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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 28, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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france seizes a british trawler amid escalating tensions over post—brexit fishing rights. the french are also threatening to block british boats from their ports — the uk government says the warnings are unwelcome. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. we'll bring you the latest from paris. also this lunchtime... the teenager who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a park is sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of 35 years. danyal hussein said he had planned the murders as part of a sacrifice he believed would help him win the lottery. the mother of the women says
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he should never be released. com 35 years�* time, they won�*t let him out. they won�*t let him out. i won�*t let them let him out. after the budget, a leading think—tank warns that millions of middle—income families will be worse off next year. but the chancellor says the economy is improving. people can have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. the man who organised the flight in which footballer emiliano sala was killed is found guilty on a safety charge. and remember boaty mcboatface? the polar research ship that was renamed after sir david attenborough prepares to set sail. coming up in the sport later in the hour on the bbc news channel, quinton de kock says he will now take a knee before south africa matches and wants to return to the side at the t20 world cup.
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good afternoon, welcome to the bbc news at one. france has seized a british trawler as the row over post—brexit fishing rights escalates. the french claim the boat was fishing in their waters without a licence and it�*s been taken to the port of le havre. the french are angry that some of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters and they�*ve threatened to block british vessels from their ports. one french minister has said we "need to speak the language of force because that seems to be the only thing this british government understands". hugh schofield reports from paris. the british—registered cornelis gertjan was impounded yesterday by the french maritime authorities, who say
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it was fishing in french waters without a proper licence. it is now moored in le havre pending possible judicial proceedings against the captain and owner. it�*s clearly intended as a message to the british about what�*s to come from next week, when the french begin to enact reprisal measures in the row over fishing licences. before a french parliamentary committee, europe minister clement beaune spelt out what�*s to happen. from tuesday he said no uk fishing boat will be allowed to unload its catch in french ports. there will be intensified inspections on uk goods entering france by ferry and the channel tunnel. and in a second wave of measures, france may raise the tariff on electricity it supplies to the channel islands. france says this is because the uk and the channel islands had failed to keep their side of the deal on fishing licences signed as part of brexit. the british government says that�*s not true. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday.
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we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. the measures being threatened do not appear to be compatible with the trading cooperation agreement or wider international law. the licences row flared in may, when protesting french fishing boats sailed in flotilla intojersey waters and london sent in two navy patrol boats in response. today though it�*s the french government that�*s starting to act tough. for some, approaching french presidential elections are complicating the picture. it only really make sense to me in terms of french domestic politics because this is really... the licensing issue is a technical matter to be resolved at a technical level, and my understanding is that quite a lot of progress has been made in resolving it. both sides say that talks are still under way over granting
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more licences, so there�*s a chance this escalating trade war can be averted. but neither country is optimistic that it will be. and we can speak to hugh now. as you outlined, a whole list of threatened for next week. how angry are the french? if threatened for next week. how angry are the french?— are the french? if you take them at their word. — are the french? if you take them at their word, they _ are the french? if you take them at their word, they are _ are the french? if you take them at their word, they are very _ are the french? if you take them at their word, they are very angry - their word, they are very angry indeed. i haven�*t heard the french minister of fisheries minister express anything other than ill concealed anger and contempt almost for the british government. they are singing things like we won�*t let the british government wipe their feet on the brexit agreement, they only understand the language of force. noticeably president macron never enters the row but clearly he has sanctioned his team, his covenant cabinet ministers use this hostile language —— his government cabinet
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ministers. partly because of the elections next april, but in general because i think they generally feel there is a big difference here and they are right to press the point. they say there are licences which the british should be giving under the british should be giving under the brexit deal, more than 200 of them, and they say they will keep up this form of reprisal until the government in britain gives way. you, thank. hugh schofield from paris, and apologies for the quality of the line there. a man has beeen sentenced to life in prison for killing two sisters in a london park. 19—year—old danyal hussein must serve a minimum of 35 years, after he was found guilty of the murder of sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death injune last year as part of a satanic blood pact. an investigation by the police watchdog criticised the response of officers when the sisters were reported missing. their mother has dismissed an apology from the metropolitan police. june kelly reports.
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nina smallman has been highly critical of the metropolitan police response when her daughters were reported missing, but today she and her husband chris walked into court with simon harding, the senior met detective who led the murder investigation. a sign of the family�*s closeness to his team. such a vivacious shot of her daughters, but this was bibaa henry and nicole smallman in what would be the last few hours of their lives. after a picnic with friends during the first lockdown, the sisters stayed on in the park. they were celebrating a birthday together and died side—by—side. a stranger, danyal hussein, was lying in wait watching them, and he was armed with a knife. he is believed to have attacked bibaa first. he stabbed her eight times. nicole saw what he had done to her sister and put up a fight.
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she was stabbed 28 times. because of the initial poor police response, it was the sisters of�* friends who launched a surge and it was nicole�*s boyfriend who discovered the bodies. danyal hussein was arrested after his dna was found at the scene. he had developed a fascination with satanic ideology, and he had drawn up satanic ideology, and he had drawn up a plan to sacrifice women in a note signed in his own blood. after seeing him sentenced to a minimum of 35 years, mina smallman shared her thoughts. 35 years, mina smallman shared her thou~hts. ., ., 35 years, mina smallman shared her thouuhts. ., . . , . thoughts. today we are celebrating what is wonderful _ thoughts. today we are celebrating what is wonderful about _ thoughts. today we are celebrating what is wonderful about the - what is wonderful about the metropolitan police. i have never been one to cast a whole organisation by one particular sort of incident. but we do have a problem. we do have an underground thatis problem. we do have an underground that is infiltrated and growing in our met police.—
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that is infiltrated and growing in our met police. because of covid, dan al our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein _ our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn't _ our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn't in - our met police. because of covid, danyal hussein wasn't in court. i our met police. because of covid, | danyal hussein wasn't in court. he danyal hussein wasn�*t in court. he appeared by video link from belmarsh top security prison. he showed little respect for the legal process. before the hearing began, he kept throwing his facemask in the air and when he kept throwing his facemask in the airand when the he kept throwing his facemask in the air and when thejudge began sentencing him, he turned his chair sideways so he was not facing the camera. since the murders, bibaa�*s daughter has had a baby boy. he will learn about everything that was lost when bibaa and nicole were taken from theirfamily. june when bibaa and nicole were taken from their family. june kelly, when bibaa and nicole were taken from theirfamily. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. the chancellor has been defending his budget, saying the government was investing in public services, future growth and people�*s skills and prioritising those on the lowest incomes. but a leading economic think tank has predicted that millions of people in the uk will be worse off in the short term due to tax increases and the rising cost of living. the institute for fiscal studies predicts that for many middle—income families, living standards will fall over the coming year. here�*s our political
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correspondent nick eardley. hi, how are you? really nice to see you. he�*s enthusiastic, but how will the public feel about rishi sunak�*s budget? after the treasury�*s big pitch yesterday, today is about the detail. oh, i do, it�*s controversial. mr sunak was spending his cash at the bury market this morning, but over the next few years he�*s going to be spending a lot of taxpayer money too, funded by the biggest tax burden since the �*505. so, will it be worth it? people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put a place a year ago to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. and yesterday we did take action and noticeably we froze fuel duty, especially when fuel prices are at almost a ten—year high, but also we cut the tax on the lowest paid people, which i think will make an enormous difference. that�*s a reference to
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universal credit changes which will allow in—work claimants to keep more of their benefits. wages are set to go up from april for public sector workers, and those on the minimum wage, but the cost of living is going up too. inflation could make household budgets even tighter. labour says the chancellor should have done more to help with the cost of living. if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth, by the end of this parliament set to be just 1.3%, it's certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the big political theme of this budget was that the government is still going to spend money. there were a number of announcements designed to be voter—friendly which mean the state is still going to play a big role in our lives. but many families and many households are facing a tough winter and when the numbers are crunched there are questions over what benefits we�*ll all feel. experts say millions of people
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will actually be worse off because of rising costs, higher energy bills, fuel bills, higherfood prices and increases in tax. the worry for the government is for all the chancellor�*s upbeat delivery, the voters may not get much feel—good factor. high inflation, rising taxes, poor growth, still undermined more by brexit than by the pandemic, will see real living standards barely rising and for many falling over the next year. he�*s got a bit more money to spend... wait, sorry... ..because the economy is in better shape than many expected, but that doesn�*t mean that there aren�*t challenging times ahead for many. and nick is in westminster for us now. now that we�*ve had time to digest the budget, how much does it look like a change of political direction for the conservatives?
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it is interesting because although the chancellor was at pains to say at the end of the budget yesterday that yes, he wanted to eventually bring taxes down, the big message off that budget was that he is going to keep spending money and a lot of it. it was a spending budget. and there is a political calculation in that. the government has made some big promises at the last general election and it knows it might only have a couple of years left to deliver them. that�*s why rishi sunak and the prime minister are prepared to tax a bit more, to make sure they can spend. really interesting the experts have also been saying that some of that was linked to the pandemic —like extra spending on the nhs, but a big pandemic —like extra spending on the nhs, buta big portion pandemic —like extra spending on the nhs, but a big portion of it was a political choice too. there is also though a political gamble in that because the big question is will we all feel the benefits of that extra
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spending? and the warning you are hearing from the institute for fiscal studies this morning is that you might not. that many families will be facing a tough few months ahead. there is going to be a squeeze on household budgets because of the rising cost of living. so although the chancellor is spending the money, the big question is will it have the impact he hopes? nick eardle , it have the impact he hopes? nick eardley. thank — it have the impact he hopes? nick eardley, thank you. _ let�*s get some more analysis on what the budget means from our economics correspondent andy verity. i�*m just outside the building and design centre near tottenham court roadin design centre near tottenham court road in central london where the institute for fiscal studies have been holding their regular briefing that they always do after a big fiscal event. what they are saying put numbers on what nick was just saying. this will go down as the year, they say, when a conservative chancellor took the size of the state to its highest level since the 19705 and the tax burden to its highest level since the early 19505.
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over the past year, he has raised taxes by £40 billion and has also had a benefit from a faster than expected economic recovery due to the vaccine. but rather than give some of those tax rises back from earlier in the year, he has decided to bank them and also raise some more. that is not so much to do with the pandemic, it is more to do with the pandemic, it is more to do with the fact there are demographic pressures. the ageing population requires more spending on health and social care that it means all this windfall benefit he�*s got from the better—than—expected recovery won�*t get through to households. in fact if you look at the last ten years, we have had the worst decade in living standards... and the director of the afs was telling me that is going to go on. it looks like the next five years will be very little increase in earnings, very little increase in living standards. you know, those of us of a certain age can remember a time when earningsjust kind of went up year on year on year,
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and they're barely going up anymore and they have barely been going up for a decade. that is a really important political point. if we're not getting better off over time, we're not going to feel so happy with the status quo. and here is one more shocking fact about that. if you look at where wages would have been if we continued on the precrisis trend, the average wage would have been 43,000, nearly 44. but now in five years�* time it will only be 31,000, so 13 grand less then we might have had if we were growing like we used to. �* , , ., ~ had if we were growing like we used to. , , .,�*, the time is 1.16. our top story this lunchtime... france seizes a british trawler amid escalating tensions over post brexit fishing rights and coming up... how our listening habits have changed during the pandemic. coming up in the sport on the bbc news _ coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel, the latest from vienna where _ news channel, the latest from vienna where the _ news channel, the latest from vienna where the british number one cameron norrie _ where the british number one cameron norrie is _ where the british number one cameron norrie is in _ where the british number one cameron norrie is in action and looking to reach _ norrie is in action and looking to
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reach the — norrie is in action and looking to reach the third round. the businessman who arranged a flight for footballer emiliano sala to travel to cardiff has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. the plane carrying sala, flown by pilot david ibbotson, crashed into the sea near guernsey in 2019, killing both men. sala had just been sold to cardiff city for £15 million. over the course of the trial the jury heard evidence showing that david henderson was aware that the pilot he chose was unfit to fly. tomos morgan is outside the court in cardiff. as you say, on the 21st of january 2019, cardiff city�*s new signing, argentinian footballer emiliano sala was on his way to the welsh capital
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from nantes, the flight took place at night in bad weather and crashed into the english channel. 67—year—old david henderson has been the man on trial here. he was the operator of that plane and also, crucially, the man responsible for choosing pilots, and over the course of this two week trial the jury has heard several pieces of evidence to suggest that mr henderson knew that pilot david ibbotson wasn�*t fit to fly emiliano sala that evening. footballer emiliano sala�*s last message before his night—time flight on the 21st of january 2019, from nantes to cardiff, crashed into the english channel. after an extensive public and private search the wreckage and the argentine�*s body was found, but the pilot�*s, david ibbotson, was never recovered. on trial for endangering the safety of an aircraft has been 67—year—old david henderson, the plane�*s operator, and crucially the one in charge
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of choosing pilots on behalf of the owner. the jury here in cardiff has heard several pieces of evidence to suggest that mr henderson knew that his pilot was not fit to fly sala. in a series of text messages which started in august 2018, night flying was discussed, a qualification it appeared mr ibbotson did not have. then in october the operator asked the pilot to acquire his night rating. the reply was, it didn�*t seem possible any time soon. and in a message a month before the crash, david henderson was made aware that the qualification still hadn�*t been achieved. realising that the weather could be treacherous on the 21st of january 2019 and knowing that mr ibbotson didn�*t have the qualifications to fly in those conditions, david henderson texted the pilot, asking him to blag the rating required to fly in bad weather outside of uk airspace, to which the reply was, yes, done it before.
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after hearing of the accident mr henderson sent a series of messages. in one text, to the plane�*s engineer, he said not to say a word to anyone. responding to another the following morning, he wrote, "need to be very careful. "opens up a whole can of worms. "keep very quiet." and, "questions may be asked about his flying." mr ibbotson�*s license to fly a piper malibu aircraft had also expired two months before the incident. when asked by the prosecution, isn�*t the true situation that you didn�*t want anyone looking at how you were running these flights because you knew you were running them illegally, david henderson replied, there�*s probably some element of that, yes. today, david henderson has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft, an aircraft in which footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson were killed. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff crown court.
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thejury the jury deliberated here forjust over a day and a half and the majority verdict was accepted of 10-2 majority verdict was accepted of 10—2 by thejudge. david henderson will be sentenced on the 12th of november and early next year there will be fulljury inquests into the death of footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. tomos, thank you very much indeed. russia has reported a record number of new cases and deaths from covid—19. yesterday saw more than 40,000 new cases, and over 1,100 deaths. it comes as new lockdown restrictions in moscow are introduced, with only essential shops allowed to open. workers across russia are also to be given nine days�* leave. steve rosenberg is in moscow. steve, how concerned are the russian authorities?
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i think the authorities are very concerned, and the statistics suggest they have every reason to be. as you say, health officials have reported more than 40,000 new covid cases in russia in the last 24 hours. that�*s a record. and also a record number of covid related deaths, 1159. those figures have been going up gradually over the last few days and that�*s why russia is reintroducing restrictions across the country. they differ slightly region to region, so in moscow there is this partial lockdown from today. people don�*t have to stay at home but there aren�*t too many places for them to go, so cafes and restaurants are shut, most of the shops are shut too. interestingly in recent days holiday bookings have shot up both for foreign holidays and forforeign holidays and holidays, getaways inside russia and one of the newspapers here in russia today had this headline, saying that instead of self isolating russians are rushing off to the resorts. so
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the question is will these new restrictions actually work? will they manage to slow the pace of the spread of the infection? we simply don�*t know. spread of the infection? we simply don't know— don't know. steve rosenberg reporting- — the met office has issued flood warnings for parts of cumbria and the lake district as heavy rain has led to many roads becoming impassable. train lines to scotland on the west coast main line have been affected, with avanti west coast trains asking passengers not to travel on the route to glasgow, where delegates are gathering for next week�*s climate change summit. megan paterson is in keswick. it's it�*s still raining pretty hard there? it's still raining pretty hard there? ~ , , it's still raining pretty hard there? ~ , ., , it's still raining pretty hard there? �* , ., , ., there? absolutely, heavy rain showers for — there? absolutely, heavy rain showers for much _ there? absolutely, heavy rain showers for much of - there? absolutely, heavy rain showers for much of this - there? absolutely, heavy rain - showers for much of this morning. in cumbria there are ten flood warnings in place. in keswick the river is flowing quickly but crucially still within its banks. over 24 hours in some parts of cumbria, 12 inches of rain has fallen. parts of the county have had disruption to the raids,
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also to the train network across the border into scotland. the environment agency say they�*ve had reports of flooding to a handful of properties in the west of the county, around egremont and cockermouth, but for the main part flood defences are coping well so far. cumbria is unfortunately familiar with flooding. storm desmond in 2015 damaged hundreds of homes, hundreds of thousands of businesses and homes, and it took the county years to fully recover, so understandably when there is heavy rainfall like this over a short period of time people are very anxious here. the met office says it expects the worst of this rain has passed. we expect that the rivers should peek here at around 3pm this afternoon. the environment agency is urging people to be vigilant, to keep an eye on the rivers and the flood alerts but hoping that people won�*t be forced to leave their homes this time. won't be forced to leave their homes this time. ~ . , won't be forced to leave their homes this time. ~ ., , ~ ., ., this time. mega sm -- megan paterson re-aortin. changes to our working lives since the start of the pandemic have affected many things, including, it seems, our radio listening habits.
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new figures out today show that audiences for breakfast shows have fallen over the past year, as some people continue to work from home, and commuter numbers remain relatively low. our entertainment correspondent david sillito has been looking at the numbers. its heart brea kfast—macro. .. its heart breakfast-macro. .. it's a window into — its heart breakfast-macro. .. it's a window into how _ its heart breakfast-macro. .. it's a window into how our _ its heart breakfast-macro. .. it's a window into how our daily - its heart breakfast—macro... it's a window into how our daily habits have changed. it�*s been more than a year since the radio industry has had any up—to—date figures and for many stations it�*s good news. overall listening has gone up. but not at breakfast. flan overall listening has gone up. but not at breakfast.— not at breakfast. can we 'ust say thank ou not at breakfast. can we 'ust say thank you so i not at breakfast. can we 'ust say thank you so much h not at breakfast. can we 'ust say thank you so much to h not at breakfast. can we just say thank you so much to everybody| not at breakfast. can we just say i thank you so much to everybody for listening to our show today.- listening to our show today. radios two, one, listening to our show today. radios two. one. four— listening to our show today. radios two, one, four and _ listening to our show today. radios two, one, four and kiss _ listening to our show today. radios two, one, four and kiss have - listening to our show today. radios two, one, four and kiss have all. two, one, four and kiss have all shown enough dip for their flagship early morning programmes, a sign that perhaps with so many people still working from home early morning routines have changed. how much does that worry you?— morning routines have changed. how much does that worry you? welcome of course... much does that worry you? welcome of course--- over— much does that worry you? welcome of course... over the _ much does that worry you? welcome of course... over the rest _ much does that worry you? welcome of course... over the rest of _ much does that worry you? welcome of course... over the rest of the _ much does that worry you? welcome of course... over the rest of the day - course... over the rest of the day firures course... over the rest of the day figures look _ course... over the rest of the day figures look better. _
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course... over the rest of the day figures look better. times - course... over the rest of the day figures look better. times radio, | figures look better. times radio, and you speech station, has a weekly audience of more than 650,000. ok, ureat! audience of more than 650,000. ok, great! easier— audience of more than 650,000. ok, great! easier than _ audience of more than 650,000. ok, great! easier than you _ audience of more than 650,000. ok, great! easier than you thought. - great! easier than you thought. heart is reaching _ great! easier than you thought. heart is reaching more - great! easier than you thought. heart is reaching more than - great! easier than you thought. heart is reaching more than 10| heart is reaching more than 10 million listeners a week. in an age of smart speakers and the growth of podcasts many wondered how traditional radio would fare. and the technological changes, especially the impact of smartphones, means the way the figures are gathered has been changed, which makes it difficult to make accurate comparisons with figures before the pandemic, but you can certainly see a broad picture. many of us may be glued to our phones and plugged into podcasts but old school radio still has an audience. david sillito, bbc news. the uk�*s newest polar research ship has completed a year of sea trials and is ready to set sail for its maiden voyage to antarctica. the £200 million vessel first made headlines when thousands of people voted to call it boaty mcboatface, but it was eventually named the rss sir david attenborough,
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after the broadcaster and naturalist. it�*s strong enough to sail through metre—thick ice sheets in the frozen antarctic seas. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports from greenwich. heading up the thames, it�*s the most advanced polar ship ever to set sail. it took just four years to build and now it�*s spending three days in london before its first voyage to antarctica. and on board, the man it�*s named after, sir david attenborough. i am indeed a very proud man to be standing in this remarkable vessel. i know that the findings made on this ship in the next few years will be of the greatest value and importance to the welfare of the world. this is a state—of—the—art research ship, and here on the top deck is the helipad so scientists and the crew can be brought to and from the ship
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while she�*s at sea. in here, you have the living quarters — a cosy cabin for two — because the crew on here can stay on board for two months at a time. there�*s room for 30 crew and 60 scientists on the ship. and this is the all—important coffee shop — where, after a hard day of polar research, the crew can come in and take a bit of a break. this big hole in the middle of the ship goes all the way from the sea up to here. it�*s called a moon pool, and it means that scientists can access the ocean with their instruments, whatever the weather. the moon pool is really significant because it means we can get these really valuable data points. the southern ocean is one of these places that we don�*t have very many observations from because it�*s so difficult to get there. and the southern ocean might feel really far away from us here in the uk, but it�*s really important for our climate as a whole. it takes up a lot of the carbon dioxide and the heat that we put into the atmosphere. it�*s notjust the water — scientists will be studying
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every aspect of this rapidly changing ecosystem. this ship will transform our understanding of the poles. seeing this ship among the ice will be absolutely remarkable and it�*s something we�*re really looking forward to. working in the antarctic, sometimes you might think you would get used to it but every time it still amazes us. and, of course, you can�*t come on board without mentioning boaty mcboatface. it�*s what the public voted to call this ship. but instead, the name�*s been given to this — a mini submarine — and soon it�*s going to be heading off to explore the antarctic ocean. the sir david attenborough will head off in a few weeks, stopping at the falklands on the way to antarctica. and the man it�*s named after has recorded a special message for when it sets sail. david attenborough: your attention, please. any personnel on board not sailing with the vessel, please disembark. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
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the late mp sir david amess 5 dog has been crowned westminster dog of the year. his three year—old french bulldog, vivienne, was wearing a southend city status bandanna as she collected the prize. the organisers, the kennel club, said she was the runaway winner of the public vote. sir david amess regularly entered his dogs into the annual competition outside parliament, but had never won. time for a look at the weather. here�*s ben rich. we were seeing some torrential rain in cumbria? yes, extraordinarily wet weather across north—west england and southern scotland, there are numerous flood warnings in force and river levels have been rising as you can see from this picture close to cockermouth. there is no real surprise as to why we�*ve seen so much of that flooding and disruption, because the rain has been piling into this part of the country. in fact according to the environment agency, 350 metres of
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rain has fallen so

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