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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 28, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: after yesterday's uk budget, a leading think tank is warning that households could see their taxes rise by several thousand pounds over the next five years. labour says more needs to be done to help ordinary people, but the chancellor says things are improving. people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago. — to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. help people with the cost of living prices, and not give tax cut to bankers or indeed to reduce air passenger duty on domestic
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flights when we should be encouraging people to use trains for those journeys. tension over post—brexit fishing rights in the channel — as france says it's detained a british boat caught fishing in french waters without a licence. a study has found that some of the world's most highly protected forests are emitting more carbon than they absorb as a result of illegal logging and wildfires. moscow is set to shut down all non—essential businesses from today, in a bid to halt soaring coronavirus cases and record death rates. as britain's newest polar research ship — the rrs sir david attenborough — prepares to set sail for its maiden voyage to antarctica, sir david himself spoke of what it might achieve. in the light of the scientific discoveries that this ship will undoubtedly be making, that nations -ot undoubtedly be making, that nations got together and listened to the science — got together and listened to the science of what has to be done if the world — science of what has to be done if
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the world is not to be overcome by catastrophe. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a leading think tank is warning that uk households could see their tax rise by several thousand pounds over the next five years. it follows chancellor rishi sunak�*s budget in which he announced a £150 billion spending spree over three years. an average of £3,000 a year more in taxes will be paid by households by 2026, according to the living standards think tank the resolution foundation after analysing the chancellor's numbers. the foundation also calculates that three quarters of households on universal credit will be worse off. the economic research institute, the ifs, says it supsects
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that with an ageing population taxes would not be coming down. the chief secretary to the treasury, simon clarke, has spoken of a "philosophical shift" in conservatism and says he makes "no apologies" for investing more in public services to stimulate growth evenly across the uk. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, has this report. any budget is a delicate mix of ingredients. first comes the chancellor's address to the commons. then it's a selling job. here we go. taxes on alcohol are being simplified... cheers! ..so a trip to a brewery was in order. to rishi! and the chancellor is out and about again this morning in what is so often a crucial time after any budget — the day after — as people start to plough through the budget documents to ferret out the details that weren't mentioned in the speech.
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the 0br says you've raised more tax this year than any chancellor since 1993. are you happy to have that title? no, and i acknowledged it. yesterday during the budget, and i was very clear about it. i'm not... i'm not happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it _ but it is the result of the country and the economy suffering - an economic shock, the likes i of which we haven't seen in 300 years, and our response to that. to help get the country through it. a plan which — as we saw yesterday — has really worked. _ here are the key things we learnt. the economy is doing better than some thought, and the government's going to spend the extra money that it raises in taxes. prices are going up — and are likely to for some time. the recent cut in universal credit won't be reversed, but workers who get it will be able to keep more of it as they earn more. and there'll be a 50% discount in business rates in england for the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors — starting next year.
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if you look at the cost of living — which is a real challenge for families and pensioners around the country right now — if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth — that, by the end of this parliament, is set tojust be 1.3% — it's certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the chancellor got some really good news for the public finances yesterday. lower borrowing because the economy's doing slightly better than we all thought six months ago — that's really good news — but good news for public finances, wasn't good news household finances because higher inflation that actually helped the chancellor with his borrowing figures is obviously hurting household budgets and that's why the office for budget responsibility expects household incomes — and, actually, wages — to actually not grow at all next year, so that's really bad news for everyone worrying about their own budgets.
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and the analysis is onlyjust beginning. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. 0ur chief political corresondent, adam fleming, says borisjohnson and rishi sunak are taking over some of labour's territory with this budget. the short—term politics has started this morning where you have labour saying the government has made the wrong priorities, so reducing the taxation on prosecco and air passenger duty for domestic flights, for example, and reducing a quite complicated tax that banks pay. rachel reeves, the shadow chancellor, says that would have been better focused on cutting vat for domestic fuel to help people with the cost of living, so this morning the chancellor is having to defend what he has done on the cost of living because also the think tanks like the resolution foundation and the institute for fiscal studies
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who churn through the documents overnight and provide analysis next morning are kind ofjoining in that argument as well, and rishi sunak is pointing to the £2 billion he is putting into universal credit, the £1 billion the fuel duty freeze will cost the treasury, and also a few other measures. but i think the debate over the next few days and weeks and actually the next few months, because inflation will stay quite high for quite a long time, will be about, has the government done enough to help people with the cost of living? the government will obviously say yes, the opposition and some of these think tanks will say, probably not. that was adam fleming, our chief political correspondant there. a study has found that some of the world's most highly protected forests are emitting more carbon than they absorb, as a result of illegal logging and wildfires. at least ten forests designated unesco world heritage sites, including yosemite national park in the united states, were found to have been net carbon emitters over the last two decades. the findings have alarmed researchers as forests are considered vital for curbing climate change because of their ability to act as carbon sinks.
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tanya dendrinos has more. forests emitting more carbon than the store. —— forests emitting more carbon than they store. it may seem perplexing, but the concept is simple. when we cut down forests or they are burned they will emit carbon into the atmosphere, and it's a matter of how much forests we cut down relative to how much forest we leave standing. if we cut down too much forest, then we have forests that emit more carbon than they are capturing from the atmosphere. researchers involved in the unesco co—authored report combined satellite and field data to estimate the amount of carbon emitted from world heritage forests between 2001 and 2020. the study looked at a network of more than 220 world heritage forests
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and on a whole they capture much more carbon than they emit. collectively it is more than 190 tonnes from the atmosphere every year. but ten, including brazil's wetlands which have been ravaged by fire in recent years, emitted more carbon than they locked away. these are some treasured iconic places and they should not be emitting so much carbon. we believe that if these heavily protected and treasured sites are at such risk, and a few of them are, others in this unesco world heritage network will also be threatened, as will other protected forests, much less forests not as protected. it is an alarming find further highlighting the need to cut global emissions. people around the world want their governments to take strong action on climate change, according to a new poll commissioned by the bbc. ahead of the opening of the cop26
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climate summit in glasgow on sunday, more than 30,000 people were surveyed across 31 countries about their attitudes to climate change policies. more than half? 56% — say they want their governments to play a key leadership role. earlier, our environment correspondent matt mcgrath told me whilst 56% might not sound like a huge majority, it is a significant increase. the opinion pollsters here carried out a _ the opinion pollsters here carried out a similar survey before the paris _ out a similar survey before the paris climate talks back in 2016 six years _ paris climate talks back in 2016 six years ago— paris climate talks back in 2016 six years ago and the difference between then and _ years ago and the difference between then and now is quite remarkable. people _ then and now is quite remarkable. people looking for strong action from _ people looking for strong action from their governments, strong leadership, that has essentially increased by 25% over that period of time _ increased by 25% over that period of time it— increased by 25% over that period of time. it increased in a lot of interesting countries, in india and interesting countries, in india and in chine — interesting countries, in india and in chine in— interesting countries, in india and in china. in china back in 2015 only 18% of— in china. in china back in 2015 only 18% of people wanted to see their government clinic take strong action and that— government clinic take strong action and that has gone up to nearly half the respondents now —— their governments. it is an opinion poll,
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a snapshot — governments. it is an opinion poll, a snapshot of opinion, but it does show— a snapshot of opinion, but it does show people are more serious about climate _ show people are more serious about climate change and want their governments to take more serious action _ governments to take more serious action. �* , ., , ., , ,, action. and is that seriousness mirrored in _ action. and is that seriousness mirrored in all _ action. and is that seriousness mirrored in all the _ action. and is that seriousness mirrored in all the 31 _ action. and is that seriousness mirrored in all the 31 countries| mirrored in all the 31 countries that were surveyed? 0r mirrored in all the 31 countries that were surveyed? or are there differences?— differences? there are certainly differences _ differences? there are certainly differences in _ differences? there are certainly differences in some _ differences? there are certainly differences in some countries. i differences in some countries. overall. — differences in some countries. overall, only 8% of those 30,000 or so people _ overall, only 8% of those 30,000 or so people polled doubt want to see an agreement come out of glasgow, but some _ an agreement come out of glasgow, but some countries are well encountered to the narrative come in certain— encountered to the narrative come in certain respects. russia, for instance. _ certain respects. russia, for instance, six years ago when the survey— instance, six years ago when the survey was— instance, six years ago when the survey was carried out, 50% of people — survey was carried out, 50% of people wanted to see strong action from the _ people wanted to see strong action from the russian government. that has fallen— from the russian government. that has fallen to less than 40%, about 38%~ _ has fallen to less than 40%, about 38%~ in— has fallen to less than 40%, about 38%. in other countries it is mostly up 38%. in other countries it is mostly up but _ 38%. in other countries it is mostly up but there — 38%. in other countries it is mostly up but there are a few like russia where _ up but there are a few like russia where the — up but there are a few like russia where the numbers have gone down. that was— where the numbers have gone down. that was matt mcgrath, our environment correspondent. france has detained a british trawler caught fishing in french waters without a licence. the boat was stopped by maritime police yesterday and has been handed
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over to judicial authorities. the company operating the british boat says its fishing activity is entirely legal. it comes during an escalating row between britain and france over post—brexit fishing rights. the french are angry that many of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters. they claim this breaches the brexit deal. france has also threatened to target energy supplies to jersey. our paris correspondent hugh schofield has more details about the detained british trawler. it's at the quayside in le havre. it was impounded yesterday, as you said, when the french maritime authorities conducted this reinforced checks on boats in the area off le havre. they stopped two boats. one was fined for not obeying an initial order to stop and allowing the authorities to board it. that was otherwise in order, but there has been a fine on that boat.
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then the other boat was found to not have the papers it was required to have in order to fish in these waters, so it has been brought into le havre where it has been impounded, and i guess the captain and the owner of the boat face legal proceedings. at some point it'll be allowed to go on its way but there will almost certainly be some kind of legal follow—up to this. that was hugh schofield, our correspondant in france. barrie deas is chief executive of the national federation of fishermen's organisations, which represents fishermen in england, wales and northern ireland. good to have you with us. your reaction first of all to the fact this british troll has been detained and impounded? i this british troll has been detained and impounded?— this british troll has been detained and impounded? i suppose this could be normal enforcement _ and impounded? i suppose this could be normal enforcement activity - and impounded? i suppose this could be normal enforcement activity by . be normal enforcement activity by the french authorities, but of course it takes place against the background of very belligerent noises made by the french government on the licensing issue yesterday. so
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it seems that france is determined to escalate this issue, which is a matter of concern to us. it only really makes sense to me in terms of french domestic politics because this licensing issue is really a technical matter to be resolved at a technical matter to be resolved at a technical level. and my understanding is that quite a lot of progress is being made in resolving it. but there is a french presidential election in the offing and that north coast of france i think is the focus of that kind of domestic political activity. so i think to understand what's happening, you really have to see it within that context. it’s within that context. it's interesting _ within that context. it's interesting that - within that context. it's interesting that you - within that context. it's interesting that you say the licensing issue is a technical matter, because of course france says the uk government refuses to grant the full number of licenses
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that they are entitled to in uk waters. can you clarify, is not actually true or not?- waters. can you clarify, is not actually true or not? well, my understanding _ actually true or not? well, my understanding is _ actually true or not? well, my understanding is the - actually true or not? well, my understanding is the uk - actually true or not? well, my understanding is the uk is - actually true or not? well, my - understanding is the uk is working completely within the terms of the trade and cooperation agreement. that's not an agreement that we like, but it exists. my understanding is that 98% of the licences applied for have been granted. there are issues, evidence issues, surrounding a number of licences, because the trading cooperation agreement doesn't say licences should be handed out like confetti, but only to vessels who can demonstrate they have a historical record of fishing in that area, and that is really what the dispute at a technical level is centred on. it's the french government's choice to escalate this into a much higher political level, i think. into a much higher political level, ithink. in into a much higher political level, i think. , ., into a much higher political level, ithink. , ., ., ., i think. in terms of escalation, what are your _ i think. in terms of escalation, what are your members - i think. in terms of escalation, j what are your members telling i think. in terms of escalation, - what are your members telling you about what is happening to them? i
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their boats being checked more? do they fear they could be locked at french ports, for example? are there boats —— are there boats being checked more. the element of course there is concern for our vessels operating in french waters in particular —— operating in french waters in particular "— operating in french waters in articular-- , ., , particular -- yes, of course there is concern- _ particular -- yes, of course there is concern. this _ particular -- yes, of course there is concern. this is _ particular -- yes, of course there is concern. this is a _ particular -- yes, of course there is concern. this is a little - is concern. this is a little strange. the french fleet fish much more in uk waters than we fish in their waters, more in uk waters than we fish in theirwaters, hugely more in uk waters than we fish in their waters, hugely more. more in uk waters than we fish in theirwaters, hugely more. so more in uk waters than we fish in their waters, hugely more. so if we were to descend into a kind of biscuit for tat approach —— a kind of biscuit for tat approach, that would leave the french fleet is very exposed, for the simple reason they fish much more in our waters than we do in theirs so i don't think this is something that has been thought through particularly well. final thou~ht, through particularly well. final thought, barrie _ through particularly well. final thought, barrie, _ through particularly well. final thought, barrie, what - through particularly well. final thought, barrie, what do - through particularly well. final thought, barrie, what do you want the uk government to do and how can this situation be de—escalated? i
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this situation be de—escalated? i think the uk government is pretty much on track. this is a technical issue. it needs to be resolved through talking. and at the appropriate level. i think what we come on all sides, need to do is take the politics out of it. that is not doing anybody any good. barrie deas, not doing anybody any good. barrie deas. chief — not doing anybody any good. barrie deas, chief executive _ not doing anybody any good. barrie deas, chief executive of _ not doing anybody any good. barrie deas, chief executive of the - deas, chief executive of the national federation of fishermen's organisations. good to have you with us full stop we will have to leave it there. thank you. let's update you with the headlines on bbc news. after yesterday's uk budget a leading think—tank is warning that households could see their taxes rise by several thousand pounds over the next five years. tension over post—brexit fishing rights in the channel — as france says it's detained a british boat caught fishing in french waters without a licence. a study has found that some of the world's most highly protected forests are emitting more carbon than they absorb, as a result of illegal logging and wildfires.
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let's return to the budget now. the chancellor rishi sunak said yesterday that the nhs in england would receive an extra £5.9 billion in funding. that money has been promised to help clear the record backlog of people waiting for tests and scans, but also to buy equipment and improve it. dr ben maruthappu is ceo of cera, a company which delivers social care at home with the aid of technology. very good to have you with us. thank you forjoining us. the chancellor has confirmed an extra £5.9 billion of funding they smack the nhs. how will that help at home care providers? 50 will that help at home care providers?— will that help at home care providers? will that help at home care roviders? , , ., , providers? so yes, this was a big bud . et providers? so yes, this was a big budget with _ providers? so yes, this was a big budget with big _ providers? so yes, this was a big budget with big spending - providers? so yes, this was a big budget with big spending and - providers? so yes, this was a big l budget with big spending and 5.9 budget with big spending and {5.9 trillion_ budget with big spending and {5.9 billion extra for the nhs, in particular to use in digital technology, but unfortunately social care and _ technology, but unfortunately social care and home care wasn't very much
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on the _ care and home care wasn't very much on the agenda, which of course is leaving _ on the agenda, which of course is leaving some of the oldest and most vulnerable _ leaving some of the oldest and most vulnerable behind. the government does need _ vulnerable behind. the government does need to take this more seriously— does need to take this more seriously and it does need to commit to providing — seriously and it does need to commit to providing a similar level of investment in social care, as you mentioned, _ investment in social care, as you mentioned, in the home, and using technology— mentioned, in the home, and using technology to modernise how those services _ technology to modernise how those services are delivered so we can get through— services are delivered so we can get through this winter where there are tremendous pressures on health and care services across the country. | care services across the country. i have care services across the country. have read care services across the country. i have read that social care will only see a fifth of that 5.9 billion. does that figure sound about right to you? does that figure sound about right to ou? , �* , ., does that figure sound about right to ou? , �*, ., ., ., to you? yes, it's a fraction of the investment _ to you? yes, it's a fraction of the investment and _ to you? yes, it's a fraction of the investment and the _ to you? yes, it's a fraction of the investment and the amount - to you? yes, it's a fraction of the investment and the amount that| to you? yes, it's a fraction of the i investment and the amount that has been announced by the chancellor yesterday, and that is very unfortunate because of course at a time when — unfortunate because of course at a time when demand is on hospitals have never— time when demand is on hospitals have never been higher we can't stop people _ have never been higher we can't stop people going to a hospital or discharge them faster back to their home _ discharge them faster back to their home without a robust social care
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sector _ home without a robust social care sector so — home without a robust social care sector. so while these investments in the _ sector. so while these investments in the nhs — sector. so while these investments in the nhs are important as a support, _ in the nhs are important as a support, they actually won't count and won't — support, they actually won't count and won't go as far as the government may want without similar investments in social care, and i think— investments in social care, and i think modernisation in particular, using _ think modernisation in particular, using technology to empower staff so they spend less time on paperwork and more _ they spend less time on paperwork and more time and actually caring and more time and actually caring and delivering high quality services in the _ and delivering high quality services in the home is critical. i mean, as an e>
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modernisation. like my eye will come back to _ modernisation. like my eye will come back to the _ modernisation. like my eye will come back to the technology but woe to the rise _ back to the technology but woe to the rise in — back to the technology but woe to the rise in national insurance which is specifically designed to help fund social care —— is specifically designed to help fund social care --_ is specifically designed to help fund social care -- yes, i will come back the technology _ fund social care -- yes, i will come back the technology was _ fund social care -- yes, i will come back the technology was about - fund social care -- yes, i will come| back the technology was about that rising national insurance help? there is that rise in the levy but actually — there is that rise in the levy but actually the majority of that over the next — actually the majority of that over the next three years is earmarked for the _ the next three years is earmarked for the nhs. the next three years is earmarked forthe nhs. it is the next three years is earmarked for the nhs. it is only after those three _ for the nhs. it is only after those three years that we will see significant amounts of the funding coming _ significant amounts of the funding coming into social care and even then— coming into social care and even then we — coming into social care and even then we are not sure how much of that will— then we are not sure how much of that will happen. there are pressures here and now especially with the _ pressures here and now especially with the pressure of the pandemic, the flu _ with the pressure of the pandemic, the flu and — with the pressure of the pandemic, the flu and hospitals being overwhelmed with pressures, and we have to _ overwhelmed with pressures, and we have to focus on this winter, let alone _ have to focus on this winter, let alone three or four winters down the road _ alone three or four winters down the road dr— alone three or four winters down the road. , �* ., ,, ., road. dr ben maruthappu, ceo of cera, unfortunately _ road. dr ben maruthappu, ceo of cera, unfortunately we _ road. dr ben maruthappu, ceo of cera, unfortunately we have - road. dr ben maruthappu, ceo of cera, unfortunately we have to i road. dr ben maruthappu, ceo of. cera, unfortunately we have to leave it there, but thank you so much for your time. it there, but thank you so much for our time. ., ~ it there, but thank you so much for your time-— moscow is set to shut down all nonessential businesses from today, ahead of the national �*non—working week�* aimed at halting soaring coronavirus cases and record death rates. the latest available daily figure for fatalities from tuesday shows 1,126 people
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died from coronavirus. but some russians who have had vaccinations believed they're being punished and their businesses will suffer because of the countries low vaccination rate. courtney bembridge reports. at one of moscow's main train stations, emergency service men suit up and start disinfecting before the first commuters arrive. it comes as infections and deaths rise across russia, and its now one of the worst—affected countries in europe. authorities have blamed slow vaccination rates and are offering incentives to get more people jabbed. translation: i obviously care about my own health| and the health of my relatives. i think we should do it, the vaccination. otherwise we won't defeat covid—19.
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moscow has reimposed a partial lockdown and only essential shops like pharmacies and supermarkets are allowed to remain open. president vladimir putin has also ordered a nationwide shutdown of workplaces from saturday, and many russians have decided to use the paid leave for a holiday. translation: there is a very large flow of tourists. - prices have rocketed for all the destinations that we provide. due to this lockdown, people are leaving. honestly, i'm not scared. they're trying to keep on top of this, including the hotels. it's not my first holiday this year. it's probably my fifth. they're trying to follow and observe the rules. plus i'm vaccinated. that won't save you, but it will still help, so everything will be great. the kremlin has stopped short of banning travel but has warned against it. that message appears to be falling on deaf ears, with recent polls suggesting one third of russians planned to travel during the workplace shutdown.
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courtney bembridge, bbc news. american police investigating the accidental killing of a cinematographer on a film set say they believe the weapon used by the actor alec baldwin contained a live round. mr baldwin had been told the weapon was safe. reports have now emerged about safety concerns on set in the days before halyna hutchins was killed. sophie long reports. it is now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead while she was doing herjob. these are the last pictures of the cinematographer alive on the set of rust. she's in the blue coat and headphones. you can see alec baldwin beyond the camera. he was holding the gun that fired the shot that killed halyna and severely injured directorjoel souza. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr souza. we regard this specific spent casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired
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from the revolver by mr baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon by assistant director dave halls, he was told it was safe — what's called a cold gun. the person responsible forfirearms on the set was the armourer — 24—year—old hannah gutierrez—reed. she's admitted ammunition was not secure, but says she checked the guns and found no live rounds. all three are cooperating fully with the investigation. all options are on the table at this point. i'm not commenting on charges — whether they will be filed or not, or on whom. so the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving, and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be
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allowed on film sets under any circumstances. sophie long, bbc news. thousands of women across the uk decided to stay away from pubs and nightclubs last night, and some protested on the streets to highlight the growing number of spikings on nights out. according to the national police chiefs council, forces have received almost 200 confirmed reports of drink spiking in just under two months. louisa pilbeam has more. i scream at the top of my lungs, "we will not accept this!" cheering this was manchester last night, where hundreds of people protested against drink spiking. and across the uk, the night in campaign has seen a boycott of nightclubs, leaving establishments empty. spread your arms apart. and across the uk, the night in campaign has seen women are particularly angry at being made to feel unsafe at the alarming trend of people on nights out being deliberately injected with dangerous substances that have left some victims unconscious. women seem to be thought
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of as the lesser kind of gene, and we are definitely not, so to spike a woman in their drink or inject them is just absolutely disgusting. new figures revealed 56 incidents of spiking by injection were recorded by police in the uk in september and october, and 198 reports of drink spiking — the majority of victims female. many young women say they'd feel safer if nightclubs and bars had tighter security. i go to some clubs and they will check underneath my phone case and they will check my pockets and my bag, and other clubs, they just don't. and actually i would rather you were taking my phone case off and looking inside and see if there's some funny things being brought in. it makes me feel safer. student unions across the country have been providing alternative places to go. there's things like board games, hot drinks, and it's a place for them to come and meet other
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people and have a chat, but it's people who want to take part in the boycott but don't want to be alone that evening, they are free to come along. many nightclubs and bars say they are making changes. the first is we are providing testing kits to venues so if drink spiking happens on their watch they are able to gather forensic evidence straight away. we have got training guides so staff know exactly what to do. but people seem determined to make a stand, with more demonstrations planned until they feel safe. louisa pilbeam, bbc news. to italy now, and the island of sicily is being battered by a rare cyclonic storm known as a medicane. torrential rain has caused widespread flooding around the city of catania. at least two people have been killed. sophia tran—thomson reports. during a brief respite from the rain, residents of catania were out checking the damage. translation: here it was like
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a swollen river, a lake. - it spread and caused major damage to this beautiful area of our city. between yesterday and the day before, 300 millimetres of rain fell. the annual average in catania is 600 millimetres. this means that in 2a hours half of what is recorded in one year fell. very unusual. this is what that much rain looks like. streets turned to rivers, the water strong enough to carry cars. mud filled many homes, and in some areas the water supply has been cut off, making the clean—up even harder. translation: it was a disaster. my mother was sleeping here. local businesses are trying to salvage what's left. translation: we don't know yet. we will try to clean these plants, but i think it will be difficult to save some of them. and the worst could be to come. forecasters are predicting more heavy rain.
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and the powerful storm is forecast to peak between thursday and friday, with more heavy rain expected. courtney bembridge, bbc news. i will take you straight to the house of commons where an urgent question is being asked about the seizure of a british trawler by the french authorities. in a reasonable and evidence-based _ french authorities. in a reasonable and evidence-based way, - french authorities. in a reasonable i and evidence-based way, recognising | french authorities. in a reasonable. and evidence-based way, recognising and evidence—based way, recognising some of the sensitivities and importance of some of these arrangements for both parties. since the 31st of december last year, the uk has issued licences to fish in our exclusive economic seven to 1073 eu vessels, this includes 736 french cells. 121 boats have been licensed to fish in the nautical mile zone.
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several of these are french. 18 of those vassals are under 12 metres. the uk has licensed 98% of eu vassals who applied for access. constructive discussions continue on a methodology to allow vassals to be replaced. once finalised, more vassals will be licensed. over the last two weeks, for further licences have been issued, after we were able to provide new and additional evidence. we can remain committed and willing to consider new information and following receipt of more over the last couple of weeks, we have been able to issue more licences. as i have said repeatedly to the french, to the european commission, our door remains ever open. in that context, it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and
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disproportionate and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. the measures being frightened to not to be compatible with the trade and cooperation agreement, orwider law, with the trade and cooperation agreement, or wider law, and with the trade and cooperation agreement, orwider law, and if carried through, will be met with appropriate and calibrated response. yesterday, spoke to commissioner, regarding comments that french officials had made. the uk stands by its commitments in the trade and cooperation agreement. as i said, we have already granted 98% of eu vessels to fish in our waters. all of our commitments have been fully aligned with this commitment. we supportjersey and guernsey's support jersey and guernsey's handling supportjersey and guernsey's handling and we have remained in close contact with them throughout. their approach has also been in line with the agreement. finally, i am
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aware of the support being undertaken by the french authorities in respect of two vassals. we are looking into these matters urgently. brexit induced changes have resulted in an excavated trading dispute could _ in an excavated trading dispute could which could end up with british— could which could end up with british boats banned from french waters _ british boats banned from french waters. we may see france go further and cut— waters. we may see france go further and cut electricity to the channel islands _ and cut electricity to the channel islands and cause custom checks to goods— islands and cause custom checks to goods arriving from the uk. french officials, _ goods arriving from the uk. french officials, and i have to say there is a considerable difference between a number— is a considerable difference between a number of licenses that the secretary— a number of licenses that the secretary of state has just given as the number of licenses that the french— the number of licenses that the french claim have been issued, french— french claim have been issued, french officials claim the process for obtaining a fishing license to fish in _ for obtaining a fishing license to fish in uk — for obtaining a fishing license to fish in uk waters is too slow and laborious, — fish in uk waters is too slow and laborious, while lord foster said
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these _ laborious, while lord foster said these are — laborious, while lord foster said these are only teething issues. france, — these are only teething issues. france, underthe these are only teething issues. france, under the brexit these are only teething issues. france, underthe brexit agreement, 175 french _ france, underthe brexit agreement, 175 french vassals have the right to fish of _ 175 french vassals have the right to fish of the — 175 french vassals have the right to fish of the nautical coast, but looking — fish of the nautical coast, but looking delivered only 100 licences. paris said _ looking delivered only 100 licences. paris said not as many boats have been _ paris said not as many boats have been delivered as promised. today, we will— been delivered as promised. today, we will hear— been delivered as promised. today, we will hear a sanction regime that will come _ we will hear a sanction regime that will come into effect on november the 2nd _ will come into effect on november the 2nd. this follows news of a scottish — the 2nd. this follows news of a scottish trawler detained for fishing — scottish trawler detained for fishing without a line in french waters — fishing without a line in french waters. this was announced overnight. come secretary of state confirm _ overnight. come secretary of state confirm what consular assistance the government has been offering to the british— government has been offering to the british fishing vessel crew, currently detained by the french authorities. what support is his department given to the vessel and its owners? the uk government couldn't— its owners? the uk government couldn't confirm whether an external water _ couldn't confirm whether an external water licence was issued. why doesn't — water licence was issued. why doesn't it— water licence was issued. why doesn't it appear on the listtoo
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early— doesn't it appear on the listtoo early to— doesn't it appear on the listtoo early to know what happened, and it could _ early to know what happened, and it could have _ early to know what happened, and it could have been on the list, but they— could have been on the list, but they have — could have been on the list, but they have had 12 hours to get to the bottom _ they have had 12 hours to get to the bottom of— they have had 12 hours to get to the bottom of this. we have a skipper of the scottish vessel, due in court this morning. it is not good enough that the _ this morning. it is not good enough that the secretary of state does not have answers to this question. what assurances — have answers to this question. what assurances can you give the house that the _ assurances can you give the house that the appropriate documents are in place. _ that the appropriate documents are in place, such as whether the lack of a licence — in place, such as whether the lack of a licence vessel, whether it had a licence _ of a licence vessel, whether it had a licence to— of a licence vessel, whether it had a licence to fish. if so, when. what is the _ a licence to fish. if so, when. what is the permitted time french authorities are allowed to take to inspect— authorities are allowed to take to inspect seafood goods arriving from the uk _ inspect seafood goods arriving from the uk by _ inspect seafood goods arriving from the uk by hgp. what advice would he offer to— the uk by hgp. what advice would he offer to seafood exporters, who would _ offer to seafood exporters, who would be — offer to seafood exporters, who would be concerned about stringent and additional checks that the french— and additional checks that the french are committed to make, and stated _ french are committed to make, and stated that — french are committed to make, and stated that they will from november the 2nd? _ stated that they will from november the 2nd? this will take longer to clear— the 2nd? this will take longer to clear hgvs and could create significant delays. thank you, madam
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deputv_ significant delays. thank you, madam deputy speaker. it's important to note, _ deputy speaker. it's important to note, although the honourable lady refers _ note, although the honourable lady refers to— note, although the honourable lady refers to this is a trade dispute, what _ refers to this is a trade dispute, what is — refers to this is a trade dispute, what is actually happening here is the french— what is actually happening here is the french are threatening to take a particular— the french are threatening to take a particular approach to trade, but linked _ particular approach to trade, but linked to, — particular approach to trade, but linked to, as they see it, issues that— linked to, as they see it, issues that they— linked to, as they see it, issues that they have over the issuing of a fishing _ that they have over the issuing of a fishing licences. i�*m that they have over the issuing of a fishing licences.— fishing licences. i'm afraid we completely — fishing licences. i'm afraid we completely reject _ fishing licences. i'm afraid we completely reject that - fishing licences. i'm afraid we - completely reject that caricature. the honourable lady says that france has claimed it as being too slow. that's not true. the vast majority of those 1700 or so vassals, but we have already licensed, received a licence on 31st of december. the only vassals that didn't have a licence immediately with those who struggled to marshal the data to support their application. as soon as data has been provided, those
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vassals have been granted their access. as i said earlier, many of those vassals are, indeed, french vassals. the honourable lady also mentioned the issue of the two vassals which have been detained. we understand one of them may still be detained. she raised the issue on whether a licence had been issued. what i've been able to establish so far, is that in respect of that vessel, they were on a list that was provided by the am am oh initially to the european union. the european union therefore did grant a licence. we are seeing some reports that for some reason, they were subsequently withdrawn from the list. it is unclear why that might have been at the moment. she asked why i have not been able to establish this morning in the course of events, by that has not been the case. i can say that
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the relevant data for this is held by marine scotland. i have asked officials to get the bottom of this issue. marine scotland hope to get back to us within the next hour or so. my officials will work constructively with the scottish government and agencies such as marine scotland, to understand what happened in case of this vessel. brute happened in case of this vessel. we leave the house of commons there, where they have asked an urgent question and what it means to mitigate a trade review with france. we had the environment secretary saying he asked officials to urgently investigate the situation surrounding a scottish vessel which has been seized and detained in france. he said it was too early to say precisely what has happened. this is against a background of a trade dispute with france over fishing. the environment secretary
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said 98% of vassals who applied to fish a uk waters were a licence. many of these were french. the french claim that far fewer licences have been granted. that's the background to these escalating tensions, which slides today to deceive thee of this scottish trawler, which has been taking to the french port of le havre row. french officials are investigating the situation. we will bring you more information on that when we get it. in the next few days tens of thousands of delegates, including world leaders, will arrive in glasgow for cop26 — the un climate change conference. countries will be asked to set out their plans for cutting emissions and rising global temperatures. people with disabilities are often disproportionately affected by the impacts of climate change. week focusing on disabled people
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and climate action. joining me now is nadia hadad, executive member of the european disability forum. what are you as an organisation hoping forfrom the what are you as an organisation hoping for from the summit in glasgow? hoping for from the summit in glasuow? ., ., glasgow? together with other organisations, _ glasgow? together with other organisations, including - glasgow? together with other i organisations, including inclusive scotland, international disability alliance, and many others, to make sure that not only the european union, but national governments and organisation individuals working on climate action understand the discrimination that is faced by people with disabilities. so it is not about. in order to realise the climate justice that not about. in order to realise the climatejustice that is going to be achieved, it can't be achieved without participation and inclusion on the disability community.
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interesting that you use the word discrimination, there. when you tell us more about the ways in which people with disabilities are affected by climate change around the world? the affected by climate change around the world? ,., . affected by climate change around the world? . ., affected by climate change around the world? ., . ., the world? the impact of climate chan . e the world? the impact of climate change around _ the world? the impact of climate change around the _ the world? the impact of climate change around the world - the world? the impact of climate change around the world is - the world? the impact of climate - change around the world is something that. the smell remember that people with disabilities represent 15% of the world's population. the disc discrimination they face is wizened in types of crisis. discrimination is four times higher than the rest of the of the population. the last earthquake that we had injapan, and for also last year in germany when there was a flood, flash floods, people with disabilities died in residential institutions because of the rescue which is not adapted or
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inclusive to help people with disabilities. and so, there is also an experience, an intersection from discrimination, for example, women with disabilities, children, and other people and other minority groups, they experience a lot of poverty. it's difficult for them to be rescued and to follow the climate impacts. be rescued and to follow the climate im acts. ., .., ., i. be rescued and to follow the climate imacts. ., .., . i. ., impacts. how confident are you that eo - le impacts. how confident are you that people with — impacts. how confident are you that people with disabilities _ impacts. how confident are you that people with disabilities will- impacts. how confident are you that people with disabilities will not - people with disabilities will not only be heard but listen to? and to what you have to say acted on in glasgow? if rare what you have to say acted on in glasgow? l— what you have to say acted on in glasaow?l�* ., .y glasgow? if we hope that the policy makers, glasgow? if we hope that the policy makers. for — glasgow? if we hope that the policy makers, for example, _ glasgow? if we hope that the policy makers, for example, when - glasgow? if we hope that the policy makers, for example, when they i glasgow? if we hope that the policy l makers, for example, when they take actions that appropriate for action, they should consult people with
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disabilities the take decisions, such as banning carbon projects, often, they do not address the differential cost and burden that this may impose on individuals with disabilities. we hope that they will hear us and involve us and also in many cases plans of emergency doesn't respond simply to people with disabilities. the infrastructure of hospitals is not often designed to be accessible. also, information and communication is often not accessible. for example, sign interpretation is not standard. perhaps organisations are rarely involved in decision—making and planning. we really hope we can
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overcome these barriers, by making them listen to us.— them listen to us. thank you for highlighting _ them listen to us. thank you for highlighting this _ them listen to us. thank you for highlighting this issue _ them listen to us. thank you for highlighting this issue for - them listen to us. thank you for highlighting this issue for us. i the headlines on bbc news... after yesterday's uk budget a leading think—tank is warning that households could see their taxes rise by several thousand pounds over the next five years tension over post—brexit fishing rights in the channel — as france says it's detained a british boat caught fishing in french waters without a licence. a study has found that some of the world's most highly protected forests are emitting more carbon than they absorb, as a result of illegal logging and wildfires. well, earlier in the hour — we heard from sir david attenborough on board the new polar research ship named after him. it's due to set sail for its maiden voyage to antarctica in the coming days. the vessel is currently
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being displayed on the river thames. our science correspondent, rebecca morelle, has been on board. it's the most advanced polar ship ever to set sail. named after sir david attenborough, it tookjust four years to build. now it's getting ready for its first voyage to antarctica. seeing the ship amongst the ice, it will be absolutely remarkable. and it's something we are all really looking forward to. working in the antarctic, sometimes you might think you get used to it, but every time it still amazes us. this is a state—of—the—art research ship, and here on the top deck is the helipad so scientists and the crew can be brought to and from the ship while she's at sea. in here, you have the living quarters — a cosy cabin for two — because the crew on here can stay on board for two months at a time. there's room for 30 crew and 60 scientists on the ship. and this is the all—important coffee shop — where, after a hard day of polar research,
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the crew can come in and take a bit of a break. this big hole in the middle of the ship goes all the way from the sea up to here. it's called a moon pool, and it means that scientists can access the ocean with their instruments, whatever the weather. the moon pool is really significant because it means we can get these really valuable data points. the southern ocean is one of these places that we don't have very many observations from because it's so difficult to get there. and the southern ocean might feel really far away from us here in the uk, but it's really important for our climate as a whole. it takes up a lot of the carbon dioxide and the heat that we put into the atmosphere. it's notjust the water — scientists will be studying every aspect of this rapidly changing ecosystem, from the animals that live there to the creatures they feed on and the nature of the ice itself. this ship will transform our understanding of the poles. the beauty of this ship is that we can bring lots of scientists from different diverse disciplines together
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on the same ship with lots of brilliant state—of—the—art facilities for each of those groups. so we can bring biologists, chemists, geologists, physicists all together. and that's really important when we're addressing issues around the environment. and, of course, you can't come on board without mentioning boaty mcboatface. it's what the public voted to call the ship. but instead, the's been given to this — a mini submarine — and soon it's going to be heading off to explore the antarctic ocean. the sir david attenborough will head off in a few weeks, stopping at the falklands on the way to antarctica. and the man it's named after has recorded a special message for when it sets sail. david attenborough: your attention, please. any personnel on board not sailing with the vessel, please disembark. the latest us economic growth figures are due out later. they'll provide a healthcheck on the state of the world's biggest economy and its recovery
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from the pandemic. the big question is how it did betweenjune and september, when the delta wave of coronavirus hit. one company that knows all about how the pandemic caused an instant collapse of business followed by a fast turnaround is the car rental giant, hertz. samira hussain has been talking to its ceo, mark fields. within two months of the pandemic taking hold in america, hertz filed for bankruptcy. it was drowning in debt and covid—19 pretty much obliterated any business. fast forward to today and the us car—rental company is an example of a pandemic turnaround. snap back in travel, constraints in the industry on the number of vehicles, that obviously has benefits at least financially to companies like hertz. clearly it does — the company is out of bankruptcy and is now spending billions of dollars buying tesla's electric cars for its fleet. it has partnered with uber
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to allow drivers of the car hailing app to rent cars at a discounted price. and it is also partnering with the online used car retailer ca rva na to sell their cars. we continue to believe that the consumer is going to continue to be quite healthy in terms of their personal balance sheets and that is going to drive a lot of demand. and then when you take it to hertz�*s business, clearly travel is integral to our business, and people, they are tired of being cooped up. hertz remains optimistic, and with reason, as people are travelling more. but the emergence of varying strains of the coronavirus could easily derail the economic recovery the country and the world has seen so far. labour shortages continue to plague restaurants and retailers, shipping delays are leading to some store shelves being bare. and ongoing supply disruptions show no signs of easing. in fact, many in corporate
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america believe these supply chain constraints will last for at least a year, if not longer, which does not bode well for a country that depends heavily on consumer spending for its economic growth. now with all eyes on the cop26 conference people are thinking about ways to save the planet. but it's notjust about politicians and big businesses making radical changes. it's also about what individuals and small businesses can do. here's how one plumber in england, is trying to make a difference morning! a lot of people i know that are tradesmen do not like the stigma attached to being a white van man. being aggressive and fat and smelly, wearing a vest, it is not something they want
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to be associated with, you know? the local city council ran a scheme where you can apply for a grant or loan for a cargo bike. ijumped straight on and applied. peak times, obviously rush—hour, school run time, i can get through a lot quicker. just having the space to think about things and go on the cyclepaths and away from the busy traffic, it really helps your mental health. but also being physically active is super good for you and with the electric motor on these bikes, you can do as much or as little effort as you want. there are so many parking restrictions and permit areas around here in the inner city and i can basically park where i want as long as i'm not blocking path,
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it is perfect. my fuel bills have come down by over half on the van. i still have to use the van occasionally to do biggerjobs, carrying boilers around and radiators and such, but it is a massive saving. i'm hoping that people will be motivated to make the changes that are needed, and if they see me doing myjobs on a big bike like this, they could say, "oh, my gosh, that is impractical," then they can look at themselves and go, "well, what is my excuse?" it's a0 years since duran duran first exploded onto the music scene — selling millions of records, performing in stadiums across the world, and earning themselves a star on the hollywood walk of fame. they're now back with their 15th studio album, called �*future past�*, and this week go head to head with sir eltonjohn for the top spot in the music charts. charlie stayt went to meet them.
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can ijust say, for people who don't know, we've been here a while, we've been sitting in this room waiting to get up. there is such a good vibe in the room with you four guys. we are super excited to have a new record coming. it's been quite a long road, the last five years. we all know the horrors that we went through for that sort of 18 month period with the pandemic. is it a silly thing to say that the new album, it really does sound like duran duran? i mean it really does, it really does. it's a very silly thing to say, but it's true. we want to experiment with music. that's what excites us, finding the new tunes, the kind of musical relationships,
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new beats, new sounds. but if it doesn't sound like duran duran, fans who we've got, who kept us going all these years are not going to like it. do you ever look at what people say about your songs? not really. 0k, here's some nice ones. someone hasjust watched invisible and they've seen the video and whatever and someone writes, "i am 50—something now, it makes me feel 16 again." that's a lovely feeling, isn't it? another one says, "sit down, grand kids. let's see how we really did it in the �*80s." that's interesting because that particular video for invisible has no markers of time for a period. i mean, it's a very modern piece, actually. # has the memory gone? # are you feeling numb? # or have i become invisible?
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what i'm thinking is, though, it's an emotional attachment to all of you and a time and place. it was a time for maverick all sorts of things. it was maverick music, maverick fashion design, maverick art and people were really prepared to stick their necks out at the time, and so if you looked at the charts, you'd see all kinds of artists — madonna, fine young cannibals — all kinds of different artists, and none of them were anything like anybody else who was in the charts. and i think that, as music has become slightly more corporate as time has gone by, there has been kind of an encouragement for artists to kind of head for the middle
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let's catch up with the weather now. as we head into the afternoon, the met office still has an amber weather warning in force for cumbria. that means an increased likelihood of impacts due to severe weather on your plans. it your travel, you might find delays, it could be flooding issues. because of this weather front, could be flooding issues. because of this weatherfront, its been could be flooding issues. because of this weather front, its been with us a few days now, and it will still produce further rain. where we have got the rain, extending to eastern, southern scotland, northern england, wales, and into the south—west, to
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the south of that comes brighter skies and sunshine. there will be gusty winds today. the average for this time of year is roughly 16 celsius. as we head into tonight, abundant rain continues to fill. it's joined abundant rain continues to fill. it'sjoined by abundant rain continues to fill. it's joined by a second abundant rain continues to fill. it'sjoined by a second one, bringing rain and across northern ireland and scotland. still windy, but not a cold night. temperatures are around five to seven celsius usually by night. it brightens up out in the past with sunshine and a few showers. it won't be as windy tomorrow. temperatures will be down one degree or so. we are looking to
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11 to 13 celsius. failure to saturday, a weather front moves in from the west. wider spacing in isobars shows that it will be breezy rather than windy. there goes the rain, moving from the west to the east, lingering in south—east england in north—east scotland. a little dry weather around and some showers in the west. temperatures are around what they should be for this time in october. clocks go back very early on sunday morning. the weather front is pushing very early on sunday morning. the weatherfront is pushing northwards and eastward through the course of the day. went will be picking up as well. the north of scotland hanging on to the brighter skies, with highs of up to 1a celsius.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 11... after yesterday's budget a leading think—tank warns middle—income families will be worse off next year. labour says ordinary people need more help — but the chancellor says things are improving. people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago. — to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. help people with the cost of living prices, and not give tax cut to bankers or indeed to reduce air passenger duty on domestic flights when we should be encouraging people to use trains for those journeys. government officials are investigating the detention of a british trawler in french waters in the channel. france says the boat
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was fishing without a licence it was fishing without a licence is very disappointing 1 comments it is very disappointing to see the comments came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate and not what we would expect from a close and partner. the uk's chief scientific advisor says plans to limit global warming to 1.5 celsius are an "urgent call for action" on climate change britain's newest polar research ship, the rrs sir david attenborough, prepares to set sail on its maiden voyage to antarctica. good morning and welcome to bbc news. middle—income families are likely to be finanically worse off next
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year because of spiralling costs and tax rises. that's the finding of an independent economic think tank, following the changes announced in the budget. the institute for fiscal studies says inflation and higher taxes on incomes would negate small wage increases. the institute says that chancellor rishi sunak will have to develop "new and radical ways" to fulfil his ambition of reducing taxes by the next election after swelling the state to its largest size in decades. it comes as a leading think—tank is warning that uk households could see their tax rise by £3,000 a year over the next five years. the chief secretary to the treasury, simon clarke, has spoken of a "philosophical shift" in conservatism and says he makes "no apologies" for investing more in public services to stimulate growth evenly across the uk. our political correspondent, chris mason, has this report. any budget is a delicate mix of ingredients.
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first comes the chancellor's address to the commons. then it's a selling job. here we go. taxes on alcohol are being simplified... cheers! ..so a trip to a brewery was in order. to rishi! and the chancellor is out and about again this morning in what is so often a crucial time after any budget — the day after — as people start to plough through the budget documents to ferret out the details that weren't mentioned in the speech. the obr says you've raised more tax this year than any chancellor since 1993. are you happy to have that title? no, and i acknowledged it. yesterday during the budget, and i was very clear about it. i'm not... i'm not happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it _ but it is the result of the country and the economy suffering - an economic shock, the likes i of which we haven't seen in 300 years, and our response to that i
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to help get the country through it. a plan which — as we saw yesterday — has really worked. _ here are the key things we learnt. the economy is doing better than some thought, and the government's going to spend the extra money that it raises in taxes. prices are going up — and are likely to for some time. the recent cut in universal credit won't be reversed, but workers who get it will be able to keep more of it as they earn more. and there'll be a 50% discount in business rates in england for the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors — starting next year. if you look at the cost of living — which is a real challenge for families and pensioners around the country right now — if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth — that, by the end of this parliament, is set tojust be 1.3% — it's certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the chancellor got some really
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good news for the public finances yesterday. lower borrowing because the economy's doing slightly better than we all thought six months ago — that's really good news — but good news for public finances, wasn't good news household finances because higher inflation that actually helped the chancellor with his borrowing figures is obviously hurting household budgets and that's why the office for budget responsibility expects household incomes — and, actually, wages — to actually not grow at all next year, so that's really bad news for everyone worrying about their own budgets. and the analysis is onlyjust beginning. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let's get some more on the fallout of the budget. our political correspondent ionie wells joins us from westminster. the analysis continues. what is the latest response and analysis to it. todayis
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latest response and analysis to it. today is really a day where everyone starts to tackle the detail of the budget and actually how it is going to affect all of us day—to—day. we've just been hearing from the independent economic think tap afs on their analysis, and one of the key points that has stuck out from their analysis is that they feel that middle income earners and families are going to be worse off next year. their argument that that is that small increases to wages will be negated by things like tax rises, but also the wider cost of living going up as well, citing in particular that rise to national insurance tax that we are expecting next year, to help with their social care levy. that was announced before the budget, but they say things like that along with rising energy bills and inflation, putting up the cost of some everyday items as well, meaning middle income families will potentially be worst off next year. the chancellor has said in response
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that he has acknowledged in his budget that they would be a squeeze on household finances, and one thing they are very keen to be stressing and talking about today is how they have introduced some measures to try and help people with cost of living as well. for example, that cut to universal credit temporary did so it will be cut by 8%. they will keep more of the benefits that they receive for every pound they iron. chancellor continuing to stress things like continuing the freeze on fuel duty to help with the rise of petrol costs at the pumps at the moment. a lot of people have been pointing out today that there was not a lot in the budget to help with people with rising energy and fuel bills. this is certainly a point that the opposition have been going on today. opposition parties stressing that they don't feel like some of the measures introduced to try and tackled cost of living will be enough to counter things like rising taxes, but also things like
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increases to the cost of living as well. interesting that the ifs did note that there has been big public spending announced, different spending announced, different spending for government departments, transport projects, nhs, schools in england as well. some people... there may not necessarily be much of a feel—good factor felt by families around the uk dealing with rising costs elsewhere.— costs elsewhere. thank you very much. we heard in chris mason's report that taxes on alcohol are to be simplified. the new system, which is due to start in 2023, will mean stronger drinks face a higher duty. but taxes on sparkling wine, draught beer and cider will be cut. there are other changes to for their hospitality industry. martin greenhow is the owner
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of mojo bars, a chain of five bars across the midlands and north of england. thank you forjoining us. what is your overview of the measures in the budget that affect you and the difference they will make? i think it is fair to _ difference they will make? i think it is fair to say _ difference they will make? i think it is fair to say it _ difference they will make? i think it is fair to say it is _ difference they will make? i think it is fair to say it is quite - difference they will make? i think it is fair to say it is quite a - it is fair to say it is quite a mixed bag. the business rate discount for next year is obviously very welcome and will be a help, but ultimately i think we have to face the fact that it will be more than offset by the rising national living wage. whilst some may say that only affects a small portion of society, in reality it is going to percolate through the rest of society. pay will rise all over. for us, the rough numbers we've done, that will more than offset the discount to business rates. with regard to the alcohol duty you have mentioned. the fine detailing that, i'm sure, there sum will be a great help. for ourselves, we are cocktail bars, so we'll be stronger on the spectrum
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and will probably be seeing a bit more pain from that. one thing that hasn't been mentioned in the budget itself but was pretty much the first thing the chancellor said was that he reminded the bank of england need to keep a careful hand on inflation. to me that was a fairly clear message that we can expect some rises in interest rates. bearing in mind most businesses have pre—existing debt and many more have new ones, it is going to increase that cut even further. club all that together, and unfortunately, what is inevitably going to happen is we will see a rise in prices that our guests are going to have to pay. hope guests are going to have to pay. how much of a rise _ guests are going to have to pay. how much of a rise in _ guests are going to have to pay. how much of a rise in prices for your guests would you anticipate there being? i guests would you anticipate there bein: ? ~ , ., being? i think listening to commentators _ being? i think listening to commentators and - being? i think listening to | commentators and people being? i think listening to i commentators and people in our industry, there is a suggestion of 33p per pint. we need to do the
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maths. everybody is finding time is pretty tough and everyone has been through a torrid time, but ultimately, hospitality is a sector is not in a position to absolve these debts. we have all burrowed to survive. ultimately, that has to be passed on because otherwise businesses fail. and remember most of these people will have other loans. if those businesses fail, those loans are liable to the british public said its not in the best interest.— best interest. you paint quite a complicated — best interest. you paint quite a complicated picture _ best interest. you paint quite a complicated picture behind i best interest. you paint quite a complicated picture behind the| complicated picture behind the scenes of the various factors in impacting on your costs and outgoings and as you say the rising national minimum wage is going to have an effect. let's talk a bit more about that. it is a huge proportion, isn't it, of outgoings in the hospitality sector? it varies from business _ in the hospitality sector? it varies from business to _ in the hospitality sector? it varies from business to business. i in the hospitality sector? it varies from business to business. for. from business to business. for businesses as ourselves that is
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roughly 25% of our cost base. any rising that has a significant impact. you did say it is a complex picture. there are other things i have not mentioned. we are just reviewing our energy costs and i know everyone has heard this time and time again but we are at that barrel of a gun where our energy contracts are up the river newell in january and we're looking at rises no less than 30%. we have one that is over 70%. we are really being squeeze hard. again, it only ends up in one place. squeeze hard. again, it only ends up in one place-— in one place. when you crunch all of those factors _ in one place. when you crunch all of those factors together _ in one place. when you crunch all of those factors together and - in one place. when you crunch all of those factors together and you i in one place. when you crunch all of those factors together and you say l those factors together and you say the net outcome will be an increase in the cost of the paint potentially by 20 to 30 p. a few things around that. would that be enough for you to be able to continue operating as a going viable concern. and how quickly do you think that cost increase my coming?- quickly do you think that cost increase my coming? most of these
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im acts increase my coming? most of these impacts are — increase my coming? most of these impacts are going — increase my coming? most of these impacts are going to _ increase my coming? most of these impacts are going to occur - increase my coming? most of these impacts are going to occur next i impacts are going to occur next year. we will hold off for as long as we possibly can, but we are a responsible business. we will bring them in when we have to. to answer your first them in when we have to. to answer yourfirst question, them in when we have to. to answer your first question, yes, them in when we have to. to answer yourfirst question, yes, we them in when we have to. to answer your first question, yes, we will find a way through this. we have just managed to navigate the worst 18 months, certainly in my living memory. we will continue to go forward and... in the last months in the return to normal operations, and the return to normal operations, and the return to normal operations, and the return to normal socialising, the return to normal socialising, the release of hospitality, if you like, has led to no significant impact on the infection rates. so i see a positive future if we are allowed to continue to trade normally. allowed to continue to trade normally-— allowed to continue to trade normall . ., ,, , ., , . allowed to continue to trade normall . ., ~ , . ., normally. thank you very much for “oininu normally. thank you very much for joining us- — france has detained a british trawler caught fishing in french waters without a licence. the boat was stopped by maritime police yesterday and has been handed over to judicial authorities.
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the company operating the british boat says its fishing activity is entirely legal. it comes during an escalating row between britain and france over post—brexit fishing rights. the french are angry that many of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters. they claim this breaches the brexit deal. france has also threatened to target energy supplies to jersey. yesterday france said it would consider blocking british boats from french ports and increase checks from as early as next week if the dispute is not resolved. speaking in the commons in the last half an hour, the environment secretary george eustice said he was disappointed by developments. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. the measures being threatened do not appear to be compatible with the trading cooperation agreement or wider
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international law. if carried through, they will be met with an appropriate and calibrated response. madam deputy speaker, yesterday, i spoke to commissioner regarding the comments that french officials had made. the uk stands by its commitments in their trading cooperation agreement and as i have said has already granted 90% of licence applications to fish in our waters. we also supportjersey and guernsey's handling of the fisheries licensing decisions. we have remained in close contact with them throughout. their approach has also been entirely in line with the provisions of the trading cooperation is agreement. finally, i am aware of reports of enforcement activity being undertaken by the french authorities in respect of two vessels. we are looking into these matters urgently. our paris correspondent hugh schofield has more details about the detained british trawler.
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it's at the quayside in le havre. it was impounded yesterday, as you said, when the french maritime authorities conducted this reinforced checks on boats in the area off le havre. they stopped two boats. one was fined for not obeying an initial order to stop and allowing the authorities to board it. that was otherwise in order, but there has been a fine on that boat. then the other boat was found to not have the papers it was required to have in order to fish in these waters, so it has been brought into le havre where it has been impounded, and i guess the captain and the owner of the boat face legal proceedings. at some point it'll be allowed to go on its way but there will almost certainly be some kind of legal follow—up to this. that was hugh schofield, our correspondant in france. barrie deas is chief executive of the national federation
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of fishermen s organisations and believes french politics has a part to play in this. i suppose this could be normal enforcement activity by the french authorities, but of course, it takes place against the background of very belligerent noises made by the french government on the licensing issue yesterday. so it seems that france is determined to escalate this issue, which is a matter of concern to us. it only really makes sense to me in terms of french domestic politics, because this is really, the licensing issue is really a technical matter to be resolved at a technical level and my understanding is that quite a lot of progress is being made in resolving it. but there is a french presidential election and that north coast of france i think is the focus of that kind of domestic political
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activity and so i think to understand what is happening, you really have to see it within that context. in the next few days tens of thousands of delegates, including world leaders, will arrive in glasgow for cop26, the un climate change conference. countries will be asked to set out their plans for cutting emissions and rising global temperatures. the uk government's chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance, says it's vital that we take action now to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees. absolutely make sure that the technologies we have today and the natural solutions we have today are implemented as fast as possible. that is critical. and there is a way to do that and there is a lot of r&d to do that and there is a lot of r&d to do that and there is a lot of r&d to do that. second thing we need to do is invest in the technologies for the future that will continue that make certain parts of that easier.
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and we also need to accept that there's got to be some change in society and the way that we consume and contribute to emissions. those things together, i think, i and contribute to emissions. those things together, ithink, i really, really important. if there are done together and there are clear plans, 1.5 is a cheaper bowl but not achievable without specific action. and there are the little things that we can all do that may seem tiny individually but you aggregate them across millions and it makes a difference. so, i cycle to work, i have reduced my meat consumption. i don't fly as much as i used to. it doesn't mean i have stopped meat consumption or i will never fly again. i will. consumption or i will never fly again. iwill. but consumption or i will never fly again. i will. but those actions across millions make a difference as well. on their own, they are not sufficient. we need to get technologies in place and need to invest in technologies in the future. the man who murdered two
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sisters in a london park last summer is being sentenced for their killings. 19—year—old danyal hussein had just turned 18 when he stabbed bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were celebrating ms henry's birthday in fryent country park in wembley. our correspondent helena wilkinson is at the old bailey. we just wejust had their we just had their sentence. the sentencing judge in this case in court seven at the old bailey has, in the last couple of seconds, sentenced the perpetrator who is 19 years old to life in prison with a minimum term of 35 years. a sentence of life imprisonment with a minimum term of 35 years. the said sentencing judge, term of 35 years. the said sentencingjudge, mrsjustice whipple in her sentencing remarks before she handed down that sentence, who had just turned 18
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years old at the time, he carried out these offences, he murdered sisters, who had been celebrating miss henry's birthday in a park in london injune of last year. in her sentencing remarks she said, you knew what you did that night, and you chose to lie about it. the court also heard that if he had been older, then perhaps a whole life tariff could have been considered by thejudge. but because he tariff could have been considered by the judge. but because he was under the judge. but because he was under the age of 21, whole life tariff which meant that he wouldn't ever have been released from prison, that means that could not been considered. here at the old bailey, he is sentenced to life in prison with a minimum term of 35 years. the defendant was not in court for that sentence. the reason that was given
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was because of covid—19 issues. he did however appear by video link from belmarsh prison to hear that sentence. as the sentencing hearing took place earlier on, as we heard from both the prosecution and the defence barristers, he was seen sitting on a chair, squatting on a chair, as the barristers were talking in court, and he then turned the chair around 90 degrees so he had his side to the court room. that is pretty much how he behaved during the trial here at the old bailey. in the trial here at the old bailey. in the sentencing remarks, thejudge mrs justice the sentencing remarks, thejudge mrsjustice whipple described the sisters as beautiful and gifted women. she also said to hussain, you surprise them, you terrified them and you killed them. you positioned their bodies in an embrace. this was to defile their bodies in death and
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to defile their bodies in death and to conceal what you had done. she also said that to make matters work, he had refused to acknowledge his actions. during the trial, he did not give evidence in his defence, and his defence did not provide any evidence to the court. a defendant does not have to give evidence in their defence, but thejudge does not have to give evidence in their defence, but the judge can direct thejury to their defence, but the judge can direct the jury to say that that can, if they want to use it against the defendant when they were considering their verdict. so in the last couple of moments, 19 years old, he has been sentenced to a whole life sentence with their minimum term of 35 years. we are expecting to hearfrom both minimum term of 35 years. we are expecting to hear from both the investigating officer and also the sister's mother outside of the old bailey perhaps in the next half hour or so. bailey perhaps in the next half hour orso. it bailey perhaps in the next half hour or so. it will of course have been very distressing for the family to
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sit through those hearings and to hear what they had two about what happened to those two women. tell us more about what was said in court about the man who has now been sentenced to life for those killings, and how far back concerns about his behaviour actually went. something we were able to report after the trial concluded was that he had previously been referred by his school to the government's counter extremism programme prevent. that was in october 2017. he was aged 15 years old at the time. he was referred to that programme. it is a de—radicalisation government scheme because of the content that he had accessed on school computers, including far right material. he was followed up after he was referred to that programme. but we know that
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after police searched... arrested and searched him, they found a note he had written, but in court he denied the note was ever written by him, but the prosecution said he had written a note to a demon. in that note it was contract, the trial heard, between him and the demon, that if he murdered six women, he would be rewarded by winning the lottery. so, he had researched, we heard afterwards, as i say, far right material, and that was why he had been referred to the fire prevent programme. someone with no previous convictions or cautions at all, and in mitigation, his defence barrister, although she said there was very little mitigation in this case, she asked the judge to consider his age, that he had just turned 18 years old at the time he
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carried out these offences. but the prosecution said it was preplanned, premeditated. he had taken a knife to the park, he was watching the sisters, it was in the early hours of the morning. and they could do very little to defend themselves. and when he murdered them he then moved their bodies and concealed them, as we have heard thejudge touch on there. so, daniel hussain, 19 years old now has been sentenced to a life sentence with a minimum of 35 years. —— danyal hussein. the sisters's mother is expected to give a statement outside court shortly. in the trial itself, the guilty verdicts following that trial, the
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sisters mother said in a victim impact statement to the court, no one expects their children to die before them, but to have two of your three children murdered overnight is just incomprehensible. if any good comes out of this, at least another four women will not meet a similar end in the so—called pact with the so—called demon. helena, thank you very much. reporting live from the old bailey. there will be statement outside the court and we will be back there to bring you those statements live when they happen. people around the world want their governments to take strong action on climate change, according to a new poll commissioned by the bbc. more than 30,000 people were surveyed — across 31 countries — about their attitudes to climate change policies. more than half? 56% — say they want their governments to play a key leadership role.
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that's an increase on a similar poll conducted five years ago. our correspondent matt mcgrath has been looking at the findings. it's rather interesting thatjust before cop 26 then leaders are due to a gathering in glasgow on sunday and monday to start this major process, that this snapshot, and it is a snapshot of public open pinion around the world, seems to encourage them and targets they have been contemplated. if you look at what the poll tells us about people but my concerns on climate change it has never been higher. 36% see it has never been higher. 36% see it has never been higher. 36% see it has never been higher. 36% theatres is a serious problem. when they asked people, five or six years ago just before the paris agreement what they wanted their governments to do, there has been a significant uptake in the number of people across a range of countries, rich and poor, who want to see their governments take on tougher targets to deal with the problem of climate change as quickly as possible. i the problem of climate change as quickly as possible.— the problem of climate change as quickly as possible. i was listening to some of —
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quickly as possible. i was listening to some of our _ quickly as possible. i was listening to some of our out _ quickly as possible. i was listening to some of our out put _ quickly as possible. i was listening to some of our out put earlier- quickly as possible. i was listening to some of our out put earlier on, | to some of our out put earlier on, australia talking about that particular issue of virus, admitting more carbon than they actually absorb, but one of the gas was talking about the government being out of step with public opinion in the country. the public seem to be more enthusiastic the climate change policies. the government was the one actually not meeting the expectations of the public. i'm sure thatis expectations of the public. i'm sure that is a problem probably notjust in australia but that is going to be a real challenge.— in australia but that is going to be a real challenge. absolutely. there are a number— a real challenge. absolutely. there are a number of— a real challenge. absolutely. there are a number of countries - a real challenge. absolutely. there are a number of countries around l a real challenge. absolutely. there l are a number of countries around the world where we are seeing a change in their in opinion not necessarily reflected in the governments. china... 18% of the population survey there said they wanted their government to take strong action on it. that's gone up to 46% now nearly half of those polled. there have
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been significant uptake is in countries like india and the usa and in australia as well. there is a general sense across the world among people that this is a serious problem in something better to be done about it. if you look at the number of people who don't want any action, they are relatively minimum skill. it is a very small minority indeed. now, it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. as we head into the afternoon, there is still an amber whether working out across cumbria. there will also be rains across well in south—east england extending into scotland in the eastern scotland.
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three tomorrow, our first band of rain will continue to edge eastwards. to the west, it will start to brighten up. we will see some sunshine, still breezy with highs up to about 1k some sunshine, still breezy with highs up to about 1a or 15 celsius. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... the man who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park last summer has been sentenced to life imprisonment — with a minimum term of 35 years after yesterday's budget, a leading think—tank warns middle—income families will be worse
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off next year. labour says ordinary people need more help — but the chancellor says things are improving. people should have reassurance that because of the plan we put in place a year ago, to ensure that our economy now is recovering strongly, more people are in work and wages are rising, we can face the future with a bit more confidence. help people with the cost of living prices, and not give tax cut to bankers or indeed to reduce air passenger duty on domestic flights when we should be encouraging people to use trains for those journeys. government officials are investigating the detention of a british trawler in french waters in the channel. france says the boat was fishing without a licence disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. sport and for a full round—up
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from the bbc sport centre. manchester city boss pep guardiola says west ham manchester city boss pep guardiola says west ham a manchester city boss pep guardiola says west ham a fantastic manchester city boss pep guardiola says west ham a fantastic team manchester city boss pep guardiola says west ham a fantastic team with a fantastic manager after the hammer is them the on penalties. west ham were flawless with theirs, winning the shoot out 5—3 with the side then ran a bear with a decisive penalty to send them into the quarterfinals, ending city's amazing run in the league cup that won the last four. liverpool made 11 changes, the entire team to the side that beat manchester united over the weekend. still too strong for championship with their second in the 2—0 when it de bell. tottenham and leicester also made it through to the quarters last night. the draw for those is on saturday. barcelona finally ran out of patience last night and sacked their manager afterjust over a year in thejob and their manager afterjust over a year in the job and lost to a team sitting ninth in la liga and that comes hot on the heels of their defeat to real madrid and were just
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two of seven in the league and has been tipped to take over. printing has held clear the air talks with cricket south africa at the t20 world cups. he says he wants to play for the team and will now take a knee before matches. the opening batsmen withdrew from the last tournament a few days ago after being told that he must take a knee with the rest of the squad in a show of unity against racism, something he hadn't done before. he has apologised to his team—mates and fans and in a lengthy statement said he wasn't racist and explains that he wasn't racist and explains that he comes from a dual heritage family and that black lives is always matted him before any international movement came to the floor. despite always matted to him for any movement came to the fore. if damage is as if taking any helps to educate others i'm happy to do so. england have got a day's extra vest before they face australia on saturday and
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morgan's men made it two wins after two and the super 12 is with an eight wicket win over bangladesh yesterday. jason roy hit a half—century. yesterday. jason roy hit a half-century.— yesterday. jason roy hit a half-century. yesterday. jason roy hit a half-centu .~ , , ., half-century. we push each other as hard as we possibly _ half-century. we push each other as hard as we possibly can _ half-century. we push each other as hard as we possibly can be _ half-century. we push each other as hard as we possibly can be pushed. l hard as we possibly can be pushed. we don't really vest on any game and we treat every single team with the respect they deserve and we go out and try and play our best cricket no matter who we're playing against, it is irrelevant so, yeah, there is no chance of is resting on our laurels, we got there and give it our all. the england world cup winnerfriend winks and has retired from international cricket. just like fran wilson. she is at the time is likely to step away. she made her debut at the age of 19 and has been capped 63 times across all three formats of england, played at three world cups and was in the team that became champions at lord's in 2017. the batter is going to continue, though, to play domestic cricket. in nevada county plays later the
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transylvania opening. —— emma raducanu. andy murray has been knocked out, though, beaten in straight sets by a spanish teenager in their second round match. he said it was just in their second round match. he said it wasjust a in their second round match. he said it was just a bump on the road and he had never previously lost in vienna winning titles in 2016 and 2017. more matches in the next half, cow and a half or so. that is all the spots are now and don't forget voting is now live for bbc women's footballer of the year and the shortlist includes the following. voting closes on the 8th of november. much more information of that on the bbc sport website and i will be back update on the next see thanks, ali. thousands of women across the uk decided to stay away from pubs and nightclubs last night, and some protested on the streets,
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to highlight the growing number of spikings on nights out. according to the national police chiefs council, forces have received almost 200 confirmed reports of drink spiking — in just under two months. louisa pilbeam has more. i scream at the top of my lungs, we will not accept this! this was manchester last night, where hundreds of people protested against drink spiking. and across the uk, the night in campaign has seen a boycott of nightclubs, leaving establishments empty. spread your arms apart. bit of social distancing. women are particularly angry at being made to feel unsafe at the alarming trend of people on nights out being deliberately injected with dangerous substances that have left some victims unconscious. women seem to be thought of as the lesser, kind of, gene, and we are definitely not, so to spike a woman in their drink or to inject them isjust absolutely disgusting. new figures revealed 56 incidents of spiking by injection were recorded by police in the uk
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in september and october, and 198 reports of drink spiking — the majority of victims female. many young women say they'd feel safer if nightclubs and bars had tighter security. i go to some clubs and they will check underneath my phone case and they'll check my pockets and they'll check my bag, and other clubs, theyjust don't. and actually i would rather, i would rather you were taking my phone case off and looking inside and see if there's some funny things being brought in. it makes me feel safer. student unions across the country have been providing alternative places to go. there's things like board games, hot drinks, and it's a place for them to come and meet other people and have a chat, but it's people who want to take part in the boycott but don't really want to be alone that evening, they're free to come along. many nightclubs and bars say they are making changes. the first is we're providing testing kits to venues so that if drink spiking happens on their watch they are able to gather forensic
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evidence straight away. we have got training guides so that staff know exactly what to do. but people seem determined to make a stand, with more demonstrations planned until they feel safe. louisa pilbeam, bbc news. lancaster university's student union's nightclub, closed last night in solidarity with the boycott, but used the opportunity to train staff on how to deal with suspected spikings. amy merchant is the vice president welfare officer at lancaster university's students union and shejoins me now. welcome and thank you very much for joining us. had there been any reported sightings at the sugar house? i reported sightings at the sugar house? ~ , ., , house? i think it is really important _ house? i think it is really important to _ house? i think it is really important to know i house? i think it is really important to know that l house? i think it is really l important to know that any house? i think it is really _ important to know that any nightclub that denies that they've ever had a spiking, it is really important that they don't do that because no nightclub can deny that they haven't had any spiking is. it is likely to happy because of predatory individuals who take opportunities individuals who take opportunities in any place they think they can and so of course vikings do happen and it is really important that we
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engage with students to see how we can mitigate the circumstances. so ou can mitigate the circumstances. so you did the training session last night. at the club —— spiking is do happen. tell us what happened at the training session.— training session. actually top dom it -os- training session. actually top dom it pops down _ training session. actually top dom it pops down to — training session. actually top dom it pops down to the _ training session. actually top dom it pops down to the venue - training session. actually top dom it pops down to the venue last i training session. actually top dom i it pops down to the venue last night a whole host of different topics and our sugar house managers are food and drink aware and of experts in this field and were able to deliver some positive training is a little bit everything from positive contributions crew can have the students night out, out today deal with harassment and make sure students are ok and if they're not ok they have somewhere to retreat 0k they have somewhere to retreat to, how to deal with spiking is and it was really just to refresher training because the sugar house staff have already had this training and it was reallyjust to refresh their minds as this has become such a prominent issue. brute
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their minds as this has become such a prominent issue.— a prominent issue. we were hearing some measures _ a prominent issue. we were hearing some measures in _ a prominent issue. we were hearing some measures in our _ a prominent issue. we were hearing some measures in our report - a prominent issue. we were hearing some measures in our report about| some measures in our report about what some people would like to see to get the assurance and one woman talked about there being tighter security checks going into venues. she said it's pretty patchy. what are your thoughts on that? yes. she said it's pretty patchy. what are your thoughts on that? yes, it is actually a _ are your thoughts on that? yes, it is actually a really _ are your thoughts on that? yes, it is actually a really interesting i is actually a really interesting topic of conversation. we are ready have a lot of provisions in place to protect and look after and cared for students and i have signed a national petition calling for improved security measures. i think it is important to highlight that at our own student union nightclub we have increased security in the sense that we actually have welfare security identifiable to our students who wear our student union colour so that students who may want one into unfortunate circumstances can identify the security that are fully equipped to help them. so there are lots of complexities
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around security and support for security measures. find around security and support for security measures.— around security and support for security measures. and we were heafina security measures. and we were hearing in _ security measures. and we were hearing in bristol— security measures. and we were hearing in bristol testing - security measures. and we were hearing in bristol testing kits i security measures. and we were i hearing in bristol testing kits have been sent to venues so there is any suspicion may have been spiked evidence can be gathered straightaway. is that something happening in lancaster? brute straightaway. is that something happening in lancaster?- straightaway. is that something happening in lancaster? we do have the drinks testing _ happening in lancaster? we do have the drinks testing kits _ happening in lancaster? we do have the drinks testing kits behind - happening in lancaster? we do have the drinks testing kits behind the i the drinks testing kits behind the bar that are available to students, we are getting the foil covers for drinks, we have a special welfare in full students if they have been spiked and can be taken there and looked after and treated with first aid. there are a lot of different provisions that i encourage my clubs to adopt in order to look after its customers. to adopt in order to look after its customers-— to adopt in order to look after its customers. ., ., ,. , customers. how would you describe the conversation _ customers. how would you describe the conversation that _ customers. how would you describe the conversation that is _ customers. how would you describe the conversation that is happening i the conversation that is happening around this and the attitudes. you mentioned the beginning, the issue being predatory men in clubs were spiking vulnerable people. and, obviously, anybody is vulnerable to
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having their drinks spiked. how are... the male community in general, would you say, responding there in lancaster and also the female community in terms of a sense of vulnerability?— of vulnerability? yes, it is really interesting _ of vulnerability? yes, it is really interesting in _ of vulnerability? yes, it is really interesting in a _ of vulnerability? yes, it is really interesting in a sense _ of vulnerability? yes, it is really interesting in a sense to - of vulnerability? yes, it is really interesting in a sense to stay i interesting in a sense to stay students in lancaster come forward and feel empowered enough and have a platform to speak out is quite important that they feel that they have the space to speak out and all of the attitudes we have have been really positive and everybody has stood in solidarity and got behind this cause. it has been really great to see the lancaster knighting campaign and they have engage students and been absolutely brilliant and they really do need help engaging students in getting
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everyone on board to make sure we tackle this issue. what in a concrete way can be done to reassure people. actually, ithink... i thought we had to go to some breaking news but we have 0k. what breaking news but we have ok. what can be done — breaking news but we have ok. what can be done in _ breaking news but we have ok. what can be done in a _ breaking news but we have ok. what can be done in a practical sense to be sure people who are feeling vulnerable? i be sure people who are feeling vulnerable?— be sure people who are feeling vulnerable? ~ ., , vulnerable? i think we need to see action from — vulnerable? i think we need to see action from these _ vulnerable? i think we need to see action from these night-time i vulnerable? i think we need to see i action from these night-time venues. action from these night—time venues. i think that is where the assurance lies. i think venues need to take a step back, listen, the flex, and see what provisions they can implement, foil covers are especially welfare train staff and i think it is really important that the assurance comes from the venues and they are appealing to customers that they are doing all they can to tackle this issue. ., ~' , ., doing all they can to tackle this issue. . ,, i. ,., doing all they can to tackle this issue. . ,, i. . doing all they can to tackle this issue. . ,, . ., ., issue. thank you so much for “oining us. amy merchant i issue. thank you so much for “oining us. amy merchant from i issue. thank you so much forjoining us. amy merchant from lancaster i us. amy merchant from lancaster university students union. thank you. we can now go back to the old bailey and our
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correspondent is there and there has been the sentencing over the murders of those two young women and a teenager, 19—year—old danielle hosein sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum return of five years. what is happening there, helena? —— danyal hussein. we are expecting a statement from the detective inspector in a few moments and we also are expecting to hear from bibaa henry and nicole smallman's mother he was expected also give a statement after the police talk outside the old bailey but in the last half—hour i think we can in a moment here detective inspector maria about danyal inspector maria about da nyal hussein.
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mehdi? 0k. danyal hussein is a dangerous, elegant and violent individual who from the outset has shown over most of acceptance for his actions. the sentence handed down by the court today is a reflection of the seriousness of his crimes. i hope that knowing he will now spend many years behind bars will bring a small degree of comfort to bibaa henry and nicole smallman's loved ones. this has been a shocking and chilling case and i know the investigation will stay with all of us involved for a very long time. danyal hussein went out that night with the intention of killing in order to satisfy his bizarre fantasies under the deluded belief he would be rewarded with financial prosperity. his wicked acts have cut
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short the lives of two completely innocent women who were simply celebrating a birthday, maxi birthday. the senselessness of danyal hussein's actions has made it even more difficult for bibaa henry and nicole smallman's families to come to terms of their loss but despite this they have shown strength in incredibly difficult circumstances and my colleagues thoughts are with them. i circumstances and my colleagues thoughts are with them.- circumstances and my colleagues thoughts are with them. i think you have heard me _ thoughts are with them. i think you have heard me say _ thoughts are with them. i think you have heard me say in _ thoughts are with them. i think you have heard me say in the _ thoughts are with them. i think you have heard me say in the past i thoughts are with them. i think you | have heard me say in the past there will be _ have heard me say in the past there will be no _ have heard me say in the past there will be no celebrations here but justice — will be no celebrations here but justice has been done but i think we do need _ justice has been done but i think we do need to— justice has been done but i think we do need to review that kind of separation, when is someone in adults? — separation, when is someone in adults? and i think it is very disrespectful to say that children can't _ disrespectful to say that children can't tell— disrespectful to say that children can't tell the difference between good _ can't tell the difference between good and evil, so that is something else i_
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good and evil, so that is something else i will— good and evil, so that is something else i will be campaigning about, but today— else i will be campaigning about, but today we're what is wonderful about _ but today we're what is wonderful about the — but today we're what is wonderful about the metropolitan police. i have _ about the metropolitan police. i have never been one to cast a whole organisation — have never been one to cast a whole organisation by one particular sort of incident, — organisation by one particular sort of incident, but we do have a problem. _ of incident, but we do have a problem, we do have an underground that has— problem, we do have an underground that has infiltrated and growing in our met _ that has infiltrated and growing in our met police, but once again i want _ our met police, but once again i want to— our met police, but once again i want to say— our met police, but once again i want to say thank you to this team that worked tirelessly to find the killer _ that worked tirelessly to find the killer. that they put in and you know _ killer. that they put in and you know when someone is just doing a 'ob know when someone is just doing a job and _ know when someone is just doing a job and when they are invested —— the hours — job and when they are invested —— the hours that they put in. well, so many— the hours that they put in. well, so many people had become invested in this story— many people had become invested in this story and i want to thank the media _ this story and i want to thank the media you — this story and i want to thank the media. you are finally getting our story, _ media. you are finally getting our story. you — media. you are finally getting our story, you are understanding why everybody — story, you are understanding why everybody is important and you are not falling — everybody is important and you are not falling into the trap of
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highlighting one story against another. everybody is worth knowing about _ another. everybody is worth knowing about and. — another. everybody is worth knowing about. and, sadly, i have had lots of requests — about. and, sadly, i have had lots of requests for interviews but the last few _ of requests for interviews but the last few weeks have been extremely difficult _ last few weeks have been extremely difficult for me. they have triggered my ailments which are cfs and fibromyalgia and what happens if your brain _ and fibromyalgia and what happens if your brain doesn't work how it should — your brain doesn't work how it should do— your brain doesn't work how it should do so only want to speak when i feel should do so only want to speak when i feel i_ should do so only want to speak when i feel i could _ should do so only want to speak when i feel i could do itjustice. but thank— i feel i could do itjustice. but thank you _ i feel i could do itjustice. but thank you all for being here in caring — thank you all for being here in caring and _ thank you all for being here in caring and get the message out to your bosses when you interview someone — your bosses when you interview someone for an hour and they only put it— someone for an hour and they only put it on— someone for an hour and they only put it on for— someone for an hour and they only put it on for two minutes, they are saying _ put it on for two minutes, they are saying something very bad about the importance and the significance of those _ importance and the significance of those people, and whether they are on the _ those people, and whether they are on the front page, the middle page of the _ on the front page, the middle page of the back page, you put a precedent and who is more important. everyone _ precedent and who is more important. everyone is— precedent and who is more important. everyone is important. don't make that mistake. because when i feel
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better— that mistake. because when i feel better and coming for you. thank you _ better and coming for you. thank ou. ., y ., better and coming for you. thank ou. . , ., , better and coming for you. thank ou. . , you. can you 'ust say thing about media's you. can you just say thing about media's bowl? _ you. can you just say thing about media's bowl? -- _ you. can you just say thing about media's bowl? -- say _ you. can you just say thing about| media's bowl? -- say something. you. can you just say thing about i media's bowl? -- say something. they were beautiful, _ media's bowl? —— say something. they were beautiful, beautiful girls to look at _ were beautiful, beautiful girls to look at anyway but they were real people _ look at anyway but they were real people with hearts. bibaa has left behind _ people with hearts. bibaa has left behind a — people with hearts. bibaa has left behind a daughter who has given birth— behind a daughter who has given birth to — behind a daughter who has given birth to a — behind a daughter who has given birth to a son in the last year, coming — birth to a son in the last year, coming up _ birth to a son in the last year, coming up fora birth to a son in the last year, coming up for a year, and i am a great—grandmother, and i only met him. _ great—grandmother, and i only met him, because of covid—19i great—grandmother, and i only met him, because of covid—19 i only met him, because of covid—19 i only met him four— him, because of covid—19 i only met him four of— him, because of covid—19 i only met him four of the first time at the celebration of life, so life is going — celebration of life, so life is going on _ celebration of life, so life is going on. there is a legacy and nicole. — going on. there is a legacy and nicole. i— going on. there is a legacy and nicole, i think we grieve more for her because there was 20 years difference. she had 20 years less than bibaa ought to know her was to love her—
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than bibaa ought to know her was to love her and — than bibaa ought to know her was to love her and there is so much more i am going _ love her and there is so much more i am going to — love her and there is so much more i am going to share with you and you can see _ am going to share with you and you can see her— am going to share with you and you can see her in action and lots and lots of— can see her in action and lots and lots of families have given tribute to bibaa — lots of families have given tribute to bibaa because she was an amazing social— to bibaa because she was an amazing social worker who was able to drill down _ social worker who was able to drill down and — social worker who was able to drill down and do the difference between... there could never be cover-ups — between... there could never be cover—ups. she wanted to see the kids. _ cover—ups. she wanted to see the kids. she — cover—ups. she wanted to see the kids, she wanted to know if there was food — kids, she wanted to know if there was food there, she wanted to know whether— was food there, she wanted to know whether they were really on it, but she would — whether they were really on it, but she would never take a child away unless _ she would never take a child away unless she — she would never take a child away unless she tried everything, so good girls _ unless she tried everything, so good girls i_ unless she tried everything, so good girls i am _ unless she tried everything, so good girls. lam really, really proud unless she tried everything, so good girls. i am really, really proud of them _ girls. i am really, really proud of them. . , ., girls. i am really, really proud of them. . , . girls. i am really, really proud of them. ., , ., , girls. i am really, really proud of them. . , . , them. can you share with us your thou~hts them. can you share with us your thoughts about _ them. can you share with us your thoughts about danyal _ them. can you share with us your thoughts about danyal hussein'sl thoughts about danyal hussein's behaviour? d0 thoughts about danyal hussein's behaviour? , ., thoughts about danyal hussein's behaviour? ~ ., thoughts about danyal hussein's behaviour?— thoughts about danyal hussein's behaviour? ~ ., ., , behaviour? do you know what? it is all a performance. _ behaviour? do you know what? it is all a performance. you _ behaviour? do you know what? it is all a performance. you know, i i all a performance. you know, i taught— all a performance. you know, i taught secondary kids for 20 years, 15 of those — taught secondary kids for 20 years, 15 of those were all boys. there is nothing _ 15 of those were all boys. there is nothing you — 15 of those were all boys. there is nothing you can't tell me about men and boys, _
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nothing you can't tell me about men and boys, and that is a performance designed _ and boys, and that is a performance designed to, i don't know, elicit sympathy— designed to, i don't know, elicit sympathy or to have us believe that there _ sympathy or to have us believe that there is— sympathy or to have us believe that there is something really wrong with him. there is something really wrong with him there _ there is something really wrong with him. there is nothing wrong with him! _ him. there is nothing wrong with him! he — him. there is nothing wrong with him! he is — him. there is nothing wrong with him! he isjust an obnoxious human being _ him! he isjust an obnoxious human being and — him! he isjust an obnoxious human being. and at one point there was a screen _ being. and at one point there was a screen in _ being. and at one point there was a screen in front of us and it was a tiny bit. — screen in front of us and it was a tiny bit. we _ screen in front of us and it was a tiny bit, we could only see a tinym — tiny bit, we could only see a tiny and _ tiny bit, we could only see a tiny... and the clerk said, would you like — tiny... and the clerk said, would you like us— tiny... and the clerk said, would you like us to... we can make that bigger. _ you like us to... we can make that bigger, bigger picture. i said, you like us to... we can make that bigger, bigger picture. isaid, no thank— bigger, bigger picture. isaid, no thank you! — bigger, bigger picture. isaid, no thank you! we don't actually need to see him _ thank you! we don't actually need to see him he — thank you! we don't actually need to see him. he is a broken human being who. _ see him. he is a broken human being who. if— see him. he is a broken human being who. if he— see him. he is a broken human being who, if he hadn't been caught for other— who, if he hadn't been caught for other families may have been suffering _ other families may have been suffering what we have. well, he isn't out — suffering what we have. well, he isn't out there now, and i think he isn't out there now, and i think he is so _ isn't out there now, and i think he is so deluded, 35 years' time they won't _ is so deluded, 35 years' time they won't give — is so deluded, 35 years' time they won't give him... they won't let him out. won't give him... they won't let him out they— won't give him... they won't let him out. they won't let him out. i won't let them _ out. they won't let him out. i won't let them let — out. they won't let him out. i won't let them let him out. thank you. we are
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let them let him out. thank you. are going to let them let him out. thank you. we are going to stop now, thank you. cheers _ are going to stop now, thank you. cheers. . ~ are going to stop now, thank you. cheers. ., ,, , ., are going to stop now, thank you. cheers-_ well. - are going to stop now, thank you. cheers._ well, that i are going to stop now, thank you. | cheers._ well, that was cheers. thank you. well, that was meaner, bibaa _ cheers. thank you. well, that was meaner, bibaa henry— cheers. thank you. well, that was meaner, bibaa henry and - cheers. thank you. well, that was meaner, bibaa henry and nicole i meaner, bibaa henry and nicole smallman's mother outside the old bailey after the man who murdered her daughters and a ferocious random attack injune last year giving her reaction to that sentence and you heard minas moment say that that there is no celebration here today injustice has been done. as the danyal hussein who is now 19 years old, the man who murdered her daughters, she described him as an obnoxious human being, a broken human being, and then she talks, didn't she, a bit about her two daughters. she said they were beautiful girls, real people with hearts and clearly emotional their outside court after that sentence. in the last hour, danyal hussein, 19 years old, has been sentenced to
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life in patient with a minimum term of 35 years and we also heard from the investigating officer that detective infects maria greene who gave that statement before mrs moment's statement and the detective inspector described danyal hussein inspector described da nyal hussein as inspector described danyal hussein as a dangerous, violent individual and described it as a shocking and chilling case. joanna. it and described it as a shocking and chilling case. joanna.— chilling case. joanna. it was an extremely _ chilling case. joanna. it was an extremely powerful _ chilling case. joanna. it was an| extremely powerful statement, chilling case. joanna. it was an - extremely powerful statement, wasn't it, from the mother bear? and she alluded to the difficulty is that the family have had to deal with which go beyond losing their daughters. she talks about her feelings about the metropolitan police, paid tribute to the amazing work of the team that brought this case to justice but what are the ramifications in terms of the way that this case was handled? well, we saw yesterday. _ that this case was handled? well, we saw yesterday, didn't _ that this case was handled? well, we saw yesterday, didn't we, _ that this case was handled? well, we saw yesterday, didn't we, from i saw yesterday, didn't we, from
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earlier this week the independent office for police conduct who released their findings after looking into issues surrounding what happened when bibaa henry and nicole smallman were first reported missing and over that weekend and we know that it was a close friend of the two women who actually found their bodies are a couple of days later and the independent office for police conduct in their findings, they said that the metropolitan police, the way that they handled that was below the standard it should have been and we heard also in reaction to that report from mrs smallman who said the met had shown incompetent, reprehensible and blatant disregard of procedures regarding missing persons during this investigation, but we did hear from mrs smallman that he was very
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clean clearly to point outjust how tirelessly the investigating team in the case had been and she always has been. after the verdict, she said similar words outside of court and she plays the investigating team but clearly there is understandably a huge amount of anger still about what happened after the women went missing —— praised the investigating team. also what happened to how the metropolitan police handled that we know the commission of the metropolitan police did offer an apology to mrs smallman and the widerfamily and also apology to mrs smallman and the wider family and also said that she would meet her if that was indeed what she wanted to happen. studio: thank you very much. helena wilkinson reporting from the old bailey. some breaking news to bring you from cardiff crown court. it is the trial of a businessman who was involved in the plane crash which killed a
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footballer. david henderson, the businessman who organised the flight that crashed, killing footballer emiliano sala, has been found guilty at cardiff crown court of endangering the safety of an aircraft. the pilot david ibbotson was also killed in 2019. david henderson was actually the person who had organised that flight and he has been found guilty of endangering the aircraft's safety so we will bring you more reaction to that a little bit later. first of all, let's catch up bit later. first of all, let's catch up with the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. in the last couple of days, some of us have had some heavy and persistent rainfall. especially so across parts of south west scotland and cumbria. this is where the met office this morning has had some amber weather warnings in force. that means increased risk of impacts due to the severe weather, for example flooding or disruption to travel. it is because of this weather front, and as we go into the afternoon, the amber weather warning
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will remain in force for cumbria. but we will see some heavy rain getting in across parts of wales, into the south west and extending a bit further north into central, southern and eastern parts of scotland. as for the rest of scotland and northern ireland, it should brighten up, with some showers, and on the other side of that weather front, in the south east, again, still quite a bit of cloud around, but some sunny skies. it is going to be windy wherever you are today, with quite strong gusts from temperatures 12 to 17 celsius, so we still are in the mild conditions for the time of year. through this evening and overnight, here is a weather front still bringing in rain roughly to the same areas. we have a second one joining it, bringing rain across northern ireland and into scotland. still windy and still mild. these are overnight lows, eight to 13. at this time of year, we would expect the overnight lows to be falling to five to seven celsius, so they too are high for the time of year. tomorrow, our first weather front moves eastwards. our second one pushes eastwards behind it,
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and what we will find is it will brighten up in the west with some sunshine, but still quite a few showers around. temperatures slipping a bit. we are looking at highs between 11 and 15 celsius. as we head on through friday and into saturday, this weather front is going to be moving from the west towards the east. the isobars which are spaced, means it is going to be quite breezy. so on saturday, here is that rain pushing from the west towards the east. lingering longest in the south east and also the far north east of scotland. then we are looking at drier conditions with a few showers in the west. and temperatures ten to 1a celsius, so more or less bang on where they should be at this stage. first thing on sunday morning the clocks go back an hour. on sunday we have a weather front pushing northwards taking its rain with it. behind it, we return to some heavy showers. the wind once again will start to strengthen. by then, top temperatures 01:14 celsius.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at midday... the man who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park last year has been sentenced to life imprisonment, with a minimum term of 35 years. thejudge said danyal hussein had �*meticulously planned�* the murders, which had left the sisters�* family �*shattered�*. he has a broken human being who, if he had not been caught, for other families may have been suffering what we have. well, he isn�*t out there now. the man in charge of the flight in which the footballer, emiliano sala, died has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. after yesterday�*s budget a leading think—tank warns middle—income families will be worse
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off next year. labour says ordinary people need more help — but the chancellor says things are improving. government officials are investigating the detention of a british trawler in french waters in the channel. france says the boat was fishing without a licence the uk�*s chief scientific advisor says plans to limit global warming to 1.5c are an "urgent call for action" on climate change. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a man who murdered two sisters in a london park last year has beenjailed for life, with a minimum term of 35 years. 19—year—old danyal hussein had just turned 18 when he stabbed bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were celebrating ms henry�*s birthday
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in fryent country park in wembley. the home secretary priti patel says the government is determined to tackle the issue of violence against women and girls, and said the case of the murdered sisters was a "terrible, tragic, tragic case". our correspondent helena wilkinson is at the old bailey. the sentencing took place at court seven here at the old bailey in the last hour or so. as you say, danyal hussein who is 19 years old was not in court today. he appeared on a video link. the reason given in court was because of covid—19 issues. he was on a video link, sat on a chair, often moving around during the sentencing hearing. he turned to the side sitting on a chair, and at one point he was spotting on the chair as the barristers were addressing the judge during the sentencing period. mrs
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justice whipple sentence danyal hussein who was just 18. he had just turned 18 years old at the time. he murdered bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a park in london last june. he was, the court heard, a ferocious random attack. they had been celebrating ms henry�*s his birthday. he has been sentenced to life with a minimum term of 35 years. just to give you some of the sentencing remarks that mrsjustice whipple gave the court today as she sentenced danyal hussein. she said, you surprise them, you terrified them and you killed them. she said, you can position their bodies in an embrace. this was to defile their bodies in death and conceal what you had done. thejustice site —— the judge described bibaa henry and nicole smallman as beautiful, gifted women. their lives, thejudge said,
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had been shattered. she also said in his sentencing remarks that the attacks carried out by danyal hussein were meticulously planned. we heard during the trial that after danyal hussein was arrested, the police searched his bedroom and they found a note that had been written by danyal hussein to a demon. the note was an apparent agreement made between him and the demon where he said he would sacrifice six women in exchange for winning the lottery. he, in court, had always denied that he carried out the murders. he denied that he had written that note. in the last 20 minutes or so, outside the old bailey, we heard from detective inspector mariette greene who is the investigating officer. ,, ., officer. danyal hussein went out that niuht officer. danyal hussein went out that night with _ officer. danyal hussein went out that night with the _ officer. danyal hussein went out that night with the intention i officer. danyal hussein went out that night with the intention of.
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that night with the intention of killing an order to satisfy his bizarre fantasies under the deluded belief he would be rewarded with financial prosperity. he cut short their lives of two completely innocent women who were simply is celebrating a birthday. the senselessness of danyal hussein�*s actions has made it all the more difficult for the sisters�*s loved ones to come to terms with their loss. in the subsequent trial they have shown the utmost dignity and strength in the most unmatchable of circumstances. my certain thoughts and those are my colleagues are always with them.— and those are my colleagues are always with them. thank you. that was detective _ always with them. thank you. that was detective maria _ always with them. thank you. that was detective maria green - always with them. thank you. that was detective maria green and i was detective maria green and investigating officer with the metropolitan police. we heard from the sisters�*s mother. metropolitan police. we heard from the sisters's mother.— the sisters's mother. people with hearts, bieber _ the sisters's mother. people with hearts, bieber has _ the sisters's mother. people with hearts, bieber has left _ the sisters's mother. people with hearts, bieber has left behind i the sisters's mother. people with hearts, bieber has left behind a i hearts, bieber has left behind a daughter— hearts, bieber has left behind a daughter who has given birth to a son in— daughter who has given birth to a son in the — daughter who has given birth to a son in the last year, coming up for
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a year. _ son in the last year, coming up for a year. and — son in the last year, coming up for a year. and i— son in the last year, coming up for a year, and i am a great grandmother. i only met him because of covid-i9~ _ grandmother. i only met him because of covid-i9~ i— grandmother. i only met him because of covid—19. i only met him for the first time — of covid—19. i only met him for the first time at — of covid—19. i only met him for the first time at the celebration of life _ first time at the celebration of life so — first time at the celebration of life. so life is going on. there is a legacy — life. so life is going on. there is a legacy. nicole, ithink life. so life is going on. there is a legacy. nicole, i think we grieve more _ a legacy. nicole, ! think we grieve more for— a legacy. nicole, i think we grieve more for her, because there was 20 years— more for her, because there was 20 years difference. she had 20 years less then _ years difference. she had 20 years less then her sister. but to know her. _ less then her sister. but to know her. was — less then her sister. but to know her. was to— less then her sister. but to know her, was to love her.— less then her sister. but to know her, was to love her. that was bibaa hen and her, was to love her. that was bibaa henry and nicole _ her, was to love her. that was bibaa henry and nicole smallman's - her, was to love her. that was bibaa| henry and nicole smallman's mother henry and nicole smallman�*s mother speaking outside of the old bailey here after thejudge had speaking outside of the old bailey here after the judge had sentenced danyal hussein to life in prison with a minimum term of 35 years. mrs smallman described the man who murdered her daughters as an obnoxious human being and a broken human being. she also praised the metropolitan police investigating team outside of court. she praised
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them for their tireless work in their investigation. helena, thank you very much. reporting from the old bailey. the man in charge of the flight in which the footballer, emiliano sala, died has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. david henderson was responsible for choosing the pilots for the plane, which crashed in the english channel two years ago. let�*s cross to our wales correspondent tomos morgan, who is outside cardiff crown court with more on this. let with more on this. mejust let with more on this. me just give you the backgrounl of let me just give you the background of the story. on the 20th of january 2019 a flight to northern cardiff was on its way carrying a football who had been signed by cardiff city. the plane went down in the english channel in bad weather overnight, and in the aftermath, there were huge tributes from fans and families for the footballer. quickly
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questions tend to what caused this crash. the man on trial, as you say, has been david henderson. he was the man responsible as the operator of that plane and crucially in charge of choosing the pilot of that plane. he had admitted, on the first day of this trial, of arranging a flight for a passenger without permission, and today, he has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. over the course of the past two weeks, the jury has heard several pieces of evidence to suggest that he knew the pilot was not fit to fly that evening. translation:...
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after an extensive public and private search, they are the wreckage and the argentine�*s body was found. i�*m trial for endangering the safety of an aircraft, has been 67—year—old david henderson, the plain operator and crucially the one in charge of choosing pilots in behalf of the owner. the jury here in cardiff have heard several pieces of evidence to suggest that mr henderson knew that his pilot was not free fit to fly. in a series of text messages which started on august 2018, night flying was discussed. a qualification the pilot did not have. the operator as the pilot to suppliers night rating. in a message the month before the crash, david henderson was made aware that the qualification had still not been achieved. realising the weather could be trencher s on the weather could be trencher s on the 1st of january 2019 and knowing
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that the pilot did not have the qualifications to fly in those conditions, david henderson texted the him to black the requirement to fly outside of operating a space. to which the reply was yes, done it before. in one text of the plain engineer, he said not to say a word to anyone. responding to another following morning, he wrote... mr ibsen�*s licence to play this kind of aircraft had been supplied two months before the incident. when asked by the prosecution, is not the true situation that you did not want anyone looking at how you were running these flights because you knew you were running them illegally? david henderson replied, there is public some element of
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that, yes. today, he has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft, an aircraft in which emiliano salla was killed. the other thing that david henderson, appeared in texts in trial, knew of was that the pilot only held a private flying licence and not a commercial one. that�*s crucial because a commercial license is required to paid for flights and also requires a higher level of expertise to gain those qualifications. it turns out, and is suggested by the text to the jury here it was known that the pilot did not have that qualification. in the immediate aftermath, there was a public and private search for the plane and the wreckage. it was found and then the body of emiliano salla
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was also fined. their body of the pilot was never recovered. early next year, there will be a fulljury inquests into the deaths, and sentencing for david henderson is likely to take place on the 12th of november, here at cardiff crown court. two and a half years on, mr henderson, david henderson, 67—year—old, has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft, an aircraft in which argentinian football superstar, emiliano salla and pilot died, after crashing into the english channel. ministers are expected to meet today to discuss the future of the covid travel red list. the government is believed to be considering a further reduction in the number of countries
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on the list, or even scrapping it altogether. such a move would end the need for quarantine hotels. let�*s ta ke let�*s take you back to our other breaking news this hour which is the sentencing of danyal hussein over the murder but of bibaa henry and nicole smallman. thejury the murder but of bibaa henry and nicole smallman. the jury found the murder but of bibaa henry and nicole smallman. thejury found him guilty today and he has been sentenced to life with a minimum term of 35 years for killing those two women. their mother, has been giving her reaction outside the court. she said justice has been done. she said she was very grateful to the investigating team who had worked tirelessly to find the killer, and she said that thanks to the hard work, potentially another fourfamilies the hard work, potentially another four families were spared what their family has had to go through because he had said he was intending to
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murder six women. the two women, bibaa henry and nicole smallman, described as really great girls. she was very proud of them. you�*re watching bbc news. middle—income families are likely to be finanically worse off next year because of spiralling costs and tax rises. that�*s the finding of an independent economic think tank, following the changes announced in the budget. the institute for fiscal studies says inflation and higher taxes on incomes would negate small wage increases. the institute says that chancellor rishi sunak will have to develop "new and radical ways" to fulfil his ambition of reducing taxes by the next election after swelling the state to its largest level in decades. it comes as another think tank, the resoution foundation, is warning that uk households could see their tax rise by £3,000 a year over the next five years. the chief secretary to the treasury, simon clarke, has spoken of a "philosophical shift" in conservatism and says he makes "no apologies"
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for investing more in public services to stimulate growth evenly across the uk. our economics correspondent, andy verity, is at the instititue for fiscal studies. over to you. thanks, joanna. the one thing the afs has been doing is calling on the numbers overnight, as it always does, but notjust about what happened yesterday in the budget but all of the other nearly budgets we have had this year where tax increases have been announced, rises in national insurance. it�*s been quite a year. with me, we have pauljohnson, the afs director. give us a sense of how important this year has been, how things have changed notjust in this budget but over 2021. i changed not 'ust in this budget but over 2021. ~ . changed not 'ust in this budget but over 2021. ~ , ., , , ., over 2021. i think this has been one ofthe over 2021. i think this has been one of the biggest _ over 2021. i think this has been one of the biggest years _ over 2021. i think this has been one of the biggest years for _ over 2021. i think this has been one of the biggest years for fiscal i of the biggest years for fiscal stuff that we�*ve had over the last years. we have seen a really big increase in tax and a pretty big
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increase in tax and a pretty big increase in tax and a pretty big increase in spending. to be fair, a lot of this was an eventual and inevitable final recognition of all the pressures and increases leading to an increased spending on health, the fact we knew the wheels was coming off the justice system and health system and all those sorts of things. overthis health system and all those sorts of things. over this period, the chancellor has said let�*s ramp up taxes and ramp up spending and take us toa taxes and ramp up spending and take us to a new place, a place we haven�*t been before. us to a new place, a place we haven't been before.- us to a new place, a place we haven't been before. that's because of democratic _ haven't been before. that's because of democratic pressure _ haven't been before. that's because of democratic pressure really, i haven't been before. that's because of democratic pressure really, not i of democratic pressure really, not the pandemic. it�*s of democratic pressure really, not the pandemic-— the pandemic. it's not to do with the pandemic. it's not to do with the pandemic. — the pandemic. it's not to do with the pandemic, no. _ the pandemic. it's not to do with the pandemic, no. it's _ the pandemic. it's not to do with the pandemic, no. it's partly i the pandemic. it's not to do with the pandemic, no. it's partly to i the pandemic. it's not to do with i the pandemic, no. it's partly to do the pandemic, no. it�*s partly to do with democracy and partly due to the increasing amount of healthcare that we want. everyone knew we needed more money for the justice system. everyone knew that local government is really beginning to struggle. i think almost under cover of the pandemic, the chancellor has decided to repair some of that and start afresh almost.— to repair some of that and start afresh almost. give us an idea of the scale of _ afresh almost. give us an idea of the scale of the _ afresh almost. give us an idea of
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the scale of the tax _ afresh almost. give us an idea of the scale of the tax rises - afresh almost. give us an idea of the scale of the tax rises we've i the scale of the tax rises we�*ve been talking about over the past year and what that will do to households.— year and what that will do to households. the tax increases really hu . e. households. the tax increases really huge- easily — households. the tax increases really huge- easily the _ households. the tax increases really huge. easily the biggest _ households. the tax increases really huge. easily the biggest tax - households. the tax increases really huge. easily the biggest tax rise i households. the tax increases really huge. easily the biggest tax rise in i huge. easily the biggest tax rise in year since the 1990s. however you want to look at it, it takes tax to its highest fraction of national income ever. in terms of households, this is going to have a pretty significant effect on everyone in work, particularly, can because we have an increase in national insurance contributions. there is also a cut effectively on the point at which you start to pay income tax coming in next april. there are the big increases in corporation tax which will affect us in one way or another. they are much less clear on how they do so. another. they are much less clear on how they do so-_ how they do so. quite a difference between households _ how they do so. quite a difference between households on _ how they do so. quite a difference between households on higher i how they do so. quite a difference i between households on higher incomes who have been dragged into the higher rate tax threshold, and lower hat how income households who have been dragged into universal credit.
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the chancellor has been generous to the lower earners. there was a big increase to universal credit for people in work. that sector are going to be somewhat better off over the next year. average sort of earners and above are going to be hit by a series of tax increases, national insurance rises and income tax rises and inflation of course, so you would expect people on somewhat higher earnings to be worse off then they are today. the trouble is that inflation for 5%, possibly, the cpr is that inflation for 5%, possibly, the opr says we might have the highest inflation for 30 years. it�*s up highest inflation for 30 years. it�*s up any pay rises quite quickly. you�*ve highlighted how it has been a very poor fare livingston sty did this really since 2008. now we are talking about a 20 year period with almost no rises in living standards, aren�*t you? it�*s almost no rises in living standards, aren't you?— aren't you? it's hard to overstate 'ust how
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aren't you? it's hard to overstate just how in _ aren't you? it's hard to overstate just how in straw _ aren't you? it's hard to overstate just how in straw and _ aren't you? it's hard to overstate just how in straw and read i aren't you? it's hard to overstate just how in straw and read the i aren't you? it's hard to overstate i just how in straw and read the last 15 have been. in the next 15 years there will probably be very little increase in earnings in living standards. many of us can remember a time when earningsjust standards. many of us can remember a time when earnings just went up year on year on yearand time when earnings just went up year on year on year and they are barely going up anymore. that is a really important political point. if we are not getting better off over time, we are not going to feel so happy with the status quo. just are not going to feel so happy with the status quo._ are not going to feel so happy with the status quo. just to give you one number on — the status quo. just to give you one number on that. _ the status quo. just to give you one number on that. if— the status quo. just to give you one number on that. if the _ the status quo. just to give you one number on that. if the precrisis i number on that. if the precrisis trend continues, the afs is saying, your average wage would be higher five years from now than it is going to be. time for a sports round—up. we are going to start with the big story of the t20 world cup that has blown up over the past hour or so. talks with cricket south africa, he says he wants to
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play for the team again and says he will now take a knee before matches. the opening batsmen withdrew from the last game at the tournament after being told a few hours before the match against the windies that he much as take a knee with the rest of the squad in unity against racism, something he had not done before. south africa say they regret the timing. he explained that he was not racist and comes from a jewel heritage family. black lives have always mattered to him before the movement came to the fore. if it helps to improve the lives of others helps to improve the lives of others he is more than happy to participate. she made her debut at the age of 19. she has been capped 64 times across all three formats. she played at three world cups and was in the england team that became
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champions at lord's in 2017. the batter is going to continue to play domestic cricket. barcelona finally ran out of patience last night. they sacked their manager afterjust over a year in charge. they are sitting ninth in la liga. they have wonjust two of their last seven in the league. club legend javier hernandez has been tipped to replace him. some tennis to look forward to today. emma redick arno plays in the transylvanian tournament. the men's tories in vienna. playersjust getting under way. ali theme of canada when every stitches tournament last time out. he is currently two — one up in the first set. playjust getting under way and
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that. on the bbc sport website voting for the women's footballer of the year award. voting closes on the 8th of november. much more information about all of those nominees on the website. i'll be back with an update at half past one after the one o'clock news. see then. france has detained a british trawler caught fishing in french waters without a licence. the boat was stopped by maritime police yesterday and has been handed over to judicial authorities. the company operating the british boat says its fishing activity is entirely legal. it comes during an escalating row between britain and france over post—brexit fishing rights. the french are angry that many of their boats have been refused licences to fish in uk waters. they claim this breaches the brexit deal. france has also threatened to target energy supplies to jersey.
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those are live pictures of the both itself. yesterday, france said it would consider blocking british boats from french ports and increase checks from as early as next week if the dispute is not resolved. speaking in the commons in the last hour, the environment secretary george eustice said he was disappointed by developments. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. the measures being threatened do not appear to be compatible with the trading cooperation agreement or wider international law. if carried through, they will be met with an appropriate and calibrated response. madam deputy speaker, yesterday, i spoke to commissioner regarding the comments that french officials had made. the uk stands by its commitments in the trading cooperation agreement, and as i have said, has already granted 98% of licence applications from eu vessels to fish in our waters. all of our decisions have been fully in line with this commitment.
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we also supportjersey and guernsey's handling of the fisheries' licensing decisions. we have remained in close contact with them throughout. their approach has also been entirely in line with the provisions of the trading cooperation agreement. finally, i am aware of reports of enforcement activity being undertaken by the french authorities in respect of two vessels. we are looking into these matters urgently.
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it's at the quayside in le havre. it was impounded yesterday, as you said, when the french maritime authorities conducted this reinforced checks on boats in the area off le havre. they stopped two boats. one was fined for not obeying an initial order to stop and allowing the authorities to board it. that was otherwise in order, but there has been a fine on that boat. then the other boat was found to not have the papers it was required to have in order to fish in these waters, so it has been brought into le havre where it has been impounded, and i guess the captain and the owner of the boat face legal proceedings. at some point it'll be allowed to go on its way but there will almost certainly be some kind of legal follow—up to this. that was hugh schofield, our correspondant in france. barrie deas is chief executive of the national federation of fishermen s organisations and believes french politics has a part to play in this. i suppose this could be normal enforcement activity by the french authorities, but of course, it takes place against the background of very belligerent noises made by the french government on the licensing issue yesterday. so it seems that france is determined to escalate this issue, which is a matter
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of concern to us. it only really makes sense to me in terms of french domestic politics, because this is really, the licensing issue is really a technical matter to be resolved at a technical level and my understanding is that quite a lot of progress is being made in resolving it. but there is a french presidential election and that north coast of france i think is the focus of that kind of domestic political activity and so i think to understand what is happening, you really have to see it within that context. in the next few days tens of thousands of delegates, including world leaders, will arrive in glasgow for cop26 — the un climate change conference. countries will be asked to set out their plans for cutting emissions and rising global temperatures. the uk government's chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance,
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says it's vital that we take action now to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees... absolutely make sure that the technologies we have today and the natural solutions we have today are implemented as fast as possible. that is critical. and there is a way to do that and there is a lot of r&d needed for that. second thing we need to do is invest in the technologies for the future that will continue that make certain parts of that easier. and we also need to accept that there's got to be some change in society and the way that we consume and contribute to emissions. those things together, i think, are really, really important. if there are done and there are clear plans, 1.5 is achievable but not achievable without specific action. and there are the little things that we can all do that may seem tiny individually but you aggregate them across millions and it makes a difference.
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so, i cycle to work, i have reduced my meat consumption. i don't fly as much as i used to. it doesn't mean i have stopped meat consumption or i will never fly again. i will. but i will reduce those things. but those actions across millions make a difference as well. on their own, they are not sufficient. we need to get technologies in place and need to invest in technologies in the future. people around the world want their governments to take strong action on climate change, according to a new poll commissioned by the bbc. ahead of the opening of the cop26 climate summit in glasgow on sunday, more than 30 thousand people were surveyed — across 31 countries — about their attitudes to climate change policies. more than half? 56% — say they want their governments to play a key leadership role. earlier, our environment correspondent matt mcgrath told me whilst 56% might not sound like a huge majority, it is a significant increase. the opinion polls for us here carried out a very similar surveyjust before the paris climate
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talks back in 2015 six years ago. the difference between then and now is quite remarkable. people are looking for strong action from their government and strong leadership has increased by 25% essentially over that period. it has increased in a lot of interesting countries, in india, and in china. in china, back in 2015, only 18% of people wanted to see their governments take strong action. that has gone up to nearly half of respondents now. so, it's an opinion poll. it's a snapshot of opinion, but it does show that people are more serious about climate change and want their governments to take more serious action on it. and, in the run up to the cop26, we'll be answering some of your questions about the whole issue of climate change and the conference itself — here on the bbc news tomorrow morning at 11.30. we'll be joined by two leading climate experts — professor laura witmarsh from the university of bath professor alice larkin who's from the university of manchester. if you've got a question please get in touch using the hashtag bbc your questions or email
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yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben. we've seen some really wet weather over some parts of the uk over the past few days. in cumbria, where rain is still falling, we have a met office amber warning, a risk of disruption and certainly a real risk of flooding. the water levels are rising at the moment. we have had to get more heavy rain piling into the higher ground of cumbria. it is going to turn increasingly wet over the afternoon across wales in south—east england. could be some travel disruption here. in the south—east, you will wonder what all the fuss is about. a dry and relatively bright day. very mild particularly towards the south—east. through tonight, the rain does not grow quickly. we see further pulses of rain drifting up from the south. some of those places that have been
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so wet will continue to be wet. that range should finally start to move eastwards tomorrow, but we have a very unsettled and quite cool weekend in prospect. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the man who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park last year has been sentenced to life imprisonment — with a minimum term of 35 years thejudge said danyal hussein had �*meticulously planned' the murders — which had left the sisters' family �*shattered'. he's a broken human being who, if he hadn't been caught, four otherfamilies may have been suffering what we have. well, he ain't out there now. the man in charge of the flight in which the footballer, emiliano sala, died has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft.
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after yesterday's budget a leading think—tank warns middle—income families will be worse off next year. labour says ordinary people need more help — but the chancellor says things are improving. government officials are investigating the detention of a british trawler in french waters in the channel. france says the boat was fishing without a licence. the uk's chief scientific advisor says plans to limit global warming to 1.5c are an "urgent call for action" on climate change. thousands of women across the uk decided to stay away from pubs and nightclubs last night, and some protested on the streets, to highlight the growing number of spikings on nights out. according to the national police chiefs council, forces have received almost 200 confirmed reports of drink spiking — in just under two months. louisa pilbeam has more. i scream at the top of my lungs, we will not accept this!
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this was manchester last night, where hundreds of people protested against drink spiking. and across the uk, the night in campaign has seen a boycott of nightclubs, leaving establishments empty. spread your arms apart. that's it — bit of social distancing. women are particularly angry at being made to feel unsafe at the alarming trend of people on nights out being deliberately injected with dangerous substances that have left some victims unconscious. women seem to be thought of as the lesser, kind of, gene, and we are definitely not, so to spike a woman in their drink or to inject them isjust absolutely disgusting. new figures revealed 56 incidents of spiking by injection were recorded by police in the uk in september and october, and 198 reports of drink spiking — the majority of victims female. many young women say they'd feel safer if nightclubs and bars had tighter security. i go to some clubs and they will check underneath my phone case and they'll check my pockets and they'll check my bag,
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and other clubs, theyjust don't. and actually i would rather, i would rather you were taking my phone case off and looking inside and see if there's some funny things being brought in. it makes me feel safer. student unions across the country have been providing alternative places to go. there's things like board games, hot drinks, and it's a place for them to come and meet other people and have a chat, but it's people who want to take part in the boycott but don't really want to be alone that evening, they're free to come along. many nightclubs and bars say they are making changes. the first is we're providing testing kits to venues so that if drink spiking happens on their watch they are able to gather forensic evidence straight away. we have got training guides so that staff know exactly what to do. but people seem determined to make a stand, with more demonstrations planned until they feel safe. louisa pilbeam, bbc news. lancaster university's student union's nightclub, closed last night in solidarity with the boycott, but used the opportunity to train staff on how to deal
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with suspected spikings. amy merchant is the vice president welfare officer at lancaster university's students union. she says no nightclub can ever deny they've had a spiking incident. spankings happen because of predatorial individuals who take opportunities wherever they have. it is important possible that we engage with students to see how we can mitigate circumstances. you with students to see how we can mitigate circumstances.- with students to see how we can mitigate circumstances. you did the trainina mitigate circumstances. you did the training session _ mitigate circumstances. you did the training session last _ mitigate circumstances. you did the training session last night _ mitigate circumstances. you did the training session last night for- training session last night for staff at the club. tell us about it. what sort of things were being said? i got down to the venue myself last night. there were a whole host of different topics as part of the package. they have done a training programme through drink where so they are experts in this field and were able to take some really comprehensive training so they
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covered anything from jugs and a student nights out, had to deal with harassment. a place to retreat to. they could be asked about spankings. it was really just a refresher training because the staff have had the training. it was reallyjust to refresh their minds as it has become such a prominent issue. we refresh their minds as it has become such a prominent issue.— such a prominent issue. we were heafina such a prominent issue. we were hearing in — such a prominent issue. we were hearing in a _ such a prominent issue. we were hearing in a report _ such a prominent issue. we were hearing in a report about - such a prominent issue. we were hearing in a report about what. hearing in a report about what measures some women would like hearing in a report about what measures some women would like to see to get the assurance and one woman talked about tighter security checks being to venues because you said it is pretty patchy. what checks being to venues because you said it is pretty patchy.— said it is pretty patchy. what are our said it is pretty patchy. what are your thoughts — said it is pretty patchy. what are your thoughts on _ said it is pretty patchy. what are your thoughts on that? - said it is pretty patchy. what are your thoughts on that? yes, - said it is pretty patchy. what are your thoughts on that? yes, this said it is pretty patchy. what are i your thoughts on that? yes, this is a really interesting topic of conversation. we already have a lot of different provisions in place to protect and look after students and i have signed a national petition calling on improved security measures and i think it is important to highlight that at the sugar house
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our student union we have increased security in the sense that we actually have welfare security who are accessible to a student so we don't make they wear our union colours so students who are in any circumstances can identify the security that are fully equipped to help them but there is a lot of complexities around securities of security measures. and we were hearing that in bristol testing kits have been set to venues so that if there is any suspicion that someone has been spiked evidence can be gathered straightaway. is that something happening in lancaster? yes, we have a whole host of provisions that we do have drink testing kits available to students, we are getting foil covers for drinks, we have the spy case, we have a special welfare having full students if they have been spiked and they can be taken there and
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looked after and treated with first aid so there are a lot of different provisions that i would encourage clubs to adopt in order to look after customers. fix, clubs to adopt in order to look after customers.— clubs to adopt in order to look after customers. �* ., ., ., , after customers. a woman who says she was a woman who says she was sexually abused in a children's home in the 19505 has called for an inquiry and an apology. mo simmons and her two brothers were taken to hollybrook children's home in southampton when she was 10 years old. now she is campaigning for an investigation into the sexual and physical abuse she says she suffered at the council—run facility. she has spoken about the alleged abuse for the first time because she hopes it will help others to come forward. in her own words, this is mo 5 story, which contains details you may find distressing. i'm going to keep trying. if it takes my last breath i'll try. i'm here because i need to talk about what happened to me as a child. there was a day in 1951 that i go over and over again in my mind.
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we got up one morning, our mother wasn't in the house. don't know why, don't know where she was. we were taken by my father in a black car to a house, three of us. myself, my two brothers — i'm ten, one�*s seven, one�*s four. my father went into a room, then he came out and said he'd forgotten something, he would come back for us. he left, and then a lady came out of the room where my father had been. she said, you all need to come with me now. and i said, "we can't come with you, my dad..." sorry. "my dad is coming back in a minute." well, he never came back. we never saw anybody again.
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you weren't allowed to have your own clothes. you had to have clothes that they gave you, and shoes. oh, this is going to be hard. you had to go to a man who i always know and always refer to as "the boot man." he would sit you on a bench to measure your feet. and then my experience of him pulling my skirt up, doing nasty things to me, and then having sex with me. well, in them times, i'm only ten. i didn't know... but i knew that this was wrong. and from then on, you weren't allowed to speak. he threatened me, "if you speak, it'll be worse for you." and your shoes were always that... you had nails in them, they hurt your feet,
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they didn't fit, whichever the reason, so you always had to go back. as well as sexual abuse, i was also threatened and beaten and it wasn'tjust me that it happened to. i could hear other children crying in the night, seeing men coming in and out of the room. i prefer to call it hell than hollybrook home. i spent two years in hollybrook, which was made up of lots of different buildings and houses. because i was a girl, i was separated from my brothers. peter, he was a lovely boy. he really was. and i do believe that this affected him so badly that he couldn't deal with his life. even though he was only four, he must still have had the most terrible memories. as an adult, peter turned to drink. when he died, i was able to get his records from his time at the home.
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they show he was regularly taken to a man's house for visits. ifeel guilty in myself, even though i was only ten, that i couldn't save my brothers. sorry. i reported what happened to me to the police in 2017. ——i reported what happened to me to the police in 2014. they told me that the boot man had died two years before, aged 102. now i wantjustice in a different way. somebody has got to stand up and say we are responsible. hollybrook closed in the �*80s, but it was a council home. i've made to this placard to take to the council, hopefully to stand on the steps and be heard. i want an enquiry into it and i want an apology. i feel like i'm just on my own.
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i'm on my own, and i want to be heard. i want somebody to actually hear about the terrible things and how it's affected my life. mo simmons speaking up about what she and her brothers experienced. southampton city council holds the historical records for the home and a spokesperson said they "sympathise" with mrs simmons' situation. they added that because the time period was before the existence of the council they "have no legal powers to undertake an investigation or inquiry into a body that legally no longer exists". a study has found that some of the world's most highly protected forests are emitting more carbon than they absorb, as a result of illegal logging and wildfires. at least ten forests designated unesco world heritage sites — including yosemite national park
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in the united states — were found to have been net carbon emitters over the last two decades. the findings have alarmed researchers, as forests are considered vital for curbing climate change because of their ability to act as carbon sinks. tanya dendrinos has more. forests emitting more carbon than the store. it may seem perplexing, but the concept is simple. when we cut down forests or they are burned they will emit carbon into the atmosphere, and it's a matter of how much forests we cut down relative to how much forests we leave standing. if we cut down too much forest, then we have forests that emit more carbon than they are capturing from the atmosphere. researchers involved in the unesco co—authored report combine satellite and field data to estimate the number of carbon emitted from world heritage forests between 2001 and 2020.
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the study looked at a network of more than 250 world heritage forests. on a whole, they capture much more carbon than they emit. collectively it is more than 190 tonnes from the atmosphere every year. but ten, including brazil's pantanal wetlands ravaged by fire in recent years, emitted more carbon than they locked away. these are some treasured iconic places and they should not be emitting so much carbon. we believe that if these heavily protected and treasured sites are at such risk, and a few of them are, others in this unesco world heritage network will also be threatened, as well as forests not as protected. it is an alarming find further highlighting the need to cut global emissions. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the man who murdered sisters
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bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a london park last summer has been given a life sentence with a minimum term of 35 years. the man in charge of the flight in which the footballer, emiliano sala, died has been found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft. after yesterday's budget a leading think—tank warns middle—income families will be worse off next year. police in the united states investigating the accidental killing of a inematographer on a film set, say they believe the weapon used by alec baldwin contained a live round. the actor had been told the weapon was safe. reports have now emerged about safety concerns on set in the days before halyna hutchins was killed. sophie long reports. it is now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead while she was doing herjob. these are the last pictures of the cinematographer
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alive on the set of rust. she's in the blue coat and headphones. you can see alec baldwin beyond the camera. he was holding the gun that fired the shot that killed halyna and severely injured directorjoel souza. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr souza. we regard this specific spent casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon by assistant director dave halls, he was told it was safe — what's called a cold gun. the person responsible forfirearms on the set was the armourer — 24—year—old hannah gutierrez—reed. she's admitted ammunition was not secure, but says she checked the guns and found no live rounds. all three are cooperating fully with the investigation. all options are on the table at this point. i'm not commenting on charges —
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whether they will be filed or not, or on whom. so the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving, and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be allowed on film sets under any circumstances. sophie long, bbc news. it first made headlines after thousands of people voted to name it boaty mcboatface — and now britain's newest polar research ship is ready to set sail for its maiden voyage to antarctica. the vessel, which was instead named the rrs sir david attenborough, is currently being displayed on the river thames. our science correspondent, rebecca morelle, has been on board. it's the most advanced polar ship ever to set sail. named after sir david attenborough, it tookjust four years to build. now it's getting ready for its first voyage to antarctica. seeing the ship amongst the ice, it will be absolutely remarkable.
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and it's something we are all really looking forward to. working in the antarctic, sometimes you might think you get used to it, but every time it still amazes us. this is a state—of—the—art research ship, and here on the top deck is the helipad so scientists and the crew can be brought to and from the ship while she's at sea. in here, you have the living quarters — a cosy cabin for two — because the crew on here can stay on board for two months at a time. there's room for 30 crew and 60 scientists on the ship. and this is the all—important coffee shop — where, after a hard day of polar research, the crew can come in and take a bit of a break. this big hole in the middle of the ship goes all the way from the sea up to here. it's called a moon pool, and it means that scientists can access the ocean with their instruments, whatever the weather. the moon pool is really significant because it means we can get these
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really valuable data points. the southern ocean is one of these places that we don't have very many observations from because it's so difficult to get there. and the southern ocean might feel really far away from us here in the uk, but it's really important for our climate as a whole. it takes up a lot of the carbon dioxide and the heat that we put into the atmosphere. it's notjust the water — scientists will be studying every aspect of this rapidly changing ecosystem, from the animals that live there to the creatures they feed on and the nature of the ice itself. this ship will transform our understanding of the poles. the beauty of this ship is that we can bring lots of scientists from different diverse disciplines together on the same ship with lots of brilliant state—of—the—art facilities for each of those groups. so we can bring biologists, chemists, geologists, physicists all together. and that's really important when we're addressing issues around the environment. and, of course, you can't come on board without mentioning boaty mcboatface. it's what the public
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voted to call the ship. but instead, the name's been given to this — been given to this — a mini submarine — and soon it's going to be heading off to explore the antarctic ocean. the sir david attenborough will head off in a few weeks, stopping at the falklands on the way to antarctica. and the man it's named after has recorded a special message for when it sets sail. david attenborough: your attention, please. any personnel on board not sailing with the vessel, please disembark. well, speaking on board the new ship this morning, its namesake — sir david attenborough — wished bon voyage to all those involved in the project, and gave a warning ahead of the climate conference in glasgow next week. we all know now the magnitude of the dangers that are facing us in the immediate future. would it not be marvellous to suppose that as a consequence of our discoveries, and that science�*s discoveries,
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that the nations of the world join together and actually did something at cop in this coming conference. let us see what it does, but i hope and pray that, my goodness, it takes action, that the nations of the world in the light of the scientific discoveries that this ship will undoubtedly be making, that nations got together and listened to the science of what has to be done if the world is not to be overcome by catastrophe. it's 40 years since duran duran first burst onto the music scene — selling millions of records, performing in stadiums across the world, and earning themselves a star on the hollywood walk of fame. they're now back with their 15th studio album, called �*future past�*, and this week go head to head with sir eltonjohn for the top spot in the music charts. charlie stayt went to meet them.
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can ijust say, for people who don't know, we've been here a while, we've been sitting in this room waiting to get up. there is such a good vibe in the room with you four guys. we're super excited to have a new record coming. you know, it's been quite a long road, the last five years. we all know the horrors that we went through for that, sort of, 18—month period with the pandemic. is it a silly thing to say that the new album, it really does sound like duran duran? no! i mean it really does, it really does. it's a very silly thing to say, but it's true. we want to experiment with music. that's what excites us, finding the new tunes,
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the new kind of musical relationships, new beats, new sounds. but if it doesn't sound like duran duran, the fans who we've got, who've kept us going all these years are not going to like it. do you ever look at what people say about your songs? not really. ok, here's some nice ones. oh, here we go! someone has just watched invisible and they've seen the video and whatever, and someone writes, "i'm 50—something now — it makes me feel 16 again." that's good. yeah, that's a lovely feeling, isn't it? another one says, "sit down, grand kids. "let's see how we really did it in the �*805." that's interesting because that particular video for invisible has no markers of time or period. i mean, it's a very modern piece, actually. # has the memory gone? # are you feeling numb?
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# or have i become invisible? what i'm thinking is, though, it's an emotional attachment to all of you and a time and place. it was a time for maverick all sorts of things. it was maverick music, maverick fashion design, maverick art and people were really prepared to stick their necks out at the time, and so if you looked at the charts, you'd see all kinds of artists — madonna, fine young cannibals — all kinds of different artists, and none of them were anything like anybody else who was in the charts. and i think that, as music has become slightly more corporate as time has gone by, there has been kind of an encouragement for artists to kind of head for the middle. these were some quite extreme
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times, and i mean that in the best possible way, of fans. times, and i mean that # wild boys never lose it. times, and i mean that # wild boys never chose this way. times, and i mean that # wild boys... # times, and i mean that a french bulldog who sir david amess said always made him smile has been crowned westminster dog of the year. vivienne was owned by the conservative mp for southend west, who was fatally stabbed while meeting constituents, a fortnight ago. when she was nominated for the award, sir david said she always lifted his spirits. he also claimed she was "an enthusiastic supporter of southend becoming a city!", something which did happen, days after his death. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello, there. some parts of the uk have seen huge amounts of rain over the last couple of days and that vein just keeps on the last couple of days and that veinjust keeps on coming. the last couple of days and that vein just keeps on coming. southern
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scotland has been very wet indeed. the far north—west of england too. that was the scene in cumbria, this pipeline of moisture just planning on over the last 36 hours and according to the environment agency one spot in cumbria has recorded over 340 millimetres of rain so far. that rain just keeps on coming, hence this met office and the one in four bouts of cumbria. the risk of disruption, certainly the risk of flooding is this rain continues to fall to the assertion, feeling very wet across parts of southern scotland, increasingly wet for wales and south—west of england and amongst the swing band somebody strong gusty winds. the central and eastern parts of an estate is this rain continues to fall to the assertion, feeling very wet across parts of southern scotland, increasingly wet for wales and south—west of england and amongst the swing band somebody strong gusty winds. the central and eastern parts of an it stays with northern through this evening and overnight this way makes very slow progress eastwards and we will see further pulses of weather pushing up the south so some of the areas that have been so wet so far will continue to seep heavy
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and persistent rain. 9—13 , those of the overnight lows. into tomorrow there is a big area of low pressure “p there is a big area of low pressure up to the north—west of us. this little weather system here continuing to fix outbreaks of rain, many of us starting tomorrow morning with cloud outbreaks of rain, heavy burst moving across cumbria in southern scotland. as we go through the day this main will continue to drift northwards and many other places will see a dryer, bright afternoon with temperatures of 11-16 afternoon with temperatures of 11—16 perhaps a slightly better feel and we will see plenty of shell and perhaps longer spells of rain pushing to the west as well as we go to friday night and into saturday. a solid start to the weekend and elsewhere thing should write up and we will see a lot scattering of some heavy showers and certainly a cooler feel by the stage 14 degrees. as we head into sunday another bout of wet weather pushes its went from the
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south—west and it may be that northern scotland stays dry but we will see blustery showers following for a time and it will turn windy by sunday afternoon.
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france seizes a british trawler amid escalating tensions over post—brexit fishing rights. the french are also threatening to block british boats from their ports — the uk government says the warnings are unwelcome. it is very disappointing to see the comments that came from france yesterday. we believe these are disappointing and disproportionate, and not what we would expect from a close ally and partner. we'll bring you the latest from paris. also this lunchtime... the teenager who murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman in a park is sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of 35 years. danyal hussein said he had planned the murders as part of a sacrifice he believed would help him win the lottery. the mother of the women says he should never be released.

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