it could? 5r there is more to do, there is always more to do at this point in time we are set for three degrees this century, that is well shy of that first goal that i mentioned, well shy of it, it is not liveable. so every government on this planet needs to be ramping up ambition and action at cop26. needs to be ramping up ambition and action at com.— needs to be ramping up ambition and action at cop26. thank you very much indeed. thank you very much indeed. and, in the run up to the cop26, we�*ll be answering some of your questions about the whole issue of climate change and the conference itself — here on the bbc news tomorrow morning at 11.30 will be joined by two leading climate experts — professor laura witmarsh from the university of bath, and professor alice larkin, who�*s from the university of manchester. if you�*ve got a question please get in touch using the hashtag
2:48 pm
bbc your questions or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. the headlines on bbc news. the teenager who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park is sentenced to life in prison — with a minimum of 35 years. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. the uk�*s newest polar research ship has completed a year of sea trials and is ready to set sail for its maiden voyage to antarctica. the £200 million vessel first made headlines when thousands of people voted to call it boaty mcboatface — but it was eventually named the rss sir david attenborough, after the broadcaster and naturalist. it�*s strong enough to sail through metre thick ice sheets in the frozen antarctic seas.
2:49 pm
our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports from greenwich. heading up the thames, it�*s the most advanced polar ship ever to set sail. it took just four years to build and now it�*s spending three days in london before its first voyage to antarctica. and on board, the man it�*s named after, sir david attenborough. i am indeed a very proud man to be standing in this remarkable vessel. i know that the findings made on this ship in the next few years will be of the greatest value and importance to the welfare of the world. this is a state—of—the—art research ship, and here on the top deck is the helipad so scientists and the crew can be brought to and from the ship while she�*s at sea. in here, you have the living
2:50 pm
quarters — a cosy cabin for two — because the crew on here can stay on board for two months at a time. there�*s room for 30 crew and 60 scientists on the ship. and this is the all—important coffee shop — where, after a hard day of polar research, the crew can come in and take a bit of a break. this big hole in the middle of the ship goes all the way from the sea up to here. it�*s called a moon pool, and it means that scientists can access the ocean with their instruments, whatever the weather. the moon pool is really significant because it means we can get these really valuable data points. the southern ocean is one of these places that we don�*t have very many observations from because it�*s so difficult to get there. and the southern ocean might feel really far away from us here in the uk, but it�*s really important for our climate as a whole. it takes up a lot of the carbon dioxide and the heat that we put into the atmosphere. it�*s notjust the water — scientists will be studying
2:51 pm
every aspect of this rapidly changing ecosystem. this ship will transform our understanding of the poles. seeing this ship among the ice will be absolutely remarkable and it�*s something we�*re really looking forward to. working in the antarctic, sometimes you might think you would get used to it but every time it still amazes us. and, of course, you can�*t come on board without mentioning boaty mcboatface. it�*s what the public voted to call this ship. but instead, the name�*s been given to this — a mini submarine — and soon it�*s going to be heading off to explore the antarctic ocean. the sir david attenborough will head off in a few weeks, stopping at the falklands on the way to antarctica. and the man it�*s named after has recorded a special message for when it sets sail. david attenborough: your attention, please. any personnel on board not sailing with the vessel, please disembark. rebecca morelle, bbc news. changes to our working lives since the start of the pandemic have affected many things,
2:52 pm
including — it seems — our radio listening habits. new figures out today show that audiences for breakfast shows have fallen over the past year, as some people continue to work from home, and commuter numbers remain relatively low. our entertainment correspondent david sillito has been looking at the numbers. it�*s a window into how our daily habits have changed. it�*s been more than a year since the radio industry has had any up—to—date figures and for many stations it�*s good news. overall listening has gone up. but not at breakfast. can we just say thank you so much to everybody for listening to our show today. radios two, one, four and kiss have all shown a dip for their flagship early morning programmes, a sign that perhaps with so many people still working
2:53 pm
from home early morning routines have changed. how much does that worry you? over the rest of the day figures look better. times radio, a new speech station, has a weekly audience of more than 650,000. 0k, great! easier than you thought. heart is reaching more than 10 million listeners a week. in an age of smart speakers and the growth of podcasts many wondered how traditional radio would fare. and the technological changes, especially the impact of smartphones, means the way the figures are gathered has been changed, which makes it difficult to make accurate comparisons with figures before the pandemic, but you can certainly see a broad picture. many of us may be glued to our phones and plugged into podcasts but old school radio still has an audience. david sillito, bbc news. the late mp, sir david amess s dog, has been crowned westminster dog of the year.
2:54 pm
his three year—old french bulldog, vivienne, was wearing a "southend city status" bandana as she collected the prize. the organisers, the kennel club, said she was the runaway winner of the public vote. sir david amess regularly entered his dogs into the annual competition outside parliament, but had never won. it�*s been years in the making, but now the life story of the singer bob marley has become a west end musical. emma north went to meet the people behind it. # get up, stand up. # stand up for your rights. this is the first time i�*ve ever felt the floor shaking when i�*m on stage. i�*ve never felt that before. because of... people get up on their feet and they dance and they move. and i was stood right here, about last week, and i thought that there was an earthquake! the earthquake was down to a world first. london's west end, and i've come to see this show. very excited. about time, dammit, it's about time.
2:55 pm
i�*ve been waiting for this day — i�*ve been waiting! cheering. the actor playing one of the most famous musicians in history knows the responsibility he carries. what�*s it like playing someone whose voice is recognised all over the world? i�*m not up there doing a bob marley impression. there is a certain level of interpretation that has to kind of come into the fold — you know, like, how do i interpret this man�*s love for his music and for his words and for his religion and for the women in his life? how does that physically affect my performance? # could you be loved and be loved? from the boy abandoned by his father, to the homeless teenager sleeping on a studio floor in kingston so he could wake up and make music, marley�*s life from cradle to grave is told. marley�*s music provides the context. it brims over with activism, politics and power. whilst it is political,
2:56 pm
whilst it is heartfelt, whilst there is an element of activism that is inside it and inherent in bob marley�*s music and in the musical...it is also a celebration of him as an individual, of those ideas, of the acceptance of those ideas now. while his music is loved the world over, for those recreating marley�*s life, the rehearsal room became a deeply private place. people have a really personal connection to bob marley, especially because most people in that room are of caribbean descent and, actually, most people in that room are jamaican heritage. so they grew up not only with the music, but their parents grew up with the music. and it felt like their parents' stories, like... rita reminds me very much of my own mum. putting the life and music of bob marley on stage has taken years. good news, then — that although the show�*s only been on a couple of weeks, its run has been extended to next year, giving us more chance
2:57 pm
to go and celebrate. emma north, bbc news. # i hope you like jammin' too! # now it�*s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello there. some parts of the uk have seen huge amounts of rain over the last couple of days and that rain just keeps on coming. southern scotland has been very wet indeed. the far north—west of england too. that was the scene in cumbria, this pipeline of moisture just ploughing on over the last 36 hours and according to the environment agency one spot in cumbria has recorded over 340 millimetres of rain so far. warning for cumbria. the risk of disruption, certainly the risk of flooding is this rain continues to fall to the assertion, feeling very wet across parts of southern scotland, increasingly wet for wales and south—west of england and amongst the swing band some strong gusty winds. the central and eastern parts
2:58 pm
of an estate is this rain continues temperatures of an estate is this rain continues between 13 and 1 degree, temperatures between 13 and 18 degree, feeling mild to the south—east, now through this evening and tonight you see this rain makes slow progress, eastwards, we will see further pulls coming up from the south. some of the wet areas will continue to see heavy and persistent rain. nine to 13 degree, those are the overnight lows and into tomorrow, there is a big area of low pressure up to the north—west. this weather system here continuing to bring some outbreaks of rain, many of us starting tomorrow morning with cloud and outbreaks of rain, heavy bursts moving across, lots of cumbria, southern scotland. this area of rain will continue to drift northwards in scotland. many other place also see a drier, brighter afternoon at least for a time. temperatures of 11 to 16, perhaps a slightly fresher feel. we will see plenty of showers or longer spells of rain pushing in from the west as
2:59 pm
we go through friday night and into saturday. a soggy start to the weekend. some rain could linger a i cross the far south—east of england but elsewhere, things should be brighten up, we will see sunshine but still a scatter of heavy shower, a cooler feel by this stage, 11 to 14, as get into sunday, another bout of wet weather pushings in from the south—west. it may be that northern scotland stays here, we will see rain for a time. blustery showers following and it will turn windy by sunday afternoon.
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman says he should never be released. come 35 years�* time, they won�*t let him out. they won�*t let him out. i won�*t let them let him out. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place
3:01 pm
a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. the man who organised the flight in which footballer emiliano sala was killed is found guilty on a safety charge. the polar research ship almost known as boaty mcboatface — but eventually named after sir david attenborough — prepares to leave on its maiden voyage to the antarctic. and the pet of the late conservative mp sir david amess has been crowned westminster dog of the year. a man has beeen sentenced to life in prison for killing two sisters in a london park. 19—year—old danyal hussein must
3:02 pm
serve a minimum of 35 years, after he was found guilty of the murder of sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death injune last year as part of a satanic blood pact. an investigation by the police watchdog criticised the response of officers when the sisters were reported missing — their mother has dismissed an apology from the metropolitan police. june kelly reports. mina smallman has been highly critical of the metropolitan police�*s response when her daughters were reported missing, but today she and her husband chris walked into court with simon harding, the senior met detective who led the murder investigation. a sign of the family�*s closeness to his team. such a vivacious shot of her daughters, but this was bibaa henry and nicole smallman in what would be the last few hours of their lives. after a picnic with friends during the first lockdown, the sisters stayed on in the park.
3:03 pm
they were celebrating bibaa�*s birthday together and died side—by—side. a stranger, danyal hussein, was lying in wait watching them, and he was armed with a knife. he�*s believed to have attacked bibaa first. he stabbed her eight times. nicole saw what he had done to her sister and put up a fight. she was stabbed 28 times. because of the initial poor police response, it was the sisters�* friends who launched a search and it was nicole�*s boyfriend who discovered the bodies. danyal hussein was arrested after his dna was found at the scene. he had developed a fascination with satanic ideology, and he had drawn up a plan to sacrifice women in a note signed in his own blood. after seeing him sentenced to a minimum of 35 years, mina smallman shared her thoughts. today we�*re celebrating what is wonderful about the metropolitan police.
3:04 pm
i�*ve never been one to cast a whole organisation by one particular sort of incident. but we do have a problem. we do have an underground that is infiltrated and growing in our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn�*t in court. he appeared by video link from belmarsh top security prison. he showed little respect for the legal process. before the hearing began, he kept throwing his facemask in the air and when the judge began sentencing him, he turned his chair sideways so he was not facing the camera. since the murders, bibaa�*s daughter has had a baby boy. he will learn about everything that was lost when bibaa and nicole were taken from their family. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. dal babu, former
3:05 pm
chief superintendent of the metropolitan police, criticised the response of officers when the sisters were reported missing. it�*s absolutely shocking, the way the family were treated in the run up to the discovery of the bodies, and the family actually found the murder weapon and the bodies. the police did not conduct a search for 13 hours after they had been reported missing and the police watchdog criticised the police for not following the processes and procedures and there were multiple failings in the whole missing person enquiry. what do you put that down to? sometimes you have just got to look at the facts. you have a 46—year—old woman who is a professional, social worker, she worked in harrow, she had a very good reputation, she had not gone missing previously and had not been in a position where she was travelling,
3:06 pm
or a chaotic lifestyle. then her sister who was 28, basically ended up going missing. multiple members of the family raised it and it wasn�*t followed up by the police for 13 hours and i wonder if that had been a white woman, a professional white woman, whether the same would have happened. do you want to go any further than wondering? the question of institutional racism has been raised for decades now. i believe race played a significant part in the decision—making. if you look at some of the comments that were made, people described the birthday party as chaotic and there were references to black lives matters demonstrations, and there was a catalogue of things where people had shown their own prejudice, individual police officers and individual police staff. what should happen now? time and again not only the question of race but also of investigating women�*s safety,
3:07 pm
that the police are found wanting, and obviously everyone knows there are huge challenges in everyday police work but realistically beyond people condemning and calling for change, is there anything anyone can do to bring about change? we�*ve got a couple of investigations running at the moment, the home secretary has announced one and the commissioner has announced one. quite frankly, we�*ve had so many investigations and i�*m old enough to remember the 1981 report, and then the lawrence inquiry, a whole range of different reports which have been put forward, but what we don�*t seem to do is follow up on recommendations. in some ways, we don�*t need any more reports because we know the police service is not representative of the communities it polices. the hierarchy is full of white men and women but it doesn�*t represent the community. almost half of the london population is from minority and ethnic backgrounds.
3:08 pm
france has seized a british trawler as the row over post brexit fishing rights escalates. the french claim the boat was fishing in their waters without a licence and it�*s been taken to the port of le havre. the french are angry that some of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters — and they�*ve threatened to block british vessels from their ports. one french minister has said "we need to speak the language of force because that seems to be the only thing this british government understands." hugh schofield reports from paris. the british—registered cornelis gertjan was impounded yesterday by the french maritime authorities, who say it was fishing in french waters without a proper licence. it�*s now moored in le havre pending possible judicial proceedings against the captain and owner. it�*s clearly intended as a message to the british about what�*s to come from next week, when the french begin to enact reprisal measures in the row over fishing licences. before a french parliamentary committee, europe minister clement beaune spelt out what�*s to happen.
3:09 pm
from tuesday, he said, no uk fishing boat will be allowed to unload its catch in french ports. there will be intensified inspections on uk goods entering france by ferry and the channel tunnel. and in a second wave of measures, france may raise the tariff on electricity it supplies to the channel islands. france says this is because the uk and the channel islands have failed to keep their side of the deal on fishing licences signed as part of brexit. the british government says that�*s not true. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. the measures being threatened do not appear to be compatible with the trading cooperation agreement or wider international law. the licences row flared in may, when protesting french fishing boats sailed in flotilla intojersey waters and london sent in two navy
3:10 pm
patrol boats in response. today, though, it�*s the french government that�*s starting to act tough. for some, approaching french presidential elections are complicating the picture. it only really make sense to me in terms of french domestic politics because this is really... the licensing issue is a technical matter to be resolved at a technical level, and my understanding is that quite a lot of progress has been made in resolving it. both sides say that talks are still under way over granting more licences, so there�*s a chance this escalating trade war can be averted. but neither country is optimistic that it will be. and a little earlier hugh told me that neither side is happy. it is a classic example of something which arises out of a compromised agreement in a treaty which works because both sides see different things in the wording.
3:11 pm
there was this agreement on fishing at the end of last year which allowed brexit to go ahead and for everyone to say we can now move ahead but of course the devil is always in the detail and when it came to actually applying this agreement, that means giving licences to the eu, especially french fishing boats in british waters, both sides have a different interpretation, and it was predicted. the french went away seeing one thing in the text and the british another thing in the text. that has now come to light and the british say they have given all the licences under the terms of the agreement, that the french deserve, but the french are saying, there are still 200 who can show they were fishing in the waters in
3:12 pm
in the period in question in the 2010s that still need licences. the question of 200 boats which the french say need licences and deserve licences and it should have them under the terms of the agreement but the british say, they have not agreed what you said they would produce in terms of proof that they were fishing here before. there are two sides here and all i can say is that tempers are very hot over here. they feel here the british are using french bashing as an excuse for their problems and the british think vice versa. the mood is not a good one. the bbc�*s understands that the remaining seven countries on england�*s red list will be removed. that means that arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador will not need to quarantine in a hotel. our transport correspondent caroline davies gave this update from heathrow airport. at the moment we don�*t have official confirmation from the government, this is speculation from inside sources about what is likely to happen. we don�*t have confirmed dates
3:13 pm
of when the policy might happen but given previous policies, quite often the announcement might come at the end of the week and then it comes into effect the next. this policy has been going on now for eight months and we know over 2,000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels since the policy was introduced butjust because there happens to be no countries on the red list does not mean that the red list policy is scrapped and it could be that the government decides to keep the policy and save the opportunity to add countries to the list if it feels the global situation has changed. the headlines on bbc news... the teenager who murdered bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park last year is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says
3:14 pm
the economy is improving. the chancellor has been defending his budget, saying the government was investing in public services, future growth and people�*s skills and prioritising those on the lowest incomes. but a leading economic think tank has predicted that millions of people in the uk will be worse off in the short term due to tax increases and the rising cost of living. the institute of fiscal studies predicts that for many middle income families, living standards will fall over the coming year. here�*s our political correspondent nick eardley. hi, how are you? really nice to see you. he�*s enthusiastic, but how will the public feel about rishi sunak�*s budget? after the treasury�*s big pitch yesterday, today is about the detail. oh, i do, it�*s controversial.
3:15 pm
mr sunak was spending his cash at bury market this morning, but over the next few years he�*s going to be spending a lot of taxpayer money, too, funded by the biggest tax burden since the �*50s. so, will it be worth it? people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. and yesterday we did take action and noticeably we froze fuel duty, especially when fuel prices are at almost a ten—year high, but also we cut the tax on the lowest paid people, which i think will make an enormous difference. that�*s a reference to universal credit changes which will allow in—work claimants to keep more of their benefits. wages are set to go up from april for public sector workers, and those on the minimum wage, but the cost of living is going up, too. inflation could make household budgets even tighter. labour says the chancellor should have done more to help with the cost of living.
3:16 pm
if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth, that by the end of this parliament is set to be just 1.3%, it's certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the big political theme of this budget was that the government is still going to spend money. there were a number of announcements designed to be voter—friendly which mean the state is still going to play a big role in our lives. but many families and many households are facing a tough winter and when the numbers are crunched there are questions over what benefits we�*ll all feel. experts say millions of people will actually be worse off because of rising costs, higher energy bills, fuel bills, higherfood prices and increases in tax. the worry for the government is for all the chancellor�*s upbeat delivery, the voters may not get much feel—good factor. high inflation, rising taxes, poor growth, still undermined more by brexit than by the pandemic,
3:17 pm
will see real living standards barely rising and for many falling over the next year. he�*s got a bit more money to spend... wait, sorry... ..because the economy is in better shape than many expected, but that doesn�*t mean that there aren�*t challenging times ahead for many. our political correspondent, ione wells joins us now from westminster. what seems to have emerged in the last 24—hour is is at the cost of brexit outweighs the cost of the pandemic but the cost of the pandemic but the cost of the pandemic to the economy is not responsible for these huge tax and spend rises?— spend rises? that is right. one of the themes _ spend rises? that is right. one of the themes we _ spend rises? that is right. one of the themes we are _ spend rises? that is right. one of the themes we are seeing - spend rises? that is right. one of| the themes we are seeing emerge spend rises? that is right. one of. the themes we are seeing emerge is the themes we are seeing emerge is the fine balance between what has been announced to assist people with the cost of living that we have seen as a result of brexit and the pandemic, and a tightening of public spending in the last couple of months, but also the rising cost of
3:18 pm
living and the bills, and whether those two things online. as we heard from the independent think tank the institute for fiscal studies says middle income families will be worse off next year and also some low income families will feel the pain of this as the cost of live ? living is set to rise faster than benefit payments, so the argument is that the balance is not tipping enough to compensate people for the rising cost of living because of things like inflation are putting up the prices of some everyday goods and also energy bills, but also the tax rise to national insurance rates which are set to go up next year, which are set to go up next year, which was announced before the budget yesterday. to fund the new nhs and social care levy that the government has introduced. the institute for fiscal studies says those things will not necessarily make it feel any better, even if peoples wages are going up, because
3:19 pm
those things we were it. rishi sunak was keen to stress that the measures they announced especially to help low income earners, the rising of the national living wage and also cutting the universal credit rate so people can keep more of their benefit for every pound they earn. the taper rate has been cut from 63p per pound to 55p per pound. interesting to note that they have been stressing some of the big spending announcements they made yesterday including things like more money on transport and more money to tackle the nhs backlog and more money for schools in england, and also freezing fuel duty so people will not necessarily be hit as hard by higher prices at the pumps but interesting to note nothing in the budget yesterday specifically to help with things like rising energy and electricity bills, so the key message really that the iss and other think tanks have been
3:20 pm
analysing and have come to, there may have been big public spending announcement, but in the words of the iss, this is the chancellor giving way to pressure from the public sector after a decade of some of those public services being squeezed ? ifs. while big spending pledges may have been made, the average voter may not feel a difference in their pay packet, in their weekly shopping allowance in their weekly shopping allowance in the weeks and months and years to come. ., «a ., the weeks and months and years to come. ., ., ., , the chancellor appeared to mix up the name of the greater manchester town he was conducting his broadcast interviews in this morning, referring to bury market as the "world famous burnley market". it came after bbc breakfast presenter ben thompson told rishi sunak he originated from burnley, in lancashire. it is not just it is notjust about being in the north, and we are here in burnley, but also if you are growing up in the south—west, people want to feel that there is opportunity there where ever you are. it is about
3:21 pm
having pride in the place you call home, and a lot of what we said yesterday, like the world—famous burnley market, that will benefit from £20 million, it is about improving the infrastructure of everyday communities. so what�*s the verdict of businesses in bury on the chancellor�*s budget, leaving aside rishi sunak�*s mixup with burnley. let�*s talk to subrah krishnan harihara from greater manchester chamber of commerce. any reaction to the chancellor not knowing where he was today? inaudible we can�*t hear you at the moment. let�*s try again. can you try again? i can hearyou. let's try again. can you try again? i can hear you-— i can hear you. inaudible we are having _ i can hear you. inaudible we are having trouble i i can hear you. inaudible| we are having trouble with i can hear you. inaudible - we are having trouble with outline. we are having trouble with outline. we will try to come back to you because it is slightly disjointed. lets have one more go quickly.
3:22 pm
inaudible we will try and come back to you in the next hour. thank you very much. a couple of problems there. now do something happening at the moment. seniorfigures from tech companies including facebook and twitter are giving evidence to mps on the government�*s draft online safety bill — let�*s listen in to what they have to say. these decisions are quite collaborative and they involve using data and science to understand and make good decisions and determine what is most impactful and they also involve the work of external experts so we take a multilayered approach where we have policies and we have ai where we have policies and we have a! we are using. sometimes we are also working with experts because there are always areas where we can improve. there are always areas where we can imrove. ~ ., , , ,
3:23 pm
improve. where does the buck stop? it is a improve. where does the buck stop? it is a company _ improve. where does the buck stop? it is a company filled _ improve. where does the buck stop? it is a company filled with _ improve. where does the buck stop? it is a company filled with experts i it is a company filled with experts and we are all working together to make these decisions. so and we are all working together to make these decisions.— and we are all working together to make these decisions. so who is the decision-maker, _ make these decisions. so who is the decision-maker, whether _ make these decisions. so who is the decision-maker, whether it - make these decisions. so who is the decision-maker, whether it is i make these decisions. so who is the decision-maker, whether it is you i make these decisions. so who is the j decision-maker, whether it is you or decision—maker, whether it is you or the whole _ decision—maker, whether it is you or the whole company, the whole breadth of people. _ the whole company, the whole breadth of people, but these are things people — of people, but these are things people want to know. people want to know how _ people want to know. people want to know how much interest mark zuckerberg takes in all of this, how much _ zuckerberg takes in all of this, how much interest he takes in the research _ much interest he takes in the research on how seriously he takes the concerns that this research has caused _ the concerns that this research has caused ? _ the concerns that this research has caused ? and how seriously he takes. ithink— caused ? and how seriously he takes. i think some — caused ? and how seriously he takes. i think some very good evidence of how seriously we take these issues is reflected in our investment in this area. we have spent $13 billion since 2016 and we are on track to spend $5 billion in this year. we have 40,000 employees who work on safety and security at facebook. it
3:24 pm
is very important to understand that we have no business interest no business interest at all in providing people with a negative experience. our platform is designed to give people an opportunity to connect. 3 million businesses in the uk use our platform to grow their businesses and if they are not safe, they don�*t feel safe, they are not going to use our platform. we are fully committed to these issues. the com an fully committed to these issues. the company spent 13 billion over the last five — company spent 13 billion over the last five years, how much do facebook— last five years, how much do facebook earn in that period of time? — facebook earn in that period of time? from 2016 until 2021. sorry, we can't _ time? from 2016 until 2021. sorry, we can't hear— time? from 2016 until 2021. sorry, we can't hear you. | time? from 2016 until2021. sorry, we can't hear you.— we can't hear you. i don't have those exact — we can't hear you. i don't have those exact numbers. - we can't hear you. i don't have those exact numbers. where l we can't hear you. i don't have those exact numbers. where i | we can't hear you. i don't have i those exact numbers. where i can tell ou,
3:25 pm
those exact numbers. where i can tell you. roughly. _ those exact numbers. where i can tell you, roughly, about _ those exact numbers. where i can tell you, roughly, about 275 i those exact numbers. where i can| tell you, roughly, about 275 billion in that— tell you, roughly, about 275 billion in that period of time, so the investment is about 4%, is that enough? — investment is about 496, is that enou~h? ~ . ~ , investment is about 496, is that enou~h? ~ ., ,, , ., enough? what i think is that we invest heavily _ enough? what i think is that we invest heavily in _ enough? what i think is that we invest heavily in providing i enough? what i think is that we | invest heavily in providing people with the best experience and if i didn�*t think that we put safety and security at the front of our decisions, i would security at the front of our decisions, iwould not security at the front of our decisions, i would not be here. i�*ve dedicated my entire career, the better part, to these issues, and i would not be here if i didn�*t think that we take these issues seriously. i believe the total number of people working _ i believe the total number of people working on— i believe the total number of people working on it is about 40000 and if the 10,000 — working on it is about 40000 and if the 10,000 people in europe who are hired to— the 10,000 people in europe who are hired to work on the matter verse, they were — hired to work on the matter verse, they were diverted to safety and security, — they were diverted to safety and security, that would be a substantial increase. that concludes my questions for the time being. hello _ my questions for the time being. hello. before i asked my question, i want to— hello. before i asked my question, i want to ask— hello. before i asked my question, i want to ask something _ hello. before i asked my question, i
3:26 pm
want to ask something that - hello. before i asked my question, i want to ask something that you i want to ask something that you mentioned _ want to ask something that you mentioned just _ want to ask something that you mentioned just then, _ want to ask something that you mentioned just then, you i want to ask something that you mentioned just then, you said i want to ask something that you i mentioned just then, you said that the take-up — mentioned just then, you said that the take-up rate _ mentioned just then, you said that the take—up rate is— mentioned just then, you said that the take—up rate is associated i mentioned just then, you said thatj the take—up rate is associated with stopping _ the take—up rate is associated with stopping people _ the take—up rate is associated with stopping people after— the take—up rate is associated with stopping people after they- the take—up rate is associated with stopping people after they have i stopping people after they have watched — stopping people after they have watched too _ stopping people after they have watched too much _ stopping people after they have watched too much or— stopping people after they have watched too much or a - stopping people after they have watched too much or a lot i stopping people after they have watched too much or a lot of, i stopping people after they have i watched too much or a lot of, but you said — watched too much or a lot of, but you said a — watched too much or a lot of, but you said a certain— watched too much or a lot of, but you said a certain kind _ watched too much or a lot of, but you said a certain kind of- watched too much or a lot of, but| you said a certain kind of content, what _ you said a certain kind of content, what did _ you said a certain kind of content, what did you — you said a certain kind of content, what did you mean _ you said a certain kind of content, what did you mean by— you said a certain kind of content, what did you mean by a _ you said a certain kind of content, what did you mean by a certain. you said a certain kind of content, i what did you mean by a certain kind of content? — what did you mean by a certain kind of content? let _ what did you mean by a certain kind of content?— of content? let me clarify it. we are in the _ of content? let me clarify it. we are in the process _ of content? let me clarify it. we are in the process of _ of content? let me clarify it. we are in the process of developing | are in the process of developing that and i think we are looking at what makes the most impact, whether it is the time spent or somebody spending time on a singular kind of content, those things are being sorted through, but the idea is to essentially offer people an opportunity to take a break. you have probably seen in the context of other apps where they may ask you, for example, streaming content, where they may check in to see if
3:27 pm
you are still watching and this is really designed to look at where we might be able to prompt people to think about their usage of the platform. i think about their usage of the latform. . , think about their usage of the latform. .,, ., , think about their usage of the latform. ., , , platform. i was really struck when francis haugen _ platform. i was really struck when francis haugen gave _ platform. i was really struck when francis haugen gave evidence, i platform. i was really struck when l francis haugen gave evidence, that she said _ francis haugen gave evidence, that she said several— francis haugen gave evidence, that she said several times— francis haugen gave evidence, that she said several times that - francis haugen gave evidence, that she said several times that there i she said several times that there are many— she said several times that there are many people _ she said several times that there are many people inside - she said several times that there| are many people inside facebook she said several times that there i are many people inside facebook who want to— are many people inside facebook who want to do— are many people inside facebook who want to do the — are many people inside facebook who want to do the right _ are many people inside facebook who want to do the right thing _ are many people inside facebook who want to do the right thing and - are many people inside facebook who want to do the right thing and who i want to do the right thing and who are trying — want to do the right thing and who are trying to — want to do the right thing and who are trying to do _ want to do the right thing and who are trying to do the _ want to do the right thing and who are trying to do the right - want to do the right thing and who are trying to do the right thing i want to do the right thing and whoj are trying to do the right thing and who are _ are trying to do the right thing and who are good _ are trying to do the right thing and who are good people _ are trying to do the right thing and who are good people and - are trying to do the right thing and who are good people and who i are trying to do the right thing andl who are good people and who don't like the _ who are good people and who don't like the outcome. _ who are good people and who don't like the outcome. i— who are good people and who don't like the outcome. i wonder- who are good people and who don'tl like the outcome. i wonder whether, you mentioned — like the outcome. i wonder whether, you mentioned the _ like the outcome. i wonder whether, you mentioned the word, _ like the outcome. i wonder whether, you mentioned the word, when- like the outcome. i wonder whether, i you mentioned the word, when talking earlier, _ you mentioned the word, when talking earlier, about — you mentioned the word, when talking earlier, about trust, _ you mentioned the word, when talking earlier, about trust, do _ you mentioned the word, when talking earlier, about trust, do you _ you mentioned the word, when talking earlier, about trust, do you think i earlier, about trust, do you think that facebook— earlier, about trust, do you think that facebook has _ earlier, about trust, do you think that facebook has actually- that facebook has actually experienced _ that facebook has actually experienced a _ that facebook has actually experienced a loss - that facebook has actually experienced a loss of- that facebook has actually. experienced a loss of trust? that facebook has actually experienced a loss of trust? what i would say is _ experienced a loss of trust? what i would say is that _ experienced a loss of trust? what i would say is that we _ experienced a loss of trust? what i would say is that we have - experienced a loss of trust? what i would say is that we have been i experienced a loss of trust? what i | would say is that we have been very focused, and as you may know, trying to provide additional transparency, for example, we have transparency reports which we put out on a quarterly basis and these reports
3:28 pm
track our removal of content and the prevalence of content on our platform and are designed to actually help us, to be held to account, to held ourselves to account, to held ourselves to account and for others to hold us to account. we have the oversight board to also help hold us to account and to also help hold us to account and to review our decisions. we are calling for additional regulation in this area, because we think it is important... this area, because we think it is important- - -_ this area, because we think it is imortant... , , , , ., important... sorry, but my question is really about _ important... sorry, but my question is really about whether _ important... sorry, but my question is really about whether you - important... sorry, but my question is really about whether you feel i is really about whether you feel that the — is really about whether you feel that the company— is really about whether you feel that the company is _ is really about whether you feel. that the company is experiencing is really about whether you feel i that the company is experiencing a lack of— that the company is experiencing a lack of trust? — that the company is experiencing a lack of trust? i _ that the company is experiencing a lack of trust? i know— that the company is experiencing a lack of trust? i know you _ that the company is experiencing a lack of trust? i know you are - that the company is experiencing a lack of trust? i know you are doing j lack of trust? i know you are doing those _ lack of trust? i know you are doing those things — lack of trust? i know you are doing those things. l'mu _ lack of trust? i know you are doing those things-— those things. i'm not sure that is exactly the _ those things. i'm not sure that is exactly the question _ those things. i'm not sure that is exactly the question to _ those things. i'm not sure that is exactly the question to be - those things. i'm not sure that isj exactly the question to be asking those things. i'm not sure that is i exactly the question to be asking me about what i do think is that our interest in regulation is in part to actually give folks like yourselves who are elected by the public, an
3:29 pm
opportunity to hold us to account because holding us to account helps to build trust. the because holding us to account helps to build trust.— to build trust. the reason i wanted to build trust. the reason i wanted to ask that — to build trust. the reason i wanted to ask that in _ to build trust. the reason i wanted to ask that in particular, _ to build trust. the reason i wanted to ask that in particular, you i to build trust. the reason i wanted to ask that in particular, you have | to ask that in particular, you have good _ to ask that in particular, you have good people — to ask that in particular, you have good people trying _ to ask that in particular, you have good people trying to _ to ask that in particular, you have good people trying to do - to ask that in particular, you have good people trying to do good - to ask that in particular, you have i good people trying to do good things and you _ good people trying to do good things and you say— good people trying to do good things and you say you _ good people trying to do good things and you say you are _ good people trying to do good things and you say you are trying _ good people trying to do good things and you say you are trying to - good people trying to do good things and you say you are trying to do - and you say you are trying to do good _ and you say you are trying to do good things. _ and you say you are trying to do good things, and _ and you say you are trying to do good things, and yet— and you say you are trying to do good things, and yet you - and you say you are trying to do good things, and yet you seeml and you say you are trying to do i good things, and yet you seem to struggle _ good things, and yet you seem to struggle to — good things, and yet you seem to struggle to uphold _ good things, and yet you seem to struggle to uphold your _ good things, and yet you seem to struggle to uphold your own - good things, and yet you seem toi struggle to uphold your own terms and conditions _ struggle to uphold your own terms and conditions and _ struggle to uphold your own terms and conditions and you _ struggle to uphold your own terms and conditions and you know - struggle to uphold your own terms i and conditions and you know because we go _ and conditions and you know because we go back_ and conditions and you know because we go back a — and conditions and you know because we go back a bit. _ and conditions and you know because we go back a bit, that _ and conditions and you know because we go back a bit, that we _ and conditions and you know because we go back a bit, that we have - and conditions and you know because we go back a bit, that we have had i we go back a bit, that we have had research _ we go back a bit, that we have had research that — we go back a bit, that we have had research that shows _ we go back a bit, that we have had research that shows children's - research that shows children's accounts — research that shows children's accounts registered _ research that shows children's accounts registered to - research that shows children's i accounts registered to children, full of— accounts registered to children, full of self—harm, _ accounts registered to children, full of self—harm, pro _ accounts registered to children, full of self—harm, pro suicide, l accounts registered to children, . full of self—harm, pro suicide, the lot, and _ full of self—harm, pro suicide, the lot, and when— full of self—harm, pro suicide, the lot, and when we _ full of self—harm, pro suicide, the lot, and when we come _ full of self—harm, pro suicide, the lot, and when we come to - full of self—harm, pro suicide, the lot, and when we come to you, i full of self—harm, pro suicide, the. lot, and when we come to you, you say, _ lot, and when we come to you, you say, we _ lot, and when we come to you, you say, we don't — lot, and when we come to you, you say. we don't like _ lot, and when we come to you, you say, we don't like your— lot, and when we come to you, you | say, we don't like your methodology and anyway — say, we don't like your methodology and anyway our _ say, we don't like your methodology and anyway our policies _ say, we don't like your methodology and anyway our policies are - say, we don't like your methodology and anyway our policies are againstl and anyway our policies are against it. and anyway our policies are against it you _ and anyway our policies are against it you just— and anyway our policies are against it you just said _ and anyway our policies are against it. you just said that _ and anyway our policies are against it. you just said that to _ and anyway our policies are against it. you just said that to the - and anyway our policies are against it. you just said that to the chair. it. you just said that to the chair now, _ it. you just said that to the chair how. we — it. you just said that to the chair how. we have _ it. you just said that to the chair now, we have policies _ it. you just said that to the chair now, we have policies against i it. you just said that to the chair| now, we have policies against it. but we _ now, we have policies against it. but we have _ now, we have policies against it. but we have taken _ now, we have policies against it. but we have taken evidence - now, we have policies against it. | but we have taken evidence from bereaved — but we have taken evidence from bereaved parents _ but we have taken evidence from bereaved parents who _ but we have taken evidence from bereaved parents who find - but we have taken evidence from bereaved parents who find their i but we have taken evidence from i bereaved parents who find their kids feeds— bereaved parents who find their kids feeds full— bereaved parents who find their kids feeds full of— bereaved parents who find their kids feeds full of that _ bereaved parents who find their kids feeds full of that material _ bereaved parents who find their kids feeds full of that material so - bereaved parents who find their kids feeds full of that material so what . feeds full of that material so what i am trying — feeds full of that material so what i am trying to— feeds full of that material so what i am trying to get— feeds full of that material so what i am trying to get at— feeds full of that material so what i am trying to get at is— feeds full of that material so what i am trying to get at is not- feeds full of that material so what i am trying to get at is not really. i am trying to get at is not really how much— i am trying to get at is not really how much you _ i am trying to get at is not really how much you spend _ i am trying to get at is not really how much you spend but - i am trying to get at is not really how much you spend but is- i am trying to get at is not really how much you spend but is the i i am trying to get at is not really- how much you spend but is the system fit for— how much you spend but is the system fit for purpose. — how much you spend but is the system fit for purpose. is _ how much you spend but is the system fit for purpose, is the _ how much you spend but is the system fit for purpose, is the material - fit for purpose, is the material
3:30 pm
that _ fit for purpose, is the material that is— fit for purpose, is the material that is ending _ fit for purpose, is the material that is ending up— fit for purpose, is the material that is ending up in— fit for purpose, is the material that is ending up in the - fit for purpose, is the material that is ending up in the handsi fit for purpose, is the material i that is ending up in the hands of kids. _ that is ending up in the hands of kids. that — that is ending up in the hands of kids. that is _ that is ending up in the hands of kids, that is against _ that is ending up in the hands of kids, that is against your- that is ending up in the hands of. kids, that is against your policies, being _ kids, that is against your policies, being stopped _ kids, that is against your policies, being stopped at _ kids, that is against your policies, being stopped at the _ kids, that is against your policies, being stopped at the source? - kids, that is against your policies, being stopped at the source? is . being stopped at the source? is facebook— being stopped at the source? is facebook safe, _ being stopped at the source? is facebook safe, is _ being stopped at the source? is facebook safe, is the _ being stopped at the source? is facebook safe, is the system i being stopped at the source? is . facebook safe, is the system safe and when — facebook safe, is the system safe and when we _ facebook safe, is the system safe and when we hear— facebook safe, is the system safe and when we hear from _ facebook safe, is the system safe and when we hear from people . facebook safe, is the system safe i and when we hear from people that actually _ and when we hear from people that actually it _ and when we hear from people that actually it is — and when we hear from people that actually it is because _ and when we hear from people that actually it is because of— and when we hear from people that actually it is because of the - and when we hear from people that actually it is because of the growth| actually it is because of the growth model. _ actually it is because of the growth model. the — actually it is because of the growth model, the spread _ actually it is because of the growth model, the spread model, - actually it is because of the growth model, the spread model, the - model, the spread model, the algorithm. _ model, the spread model, the algorithm, surely— model, the spread model, the algorithm, surely that - model, the spread model, the algorithm, surely that is - model, the spread model, the - algorithm, surely that is something we could _ algorithm, surely that is something we could all— algorithm, surely that is something we could all work— algorithm, surely that is something we could all work together - algorithm, surely that is something we could all work together to - algorithm, surely that is something we could all work together to say, i we could all work together to say, actually, — we could all work together to say, actually, where _ we could all work together to say, actually, where there _ we could all work together to say, actually, where there is— we could all work together to say, actually, where there is growth i we could all work together to say, i actually, where there is growth that is harming — actually, where there is growth that is harming children— actually, where there is growth that is harming children we _ actually, where there is growth that is harming children we have - actually, where there is growth that is harming children we have got - actually, where there is growth that is harming children we have got to. is harming children we have got to stop the _ is harming children we have got to stop the growth _ is harming children we have got to stop the growth there _ is harming children we have got to stop the growth there and - is harming children we have got to stop the growth there and stop - is harming children we have got to| stop the growth there and stop the mirrorihg _ stop the growth there and stop the mirrorihg ahd — stop the growth there and stop the mirroring and start _ stop the growth there and stop the mirroring and start to _ stop the growth there and stop the mirroring and start to identify - stop the growth there and stop the mirroring and start to identify thisi mirroring and start to identify this material— mirroring and start to identify this material and _ mirroring and start to identify this material and it— mirroring and start to identify this material and it can't _ mirroring and start to identify this material and it can't just - mirroring and start to identify this material and it can'tjust be - mirroring and start to identify this material and it can'tjust be at - mirroring and start to identify thisj material and it can't just be at the end, _ material and it can't just be at the end. take — material and it can't just be at the end. take a — material and it can't just be at the end, take a break? _ material and it can't just be at the end, take a break? we _ material and it can't just be at the end, take a break? we don't - material and it can't just be at the end, take a break? we don't want material and it can't just be at the - end, take a break? we don't want our kids takihg _ end, take a break? we don't want our kids taking a — end, take a break? we don't want our kids taking a break _ end, take a break? we don't want our kids taking a break from _ end, take a break? we don't want our kids taking a break from self—harm, . kids taking a break from self—harm, we want _ kids taking a break from self—harm, we want your— kids taking a break from self—harm, we want your policies _ kids taking a break from self—harm, we want your policies to _ kids taking a break from self—harm, we want your policies to work. - to your point take a break is one particular— to your point take a break is one particular issue, we use a multi—layered approach, so we have
3:31 pm
ai at multi—layered approach, so we have n at scale _ multi—layered approach, so we have ai at scale to try to remove potentially harmful content. we have reviewers— potentially harmful content. we have reviewers who are also in place, and have create — reviewers who are also in place, and have create opportunities to report, we work _ have create opportunities to report, we work with experts, on the ground, to fill— we work with experts, on the ground, to fill irr— we work with experts, on the ground, to fill in those, to fill in those gaps— to fill in those, to fill in those gaps to — to fill in those, to fill in those gaps to identify, and we are constantly getting better. we are a very large — constantly getting better. we are a very large platform, things are going — very large platform, things are going to — very large platform, things are going to get through, there are areas _ going to get through, there are areas where say, our ai is 90% effective — areas where say, our ai is 90% effective as find thing, we would like to— effective as find thing, we would like to get that to 95, 98%, effectiveness and we are working in that area _ effectiveness and we are working in that area i— effectiveness and we are working in that area. i do agree with you, that there _ that area. i do agree with you, that there is— that area. i do agree with you, that there is an — that area. i do agree with you, that there is an opportunity for partnership here, we do agree there is an opportunity for a regulator here, _ is an opportunity for a regulator here, and — is an opportunity for a regulator here, and we are actually, overall, guite _ here, and we are actually, overall, quite supportive of the online safety — quite supportive of the online safety bill. there are pieces of it we need —
3:32 pm
safety bill. there are pieces of it we need to— safety bill. there are pieces of it we need to work through or share insights— we need to work through or share insights to — we need to work through or share insights to make it work. or even more _ insights to make it work. or even more effective but we are supportive of that _ more effective but we are supportive of that kind — more effective but we are supportive of that kind of partnership with the regulator — of that kind of partnership with the re . ulator. ., of that kind of partnership with the re . ulator. . ., of that kind of partnership with the reaulator. . ., .., , ., regulator. ok, i have a couple of very specific _ regulator. ok, i have a couple of very specific question, _ regulator. ok, i have a couple of very specific question, one - regulator. ok, i have a couple of very specific question, one is - regulator. ok, i have a couple of very specific question, one is i i regulator. ok, i have a couple of. very specific question, one is i am sure you know that we got a letter from parents who struggled to get information about their daughters, agent their daughter who committed suicide, her instagram feed and i understand that it is not possible from the policies of instagram for them to have access to it, and riley want to understand, i don't want to go through what your pool psi is, i want to understand who is that protecting? who in the eco system is is protected by a bereaved parent not being able to see there, the instagram account of a child who is, who is now passed away, and it may give them some sort of closure, it
3:33 pm
may give them some sort of information about what happened to their child, and i am sort of thinking about it from the terms of both humanity, and probate, anything else that row belonged to that child would go to the parents. 50. i else that row belonged to that child would go to the parents. so, i know the specific — would go to the parents. so, i know the specific case _ would go to the parents. so, i know the specific case you _ would go to the parents. so, i know the specific case you are _ would go to the parents. so, i know the specific case you are speaking l the specific case you are speaking about, and we are working, we are working with that particular family. and it is extraordinarily hard. i had a brother who died by suicide and one of particular challenges when someone dies by suicide is trying to understand, understand why. and we are working, working with that family. we also have privacy obligations to people who use our platform, and one of the things that we have done to add dress this particular kind of circumstances, is something called legacy contacts and that enables a certain amount of control and access, so this is the kind of work
3:34 pm
that we are doing but we are working very specifically with that family. i am not sure i 100% accept that answer but let us move on the one last thing, which is, you know, it seems that where material is ip protected, itjust seems to get a much quicker attention, not only, and this is not a facebook question, this is right across the sector, and i am interested to know why it is that it i am interested to know why it is thatitis i am interested to know why it is that it is easier for you to identify material that is ip protected, than say, self—harm and protected, than say, self—harm and pro suicide material? m3 protected, than say, self-harm and pro suicide material?— pro suicide material? ip protected content, pro suicide material? ip protected content. and. _ pro suicide material? ip protected content, and, that _ pro suicide material? ip protected content, and, that is _ pro suicide material? ip protected content, and, that is not - pro suicide material? ip protected content, and, that is not my - content, and, that is not my understanding of how our systems work, so i can take back and question to find outances specific to that, to that comparison but i don't have that answer. thank you. thank you very much
3:35 pm
indeed chair, thank you forjoining us. you said to the chair, that you would like to share much more evidence that you do, what is stopping you? evidence that you do, what is stepping you?— evidence that you do, what is stopping you? evidence that you do, what is sto -|n~ ou? ~ ,, ., ., stopping you? well, think one of the thins i stopping you? well, think one of the things i talked _ stopping you? well, think one of the things i talked about _ stopping you? well, think one of the things i talked about quite _ things i talked about quite specifically is how we can provide people access to data, so, one of the things i think is very important in all this allowing independent researchers to be able to do work, to look at the impact, aside from us. �* . to look at the impact, aside from us. . . , ., to look at the impact, aside from us. . . ,., , to look at the impact, aside from us. . . , ., to look at the impact, aside from us. agreed, agreed so why are you not lettin: us. agreed, agreed so why are you not letting them _ us. agreed, agreed so why are you not letting them do _ us. agreed, agreed so why are you not letting them do more - us. agreed, agreed so why are you not letting them do more of - us. agreed, agreed so why are you not letting them do more of it? - us. agreed, agreed so why are you| not letting them do more of it? we are not letting them do more of it? , are working to try to do that, so we are working to try to do that, so we are working to try to do that, so we are working with academics, institutions,— are working with academics, institutions, ~ ., ., , ., ., institutions, what does that mean, we are working _ institutions, what does that mean, we are working towards _ institutions, what does that mean, we are working towards it, - institutions, what does that mean, we are working towards it, means l institutions, what does that mean, l we are working towards it, means we are not doing it now, why are you not doing it now? bah are not doing it now, why are you not doing it now?— are not doing it now, why are you not doing it now? bah because there are riva
3:36 pm
not doing it now? bah because there are privacy obligations _ not doing it now? bah because there are privacy obligations we _ not doing it now? bah because there are privacy obligations we have - are privacy obligations we have round people's data, and what we would like to be able to do is provide that data to researchers in a way that meets the privacy obligation, i think this is an area where a regulator like ofcom could help to tell, to say to us, here are the privacy obligations that have to be met, we can show that we have met those obligations and enable researches to do the work they want to do. , ., . researches to do the work they want todo. ., . ., , to do. ok, you are clearly frustrated _ to do. ok, you are clearly frustrated by _ to do. ok, you are clearly frustrated by your - to do. ok, you are clearly - frustrated by your experience in the senate, so i would like to give you an opportunity to, to go back over some of the, the comments from this, a couple of the senators at least, because you said that research presented had been mischaracterised. sojust presented had been mischaracterised. so just for clarity, presented had been mischaracterised. sojust for clarity, please, for teen girls who reported body image issue, what percentage felt worse
3:37 pm
because of instagram? i issue, what percentage felt worse because of instagram?— issue, what percentage felt worse because of instagram? i would have to net ou because of instagram? i would have to get you the _ because of instagram? i would have to get you the exact, _ because of instagram? i would have to get you the exact, the _ because of instagram? i would have to get you the exact, the exact - to get you the exact, the exact number. it to get you the exact, the exact number. , ., .. ,., ., , number. it is from the facebook's own head of _ number. it is from the facebook's own head of research. _ number. it is from the facebook's own head of research. so - number. it is from the facebook's own head of research. so we, - number. it is from the facebook's own head of research. so we, we| own head of research. so we, we actually published _ own head of research. so we, we actually published a _ own head of research. so we, we actually published a blog. - own head of research. so we, we actually published a blog. i - actually published a blog. i have the figures _ actually published a blog. i have the figures it — actually published a blog. i have the figures it is, _ actually published a blog. i have the figures it is, i— actually published a blog. i have the figures it is, i am _ actually published a blog. i have the figures it is, i am inviting i the figures it is, i am inviting your because you expressed frustration because i thought you would have the figures at your finger—tips. it is one in three. one in three teen girls feel worse because of instagram. what about those who feel anxious, do you know what that figure is? 50. those who feel anxious, do you know what that figure is?— what that figure is? so, let me actually clarify. _ what that figure is? so, let me actually clarify, clarify - what that figure is? so, let me actually clarify, clarify that - what that figure is? so, let me actually clarify, clarify that one in three for a minute. of teens who, who said they had an issue with body image. who said they had an issue with body imaue. , who said they had an issue with body image. yes. two out of the three said they found, _ image. yes. two out of the three said they found, they were neutral. hold on a second, that is, you know,
3:38 pm
thatis hold on a second, that is, you know, that is clearly designed to distract, because far more important than that, is the number of children who feel worse. those are the ones we should be focusing on, not the ones who feel better it is great some people are feeling better, that is is a high figure, to a third to find their condition is exacerbated because of instagram is a shameful figure, and on the question of anxiety, that is i2%, and i am guessing you are not going to know the figure for loneliness, that is 13%, so 13% of users of instagram, who felt lonely, thought it was because of instagram. so what instagram is doing is exacerbating children's problems, you are not coping with this, you should be handing over your research to folk who can do better than you, in
3:39 pm
assessing the damage that facebook and instagram are doing. so, you are correct that somewhere between about 12 and 30% and the various issues of people who identify having issues have issue, we do take those things quite seriously, so in the context of one of the issue, let us take eating disorders for a moment, because that is the one with the highest number, we don't serve weight loss ads to teen, we surface resources, to teens who may be searching for this content. we work with experts to identify how we can put on proper warnings systems for people and surface that content, to try not to repelled that content f you look at something like suicide and self... another very serious issue, we not only do we surface resources whence someone searches for it but we have built in the opportunity right within our platform and identify
3:40 pm
that content to flag that and... listen it is not working, it is not working because the figure yours are too high so whatever you are doing isn't working, so let us move on to another air area that was identified by senator blackburn, at the senate, and that is the whole question of human trafficking. now you have aiken some action on human trafficking and you took town some of fending page, but do you remember why you took them down? taste of fending page, but do you remember why you took them down?— of fending page, but do you remember why you took them down? we take down those “aes why you took them down? we take down those pages because _ why you took them down? we take down those pages because they _ why you took them down? we take down those pages because they violate - why you took them down? we take down those pages because they violate our - those pages because they violate our policies, we have strict policies. no because the app store said they would remove you, apple said they would remove you, apple said they would remove you from the app store if you didn't do it would remove you from the app store if you didn't do i— if you didn't do it quite contrary, it is my experience _ if you didn't do it quite contrary, it is my experience we _ if you didn't do it quite contrary, it is my experience we take - if you didn't do it quite contrary, | it is my experience we take down if you didn't do it quite contrary, - it is my experience we take down the pages because they violate policy, they with invested innism a to identify them.—
3:41 pm
they with invested innism a to identify them. they with invested innism a to identi them. , ., , identify them. why did you only take them down actual— identify them. why did you only take them down actual apple _ identify them. why did you only take them down actual apple issues - identify them. why did you only take them down actual apple issues you i them down actual apple issues you with that threat. fblur them down actual apple issues you with that threat.— with that threat. our ai is not erfect. with that threat. our ai is not perfect- you _ with that threat. our ai is not perfect. you can _ with that threat. our ai is not perfect. you can say - with that threat. our ai is not perfect. you can say that - with that threat. our ai is not l perfect. you can say that again. with that threat. our ai is not - perfect. you can say that again. to imrove, perfect. you can say that again. to improve. people — perfect. you can say that again. to improve, people also _ perfect. you can say that again. to improve, people also flag - perfect. you can say that again. to improve, people also flag this - improve, people also flag this content for us and when they flag it for u we also, we also, we will remove it. for u we also, we also, we will remove it— for u we also, we also, we will remove it. ., ., ., ., , �* remove it. come on, that wasn't a- le remove it. come on, that wasn't apple flagging — remove it. come on, that wasn't apple flagging the _ remove it. come on, that wasn't apple flagging the content, - remove it. come on, that wasn't. apple flagging the content, apple threatened you with something financially, disastrous for you, which was to have facebook removed from the app store. that's when you leapt into action and it's a recurring theme with facebook, you offered more research to open up more research when the whistle—blower opens up, and gives us lots of information about your secretive company, you lead them to action on human trafficking but only after you threatened with removal by the app store. now at this committee we have heard evidence of the result of all the negotiation generals, human trafficking to the middle east, we know about that, and
3:42 pm
facebook's role in it. the stalks of ethnic violence webs know about that from the wall streetjournal. covid misinformation spreading, with only 10-20% misinformation spreading, with only 10—20% being picked up. we know io—20% being picked up. we know about that from are the facebook whistle—blower. . at home here in the uk, the evidence shows the 2a children a week are groomed across your platform. i mean, all this rather suggests that facebook is an abuse facilitator, that only reacts when you are under threat, either from terrible publicity or from companies like apple who threaten you financially. that is quite the contrary, and not my experience at all, at facebook. i think for example, in the context of covid, our services have played
3:43 pm
incredibly important for people who have been isolated and particularly young people who couldn't go back to schools, or their universities to kick them. we have taken the issue of covid misinformation incredibly seriously, we are working with nhs, with the uk government, we have taken down 20 million posts that violate our policies, when health authorities identify comment that is, that is poses harmful we remove it. more importantly we have put people in touch with authoritative content in this area, and we are running the world's largest campaign in the area of vaccines for covid, so i don't agree with you there, that tour actions are entirely responsive and incredibly pro accusety, we have built some the
3:44 pm
world's leading classifiers to identify content that is potentially harmful and remove it. share identify content that is potentially harmful and remove it.— identify content that is potentially harmful and remove it. are you glad that frances — harmful and remove it. are you glad that frances came _ harmful and remove it. are you glad that frances came forward _ harmful and remove it. are you glad that frances came forward as - harmful and remove it. are you glad that frances came forward as a - that frances came forward as a whistle—blower? that frances came forward as a whistle-blower?— that frances came forward as a whistle-blower? really can't speak to her motivations, _ whistle-blower? really can't speak to her motivations, i _ whistle-blower? really can't speak to her motivations, i can _ whistle-blower? really can't speak to her motivations, i can speak - whistle-blower? really can't speak to her motivations, i can speak to i to her motivations, i can speak to ourfundamental to her motivations, i can speak to our fundamental dedication to the issue of safety and security, to the teams that we have, in every country, to the specific teams... the teams you have in every country? you don't have teams, you don't have teams in every country, facebook's bad in the english language, it is bad in the english language, it is bad enough in the english language, thatis bad enough in the english language, that is where you have most of your content moderation. if you are a kid in most of the world you can be abused with immune the i because there is no content moderation going on at all in most of the world's land wallings, you manage —— language, you managed to do pirate
3:45 pm
language, you managed to do pirate language on facebook but you didn't manage to do content moderation in multiple languages where real children live and get abused without moderation of content at all. i would again, disagree with that characterisation, we have language review in 70 different languages. how many languages does facebook use? taste how many languages does facebook use? ~ .. how many languages does facebook use? ~ . ., how many languages does facebook use? . . ., ,, ., ,. , how many languages does facebook use? . ., ., , , ., ~ , ., how many languages does facebook use? . . ., , , .,~ , ., ., use? we have native speakers, who do this, use? we have native speakers, who do this. because — use? we have native speakers, who do this. because it— use? we have native speakers, who do this, because it is _ use? we have native speakers, who do this, because it is important _ use? we have native speakers, who do this, because it is important to - use? we have native speakers, who do this, because it is important to not - this, because it is important to not only have language coverage but to have context, we have where there are places where we may not be able to get context, we have systems that allow people to filter out content based on the things they are seeing that you may not be able to catch through our own, through our own ai. there are hundreds of world languages and you moderate content to a tiny degree, in only a small
3:46 pm
number of them, and english is the best of them all and that is pretty grim. back to you chair. debbie aim hams. good afternoon, thank ou debbie aim hams. good afternoon, thank you very _ debbie aim hams. good afternoon, thank you very much _ debbie aim hams. good afternoon, thank you very much for _ debbie aim hams. good afternoon, thank you very much forjoining - debbie aim hams. good afternoon, thank you very much forjoining the committee this afternoon. ijust wondered if you could describe the culture regarding safety that exists, in facebook, and if you are able to give any specific examples, again i am conscious of time so if i move you on after a few sentences please don't be offended. thank you for the question. it has been my experience we have a very rigorous culture when it comes to safety and security and we put forward and challenge our selves to look for gaps. i have specific subject matter experts across
3:47 pm
women's safety, across child safety, people who have prosecuted for example those who exploit children, people whoa have dedicated their 20 years of their life to supporting domestic abuse survivors, who work across these issues, who challenge the teams to do better, who look for gaps, who do analysis with experts externally to find the gaps to make improvements. how is that manifested in a staff hand book, in terms of train rag, so for example if i may, give you the example that was given to us from frances earlier this week, and she said, she didn't know who or how to escalate concerns to, regarding both posts or groups that she was responsible for.— posts or groups that she was responsible for. both internal s stems responsible for. both internal systems where _ responsible for. both internal systems where people - responsible for. both internal systems where people can i responsible for. both internal- systems where people can escalate any particular thing they might be seeing, and get and get a response,
3:48 pm
but more than that, we actually have built safety and integrity teams across each of our product teams so for example we have a central integrity and safety team, but we also have integrity teams in every product. and teams like mine are working both with that central integrity team, and also, with those individual integrity teams so there are numerous ways to escalate a particular concern or draw attention to it. at any moment in time, really is that documented? documented? would the committee be able the see how you are managing that risk? —— to see? how you are managing that risk? -- to see? �* ., , how you are managing that risk? -- tosee? �* ., , , ., to see? i'm not sure exactly how we would necessarily _ to see? i'm not sure exactly how we would necessarily provide _ to see? i'm not sure exactly how we would necessarily provide that - to see? i'm not sure exactly how we would necessarily provide that to . would necessarily provide that to you and in fact i think in the context of testify online safety, this is an area where it would be great to sort through how we would be able to provide you with the information you need to do, to do
3:49 pm
your work. what i can tell you is that it's, spread across the company, and through the company, i mean, i take 360 degree view within the company. fik. mean, i take 360 degree view within the company-— the company. 0k. another former facebook employee _ the company. 0k. another former facebook employee also - the company. 0k. another former facebook employee also gave - the company. 0k. another former - facebook employee also gave evidence to the committee last week, and she reported that she, when she alerted one of these vice president's responsible for integrity, regarding bot accounts and posts promoting the president of honduras, it took 11.5 months for this to be investigated. that doesn't look like a very robust system where safety and security is a priority for the company, does it? i can't speak to that specific
3:50 pm
example, but i do know that most of the, of the things that are brought to our attention are managed within, within, you know, 48—hours for example, that, you know, that particular issue i can't speak to, but what i can speak to is a very rigorous process, every time a product is launched at facebook, it goes through a rigorous review on privacy safety and security. flan i privacy safety and security. can i then ask. _ privacy safety and security. can i then ask. if _ privacy safety and security. can i then ask. if it _ privacy safety and security. can i then ask, if it is _ privacy safety and security. can i then ask, if it is so _ privacy safety and security. can i then ask, if it is so rigorous, - privacy safety and security. can i then ask, if it is so rigorous, why has self regulation failed so miserably? i has self regulation failed so miserably?— has self regulation failed so miserably? has self regulation failed so miserabl ? ., miserably? i would disagree with it as a, in miserably? i would disagree with it as a. in that _ miserably? i would disagree with it as a, in that characterisation, - miserably? i would disagree with it as a, in that characterisation, whatj as a, in that characterisation, what i do think though, is that there are some decisions that we make that are very hard decisions, we are dealing with societal issue, in particular in relation to content for example, and it would be very useful to have
3:51 pm
the people who are elected and represent the public�*s interest to play a role in sorting those decisions is and putting in place and having industry standards for example that we adhered to. i think that would be very useful for the industry. but you have just mentioned you don't understand why it took 11 half months but you don't disagree it took that long for an investigation took that long for an investigation to be completed, of a time sensitive issue, which threatened the demock so i of a particular —— democracy of a particular country. so i of a particular -- democracy of a particular country.— a particular country. can't speak to that specific _ a particular country. can't speak to that specific thing, _ a particular country. can't speak to that specific thing, what _ a particular country. can't speak to that specific thing, what i - a particular country. can't speak to that specific thing, what i can - a particular country. can't speak to that specific thing, what i can say i that specific thing, what i can say is we take a very problem ative approach. we do our own investigations to identify situations, and see where we may have gaps, in fact only of the research that was leaked is actually research that was leaked is actually research of us doing our own work
3:52 pm
internally to identify gaps and to take action to close those gaps, and what has been unfortunate in the reporting, is that we are missing the story about the actions that we took, which is hopefully some of what i can fill today.- whatican fill toda . ., ., ., today. so, then, moving on then to the 6th january _ today. so, then, moving on then to the 6th january this _ today. so, then, moving on then to the 6th january this year, _ today. so, then, moving on then to the 6th january this year, and - today. so, then, moving on then to the 6th january this year, and the l the 6th january this year, and the use of facebook live, to co—ordinate people live in the us during the insurrection there. what lessons had you learned from previous, the honduras one, occurred i think in 2017, what lessons had you learned from the delays in taking action there, that were applied on 6th jan? ahead of the election and ahead of january 6th, years before we began working to make sure that we had, had the right systems, systems in place, and fume rows elections have
3:53 pm
taken place across the world where we have not had issues, we put in place things like not, in the us case not recommending civic groups for example, that is something that has continued forward, but when we have heightened situations as we did here, we put in place measures that make sense for that heightened situation, and then we may remove them later, so profile frame, you maybe familiar with these thing, you play round with your profile. people use them for charitable causes, or for important social movement, in the states for something like black lives matter. we remove those, we made those not available right up to the run up ofjanuary made those not available right up to the run up of january 6th made those not available right up to the run up ofjanuary 6th bah because we were concerned about safety issues on the ground. we have put them back in place, these are the kinds of things that we are learning and distributing that learning and distributing that learning across our platform for other areas as well. my
3:54 pm
other areas as well. my final question is in relation to molly russell, now, molly as you know, took her own life, her father,ian, is absolutely convinced of the impact of instagram in her decision to do this, based on the communications that she left, but thatis communications that she left, but that is really tragic, but what, what i would like to understand is what i would like to understand is what research you are doing, to understand where facebook or instagram may be implicated in teenagers takering their own lives? —— taking. that, that is incredibly, incredibly tragic case, and end herfather is incredibly courageous in his effort. i can't speak to that ongoing investigation except we are trying to be very helpful there. i do think
3:55 pm
that some of the research that you are aware of is research designed to understand how teens for example are experiencing our platform and to put in place better, make product improvements. we work with a bunch, a number of suicide and self injury experts we are meeting with on an ongoing basis, to identify additional things that we can, so for example, we have made policy changes, over the course of the last, you know, few years, based on theirfeedback, we provide resources and have warning screens over certain content. we are looking at how we can develop those further, so this is ongoing, ongoing work as we learn more, but we are extraordinarily invested when it comes to suicide and self injury.
3:56 pm
the global head of safety facing a grilling from mps on the online safety bill there. and we heard from baroness kidman, also from john nicholson and debbie abrahams questioning that representative of facebook, touching there on the risk of instagram having a harmful effect on young people and suicide, and john nicholson saying facebook was an abuse facilitator that only reacts when i under threat like when apple threatened it financially. we will keep you across that ongoing select committee, and let us catch up select committee, and let us catch up with the weather. some part of the uk have seen huge
3:57 pm
amounts of rain and that rainjust keeps on coming, southern scotland has been very wet indeed, the far north—west of england too, that was the scene in cumbria this pipeline of moisture just ploughing in over the last 36 hours, and according to the last 36 hours, and according to the environment agency, one spot in cumbria has recorded over 340 millimetres of rain so far, that rainjust keeps on coming, hence this met office amber warning for parts of cumbria, the risk of disruption, the risk of flooding as this rain continues to fall through the rest of the afternoon, staying wets in southern scotland, increasingly wets for wales, and the south—west of england, and in among this rain band south—west of england, and in among this rain hand some strong and gusty winds, for central and eastern parts it stays largely dry with spells of sunshine. northern ireland, north—west scotland seeing sunny spells and the odd shower. temperatureses between 13 and 18, feeling mild towards the south—east. through this evening and tonight you see this rain makes very slow the progress eastwards, we will see
3:58 pm
further pulses pushing up from the south. so some the wet areas will continue to see heavy rain. nine to 13 degree, those are the overnight lows and into tomorrow, there is a big area of low pressure up to the north—west. this weather system here continuing to bring some outbreaks of rain, many of us starting tomorrow morning with cloud and outbreaks of rain, heavy bursts moving across, parteds of cumbria, southern scotland. as we go through the day this area of rain will continue to drift, many other places will see a drier, brighter afternoon, at least for a time. temperatures of 11 to 16, perhaps a slightly fresher feel, but we will see plenty of showers or longer spells of rain pushing in from the west again, as we go through friday night and into saturday, so, a soggy starts to the weekend, for many of us, some of that rain could ling for a good part of day in the far south—east of england but elsewhere, things should brighten up a scatterling of heavy shower, a cooler feel by this stage, 11 to 1a
3:59 pm
degrees, as get into sunday, another bout of wet weather pushes in from the south—west, it may be that northern scotland stays dry, elsewhere we will see rain for a time, blustery showers following on behind ate will turn windy by sunday afternoon.
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines. the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman says he should never be released. r ,35 , 35 years' time, they won't let him out. they won't let him out. i won't let them let him out. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago,
4:01 pm
to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. technology companies are facing questions in parliament about what they are doing to better protect their users from harm on the internet. facebook says it's committed to safety measures. we are on track to spend $5,000,000 in this yearand we are on track to spend $5,000,000 in this year and we have 40,000 employees who work on safety and security at facebook. the bbc understands that the remaining seven countries on england's travel red list will be removed. arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuala and ecuador will not need to quarantine in a hotel. as the global climate summit approaches, we hear from the young activists tackling climate change.
4:02 pm
a man has beeen sentenced to life in prison for killing two sisters in a london park. 19—year—old danyal hussein must serve a minimum of 35 years, after he was found guilty of the murder of sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death injune last year as part of a satanic blood pact. an investigation by the police watchdog criticised the response of officers when the sisters were reported missing: their mother has dismissed an apology from the metropolitan police. june kelly reports. mina smallman has been highly critical of the metropolitan police's response when her daughters were reported missing, but today she and her husband chris walked into court with simon harding, the senior met detective who led the murder investigation.
4:03 pm
a sign of the family's closeness to his team. such a vivacious shot of her daughters, but this was bibaa henry and nicole smallman in what would be the last few hours of their lives. after a picnic with friends during the first lockdown, the sisters stayed on in the park. they were celebrating bibaa's birthday together and died side—by—side. a stranger, danyal hussein, was lying in wait watching them, and he was armed with a knife. he's believed to have attacked bibaa first. he stabbed her eight times. nicole saw what he had done to her sister and put up a fight. she was stabbed 28 times. because of the initial poor police response, it was the sisters' friends who launched a search and it was nicole's boyfriend who discovered the bodies. danyal hussein was arrested after his dna was found at the scene. he had developed a fascination
4:04 pm
with satanic ideology, and he had drawn up a plan to sacrifice women in a note signed in his own blood. after seeing him sentenced to a minimum of 35 years, mina smallman shared her thoughts. today we're celebrating what is wonderful about the metropolitan police. i've never been one to cast a whole organisation by one particular sort of incident. but we do have a problem. we do have an underground that has infiltrated and is growing in our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn't in court. he appeared by video link from belmarsh top security prison. he showed little respect for the legal process. before the hearing began, he kept throwing his facemask in the air and when the judge began sentencing him, he turned his chair sideways so he was not
4:05 pm
facing the camera. since the murders, bibaa's daughter has had a baby boy. he will learn about everything that was lost when bibaa and nicole were taken from their family. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. our correspondent helena wilkinson was at the old bailey for the sentencing hearing. thejudge had said that the judge had said that to lose two treasured family members and friends in this way is unimaginable. the judge said to danyal hussein, who as you heard from june there, was watching proceedings via video link from belmarsh prison, she said directly to him, you made that loss worse by your refusal to acknowledge your actions. you made those family members and friends sit through day after day of evidence at this trial. you admitted nothing. and she added that anyone following this trial would have found those details
4:06 pm
harrowing in the extreme, and for bibaa henry and nicole's family, her mother was in court today, the horrific detail she had to sit through during the trial, the ferocious attack that danyal hussein carried out on them, a random attack and he was lying in wait for them hours of the night, and they had been celebrating a birthday. the judge also said that his dna was all over the crime scene and there was a vast amount of cctv evidence against him but danyal hussein, again, as you heard in the report there, he was watching via the video link and at times he was crouching on the chair from at times he was crouching on the chairfrom a room at times he was crouching on the chair from a room from belmarsh prison where he was watching proceedings and he deliberately moved his chair as the judge was beginning her sentencing remarks, and she was addressing him directly. he moved his chair deliberately so
4:07 pm
he could only been seen by his profile, but meno smallmann sat in court, ignored danyal hussein's antics as he was doing that and she sat dignified in court but as we've heard from her outside of court, she said today is not a day of celebration. justice has been done, but if she has her way, he will never, ever be released from prison. france has seized a british trawler as the row over post brexit fishing rights escalates. the french claim the boat was fishing in their waters without a licence and it's been taken to the port of le havre. the french are angry that some of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters — and they've threatened to block british vessels from their ports. one french minister has said we �*need to speak the language of force because that seems to be the only thing this british government understands'. hugh schofield reports from paris.
4:08 pm
the british—registered cornelis gertjan was impounded yesterday by the french maritime authorities, who say it was fishing in french waters without a proper licence. it's now moored in le havre pending possible judicial proceedings against the captain and owner. it's clearly intended as a message to the british about what's to come from next week, when the french begin to enact reprisal measures in the row over fishing licences. before a french parliamentary committee, europe minister clement beaune spelt out what's to happen. from tuesday, he said, no uk fishing boat will be allowed to unload its catch in french ports. there will be intensified inspections on uk goods entering france by ferry and the channel tunnel. and in a second wave of measures, france may raise the tariff on electricity it supplies to the channel islands. france says this is because the uk and the channel islands have failed to keep their side of the deal on fishing licences signed as part of brexit. the british government says that's not true. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came
4:09 pm
from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. the measures being threatened do not appear to be compatible with the trading cooperation agreement or wider international law. the licences row flared in may, when protesting french fishing boats sailed in flotilla intojersey waters and london sent in two navy patrol boats in response. today, though, it's the french government that's starting to act tough. for some, approaching french presidential elections are complicating the picture. it only really make sense to me in terms of french domestic politics because this is really... the licensing issue is a technical matter to be resolved at a technical level, and my understanding is that quite a lot of progress has been made in resolving it. both sides say that talks
4:10 pm
are still under way over granting more licences, so there's a chance this escalating trade war can be averted. but neither country is optimistic that it will be. what's the political backdrop to all this? sophie pedder is the economist's paris bureau chief and joins us now. thank you for your time today. how bad thank you for your time today. how had our relations, really, between the french and british governments at the moment on this? i the french and british governments at the moment on this?— at the moment on this? i think there's been — at the moment on this? i think there's been a _ at the moment on this? i think there's been a complete - at the moment on this? i think- there's been a complete breakdown of trust, to be honest, between the two governments. i've not seen anything quite this bad for a very long time and i think each side does not believe a word of the other, and thatis believe a word of the other, and that is making this issue extremely complicated. as your report said, it's a technical issue that could be resolved and is becoming each time
4:11 pm
there is any dispute, it escalates fast and becomes a political issue and that reflects exactly the breakdown of trust and from the french point of view around the british government, it cannot be trusted to keep to its word, so despite its efforts to talk sense, it is getting nowhere and taking these pretty drastic measures. hogs these pretty drastic measures. how far do ou these pretty drastic measures. how far do you think— these pretty drastic measures. how far do you think the french government would be prepared to go? it is said at the moment that they are talking about reinforcing checks and border controls, particularly of freight, notjust in the courts on the french coast, but equally it could be through eurotunnel or any kind of freight lorries coming in and out of france and it would reinforce those checks. it's entitled to do that because it's part of the single market and there is no legal issue for france in reinforcing those controls and it just wants to make a statement. i
4:12 pm
personally would be very surprised if it goes further than that and it certainly won't cut electricity further and it's talked about pricing rather than cutting electricity but it's nonetheless a real reflection of how the french exasperation is seen here in paris at trying to negotiate or find a compromise which hasn't worked and they have decided that this is the kind of language the british government, rightly or wrongly will understand and respond to and we will see if that is the case.- will see if that is the case. some eo - le will see if that is the case. some people put _ will see if that is the case. some people put this _ will see if that is the case. some people put this down _ will see if that is the case. some people put this down to - will see if that is the case. some people put this down to the - will see if that is the case. some people put this down to the fact | people put this down to the fact that there is an election ahead in france. is that a fair element to raise? i france. is that a fair element to raise? ~ �* . france. is that a fair element to raise? ~' �* , ., ., raise? i think there's an element of background- _ raise? i think there's an element of background. defending _ raise? i think there's an element of background. defending french - background. defending french fishermen is part of an electoral statement that goes down well but we are still six months away and i think the french point of view would
4:13 pm
be it suits the british comment equally to deal with france when it has its own problems, so the difficulty that each side has so make this kind of gestures ultimately makes it difficult to resolve because this ought to be a technical issue that should be resolved if the two sides can sit down but at this point it has gone beyond that. down but at this point it has gone beyond that-— beyond that. when we see the flare-ups _ beyond that. when we see the flare-ups in — beyond that. when we see the flare-ups in the _ beyond that. when we see the flare-ups in the aftermath - beyond that. when we see the flare-ups in the aftermath of. beyond that. when we see the - flare-ups in the aftermath of brexit flare—ups in the aftermath of brexit as we've seen repeatedly, how does it play into the uk and france relationship which operates on so many levels. we have a multinational summits and cop26 next week. do things then change when the leaders meet? �* ., ., , meet? don't forget that this agreement _ meet? don't forget that this agreement with _ meet? don't forget that this agreement with australia i meet? don't forget that this i agreement with australia which france felt extremely bruised by and really undercut both by the uk and also the us, that is part of the
4:14 pm
background to it. there is a real problem with trust and there are issues that the two countries can work together on and climate is a good one and the iran nuclear negotiations, that is another, but it is complicated and if you talk to people like emmanuel macron, that is the difficulty they express, trying to work in a confident environment over issues, even when there is a common interest which is more difficult precisely because of the political issues that keep flaring up political issues that keep flaring up over things like the fishing boats and that is what is making it quite difficult. bind boats and that is what is making it quite difficult.— quite difficult. and when you said at the beginning _ quite difficult. and when you said at the beginning that _ quite difficult. and when you said at the beginning that you - quite difficult. and when you said at the beginning that you had i quite difficult. and when you said l at the beginning that you had never seen it this bad, what do you think is different about what is happening now? is it the way this government operates, the personnel within it or is it about the wider political brexit aftermath. it’s is it about the wider political brexit aftermath. it's the brexit aftermath and _ brexit aftermath. it's the brexit aftermath and then _ brexit aftermath. it's the brexit aftermath and then the - brexit aftermath. it's the brexit
4:15 pm
aftermath and then the prickly i aftermath and then the prickly relationship that this government has. i don't think it's a question of never seeing it so bad, it'sjust i cannot personally remember things being this bad and you would have to probably go back to the gulf war perhaps in 2003 or something like that as an awkward and tense relationship between the two sides and i think it's the aftermath of brexit and france has a president that doesn't mind speaking in a way that doesn't mind speaking in a way that other european countries perhaps don't do and that makes him a kind of rent a villa the british in the brexit aftermath and emmanuel macron has never wanted britain to leave the european union and was probably the person who expressed it the most clearly and thatjust provides the context in which the current problem is that the french and british governments have, especially in respect of the northern ireland protocol and it's really a question of respecting whether the french feel the british
4:16 pm
are respecting their word and that is a combination of the two which is leading to such a collapse of trust, at least that's the way i see it from the french side.- at least that's the way i see it from the french side. thank you so much forjoining — from the french side. thank you so much forjoining us _ from the french side. thank you so much forjoining us from _ from the french side. thank you so much forjoining us from paris. i the chancellor has been defending his budget, saying the government was investing in public services, future growth and people's skills and prioritising those on the lowest incomes. but a leading economic think tank has predicted that millions of people in the uk will be worse off in the short term due to tax increases and the rising cost of living. the institute of fiscal studies predicts that for many middle income families, living standards will fall over the coming year. here's our political correspondent nick eardley hi, how are you? really nice to see you. he's enthusiastic, but how will the public feel about rishi sunak�*s budget? after the treasury's big pitch yesterday, today is about the detail. oh, i do, it's controversial.
4:17 pm
mr sunak was spending his cash at bury market this morning, but over the next few years he's going to be spending a lot of taxpayer money, too, funded by the biggest tax burden since the �*50s. so, will it be worth it? people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. and yesterday we did take action and noticeably we froze fuel duty, especially when fuel prices are at almost a ten—year high, but also we cut the tax on the lowest paid people, which i think will make an enormous difference. that's a reference to universal credit changes which will allow in—work claimants to keep more of their benefits. wages are set to go up from april for public sector workers, and those on the minimum wage, but the cost of living is going up, too. inflation could make household budgets even tighter. labour says the chancellor should have done more to help
4:18 pm
with the cost of living. if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth, that by the end of this parliament is set to be just 1.3%, it's certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the big political theme of this budget was that the government is still going to spend money. there were a number of announcements designed to be voter—friendly which mean the state is still going to play a big role in our lives. but many families and many households are facing a tough winter and when the numbers are crunched there are questions over what benefits we'll all feel. experts say millions of people will actually be worse off because of rising costs, higher energy bills, fuel bills, higherfood prices and increases in tax. the worry for the government is for all the chancellor's upbeat delivery, the voters may not get much feel—good factor. high inflation, rising taxes, poor growth, still undermined more by brexit than by the pandemic, will see real living standards barely rising and for many
4:19 pm
falling over the next year. he's got a bit more money to spend... wait, sorry... ..because the economy is in better shape than many expected, but that doesn't mean that there aren't challenging times ahead for many. a man been charged with malicious communications over threats made to labour's deputy leader, angela rayner. ms rayner reported receiving the threatening contacts over a number of weeks. benjamin iliffe who's 36 and from cambridgeshire sent a series of threats made in phone calls, emails and abuse. it comes amid increased concern over the safety of mps following the killing of sir david amess. seniorfigures from tech companies including facebook and twitter have been giving evidence to mps on the government's draft online safety bill. the bill will place new duties on social media firms to remove harmful or illegal content. the head of global safety
4:20 pm
at facebook, antigone davis, described the current measures the social media site has in place to protect users. with regard to specific kind of content, for example suicide and self injury in content or eating disorder content we have policies against that content and those policies are informed by work that we do with experts in the area, so we do with experts in the area, so we don't allow the promotion of suicide and self injury content. we do allow people to speak about their issues or concerns and theirjourney towards recovery. that is because our experts have said that finding a place where they can talk about recovery can be helpful whereas things that promote can be harmful so with those experts we've developed policies and we use artificial intelligence to remove the content. our technology correspondent
4:21 pm
marc cieslak is with me. we heard a little bit of the questions there. the facebook representative getting quite a grilling from mps and focusing partly on instagram and partly on the overall sense of whether they will submit to regulation. it’s the overall sense of whether they will submit to regulation. it's been a turbulent — will submit to regulation. it's been a turbulent couple _ will submit to regulation. it's been a turbulent couple of— will submit to regulation. it's been a turbulent couple of weeks - will submit to regulation. it's been a turbulent couple of weeks for. a turbulent couple of weeks for facebook and the whistle—blower said on monday that the social media giant is unquestionably making hate worse, and today the social media companies are in front of mps and facebook is the first one in the spotlight and they are broadly saying that they welcome regulation and that they spend billions on online safety but as you say they are getting quite robust questioning, especially on instagram and its affect on vulnerable teams and its affect on vulnerable teams and the mental health of vulnerable teams. �* .. . and the mental health of vulnerable teams. . ., , and the mental health of vulnerable teams. . . , ., , teams. and it was said that they would work _ teams. and it was said that they would work with _ teams. and it was said that they would work with the _ teams. and it was said that they would work with the regulator. teams. and it was said that they i would work with the regulator and she really rebuffed much of the criticism. ., ~' criticism. the working with the regulator. _
4:22 pm
criticism. the working with the regulator, that _ criticism. the working with the regulator, that is _ criticism. the working with the regulator, that is a _ criticism. the working with the regulator, that is a line - criticism. the working with the regulator, that is a line they i criticism. the working with the i regulator, that is a line they have been talking about for some quite ? quite a while now, and a senior facebook executive at the weekend said they were happy to work with regulators and they in fact welcomed it. . ., ., ., regulators and they in fact welcomed it. what about other companies who miaht it. what about other companies who might appear _ it. what about other companies who might appear now? _ it. what about other companies who might appear now? later— it. what about other companies who might appear now? later on - it. what about other companies who might appear now? later on today i it. what about other companies who i might appear now? later on today we have mps hearing _ might appear now? later on today we have mps hearing representatives i have mps hearing representatives from google, youtube, tiktok, and it's notjust a facebook story, because all of these issues affect every single one of the big tech companies. every single one of the big tech companies-— every single one of the big tech comanies. ~ . . , . companies. what in reality are the mps hoping _ companies. what in reality are the mps hoping to _ companies. what in reality are the mps hoping to get _ companies. what in reality are the mps hoping to get from _ companies. what in reality are the mps hoping to get from this? i companies. what in reality are the| mps hoping to get from this? they didn't seem to be making much headway other than putting strong criticism towards miss davies. there is a aood criticism towards miss davies. there is a good chance _ criticism towards miss davies. there is a good chance that _ criticism towards miss davies. there is a good chance that a _ criticism towards miss davies. there is a good chance that a lot _ criticism towards miss davies. there is a good chance that a lot of- criticism towards miss davies. ii—urr is a good chance that a lot of the evidence will possibly form some of the ideas around the online hamas bill, the long gestating online harm bills ? online harm bills, bill, the long gestating online harm bills ? online harm hills, which would give ofcom the power to police social media companies so there are big suggestions they will be able to give the social media companies massive, multimillion pound fines if they breach uk regulations. taste massive, multimillion pound fines if they breach uk regulations.-
4:23 pm
they breach uk regulations. we will have to leave _ they breach uk regulations. we will have to leave it _ they breach uk regulations. we will have to leave it there. _ they breach uk regulations. we will have to leave it there. thank - they breach uk regulations. we will have to leave it there. thank you i have to leave it there. thank you very much. some breaking news on the angela rayner case that we mentioned and we are hearing that the 36 —year—old man from cambridgeshire has been sentenced at huntington magistrates court to 15 weeks in prison, suspended for 18 months after admitting sending the deputy leader leader ? labour leader a threatening email and that has just been reported by pa news that a man from cambridgeshire has been sentenced to 15 weeks in prison, suspended for 18 months. and we knew that angela rayner had had some abuse and threats in recent weeks. we will get you more on that as soon as we can. the bbc s understands that the remaining seven countries on england's red list will be removed. that means that arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador will not need to quarantine in a hotel.
4:24 pm
our transport correspondent caroline davies gave this update from heathrow airport. at the moment we don't have official confirmation from the government — this is speculation from inside sources about what is likely to happen. we don't have confirmed dates of when the policy might happen but given previous policies, quite often the announcement might come at the end of the week and then it comes into effect the next. this policy has been going on for eight months and we know over 200,000 people have stayed in quarantine hotels across the uk since the policy was introduced. butjust because there happens to be no countries on the red list does not mean that the red list policy is scrapped and it could be that the government decides to keep the policy and save the opportunity to add countries to the list if it feels the global situation has changed. a small number of properties have been hit by flooding in cumbria today —
4:25 pm
as a month's worth of rain is expected to fall in just 36 hours. some holiday lets in cockermouth have been affected — but defences installed after 2009 have helped spare the kind of scenes witnessed during storm desmond in 2015. mark mcalindon reports. we are standing at the very point where cocker meets the derwent, that run through cockermouth and you can see the height the figures now even at the peak has passed at one point this town came close to devastation. by and large, the flood defences here have protected most of the people here but there have been one or two properties where water got in. we've been through this before so it's get up, get on with it. yes, it's upsetting but we kind of got a bit hardened to it, got used to it, and we just have to crack on and sort it out. of course, back in 2009 and 2015 anyone he was here cannot forget pictures of water running waist deep in the worst on main street saint
4:26 pm
last night of course was an anxious night for people who own businesses in this town. since the 2009 and 2015 floods, 90% of us haven't got insurance, so if we get flooded this time we have to pay for rebuild and everything, which, you know, goes into hundreds of thousands. we will continue to work with the council and the environment agency, and monitor the river levels and if people need help, then we will mobilise our volunteers to provide that help. further up stream in the derwent it is hoped that keswick has survived the worst of last night's water, but everyone will be keeping an anxious watch on the forecast over days to come. mike mcalinden, bbc look north in cockermouth. our correspondent megan paterson is in cockermouth. we have had a welcome break in the rain in the last hour and the water
4:27 pm
level is fairy ? fairly high and the river cocker is full and fast flowing but it is being contained and just beyond the river is cockermouth main street where we saw mark in that report and this afternoon people have been putting up afternoon people have been putting up their flood defences and some businesses and properties have been taking them down and all of them watching the weather to see what happens over the next 2a hours. there is a sense of calm preparedness here. this is a community used to dealing with flooding and they are prepared and watching to see what happens next. obviously a certain amount of nervousness as well. according to the environment agency, 11 flood warnings are still in place across cumbria and already we have heard of 40 cumbria and already we have heard of a0 properties flooded in around the cockermouth and egremont areas, west cumbria and we expect the rainfall will continue over the next 36 hours and the environment agency is urging people to be vigilant and prepared and to sign up for flood alerts that will tell them if they need to leave their homes and be ready to do so.
4:28 pm
multimillion pound flood defences have been put in place across cumbria and cockermouth was a focus for that investment as well and as mark mentioned, these flood defences do seem to be doing theirjob. the river has peaked here and there still seems to be around two metres on the flood defences on the other side of the river and to go until they are over tops, but understandably people will be watching and waiting to see what happens next because every time there is heavy rainfall here there is a level of anxiety. at the moment the environment agency are warning people to be cautious, to particularly people who are holiday making of a half term, to keep an ear open and listen to local radio stations and just be mindful that the roads around here might be difficult to pass on to be careful near the rivers and the bridges because what might make a wonderful photo opportunity could be dangerous, because the force of the water is really fast flowing and can be really dangerous. thankfully at the moment it doesn't look like there is danger to property here but
4:29 pm
we know that a0 have already been flooded so far. taste we know that 40 have already been flooded so far.— flooded so far. we are 'ust hearing one flooded so far. we are 'ust hearing newsune h flooded so far. we are 'ust hearing one newsline that i flooded so far. we are 'ust hearing one newsline that a i flooded so far. we are just hearing one newsline that a major- flooded so far. we are just hearing one newsline that a major incident has been declared in hawick and i don't know if that is in your area. but obviously it is very alarming to see these images still. i know there are proper flood defences, see these images still. i know there are properflood defences, but if people are worried about their property, realistically what can they do? property, realistically what can the do? . , , they do? hawick is 'ust across the scottish border, i they do? hawick is 'ust across the scottish border, soj— they do? hawick isjust across the scottish border, so not _ they do? hawick isjust across the scottish border, so not far - they do? hawick isjust across the scottish border, so not far from i scottish border, so not farfrom here but still a reasonablejourney and train services across scotland have been disrupted because of the weather and people in their homes are being urged to move anything they think might be on the way flood waters, if they are on a flood plain oran waters, if they are on a flood plain or an area prone to flooding and lots of properties have been flooded in the past and they have their own floodgates they can put up at the front of the properties and the back gate and reinforce their homes as much as possible but as you point out, if the water starts to go over
4:30 pm
the top of those defences, there is not much householders can do other than be prepared to leave their homes if they had to, but at the moment it doesn't seem to be the case in cumbria and west cumbria. property owners are being urged to be prepared but they are not being asked to leave their homes at the moment. we have weather alerts in place for the next 36 hours and there is a break in the weather that was anticipated by the met office and a lot of people breathing a sigh of relief that the rain has stopped and it's important to get the breaks in the rain so the river system can regulate, but we have passed the peak and the hope is that will mean that the worst is over and the environment agency are still urging caution. �* . environment agency are still urging caution. h .,. environment agency are still urging caution. �*, ~ ., caution. let's hope so. megan patterson. _ caution. let's hope so. megan patterson, thank _ caution. let's hope so. megan patterson, thank you - very much indeed. let's have a look at the weather with a bairn. it looks incredibly alarming to see those images from cumbria. it's no surprise that there are parts of cumbria that have had in excess of 350 millimetres of rain,
4:31 pm
so it has been exceptionally wet, not only cumbria but the scottish borders and we heard those reports from hawick of a major incident and the amber warning is still in force for cumbria particularly through the rest of the day, but that break in the weather we were hearing about and you can see the band of rain breaking apart a bit, so a bit driver parts of north—west england, southern scotland for a time and overnight we expect more pulses of heavy rain to come up from the south so some of those wet areas will stay pretty wet and some clear spells around as well and tomorrow starts on a cloudy and wet note for many and you can see a pulse of heavy rain drifting across cumbria but by this afternoon we should see spells of sunshine and it will feel cooler and fresher and showers returning from the west late in the day and then there is more rain at the weekend, not the relentless rain we've seen in 36 hours, but
4:32 pm
certainly it looks like staying unsettled at times over the next few days. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman says he should
4:33 pm
never be released. come 35 years' time, they won't let him out. they won't let him out. i won't let them let him out. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving people should have reassurance that because _ people should have reassurance that because of— people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year— because of the plan we put in place a year ago — because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy— a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more _ economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising. — more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a _ are rising, we can face the future with a bit— are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. technology companies are facing questions in parliament about what they are doing to better protect their users from harm on the internet. the bbc understands that the remaining seven countries on england's travel red list will be removed — meaning arrivals will not need to quarantine in a hotel
4:34 pm
meaning arrivals will not need to quarantine in a hotel. let's have a look at what the sport is doing at the moment. all you, hello. ., . ., . is doing at the moment. all you, hello. ., ., ., . , .,, is doing at the moment. all you, hello. ., ., ., . , ., hello. hello again. we will stop at tennis, because _ hello. hello again. we will stop at tennis, because emma _ hello. hello again. we will stop at tennis, because emma raducanul hello. hello again. we will stop at i tennis, because emma raducanu says she is still finding herfeet tennis, because emma raducanu says she is still finding her feet but she's learning with every match. she is through to the quarterfinals at the transylvania open. the 18—year—old's two wins in romania so far are herfirst on 18—year—old's two wins in romania so far are her first on the women's tour outside the grand slam she has played this year, wimbledon and of course that us open triumph last month. she is the third seed in cluj, pete emma bogdan in straight sets. no crowds at that tournament but raducanu certainly enjoyed plenty of support in the area. her father is romanian, he is there with her, and her grandmother lives in bucharest. raducanu will face another teenager from ukraine bucharest. raducanu will face another teenagerfrom ukraine next. another teenager from ukraine next. read another teenagerfrom ukraine next. read a car and are going well but cameron norrie, the men's british number one is out of the vienna open at the second round stage. he took
4:35 pm
the first set but lost in three to the first set but lost in three to the canadian sixth seed felix o'shea earlier seen. the canadian sixth seed felix o'shea earlierseen. english the canadian sixth seed felix o'shea earlier seen. english put all�*s leading authorities have provisionally agreed to an industrywide fund to support players living with dementia and other neurodegenerative conditions. the football association which has been criticised for its approach to brain injuries in recent years has told the bbc that the level of support has not yet been decided but all parties are aware of the urgency. what i sense is that they all acknowledge this is urgent, because again. _ acknowledge this is urgent, because again, when you see the way that some _ again, when you see the way that some of— again, when you see the way that some of those membersjust deteriorate day after day because of the inter— deteriorate day after day because of the inter of —— with this terrible disease. — the inter of —— with this terrible disease. it— the inter of —— with this terrible disease, it cannot wait ceron is conscience _ disease, it cannot wait ceron is conscience of that, so again, the sooner— conscience of that, so again, the sooner the — conscience of that, so again, the sooner the better. we are going to push _ sooner the better. we are going to push for— sooner the better. we are going to push for this to happen as soon as possible — push for this to happen as soon as ossible. , . push for this to happen as soon as
4:36 pm
ossible. ,. , ., , push for this to happen as soon as ossible. ,~ , ., , ., .,, possible. ryan reynolds and rob mcalen , possible. ryan reynolds and rob mcaleny. the _ possible. ryan reynolds and rob mcaleny, the hollywood - possible. ryan reynolds and rob mcaleny, the hollywood duo i possible. ryan reynolds and robj mcaleny, the hollywood duo who bought non—league wrexham football club in february had visited the racecourse ground for the first time. they watched the conference i'd lose at maidenhead on tuesday night, but they've been meeting local fans and club staff in north wales this afternoon. the support that this club — wales this afternoon. the support that this club has _ wales this afternoon. the support that this club has had _ wales this afternoon. the support that this club has had in _ wales this afternoon. the support that this club has had in the i wales this afternoon. the support that this club has had in the past. that this club has had in the past and has now, you know, ourjob is mostlyjust and has now, you know, ourjob is mostly just to and has now, you know, ourjob is mostlyjust to remind the supporters of the club, less about introducing it, because they have always been such a huge staple in the community. so, and then, hopefully to make sure that wrexham is a name that is a little bit more global than it is now. that's a big priority for us, expanding and growing the club in every way we can. if expanding and growing the club in every way we can-— every way we can. if they hang around in _ every way we can. if they hang around in the _ every way we can. if they hang around in the area, _ every way we can. if they hang around in the area, they i every way we can. if they hang around in the area, they can i every way we can. if they hang i around in the area, they can watch some rugby this weekend, the autumn internationals get going. wales have named their team to face new zealand in cardiff on saturday. the 21—year—old flanker taine bahsam 21—year—old flanker taine ba hsam gets 21—year—old flanker taine bahsam gets his first touch. fly half
4:37 pm
gareth anscombe will play against a country where he was born full stop hasn't started for wales and over two years after suffering knee ligament damage. captain alun wyn jones will play his 1a9 international, overtaking the previous record set by the all blacks legend richie mccaw. wales's selection has been hampered by a raft of injuries and because the game is outside rugby's international window, many players are unable to feature. it’s international window, many players are unable to feature.— are unable to feature. it's about what is the _ are unable to feature. it's about what is the combination - are unable to feature. it's about what is the combination we i are unable to feature. it's about | what is the combination we think are unable to feature. it's about i what is the combination we think can get thejob done what is the combination we think can get the job done out of the players that are available. so yes, it has been a tricky time, i've got to say. it has been nine or ten days now together as a group. with this group, just focusing on one game of rugby, so that is how we have pitched it. we will have reinforcements coming to the squad next week, but for this game all of the players that are in the squad at the players that are in the squad at the moment, about 32 of them, just focused on the new zealand match. yorkshire cricket club say that no action is going to be taken against any of its staff, following allegations of racism made by their
4:38 pm
former player azeem raffi, despite the club apologising to the player last month and accepting an independent investigation's findings that he had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying at his two spells and the club between 2008 and 2018. today, following an internal enquiry, the club have concluded there is no conduct or action taken by any of its employees, players or executives that warrants disciplinary action. a spokesman for the player has called on the yorkshire born to do the decent thing and resign. lots more on that story on the bbc sport website. australia playing sri lanka in the t20 world cup right now. australia put sri lanka into bat first, they started like a train, going at something like ten and over. they had a bit of a wobble, they are into the final over, they are 1aa—6 will stop it has been a really good game, you can get in play highlights on the bbc sport website of that as well and i will also have an update in the next
4:39 pm
hour. the t20 somewhat dominating life in my house at the moment, i have to confess. it's just three days until the uk hosts the cop26 climate summit — and over the coming weeks, young people will be telling climate change stories relevant to their own lives. 22 people aged between 18 and 2a have been working with regional bbc teams across the uk ? from the isle of skye to jersey. today, we're taking a look at stories from these bbc young reporters in both yorkshire and greater manchester. and we start with this story by maisie goodwin, who's been investigating the issue of single—use plastics and a call for better labelling for the partially sighted. some packaging can be really difficult for people who struggle with product identification. a lot of containers have the same shape, colour and texture so it can be impossible to tell what's what, especially if you can't read the label. but some companies avoid a
4:40 pm
move towards alternative products and packaging, which can be more accessible and remove the need for single—use plastic. these products are often found at zero waste and refill shops, are often found at zero waste and refillshops, but are often found at zero waste and refill shops, but what are the shops and what do they do? just refill shops, but what are the shops and what do they do?— refill shops, but what are the shops and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free — and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free shops _ and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free shops so _ and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free shops so we _ and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free shops so we try - and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free shops so we try to i and what do they do? just a guy is a plastic-free shops so we try to get l plastic—free shops so we try to get rid of any single—use plastic full stop you can bring your containers and, so if you have any food containers at home you can bring them in and refill with us and that is the same with larger liquid, fabric conditioner, bring back your container we will refill it for you. you will find like for like, quite a lot of things in the zero waste shop are designed to last a lot longer, so cost per use, they are actually going to be cheaper in the long run. it is clear shops like this are more environmentally friendly, but product labelling and identification is still an issue. mac powell from the royal national institute for the blind is working hard to do with this. i blind is working hard to do with this. , , ,
4:41 pm
this. i find myself being in the kitchen sometimes _ this. i find myself being in the kitchen sometimes with - this. i find myself being in the kitchen sometimes with a - this. i find myself being in the. kitchen sometimes with a piece this. i find myself being in the - kitchen sometimes with a piece of plastic i have just used to heat something up, or a plastic i have just used to heat something up, ora box, and i don't know whether it is recyclable or not, and for people like myself who are blind or partially sighted, we want to play our part in looking after the environment. a lot of this information, including the recycling information, including the recycling information, is conveyed visually, and therefore i am excluded from that. it is really important for us to collaborate with brands to champion solutions that provide all that information to me in an accessible way.— that information to me in an accessible way. that information to me in an accessible wa . ., ., ., accessible way. moving into a more sustainable — accessible way. moving into a more sustainable future _ accessible way. moving into a more sustainable future provides - accessible way. moving into a more sustainable future provides a - accessible way. moving into a more sustainable future provides a great| sustainable future provides a great opportunity to make packaging more accessible to encourage the changes we all need to make. no one has to do everything that everyone has to do everything that everyone has to do something, and by incorporating universal design, we can help people and our planet. there's a lot of discussion about how to be more sustainable with products and materials — but what about digital sustainability? according to one estimate, if every adult in the uk sent one fewer thank you emaila day, it would be the equivalent of taking
4:42 pm
3,330 diesel cars off the road. ekenna hurekay has more on the impact of the internet. i'm here at the science and industry museum in manchester, and it was here in the north—west where the first industrial revolution started, and the second one, too. computers have come a long way since their birth in i9li8. today's smartphones have over 500 times the storage, but it was this experimental machine that paved the way for the digital world you know today. so from humble beginnings in the lab in manchester, data travels at the speed of light across the globe. we can shop, play games, live stream, talk to family and friends, and do business with anyone, anywhere 21w. but every time we tap a key or touch a screen, we use electricity, and that produces carbon and carbon leads to climate change.
4:43 pm
professor nigel lynch is an expert in telecommunications at salford university. it's been suggested that if you stream one hour of video, that is you watch one hour of video through the internet, that is the equivalent of boiling the kettle about three times. your computer at home uses fans to cool it, but in industry, with big data centres like this one, you need lots of air conditioning, which you can hear. this is the kind of thing that contributes to climate change. if you think about data centres, you have two problems. you have the electrical power that the computers use, and computers get hot, so then you have to power the air conditioning units to keep them cool. so you actually find that some data centres, believe it or not, have been moved closer to the arctic circle, where you have lower ambient temperatures. in lockdown, manchester internet service provider talktalk saw 44% increase in internet traffic. this is a fibre optic
4:44 pm
cable, with a glass tube inside that's a hair's width. it carries your data, faster, further and more efficiently than your standard copper cable. we believe that it is up to 80% more energy—efficient. we can remove a lot of exchanges, kit that is used, legacy equipment that is used in providing the provision of copper services, and remove that and all the energy, and all the air condition that comes with that. according to 0fcom, uk adults spend more than a quarter of their working day online. that is the highest on record. with just half the planet connected to the internet, the demand for energy can only go up. though it is hoped digital technology can keep emissions down, keeping the world's temperature increase to below two degrees will be a global effort. we can all play our part. ikenna hurike, bbc north west tonight. well, i'm pleased to say that we're joined by both of those young reporters, maisie goodwin, and also also ikenna hurike. thank you both very much forjoining us, and congratulations on your reports, they were both absolutely
4:45 pm
fascinating. maisie, very interested to know whether you've got any idea about how packaging could be made clearer for those who are partially sighted to try and help them in this battle for sustainability. i sighted to try and help them in this battle for sustainability.— battle for sustainability. i spoke to the rnib _ battle for sustainability. i spoke to the rnib as— battle for sustainability. i spoke to the rnib as part _ battle for sustainability. i spoke to the rnib as part of— battle for sustainability. i spoke to the rnib as part of my - battle for sustainability. i spoke l to the rnib as part of my report, and mark brought up how using nappy codes, which is a step up from or codes, which is a step up from or codes, that people are able to stamp with their smartphone, and it will give them the exact same information thatis give them the exact same information that is on normal packaging, so that someone with visual impairment can access it the same as someone with site, but also looking at alternative products, the way i have found about access sustainability and sustainability, giving people the opportunity to also become familiar with their own packaging and reuse that packaging so that they are always able to identify it. and ikenna, is what your report is revealing is that perhaps all of us should be careful from
4:46 pm
revealing is that perhaps all of us should be carefulfrom now revealing is that perhaps all of us should be careful from now about how much we use the internet, if we don't need to?— much we use the internet, if we don't need to? no, i wouldn't say so, i don't need to? no, i wouldn't say so. i wouldn't _ don't need to? no, i wouldn't say so, i wouldn't say _ don't need to? no, i wouldn't say so, i wouldn't say that, _ don't need to? no, i wouldn't say so, i wouldn't say that, because i so, i wouldn't say that, because what _ so, i wouldn't say that, because what we — so, i wouldn't say that, because what we found out when trying to gather— what we found out when trying to gather information for this piece is that we _ gather information for this piece is that we are — gather information for this piece is that we are actually working towards a future _ that we are actually working towards a future where internet usage may be carbon _ a future where internet usage may be carbon neutral or net zero, so where using _ carbon neutral or net zero, so where using the _ carbon neutral or net zero, so where using the internet won't matter because — using the internet won't matter because we will be able to generate it in a _ because we will be able to generate it in a sustainable way. how because we will be able to generate it in a sustainable way.— it in a sustainable way. how far off is that, do — it in a sustainable way. how far off is that. do you _ it in a sustainable way. how far off is that, do you think? _ it in a sustainable way. how far off is that, do you think? let's - it in a sustainable way. how far off is that, do you think? let's say - is that, do you think? let's say 2030, around _ is that, do you think? let's say 2030, around there, _ is that, do you think? let's say 2030, around there, from - is that, do you think? let's say| 2030, around there, from what is that, do you think? let's say i 2030, around there, from what i is that, do you think? let's say - 2030, around there, from what i hear from different sources, 2030 seems to he _ from different sources, 2030 seems to he a _ from different sources, 2030 seems to he a safe — from different sources, 2030 seems to be a safe spot.— to be a safe spot. interesting that ou don't to be a safe spot. interesting that you don't think — to be a safe spot. interesting that you don't think people _ to be a safe spot. interesting that you don't think people should - to be a safe spot. interesting that you don't think people should cut| you don't think people should cut back on them already because i was also going to ask you both in a way whether covid has made both of the issues you have highlighted worse, because maisie, i guess there has been a lot more plastic packaging to keep for example foods hygienic and clean, and of course everyone then
4:47 pm
going back to for example not taking their own coffee cup to a coffee shop but having to use the instant one use caps that the shops provide. yes, it has definitely not helped single—use plastics at all, especially the increase of ppe masks being left and related, so there definitely has been an increase in waist and things like that, which is a shame, but hopefully if more awareness has been raised, that will change. awareness has been raised, that will chance. ., , awareness has been raised, that will chance. .,, ~ ., change. people flocked to the internet in _ change. people flocked to the internet in the _ change. people flocked to the internet in the last _ change. people flocked to the internet in the last 18 - change. people flocked to the | internet in the last 18 months. change. people flocked to the - internet in the last 18 months. yes, definitel , internet in the last 18 months. yes, definitely. i — internet in the last 18 months. yes, definitely, i think— internet in the last 18 months. yes, definitely, i think it _ internet in the last 18 months. yes, definitely, i think it was _ internet in the last 18 months. yes, definitely, i think it was talktalk who told — definitely, i think it was talktalk who told us that despite the rise in internet— who told us that despite the rise in internet usage, the actual amount of energy— internet usage, the actual amount of energy that — internet usage, the actual amount of energy that we were using, it was only a _ energy that we were using, it was only a small difference. but they weren't— only a small difference. but they weren't exactly worried about how much _ weren't exactly worried about how much more — weren't exactly worried about how much more people were using the
4:48 pm
internet— much more people were using the internet than before. they weren't? yeah, so i think— internet than before. they weren't? yeah, so i think we _ internet than before. they weren't? yeah, so i think we are _ internet than before. they weren't? yeah, so i think we are on - internet than before. they weren't? yeah, so i think we are on track - internet than before. they weren't? yeah, so i think we are on track for| yeah, so i think we are on track for a very— yeah, so i think we are on track for a very bright — yeah, so i think we are on track for a very bright future when it comes to intranet— a very bright future when it comes to intranet usage, and whether or not it— to intranet usage, and whether or not it is_ to intranet usage, and whether or not it is actually bad for the environment. it may be the case in a few years _ environment. it may be the case in a few years -- — environment. it may be the case in a few years -- it— environment. it may be the case in a few years —— it may not be the case in a few— few years —— it may not be the case in a few years _ few years -- it may not be the case in a few years— in a few years. that is or is the ho -e in a few years. that is or is the hope that _ in a few years. that is or is the hope that technology - in a few years. that is or is the hope that technology might. in a few years. that is or is the - hope that technology might evolve to mitigate these problems but we're not there yet. maisie, can i ask you, what are your hopes for the cop26 summit? do you think something tangible as well are going to come out of it? ~ tangible as well are going to come out of it? ,, ., , ., , tangible as well are going to come out of it? ,, .,, .,, ,., out of it? think i was -- hope it so important. — out of it? think i was -- hope it so important. you've _ out of it? think i was -- hope it so important, you've got _ out of it? think i was -- hope it so important, you've got to _ out of it? think i was -- hope it so important, you've got to hope - out of it? think i was -- hope it so important, you've got to hope for. important, you've got to hope for these times, just really important time in the world's history because change is inevitable and we are moving in the right direction and i think it is a really exciting time, and a lot of things are happening. we are getting so many world leaders together to talk about that, and that in itself is amazing, so i'm really hopeful and i do think a lot of good things will come out of it. ikenna, are there any specifics you are looking for? in
4:49 pm
ikenna, are there any specifics you are looking for?— are looking for? in terms of, like... what— are looking for? in terms of, like... what comes - are looking for? in terms of, like... what comes out - are looking for? in terms of, like... what comes out in i are looking for? in terms of, | like... what comes out in the are looking for? in terms of, - like... what comes out in the next coule of like... what comes out in the next couple of weeks? _ like... what comes out in the next couple of weeks? over, _ like. .. what comes out in the next couple of weeks? over, i- like... what comes out in the next couple of weeks? over, ijust - like... what comes out in the next| couple of weeks? over, ijust hope couple of weeks? over, i 'ust hope that, ou couple of weeks? over, i 'ust hope that. you know. * couple of weeks? over, i 'ust hope that, you know, ifh couple of weeks? over, i 'ust hope that, you know, if there _ couple of weeks? over, ijust hope that, you know, if there are - that, you know, if there are organisations, companies around the world _ organisations, companies around the world who _ organisations, companies around the world who haven't kind of tightened up world who haven't kind of tightened up on _ world who haven't kind of tightened up on their— world who haven't kind of tightened up on their promises for a sustainable future, they do so. they see reports — sustainable future, they do so. they see reports like mine and maisie's and kind _ see reports like mine and maisie's and kind of— see reports like mine and maisie's and kind of realised that it is important that we preserve stuff for future _ important that we preserve stuff for future generations, and continue to make _ future generations, and continue to make stuff— future generations, and continue to make stuff better, more sustainable so that _ make stuff better, more sustainable so that the _ make stuff better, more sustainable so that the human race can last as lon- so that the human race can last as long as _ so that the human race can last as long as it— so that the human race can last as long as it can. so that the human race can last as long as it can-— long as it can. and i'm 'ust going to ask you — long as it can. and i'm 'ust going to ask you both h long as it can. and i'm 'ust going to ask you both very _ long as it can. and i'm just going to ask you both very briefly - long as it can. and i'm just going to ask you both very briefly howl long as it can. and i'm just going i to ask you both very briefly how did you find being young reporters? i have absolutely loved it, it has been an amazing opportunity and such a great expense i'm very thankful to the bbc, i've loved it.— the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're hired. the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're hired- and — the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're hired. and ikenna? _ the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're hired. and ikenna? same _ the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're hired. and ikenna? same as - the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're| hired. and ikenna? same as maisie, the bbc, i've loved it. good. you're l hired. and ikenna? same as maisie, i en'o ed it, hired. and ikenna? same as maisie, i enjoyed it. slightly — hired. and ikenna? same as maisie, i enjoyed it, slightly stressful, - hired. and ikenna? same as maisie, i enjoyed it, slightly stressful, you - enjoyed it, slightly stressful, you .et enjoyed it, slightly stressful, you get to— enjoyed it, slightly stressful, you get to see — enjoyed it, slightly stressful, you get to see how the news is made but it is all— get to see how the news is made but it is all worth it for the final product _ it is all worth it for the final product |_ it is all worth it for the final roduct. .., . it is all worth it for the final roduct. .. , ., , it is all worth it for the final roduct. , ., , , ., product. i can see over my shoulder
4:50 pm
eve one product. i can see over my shoulder everyone is — product. i can see over my shoulder everyone is nervous _ product. i can see over my shoulder everyone is nervous because - product. i can see over my shoulder everyone is nervous because they . product. i can see over my shoulder. everyone is nervous because they can see you too are about to take everyone's jobs. see you too are about to take everyone'sjobs. you see you too are about to take everyone's jobs. you are very welcome, congratulations, both your pieces are very interesting and again, i'm sure they will provoke a lot of thought too. i'm sure we will be seeing you again. thank you very much, ikenna and maisie. and, in the run up to the cop26, we'll be answering some of your questions about the whole issue of climate change and the conference itself — here on the bbc news tomorrow morning at 11:30. we'll be joined by two leading climate experts — professor laura witmarsh from the university of bath professor alice larkin, who's from the university of manchester. if you've got a question please get in touch using the hashtag bbc your questions or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. the uk's newest polar research ship has completed a year of sea trials and is ready to set sail for it's maiden voyage to antarctica. the £200 million vessel first made headlines when thousands of people voted to call it
4:51 pm
boaty mcboatface — but it was eventually named the rss sir david attenborough, after the broadcaster and naturalist. it's strong enough to sail through metre—thick ice sheets in the frozen antarctic seas. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports from greenwich. heading up the thames, it's the most advanced polar ship ever to set sail. it tookjust four years to build, and now it's spending three days in london, before its first voyage to antarctica. applause and on board, the man it's named after, sir david attenborough. i am indeed a very proud man to be standing in this remarkable vessel. i know that the findings made on this ship in the next few years will be of the greatest value and importance to the welfare of the world. this is a state—of—the—art research ship, and here on the top deck is the helipad so scientists
4:52 pm
and the crew can be brought to and from the ship while she's at sea. in here, you have the living quarters — a cosy cabin for two — because the crew on here can stay on board for two months at a time. there's room for 30 crew and 60 scientists on the ship. and this is the all—important coffee shop — where, after a hard day of polar research, the crew can come in and take a bit of a break. this big hole in the middle of the ship goes all the way from the sea up to here. it's called a moon pool, and it means that scientists can access the ocean with their instruments, whatever the weather. the moon pool is really significant because it means we can get these really valuable data points. the southern ocean is one of these places that we don't have very many observations from because it's so difficult to get there. and the southern ocean might feel really far away from us here in the uk, but it's really important for our climate as a whole. it takes up a lot of the carbon dioxide and the heat that we put
4:53 pm
into the atmosphere. it's notjust the water — scientists will be studying every aspect of this rapidly changing ecosystem. this ship will transform our understanding of the poles. seeing this ship among the ice will be absolutely remarkablel and it's something we're really looking forward to. _ working in the antarctic, . sometimes you might think you would get used to it but every time it still amazes us. _ and, of course, you can't come on board without mentioning boaty mcboatface. it's what the public voted to call this ship. but instead, the name's been given to this — a mini submarine — and soon it's going to be heading off to explore the antarctic 0cean. the sir david attenborough will head off in a few weeks, stopping at the falklands on the way to antarctica. and the man it's named after has recorded a special message for when it sets sail. david attenborough: your attention, please. any personnel on board not sailing with the vessel, please disembark. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
4:54 pm
changes to our working lives since the start of the pandemic have affected many things, including — it seems — our radio listening habits. new figures out today show that audiences for breakfast shows have fallen over the past year, as some people continue to work from home, and commuter numbers remain relatively low. 0ur entertainment correspondent david sillito has been looking at the numbers. it's a window into how our daily habits have changed. it's been more than a year since the radio industry has had any up—to—date figures, and for many stations, it's good news. overall, listening has gone up. but not at breakfast. can we just say thank you so much to everybody for listening to our show today. radios two, one, four, capital and kiss have all shown a dip for theirflagship early morning programmes, a sign that perhaps with so many people still working from home early morning routines have changed.
4:55 pm
how much does that worry you? over the rest of the day, figures look better. times radio, a new speech station, has a weekly audience of more than 650,000. ok, great! easier than you thought. heart is reaching more than ten million listeners a week. in an age of smart speakers and the growth of podcasts, many wondered how traditional radio would fare. and the technological changes, especially the impact of smartphones, means the way the figures are gathered has been changed, which makes it difficult to make accurate comparisons with figures before the pandemic, but you can certainly see a broad picture. many of us may be glued to our phones and plugged into podcasts but old—school radio still has an audience. david sillito, bbc news. just to let you know, grant shapps, the transport secretary, has confirmed all seven remaining
4:56 pm
countries on the red list are going to be removed from monday the 1st of november at 4am. we did think that was going to be announced but that is confirmed now by the government. much more coming up with ben in the five, but first of all the weather with ben rich. here i am. thank you very much. a very good afternoon to you. we have had some pretty serious weather actually comes in pretty wet weather actually comes in pretty wet weather across many parts of the uk, especially across the north west of england in the far south of scotland. that was the scene for a weather watcher in cumbria a bit earlier on, river levels very high, many flood warnings in force. this is the reason why, rain has been falling relentlessly ever since yesterday. parts of canberra have now seen —— cumbria have seen more than 60 millimetres of rain, we have reports of a state of emergency being declared in hike, —— quake, homes evacuated. the rain has
4:57 pm
actually eased offjust a little bit now, but heavy rain is set to return from the south as we go through tonight. also affecting some of those parts of southern scotland, wales, the south—west very wet indeed, dry weather towards the south—east and the far north—east of the uk, but temperatures between and 13, quite a mild night, but we start off with some heavy rain in the forecast for friday. this curl of a weather front here bringing another bout of very heavy rain to the far north—west of england and parts of southern and eastern scotland through the day. more wet weather here, brought more potentialfor travel disruption and flooding, but elsewhere through the day the weather should improve. we will see more dry weather, spells of sunshine developing as we get on into the afternoon. some showers following on into the west. some temperatures just a little lower than they have been today, 11 to 16 degrees. as we had three friday night we will see some of the showers in the west really ganging together and pushing their way eastwards, so some pretty
4:58 pm
wet weather to come across and western parts of the uk again on friday night, as another weather system works its way through. it is this area of low pressure really driving things. pulses of wet weather running around it, saturday morning will start off with outbreaks of rain for many, this rain likely to cling on down towards the south—east corner as we go through the day. elsewhere, a return to brighter skies, some sunshine, one or two showers. you will notice a cooler, fresher feel by this point, ten to 1a degrees. and then sunday, well, here comes the more rain, some more wet weather pushing northwards. it looks like this rain are not quite reach the far north of scotland but other areas will see a dose of wet weather, some heavy blustery showers following on behind with some increasingly strong winds as well, temperatures of 11 to 13 degrees. a cooler fresher feel full stop lots more unsettled weather, still weather warnings and flood warnings in force, particularly southern morning when the bbc weather website is the place to check on those.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
this is bbc news — the headlines. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago, to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. the transport secretary confirms the remaining seven countries on england's travel red list will be removed. arrivals from colombia, peru, panama, the dominican republic, haiti, venezuala and ecuador will not need to quarantine in a hotel. the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison,

73 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on