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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 28, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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his three year—old french bulldog, vivienne, was wearing a southend city status bandanna as she collected the prize. the organisers, the kennel club, said she was the runaway winner of the public vote. sir david amess regularly entered his dogs into the annual competition outside parliament, but had never won. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. we were seeing some torrential rain in cumbria? yes, extraordinarily wet weather across north—west england and southern scotland, there are numerous flood warnings in force and river levels have been rising as you can see from this picture close to cockermouth. there is no real surprise as to why we've seen so much of that flooding and disruption, because the rain has been piling into this part of the country. in fact according to the environment agency, 350 metres of
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rain has fallen so far in parts of cumbria. i say so far, because the rain is still falling. a met office amber warning rain is still falling. a met office amberwarning in rain is still falling. a met office amber warning in force, rain is still falling. a met office amberwarning inforce, disruption and flooding looking very likely. you can see a really soggy afternoon across parts of cumbria, southern scotland, turning increasingly wet for wales, the south—west of england, quite windy and amongst this rain band as well. down towards the south—east it's another largely dry and relatively bright afternoon and for northern ireland, western scotland, here we will see some sunshine, one or two micro showers too. temperature is 13—18, quite mild particularly towards the south—east but tonight there are further pulses of rain to come. really wet in south—west england, wales, more rain in cumbria, parts of southern scotland, so many others ending the night with cloud with some outbreaks of rain, heavy and persistent rain in places. temperatures 9—14. what about tomorrow? we start off with a big area of not pressure —— low pressure to the north—west, this curl will bring more rain to places that have
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already seen so much. this lump of rain here will move across the north west of england into southern scotland, so there could be some more disruption with that. cloud and rain for many other spots first thing but notice by the afternoon many places away from scotland will see some sunshine stop one or two micro showers pushing into towards the west. it will start to feel cooler and fresher by this stage. the showers in the west will become quite plentiful. there will be lots moving through during friday night and into saturday. still this big low driving things up to the north—west. this frontal system bring rain for some others on saturday morning which could cling on for a good part of the day towards the south—east. then weekly something brighter with and showers but certainly a cooler feel, 11—14. what about sunday? well, there is more rain in the forecast. another band of heavy rain pushing northwards. it may be this doesn't reach the north of scotland but most other areas will see a dose of heavy rain, some hefty showers following on behind and some blustery winds,
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highs of 11—13. there are flood warnings and weather warnings in force, check those on the bbc weather website. a reminder of our top story. france seizes a british trawler amid escalating tension over post—brexit fishing rights. that's all from the bbc news at one. it's goodbye from me. 0n bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. english football's leading authorities are provisionally agreed to an industrywide fund to support players living with dementia and
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other neurodegenerative conditions. professional footballers association which has been criticised for its approach to brain injuries in recent years has told the bbc that the level of support hasn't yet been decided but all parties are aware of the urgency. decided but all parties are aware of the urgency-— the urgency. what i sense is that the urgency. what i sense is that the all the urgency. what i sense is that they all acknowledge _ the urgency. what i sense is that they all acknowledge that - the urgency. what i sense is that they all acknowledge that this i the urgency. what i sense is that they all acknowledge that this is | they all acknowledge that this is urgent because, again, when you see the way that some of those members just deteriorate day after day because of this terrible disease i think we cannot wait i think everyone is conscious of that so, again, the sooner the better, you know, so i'm going to push for this to happen as soon as possible. the? to happen as soon as possible. they have pointed — to happen as soon as possible. they have pointed a _ to happen as soon as possible. they have pointed a new _ to happen as soon as possible. they have pointed a new interim head coach of barcelona after sacking the bus a bt manager is going to take charge until they find a full—time replacement. they are sitting ninth in love either now and the result comes hot on the heels of defeat
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over the weekend. —— sitting ninth in mickley. rugby union's or internationals get going this weekend in wales have named their team to face new zealand in cardiff on saturday. a 21—year—old has entered his first answer was a fly—half going to get his first start since 2019, along the back of a knee injury for him and well selection has been hampered by a raft of injuries and because of the game being outside world will be's international window many unable to feature. captain alanjones is going to play his 149th international, surpassing the previous international record set by the all blacks legend which you occur. there have been talks about the t20 world cup in south africa. he says he wants to play for the team again and will now take a knee before matches. he withdrew last weekend after being
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told a few hours before the match that he has to take a knee with the rest of the squad in a show of unity against racism, something he hadn't done before. cricket south africa say they regret the timing that directive and he has apologised to his team—mates and fans ended a lengthy statement said he wasn't racist and that he comes from a dual heritage family in the black lives have always mattered to him before any international movement came to the floor. he said if taking on each helps to educate others and make the lives of others that i am other than happy to do so. —— taking a knee. england captain fran wilson has retired from international cricket and she says the time feels right to step away. after ten years playing she made her debut at the age of 19 and has been capped 63 times across all formats and within the england team that became champions of london 2017. she is going to continue to play domestic cricket. some good tennis today. in the vatican is going to step on court shortly in
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the second round of the transylvania open and she is up against a romanian player. —— in in nevada can it is going to step in court. —— emma raducanu. andy murray is out. currently six — five up in the current match. you can vote for the bbc women's footballer of the year and the shortlist is on there. voting closes on the 8th of november. much more from me across the rest of the afternoon on bbc news. cheers. thank you very much indeed. let's return now to one of our top stories this afternoon. the man who murdered two sisters in a london park last year has beenjailed for life, with a minimum term of 35 years. 19—year—old danyal hussein had just turned 18 when he stabbed
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bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were celebrating ms henry's birthday in fryent country park in wembley. speaking outside the old bailey, the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman paid tribute to her daughters and gave her reaction to the sentencing... there'll be no celebrations here, butjustice has been done, but i think we do need to review that, kind of, separation — when is someone an adult? and i think it's very disrespectful to say that children can't tell the difference between good and evil, so that's something else i will be campaigning about, but today we're celebrating what is wonderful about the metropolitan police. i've never been one to cast a whole organisation by one particular sort of incident, but we do have a problem, we do have an underground that has infiltrated and growing in our met police, but once again i want to say thank you to this team that worked tirelessly to find the killer. they were real people with hearts.
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bibaa has left behind a daughter who has given birth to a son in the last year, be coming up for a year, and i'm a great—grandmother, and i only met him... because of covidm i only met him four of the first time at the celebration of life, so life is going on. there is a legacy. and nicole, i think we grieve more for her because there was 20 years difference. she had 20 years less than bibaa, but to know her was to love her, and there's so much more i am going to share with you. mina, can you just share with us your thoughts about danyal hussein's behaviour? do you know... do you know what?
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it's all a performance. you know, i taught secondary kids for 20 years. 15 of those were all boys. there's nothing you can't tell me about men and boys, and that is a performance designed to, i don't know, elicit sympathy or to have us believe that there's something really wrong with him. there is nothing wrong with him! he'sjust an obnoxious human being. and at one point there was a screen in front of us and it was a tiny bit, we could only see a tiny... and the clerk said, would you like us to... "we can make that bigger, bigger picture." i said, "no, thank you!" we don't actually need to see him. he's a broken human being who, if he hadn't been caught, four other families may have been suffering what we have. well, he ain't out there now, and i think he is so deluded, come 35 years' time they won't give him... they won't let him out.
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i won't let them let him out. but as the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman. in the next few days tens of thousands of delegates, including world leaders, will arrive in glasgow for cop26 — the un climate change conference. countries will be asked to set out their plans for cutting emissions and rising global temperatures. the uk government's chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance, says it's vital that we take action now to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees... absolutely make sure that the technologies we have today and the natural solutions we have today are implemented as fast as possible. that is critical. and there is a way to do that and there's a lot
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of r&d needed for that. second is we need to invest in the technologies for the future that will continue that and make certain parts of that easier. and we also need to accept that there's got to be some change in society in terms of the way we consume and the way we contribute to emissions. and those things together, i think, are really, really important. if those things are done and there are clear plans, 1.5 is achievable, but it's not achievable without significant action and steep reduction in emissions over the period to 2030. and there are the little things that we can all do that may seem tiny individually but you aggregate them across millions and it makes a difference. so, you know, i can tell you what i do. i cycle to work, i have reduced my meat consumption, i don't fly as much as i used to. it doesn't mean i've stopped meat consumption or i will never fly again. i will. i am going to, but i will reduce those things. and i think those aggregate actions across millions make
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a difference as well. on their own, they are not sufficient. but we need to get technologies in place and we need to invest in technologies in the future. people around the world want their governments to take strong action on climate change, according to a new poll commissioned by the bbc. more than 30 thousand people were surveyed — across 31 countries — about their attitudes to climate change policies. more than half? 56 % — say they want their governments to play a key leadership role. earlier, our environment correspondent matt mcgrath told me whilst 56% might not sound like a huge majority, it is a significant increase... the opinion polls for us here carried out a very similar surveyjust before the paris climate talks back in 2015, six years ago. and the difference between then and now is quite remarkable. people looking for strong action from their government, strong leadership was... it's increased by 25%, essentially, over that period.
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and it's increased in a lot of interesting countries, in india and in china. in china, back in 2015, only 18% of people wanted to see their governments take strong action. that has gone up to nearly half of respondents now. so, it's an opinion poll, it's a snapshot of opinion, but it does show that people are more serious about climate change and want their governments to take more serious action on it. the headlines on bbc news... the man who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park last summer has been given a life sentence — with a minimum term of 35 years the uk has urged france to �*de—escalate' the row over post—brexit fishing rights, after authorities seized a british trawler off le harve — claiming it didn't have a licence to be there. after yesterday's budget, a leading think—tank warns middle—income families will be worse off next year.
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a small number of properties have been hit by flooding in cumbria today — as a month's worth of rain is expected to fall in just 36 hours. some holiday lets in cockermouth have been affected — but defences installed after 2009 have helped spare the kind of scenes witnessed during storm desmond in 2015. mark mcalindon reports. we are standing at the very point weathercock meets the derwent, the tv that run through cockermouth and you can see the height the figures now even at the peak has passed at one point this town came close to devastation. by and large, the flood defences here have protected most of the people here but i have been one or two properties where water got in. ~ �* , ., , , ., in. we've been through this before so it's aet in. we've been through this before so it's get up. _ in. we've been through this before so it's get up. get _ in. we've been through this before so it's get up, get on _ in. we've been through this before so it's get up, get on with - in. we've been through this before so it's get up, get on with it. - in. we've been through this before so it's get up, get on with it. yes, | so it's get up, get on with it. yes, it's upsetting that we kind of got a bit hard on to it, that used to it, and wejust bit hard on to it, that used to it, and we just have to crack on and
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sort it out. {lit and we just have to crack on and sort it out-— sort it out. of course, back in 20,009 sort it out. of course, back in 20.009 in — sort it out. of course, back in 20,009 in 2015 _ sort it out. of course, back in 20,009 in 2015 anyone - sort it out. of course, back in 20,009 in 2015 anyone he - sort it out. of course, back in | 20,009 in 2015 anyone he was sort it out. of course, back in - 20,009 in 2015 anyone he was here cannot forget pictures of water running waist deep in the worst on main street saint last night of course was an anxious night for people who own businesses in this town. ,, . :: :: ' ::' people who own businesses in this town. ,, . :: ::' ::' people who own businesses in this town. ,, . ::::' if town. since the 2009, 2015 was 9096 of us haven't — town. since the 2009, 2015 was 9096 of us haven't got _ town. since the 2009, 2015 was 9096 of us haven't got the _ town. since the 2009, 2015 was 9096 of us haven't got the insurance - town. since the 2009, 2015 was 9096 of us haven't got the insurance if- of us haven't got the insurance if we get _ of us haven't got the insurance if we get flooded this time we have to pay for— we get flooded this time we have to pay for the — we get flooded this time we have to pay for the rebuild and everything which, _ pay for the rebuild and everything which, you — pay for the rebuild and everything which, you know, goes into hundreds of thousands. we which, you know, goes into hundreds of thousands-— of thousands. we will continue to monitor the _ of thousands. we will continue to monitor the situation, _ of thousands. we will continue to monitor the situation, we - of thousands. we will continue to monitor the situation, we will. monitor the situation, we will continue to the county council, district council and environment agency and monitor the river levels as closely as we possibly can and if people need help then we'll walk down might mobilise our volunteers to provide their help.— to provide their help. further upstream _ to provide their help. further upstream on _ to provide their help. further upstream on the _ to provide their help. further upstream on the derwent - to provide their help. further upstream on the derwent it's to provide their help. further- upstream on the derwent it's hoped that keswick too has survived the worst of last nights water was everyone will be keeping an anxious watch on the forecast of the days to come. mike mcalinden, bbc look north in cockermouth.
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east midlands railway�*s been criticised for allowing overcrowded trains to take fans to football matches, as covid rates rise. 0ne passengerfilmed himself on a packed train this weekend on his way to a local football match, while signs asked people to �*stay apart�*. the rail franchise says it operates services according to the latest government guidelines. navtej johal reports. stay apart? not when there are this many passengers on the same train. but this was the scene when football fan alan clark was on his way to a match on saturday from kirkby to nottingham. it was frightening. there were people with their heads, basically, noses touching each other. and i think if we'd have realised at the time and it came through your mind, i don't think we have got on the train, but, saying that, they only run every two hours. i'm sure they could put an extra couple of carriages on. as far as i'm looking at it, they're putting profit before safety. so, can the operators just add more cabbages? we would love to and these are some of the challenges that we continue to face. particularly on that line, it's been
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a real victim of its own success. it has some specific challenges around it not being possible tojust add more cabbages and we continue to work really hard with our industry partners to look at how we can improve the frequency on that. these concerns comes a time when many are worried about the rate of coronavirus infections. the rates in nottinghamshire - are still very high at the moment so with more of us out - and about and enjoy getting out to football matches, shopping and so on, j whenever we find ourselves i in crowded enclosed spaces — and certainly whenever we're on public transport — - whoever can wear face i coverings really should. the government says currently the data does not suggest that we should be immediately moving to plan b, which would include compulsory face masks in some settings, such as public transport. navteonhal, bbc east midlands today.
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residents in north nottinghamshire are campaigning against plans for a solar farm. the proposal, if approved, could occupy up to six hundred acres of open land in the village of gringley on the hill. developers claim the panels could generate enough �*clean energy�* to power 160,000 homes. local residents are concerned about the effect on the local landscape. tom ingall reports. this field, around here. cleaner than coal, but solar power can still generate strong feelings. pat has run a wedding venue business here for two decades. she hasjust found out a new solarfarm could come right up to her fence. what do you think the impact will be with the solar screens? well, i won�*t be doing the business. i don�*t think i could because i can�*t sell that when, really, i�*ve sold it as a picture. you know, and i�*m passionate about it. up to 600 acres between gringley on the hill and clayworth could be covered by a.5—metre—high solar panels. and this is just one of four
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sites being proposed for the west burton solar project. these plans are at such a scale that it is the government that makes the decision. everyone recognises the need to reduce our carbon footprint as a country. my query is whether doing this in this particular location is the best thing. in this case, the developer is a company called island green power. they told us this whole project could power almost 150,000 homes. they add, while the project�*s importance is clear, we do recognise the need to deliver it sensitively and with respect to the local environment. in the last two weeks, a campaign against the proposals has gathered pace. we're a growing population. you know, covid—19 has shown supply chains have been breaking down. - i feel the country needs to be self—sufficient, i and you are taking perfect arable land out of production. _ we�*ve got two power stations now that are going out. why can�*t we use some
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of the land round there? 0r look at old pit sites? there�*s loads of places that they could enhance. they can�*t enhance this. for now, these ancient acres slumber while landowners and locals, councils and constructors deal with the future. it would be 2024 at the earliest before diggers moved onto the site, but on the skyline, a reminder to all that the future is fast approaching. tom ingall, bbc look north, gringley on the hill. it�*s been years in the making, but now the life story of the singer we have just got some breaking we havejust got some breaking news and travel restrictions from a transport of respondent caroline davies said the bbc understands that the remaining seven countries which were on the red list for travel are being removed, colombia, peru,
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panama, haiti, venezuela and ecuador and want removed arrivals from those destinations don�*t need to quarantine in the hotel. currently no suggestion the government is going to get rid of the red list policy entirely. it is possible that countries where gold could be the added to the red list if the situation changes. this is a policy for england, scotland, wales, northern ireland could choose to follow different policy but that is what hearing for now, that those countries have been removed from the red list will be removed. were not quite sure when that will come into force, it is usually the following monday or tuesday after an announcement but those countries again have been taken off the lead list. colombia, peru, panama, dominican republic, haiti, venezuela and ecuador and that former transport correspondent caroline davies. it�*s been years in the making, but now the life story of the singer
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bob marley has become a west end musical. emma north went to meet the people behind it. # get up, stand up. # stand up for your rights. this is the first time i�*ve ever felt the floor shaking when i�*m on stage. i�*ve never felt that before. because of... people get up on their feet and they dance and they move. and i was stood right here, about last week, and i thought that there was an earthquake! the earthquake was down to a world first. london's west end, and i've come to see this show. very excited. about time, dammit, it's about time. i�*ve been waiting for this day — i�*ve been waiting! cheering. the actor playing one of the most famous musicians in history knows the responsibility he carries. what�*s it like playing someone whose voice is recognised i�*m not up there doing a bob marley impression.
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there is a certain level of interpretation that has to kind of come into the fold — you know, like, how do i interpret this man�*s love for his music and for his words and for his religion and for the women in his life? how does that physically affect my performance? # could you be loved and be loved? from the boy abandoned by his father, to the homeless teenager sleeping on a studio floor in kingston so he could wake up and make music, marley�*s life from cradle to grave is told. marley�*s music provides the context. it brims over with activism, politics and power. whilst it is political, whilst it is heartfelt, whilst there is an element of activism that is inside it and inherent in bob marley�*s music and in the musical...it is also a celebration of him as an individual, of those ideas, of the acceptance of those ideas now. while his music is loved the world over, for those recreating marley�*s life, the rehearsal room became a deeply private place.
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people have a really personal connection to bob marley, especially because most people in that room are of caribbean descent and, actually, most people in that room are jamaican heritage. so they grew up not only with the music, but their parents grew up with the music. and it felt like their parents' stories, like... rita reminds me very much of my own mum. putting the life and music of bob marley on stage has taken years. good news, then — that although the show�*s only been on a couple of weeks, its run has been extended to next year, giving us more chance to go and celebrate. emma north, bbc news. # i hope you like jammin' too! # in the quest to push the barriers of transport technology, we�*ve had self—driving cars, self—driving lorries, and self—driving buses. now — in the dutch city of amsterdam — they�*re trying out self—driving boats.
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the designers hope they could revolutionise travel and commuting — as tim allman reports. # row, row, row your boat. # gently down the stream... # actually, there�*s not much rowing involved. this is the autonomous floating vehicle, the roboat — as in robot. an electric—powered vessel that finds its own way around. we have a lot of open water available in the canals that is not being used anymore for transport. only for tourists. so we developed a self—driving autonomous ship. for several years they have been testing the roboats on a project involving the massachusetts institute of technology. the small ships have no pilot and depend on sensors to avoid any unwanted aquatic encounters. so if you want to go from a to b, it automatically calculates the most efficient route to sail. then when it�*s sailing, it senses and maps the environment to see where are other objects
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or other ships that i have to avoid any collisions with. the designers have lofty ambitions for the roboats. they can be used like tugboats, linked together to form a bridge, there are even hopes they could one day be used to contain oil spills. # row, row, row your boat # row your boat down my stream... # for now, the plan is to utilise them as mobile rubbish collectors — vital in a crowded, congested city like amsterdam. after that, the sky — well, the water — is the limit. tim allman, bbc news. we will have a new presenter steering the than if she has but first we will look at the weather with ben rich. some parts of the uk have been exceptionally wet in the last couple of days in the rain just keeps on coming, not least in combi where we
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still have a net of his amber warning and foster some parts of the uk have been exceptionally wet in the last couple of days in the rain just keeps on coming, not least in combi where we still have a net of his amber warning enforcers and some parts winds along the line at this band of rain as well so to the south and east main dry or some spells of sunshine and it is a club living through, sunny spells and one or two showers from northern ireland and north—west scotland and 30 degrees. we will see further pulses of rain pushing down from the south of the night and some of those places that have been really wet will see further heavy end persistent rain and busily overnight lows. that they intend to push eastwards through friday something going on for a time and it does look and it does look very unsettled through the weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the teenager who murdered two sisters in what he believed was a satanic sacrifice is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 35 years. the mother of bibaa henry and nicole smallman says he should never be released... in 35 years�* time, they won�*t let him out. they won�*t let him out. i won�*t let them let him out. a british trawler has been seized by france and another has been fined, amid an escalating row over post—brexit fishing rights. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. people should have reassurance that
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because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy now

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