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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 28, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a £150 billion spending spree from the chancellor, but a warning that high taxes and inflation mean living standards won't improve. what will it mean for people in burnley or berwick, singled out in a speech yesterday as part of the governors�*s levelling up? how will changing westminster affect people here? —— people in bury? we'll bring you analysis and reaction to the budget throughout the morning, including an interview with the chancellor rishi sunak live at 7.30 police say the gun fired on a film set by actor alec baldwin killing a colleague contained a live round. it's a league cup
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without manchester city. the holders have been knocked out for the first time in five years — in a penalty shootout with west ham. good morning. the met office has a tear and that warning is out for heavy rain today. for south—west scotland and cumbria. further disruption and flooding as possible and wherever you are it will be windy but mild. all the details later in the programme. it's thursday, the 28th of october. our main story. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has outlined a £150 billion spending spree over three years in his budget. but there are warnings that rising inflation and high taxation could mean no improvement in living standards. our political correspondent chris mason has the story. any budget is a delicate mix of ingredients. first comes the chancellor's address to the commons. then it's a selling job.
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here we go. taxes on alcohol are being simplified... cheers! ..so a trip to a brewery was in order. to rishi! and the chancellor is out and about again this morning in what is so often a crucial time after any budget — the day after — as people start to plough through the budget documents to ferret out the details that weren't mentioned in the speech. here are the key things we learnt. the economy is doing better than some thought, and the government's going to spend the extra money that it raises in taxes. prices are going up — and are likely to for some time. the recent cut in universal credit won't be reversed, but workers who get it will be able to keep more of it as they earn more. and there'll be a 50% discount in business rates in england for the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors — starting next year. where there are chances,
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as the economy recovers, to cut taxes — as we've shown through our action on business rates today and as we've shown through universal credit taper relief, as well — we will do that, and i suspect that over the course of budgets to come between now and the next election, as the chancellor hinted, we will look to ease the burden of taxation on the public. of course there are things in this budget that we welcome — including some of the additional money for public services — but the key challenges that people are facing right now with the cost—of—living crisis and looking into a winter when food prices are going up, when the cost of filling your tank with petrol is increasing, and when gas and electricity bills are soaring...there's nothing. and the analysis is onlyjust beginning. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let's get more reaction now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning. it is interesting, we saw the reaction in the commons
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yesterday after the budget had been delivered but now it is all about what do we, how do we label the conservative party, how do we label this chancellor's strategy? i conservative party, how do we label this chancellor's strategy?— this chancellor's strategy? i think we label rishi _ this chancellor's strategy? i think we label rishi sunak _ this chancellor's strategy? i think we label rishi sunak is _ this chancellor's strategy? i think we label rishi sunak is someone | this chancellor's strategy? i think - we label rishi sunak is someone who is happy to put up taxes because thatis is happy to put up taxes because that is what he did in the budget in march, the first one this year, and then he has been happy to spend that money on government departments in this budget in october. and that will be a little bit uncomfortable with some conservative mps in the long term because the government was a bit smaller and the taxpayer must smile, they would rather. in terms of reaction, labour have said that the government has gone for the wrong priorities here, that by cutting taxes on domestic flights and on sparkling wine, which was one of the more minor things in the budget, that the government is prioritising the wrong things here and they could be doing more for the cost of living, to which the government say one of the biggest things in this budget document when you look at the tables is the changes to universal credit, which
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is basically putting another £2 billion, at least, into the welfare system and also the freeze on fuel duty which saves about £1 billion as well. as we have seen in the last few months, though, the things we all end up talking about are things that come along in the real world. remember that the co2 crisis, the petrol queues, so ijust wonder, when you also read the forecast for the economy, when you see that inflation could be 5% at some point next year, are there things in the real world that will end up feeling a lot more significant and a lot more dramatic than what is in this big document? i more dramatic than what is in this big document?— more dramatic than what is in this big document? i trust you have read it all. of course. _ big document? i trust you have read it all. of course. there _ big document? i trust you have read it all. of course. there is _ big document? i trust you have read it all. of course. there is another i it all. of course. there is another one, it all. of course. there is another one. there _ it all. of course. there is another one. there is _ it all. of course. there is another one, there is the _ it all. of course. there is another one, there is the one _ it all. of course. there is another one, there is the one from - it all. of course. there is another one, there is the one from the i one, there is the one from the office for budget responsibility, which i have to be.— office for budget responsibility, which i have to be. which you have read, of course. _ which i have to be. which you have read, of course. of— which i have to be. which you have read, of course. of course. - which i have to be. which you have read, of course. of course. adam l read, of course. of course. adam flemin: , read, of course. of course. adam fleming. our— read, of course. of course. adam fleming, our chief _ read, of course. of course. adam fleming, our chief political - fleming, our chief political correspondent, who has read all of the things that need to be read, thank you very much. some of the
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issues about affecting people in the real world, issues about affecting people in the realworld, bennett issues about affecting people in the real world, bennett will be talking about that and talking to the chancellor rishi sunak at 7:30am. —— ben will be here. ministers are expected to meet today to discuss the future of the covid travel red list. the government is believed to be considering a further reduction in the number of countries on the list — or even scrap it altogether. such a move would end the need for quarantine hotels. the duchess of cornwall has paid tribute to people whose lives have been "brutally ended" — as she called for action to prevent violence against women. speaking at an event in london last night, she said the names of women who'd died in violent circumstances — including sarah everard — should never be forgotten. sarah everard, sabina nasser, then lane burke. names which, with all the others, must never be forgotten. each one of these women enjoyed unimaginable torment. and their
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loved ones who are left behind continue to suffer —— endured unimaginable torment. police in the united states investigating the accidental killing of a cinematographer on a film set in new mexico say they believe the weapon used by the actor alex baldwin contained a live round. reports have now emerged about safety concerns on set in the days before halyna hutchins was killed. our us correspondent sophie long reports. it is now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead while she was doing herjob. these are the last pictures of the cinematographer alive on the set of rust. she's in the blue coat and headphones. you can see alec baldwin beyond the camera. he was holding the gun that fired the shot that killed halyna and severely injured directorjoel souza. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr souza. we regard this specific spent casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired
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from the revolver by mr baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon by assistant director dave halls, he was told it was safe — what's called a cold gun. the person responsible forfirearms on the set was the armoury — 24—year—old hannah gutierrez—reed. she's admitted ammunition was not secure, but says she checked the guns and found no live rounds. all three are cooperating fully with the investigation. all options are on the table at this point. i'm not commenting on charges — whether they will be filed or not, or on whom. so the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving, and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be allowed on film sets under any circumstances. sophie long, bbc news.
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100 years after the poppy appeal was first launched, thousands of fundraisers will once again take to the streets in support of the royal british legion. last year, face—to—face collections were cancelled for the first time in history because of covid restrictions. the charity supports serving and former military personnel and their families. the polar research vessel which made headlines when a public vote suggested the name boaty mcboatface is preparing for her first expedition. the ship, which was instead named the rrs sir david attenborough, is currently in south east london ahead of the upcoming climate change conference, which the uk is hosting. the ship is expected to set sail for antarctica next month. north yorkshire has a very special new resident — an endangered black rhino, born at flamingo land on sunday. here he is taking his first steps — keepers say they're pleased
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with the calf�*s progress. a little bit grope but ok. —— a little bit ropey but ok. he's the first black rhino to be born in europe this year. there arejust 3,000 left in the wild. i like the fact he has little knobbly legs and they are going to fill out. talking of another late legs, let's get the weather, shall we? i legs, let's get the weather, shall we? �* , ., _, ., legs, let's get the weather, shall we? �* , ., ., ., we? i didn't see that coming at all. it is only ten _ we? i didn't see that coming at all. it is only ten past _ we? i didn't see that coming at all. it is only ten past six, _ we? i didn't see that coming at all. it is only ten past six, i _ we? i didn't see that coming at all. it is only ten past six, i will- we? i didn't see that coming at all. it is only ten past six, i will try - it is only ten past six, i will try to get better. how are you? bless ou, ve to get better. how are you? bless you. very well. — to get better. how are you? bless you, very well, thank _ to get better. how are you? bless you, very well, thank you, - to get better. how are you? bless you, very well, thank you, hope i to get better. how are you? bless you, very well, thank you, hope you are, as _ you, very well, thank you, hope you are, as well — you, very well, thank you, hope you are, as well. the weather is causing are, as well. the weather is causing a lot of— are, as well. the weather is causing a lot of issues at the moment. the met office — a lot of issues at the moment. the met office has two macro weather warnings — met office has two macro weather warnings out south—west scotland and cumbria _ warnings out south—west scotland and cumbria for— warnings out south—west scotland and cumbria for heavy rain. and amber weather— cumbria for heavy rain. and amber weather warning means an increased likelihood _ weather warning means an increased likelihood of impact from severe weather, — likelihood of impact from severe weather, so disruption to transportation and risk of a feathen _ transportation and risk of a feather. the holistic pass in the lake _ feather. the holistic pass in the
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lake district in cumbria in the last 36 hours _ lake district in cumbria in the last 36 hours has seen a foot of rain, 'ust 36 hours has seen a foot of rain, just over— 36 hours has seen a foot of rain, just over 304 millimetres, because of this— just over 304 millimetres, because of this weather front. it has been with us— of this weather front. it has been with us now for a while and it will be with— with us now for a while and it will be with us— with us now for a while and it will be with us get through that was of today— be with us get through that was of today so— be with us get through that was of today so we could see further rainfall— today so we could see further rainfall in _ today so we could see further rainfall in areas that are already being _ rainfall in areas that are already being affected. the rain will be heavy — being affected. the rain will be heavy across northern england, through — heavy across northern england, through wales come into the south—west through the day. moving across _ south—west through the day. moving across northern ireland and central and eastern parts of scotland. to the north— and eastern parts of scotland. to the north of that, some brighter conditions — the north of that, some brighter conditions with a few showers. to the south, — conditions with a few showers. to the south, still quite a bit of cloud — the south, still quite a bit of cloud around but largely dry. wherever you are it windy but the costliest — wherever you are it windy but the costliest winds will be out towards the west — costliest winds will be out towards the west. temperatures 12 to about 17 degrees — the west. temperatures 12 to about 17 degrees. as we head on through the evening and overnight you can see we _ the evening and overnight you can see we still are looking at rain for a time _ see we still are looking at rain for a time in — see we still are looking at rain for a time in the same areas. if anything. _ a time in the same areas. if anything, the rain edges by the east but there _ anything, the rain edges by the east but there will be heavy showers following on behind and once again a windy— following on behind and once again a windy night but also still a mild one _ windy night but also still a mild
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one. tomorrow through the course of the day— one. tomorrow through the course of the day our— one. tomorrow through the course of the day our first weather front that has been _ the day our first weather front that has been with us for a while starts to edge _ has been with us for a while starts to edge over towards the east. you can see _ to edge over towards the east. you can see heavy showers following on behind _ can see heavy showers following on behind. through the day things will improve _ behind. through the day things will improve from the west, we will see brighter— improve from the west, we will see brighter conditions with some sunshine _ brighter conditions with some sunshine coming in and temperatures are slipping _ sunshine coming in and temperatures are slipping just a little bit. thank— are slipping just a little bit. thank you, see you later on. pleasure. it thank you, see you later on. pleasure-— thank you, see you later on. pleasure. , ' , , , thousands of women across the uk decided to stay away from pubs and nightclubs last night, some protested on the streets, to highlight the growing number of spikings on nights out. according to the national police chiefs council, forces have received almost 200 confirmed reports of drink spiking in just under two months. louisa pilbeam has more. i scream at the top of my lungs, we will not accept this! this was manchester last night, where hundreds of people protested against drink spiking. and across the uk, the night in campaign has seen
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a boycott of nightclubs, leaving establishments empty. spread your arms apart. bit of social distancing. women are particularly angry at being made to feel unsafe at the alarming trend of people on nights out being deliberately injected with dangerous substances that have left some victims unconscious. women seem to be thought of as the lesser kind of gene, and we are definitely not, so to spike a woman in their drink or inject them is just absolutely disgusting. new figures revealed 56 incidents of spiking by injection were recorded by police in the uk in september and october, and 198 reports of drink spiking, the majority of victims female. many young women say they'd feel safer if nightclubs and bars had tighter security. i go to some clubs and they will check underneath my phone case and they will check my pockets and my bag, and other clubs, they just don't. and actually i would rather
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you were taking my phone case off and looking inside and see if there's some funny things being brought in. it makes me feel safer. student unions across the country have been providing alternative places to go. there's things like board games, hot drinks, and it's a place for them to come and meet other people and have a chat, but its people who want to take part in the boycott but don't want to be alone that evening, they are free to come along. many nightclubs and bars say they are making changes. the first is we are providing testing kits to venues so if drink spiking happens on their watch they are able to gather forensic evidence straight away. we have got training guides so staff know exactly what to do. but people seem determined to make a stand, with more demonstrations planned until they feel safe. louisa pilbeam, bbc news. let's take a look at today's papers which are unsurprisingly dominated by yesterday's budget announcement. "the drinks are on us" declares the daily mail under a picture of the chancellor and the prime minster lifting beer kegs. it comes after rishi sunak announced
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a tax cut on draught beers and prosecco. meanwhile, the mirror describes yesterday's announcement as "the bankers' budget". the headline there is "champagne for the rich — real pain for the poor." the guardian sums it up as "spend now, cut taxes later", claiming rishi sunak intends to slash taxes before the next general election. while the sun leads with an exclusive interview with singer ed sheeran who tells the paper he "ballooned to 15 stone on a diet of wine, beer and chicken wings". he admits he put on weight when he stopped touring, but has since shed five stone. worth saying, the chancellor will be speaking to bbc breakfast at 7:30am. how did you link that to a cheer and losing five stone? i how did you link that to a cheer and losing five stone?— losing five stone? i didn't particularly- _ losing five stone? i didn't
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particularly. this - losing five stone? i didn't particularly. this is - losing five stone? i didn't - particularly. this is information that people need to know as they plot through their mornings. 7:30am, the chancellor, if you want to hear him speak. this is the place. obviously very important stop by looking at this, i'm very excited about brian cox coming in. that is also a completely different end of the scale. not the scientist, it is brian cox the actor who has been in the business for decades and is currently starring in succession, which is on sky and it has taken the drama world by storm, and the comedy world because it is funny. i have read his book, which is very funny. and it is not name—dropping because he does know people, but it is across all eras of acting, so it goes from laurence olivier through to brad pitt, through to pretty much anyone you could mention. everyone. he will be here _ anyone you could mention. everyone. he will be here later. _ anyone you could mention. everyone. he will be here later. i'm _ anyone you could mention. everyone. he will be here later. i'm very - he will be here later. i'm very excited. he will be here later. i'm very excited- do — he will be here later. i'm very excited. do you _ he will be here later. i'm very excited. do you have - he will be here later. i'm very excited. do you have some i
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he will be here later. i'm very i excited. do you have some nice pictures or a nice picture? i hope ou can pictures or a nice picture? i hope you can pick _ pictures or a nice picture? i hope you can pick this _ pictures or a nice picture? i hope you can pick this out. _ pictures or a nice picture? i hope you can pick this out. i _ pictures or a nice picture? i hope you can pick this out. i don't i you can pick this out. i don't know why they do this picture so small. this picture is from jersey stop can you see that? what is happening is this is the england rugby team on the beach injersey as part of their warm up routine, pulling a big truck. it is a ten tonne truck and this is part of their training routine. they all pulled together. as opposed teamwork. we will pull the ten tonne truck, if everyone goes against... fist the ten tonne truck, if everyone goes against. . .— the ten tonne truck, if everyone goes against... at those team days awa , goes against... at those team days away. going — goes against... at those team days away. going over — goes against... at those team days away, going over to _ goes against... at those team days away, going over to jersey. - goes against... at those team days away, going over to jersey. it i goes against... at those team days away, going over to jersey. it was i away, going over tojersey. it was banksy piece of art that we spoke about a couple of weeks ago, the girl with the balloon, the shredder and i think it was originally bought for £1.5 million, lot of money, and then sold for 15, so if you are into your art, you could own, buy, an
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original andy warhol sketch what £180. which is very cheap, considering how much andy warhols go far. what is happening is you are going to be drawn. you buy a ticket and you get lucky and you could make $19,750. i5 and you get lucky and you could make $19,750. , , ., $19,750. is there 'ust the one aintin: $19,750. is there 'ust the one painting that _ $19,750. is there 'ust the one painting that is i $19,750. is there just the one painting that is going - $19,750. is there just the one painting that is going to i $19,750. is there just the one painting that is going to be... j painting that is going to be... yellow co it is they fairies. it has been mixed _ yellow co it is they fairies. it has been mixed along _ yellow co it is they fairies. it has been mixed along with _ yellow co it is they fairies. it has been mixed along with 999 i been mixed along with 999 high—quality copies, so you get something anyway if you put your $250, £180, but you don't know if you get the original. kind of worth it because if you like the picture anywhere you will get it but you may get the original. that is quite nifty marketing strategy. aha, get the original. that is quite nifty marketing strategy. a picture for ou. i nifty marketing strategy. a picture foryou- twill— nifty marketing strategy. a picture for you. i will show _ nifty marketing strategy. a picture for you. i will show you _ nifty marketing strategy. a picture for you. i will show you this - nifty marketing strategy. a picture for you. i will show you this for i for you. i will show you this for
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free, this has been around a while stop this is a great video. i free, this has been around a while stop this is a great video.- stop this is a great video. i saw it yesterday- _ stop this is a great video. i saw it yesterday- the — stop this is a great video. i saw it yesterday. the australian - stop this is a great video. i saw it yesterday. the australian gold i yesterday. the australian gold coast, yesterday. the australian gold coast. this _ yesterday. the australian gold coast, this is _ yesterday. the australian gold coast, this is wendy, - yesterday. the australian gold coast, this is wendy, an i yesterday. the australian gold i coast, this is wendy, an amateur golfer, just about to tee off and the golf course is invaded by... well, i say invaded... frankly, maybe they are just reclaiming the area that should rightfully be theirs. kangaroos, anyway, lots of them in the middle of the course. as anyone knows, you shouldn't mess with kangaroos. ila! anyone knows, you shouldn't mess with kangaroos.— anyone knows, you shouldn't mess with kangaroos. no! don't get into a boxin: with kangaroos. no! don't get into a boxing match _ with kangaroos. no! don't get into a boxing match with _ with kangaroos. no! don't get into a boxing match with a _ with kangaroos. no! don't get into a boxing match with a kangaroo, i with kangaroos. no! don't get into a boxing match with a kangaroo, you | boxing match with a kangaroo, you will lose. fir boxing match with a kangaroo, you will lose. ., , ., �* boxing match with a kangaroo, you will lose. . , ., �* , , will lose. or generally, don't mess with kangaroos. _ will lose. or generally, don't mess with kangaroos. have _ will lose. or generally, don't mess with kangaroos. have you - will lose. or generally, don't mess with kangaroos. have you ever- will lose. or generally, don't mess i with kangaroos. have you ever messed with kangaroos. have you ever messed with a kangaroo? _ with kangaroos. have you ever messed with a kangaroo? no, _ with kangaroos. have you ever messed with a kangaroo? no, not— with kangaroos. have you ever messed with a kangaroo? no, not really, i with kangaroos. have you ever messed with a kangaroo? no, not really, but. with a kangaroo? no, not really, but it is one of — with a kangaroo? no, not really, but it is one of those _ with a kangaroo? no, not really, but it is one of those things _ with a kangaroo? no, not really, but it is one of those things you - with a kangaroo? no, not really, but it is one of those things you pick i it is one of those things you pick up it is one of those things you pick up along the way. it it is one of those things you pick uo along the way-— up along the way. it sounds like exoerience- _ up along the way. it sounds like experience. one _ up along the way. it sounds like experience. one of— up along the way. it sounds like experience. one of the - up along the way. it sounds like experience. one of the things i | up along the way. it sounds like i experience. one of the things i have learnt over the _ experience. one of the things i have learnt over the years _ experience. one of the things i have learnt over the years is _ experience. one of the things i have learnt over the years is not - experience. one of the things i have learnt over the years is not to i experience. one of the things i have learnt over the years is not to mess | learnt over the years is not to mess with kangaroos. learnt over the years is not to mess with kangaroos-— learnt over the years is not to mess with kangaroos. how do you learn not to mess with — with kangaroos. how do you learn not to mess with a _ with kangaroos. how do you learn not to mess with a kangaroo? _ with kangaroos. how do you learn not to mess with a kangaroo? i— with kangaroos. how do you learn not to mess with a kangaroo? i think- with kangaroos. how do you learn not to mess with a kangaroo? i think it. to mess with a kangaroo? i think it is wisdom. — to mess with a kangaroo? i think it is wisdom, comes _ to mess with a kangaroo? i think it is wisdom, comes from _ to mess with a kangaroo? i think it is wisdom, comes from age - to mess with a kangaroo? i think it is wisdom, comes from age and i
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is wisdom, comes from age and wisdom. �* ,, is wisdom, comes from age and wisdom. �* , , ., is wisdom, comes from age and wisdom. �* ,, ., wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there ou wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there you go- _ wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there you go. brian _ wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there you go. brian cox _ wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there you go. brian cox will- wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there you go. brian cox will tell i wisdom. don't mess with a panther, there you go. brian cox will tell us l there you go. brian cox will tell us why. i am not competing at all but i think this is a gorgeous picture. i think this is a gorgeous picture. i think carol would appreciate this. this is a gorgeous picture, a double rainbow in the peak district will stop danny shepard was on a walk, a keen hiker, he was at the top when the rainbows appeared and they stayed for 20 minutes and he took this shot which i think is stunning. it is like a bubble, and —— orb. beautiful. 6:20am is the time. duran duran, the soundtrack over the years, the soundtrack to lots of people's lives. years, the soundtrack to lots of people's lives-—
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years, the soundtrack to lots of people's lives. rio, the reflex. white they _ people's lives. rio, the reflex. white they have _ people's lives. rio, the reflex. white they have looked - people's lives. rio, the reflex. white they have looked back. people's lives. rio, the reflex. l white they have looked back over their early days before their success, the birmingham club called the rum runner. we were looking for somewhere to play. something that punk rock did — it broke out of all the conventional venues. you really didn't want to be playing where everybody else was. you weren't going to play some public residency so, you know, one afternoon, nick and i, i think we saw a poster for the rum runner and i think it was a bowie night or something. we were like, "why don't we go and check that place out?" we went back that night and it was a friday night and the scene was incredible. it was an incredible crossroads of culture, actually, what was going on at that moment. it was like a micro culture of how society would want to be. you could get in there if you were gay, transgender, black, white, whatever kind of music you're into, as long as it was cool, you could get in there, and everybody really mixed and it was a really cool... a really great place for us to perform our sound and our look. to form our sound and our look.
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can i take you through the look i was sporting in the early days of duran duran? yes, please! before we go any further, did anybody ever stop i you from going in at the door? yes. a lot. so the club you were playing at, i couldn't get into. but i'll take you through the outfit, ok? i was going to say, - if you had a photo we could probably find you... we could tell you why you didn't get in. laughter. there are no photos from those days, as you know. you weren't wearing those socks, were you? so, i'll take you through the outfit, ok? winkle—picker shoes, purple. silver balloon trousers with, like, about eight buttons up here across the waist. it's a wonder you didn't get in. a donkeyjacket and, on the top, a beret. right. wow. i think it was the donkeyjacket. i think you were confused. and i think you found the perfectjob. balloon pants and a donkeyjacket! definitely not. i'm going to go home and try it on as soon as we finish this. i it's dexys midnight runners, i think is your problem.
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the thing is... i was going to say the are the thing is... i was going to say they are in _ the thing is... i was going to say they are in very _ the thing is... i was going to say they are in very good _ the thing is... i was going to say they are in very good form i the thing is... i was going to say they are in very good form and i the thing is... i was going to say i they are in very good form and what is lovely about them, and it is the first thing we said when i met them, theyjust seem to get on really well. they have had their rows over the years, but theyjust have a laugh together which is probably why they are still performing. do laugh together which is probably why they are still performing.— they are still performing. do you still have the _ they are still performing. do you still have the trousers? - they are still performing. do you still have the trousers? no, i they are still performing. do you still have the trousers? no, all | still have the trousers? no, all one. still have the trousers? no, all gone- all _ still have the trousers? no, all gone. all gone. _ still have the trousers? no, all gone. all gone. slightly - gone. all gone. slightly disappointing, - gone. all gone. slightly disappointing, isn't i gone. all gone. slightly disappointing, isn't it? | gone. all gone. slightly| disappointing, isn't it? i gone. all gone. slightly i disappointing, isn't it? i would really like to see that- disappointing, isn't it? i would really like to see that 6:23am is the time! bob marley's life may have been short, but it was extraordinary. from growing up on the streets of kingston injamaica, to international stardom. it's been years in the making, but his life has now been turned into a stage musical for the very first time in the west end. emma north went to meet the people behind it. # get up, stand up. # stand up for your rights. this is the first time i've ever felt the floor shaking when i'm on stage. i've never felt that before. because of... people get up on their feet
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and they dance and they move. and i was stood right here, about, last week, and i thought that there was an earthquake! the earthquake was down to a world first. london's west end, and i've come to see this show. very excited. about time, dammit, it's about time. waiting for this day — i've been waiting! cheering. the actor playing one of the most famous musicians in history knows the responsibility he carries. what's it like playing someone whose voice is recognised all over the world? i'm not up there doing a bob marley impression. there is a certain level of interpretation that has to kind of come into the fold — you know, like, how do i interpret this man's love for his music and for his words and for his religion and for the women in his life? how does that physically affect my performance? # could you be loved and be loved?
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from the boy abandoned by his father, to the homeless teenager sleeping on a studio floor in kingston so he could wake up and make music, marley's life from cradle to grave is told. marley's music provides the context. it brims over with activism, politics and power. whilst it is political, whilst it is heartfelt, whilst there is an element of activism that is inside it and inherent in bob marley and his music and in the musical...it is also a celebration of him as an individual, of those ideas, of the acceptance of those ideas now. while his music is loved the world over, for those recreating marley's life, the rehearsal room became a deeply private place. people have a really personal connection to bob marley, especially because most people in that room are of caribbean descent and, actually, most people in that room are jamaican heritage. so they grew up not only
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with the music, but their parents grew up with the music. and it felt like their parents' stories, like... rita reminds me very much of my own mum. putting the life and music of bob marley on stage has taken years. good news, then — that although the show�*s only been on a couple of weeks, its run has been extended to next year, giving us more chance to go and celebrate. emma north, bbc news. fantastic music. really is. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the duchess of cornwall has paid tribute to people whose lives have been 'brutally ended' as she called for action to prevent violence against women. speaking at an event in euston she said the names of women who'd died in violent circumstances, including sarah everard, should never be forgotten.
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she also said survivors of abuse should be suppoted to end stigma and isolation. it is, as almost all women know, a deeply disturbing experience to be sexually harassed, yet somehow a culture of silence has grown up in which these women conceal their experiences of such offences. why? there are, of course, many explanations, but there is one significant reason on which we are focusing today. shame. talks to save one of surrey 5 main bus operations have collapsed ? putting more than 100 jobs and 14 routes at risk. arriva plans to close its depot in guildford in december, due to falling passenger numbers. surrey council says many residents rely on the service to get them to work, school and medical appointments. surrey county council says many of our residents rely on these services to get them to work, school, medical appointments.
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london has been ranked as number 11 in a list of the uk's greenest cities, behind sheffield, edingburgh and cardiff. (00v) the study by natwest and the university of southampton ranked cities according to issues such as green space, energy use, recycling and the way we commute. 40 years after they broke into the top ten charts, duran duran are beack with a new album. they've been talking to bbc london about how they made it and the secret of their success. just sitting there in the back of our minds, waiting to come out. it’s our minds, waiting to come out. it's true, and when we get together something special always happens. we have an _ something special always happens. we have an amazing cast of people around — have an amazing cast of people around us — have an amazing cast of people around us on this record, but there's— around us on this record, but there's something that when the four of us get _ there's something that when the four of us get together, there is a spark — quite a few problems on the tube this morning. let's take a look . there are minor delays on the circle and metropolitan lines— and the district line has severe delays between upminster
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and earls court and turnham green and richmond — engineering works have overrun. time for the weather now with gillian brown. hello and good morning to you. another mild day on the cards across the capital today. plenty of cloud around, but also some clear spells out there this morning but we will start to see something a little brighter coming through this afternoon and it will feel blustery again today though on this southerly breeze but very mild with temperatures around 17 celsius. some clear skies for a time tonight before this band of rain starts to push in from the west, so a very wet start to the day as we head towards dawn on friday. temperatures around 11 or 12 c overnight, so a change is on the cards as we head towards tomorrow. this band of rain really going to be with us the best part of the day and pretty cloudy skies as well and as we head towards the weekend there is more rain in the forecast as well.
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good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt coming up on breakfast this morning. next stop antarctica — we're on board britain's newest polar research ship — otherwise known as boaty mcboatface — ahead of its maiden voyage next month. from childhood struggles to succession stardom — and a load of famous encounters in between. actor brian cox joins us to discuss his remarkable life on and off the screen. and the doctor returns! we get a taste of what's to come on season 13 of doctor who, from the time lord's companion, actor mandip gill. "challenging months ahead" is what the chancellor rishi sunak warned as he delivered his budget to the house of commons yesterday. thanks to better—than—expected economic recovery from the pandemic, he was able to announce some measures to help
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businesses and households. but was it enough? ben is in bury for us. good morning, ben. we go through a lot of numbers when the chancellor speaks and then there is that moment in time when we stop and think and people look at their household budgets and try to work out what it means. , y ., budgets and try to work out what it means. , , ., ., ., �* means. yes, you are right, and we've had some time _ means. yes, you are right, and we've had some time to _ means. yes, you are right, and we've had some time to examine _ means. yes, you are right, and we've had some time to examine the i means. yes, you are right, and we've had some time to examine the detail| had some time to examine the detail and all week i have been in burnley, in my hometown and we are in bury, two towns in the north—west singled out in the chancellor's beach yesterday as an example of places where they are spending money to try and level up. there are already some criticism is that it is pretty scarce on detail when it comes to what they will offer places like this but we do have an indication about what the announcements in westminster could mean for personal finances, so let me run you through a few of the headline announcements we got yesterday and there is some good news if you are on universal
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credit, so if you're in work and claiming universal credit, at the moment if you work more hours, the amount of benefit money you get will be reduced and the level of that is cut will come down from 63p down to 55p so you will be able to keep more of the money you earn if you are in work and there is also a freeze on fuel duty as well which has been frozen for about a decade and the chancellor says the freeze will go on for another year and it might help people who are seeing prices go up help people who are seeing prices go up at the pump but crucially there was no specific help for people who are struggling to pay their gas bills for example. there was also a rise in the minimum wage so if you are over 23 and getting the national living wage, this was one of the announcements leaked earlier in the week which is going up to £9 50 and there will be increases for apprenticeships and those under the age of 23. there was also a big overhaul of alcohol duty, one of the
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emotive issues on the chancellor likes to give away a little on and basically they've changed the rules so the more alcohol your drink contains, the more tax you will pay on it and the less alcohol, the less tax, so good news for things like sparkling wine and rose but not so good for a strong ciders and red wine and things like that. and also changes to air passenger duty, the tax you pay if you are on a flight, that will go up for long haul flights but crucially it's coming down for domestic flights, much to the dismay of some environmental groups, it has to be said. so what does it all mean for places like this? do the decisions in westminster really filter through to places like this? i was out in burnley yesterday and spoke to a few people about what they made up what the chancellor had to say.— the chancellor had to say. yeah, it's 'ust the chancellor had to say. yeah, it's just more — the chancellor had to say. yeah, it'sjust more disposable - the chancellor had to say. yeah, it'sjust more disposable income j the chancellor had to say. yeah, i it'sjust more disposable income and more _ it'sjust more disposable income and more to— it'sjust more disposable income and more to save and we live in a world where _ more to save and we live in a world where saving — more to save and we live in a world where saving is so important, even 'ust where saving is so important, even just a _ where saving is so important, even just a little — where saving is so important, even just a little bit every month. | just a little bit every month. don't
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just a little bit every month. i don't think it helped the pensioners at all~ _ don't think it helped the pensioners at all~ he _ don't think it helped the pensioners at all. he talked _ don't think it helped the pensioners at all. he talked about _ don't think it helped the pensioners at all. he talked about tax - don't think it helped the pensioners at all. he talked about tax coming i at all. he talked about tax coming down, _ at all. he talked about tax coming down, but — at all. he talked about tax coming down, but it's— at all. he talked about tax coming down, but it's not— at all. he talked about tax coming down, but it's not really— at all. he talked about tax coming down, but it's not really coming . down, but it's not really coming down _ down, but it's not really coming down to— down, but it's not really coming down to help _ down, but it's not really coming down to help pensioners - down, but it's not really coming down to help pensioners and i down, but it's not really coming i down to help pensioners and people who need _ down to help pensioners and people who need it — down to help pensioners and people who need it. it's— down to help pensioners and people who need it. it's not— down to help pensioners and people who need it. it's not helping - down to help pensioners and people who need it. it's not helping the i who need it. it's not helping the nhs, _ who need it. it's not helping the nhs, really _ who need it. it's not helping the nhs, really. carers— who need it. it's not helping the nhs, really. carers are - who need it. it's not helping the nhs, really. carers are the i who need it. it's not helping the nhs, really. carers are the onei who need it. it's not helping the - nhs, really. carers are the one that werent— nhs, really. carers are the one that weren't mentioned _ nhs, really. carers are the one that weren't mentioned and _ nhs, really. carers are the one that weren't mentioned and they- nhs, really. carers are the one that weren't mentioned and they were i nhs, really. carers are the one that. weren't mentioned and they were the ones that— weren't mentioned and they were the ones that need — weren't mentioned and they were the ones that need it. _ weren't mentioned and they were the ones that need it. there's _ weren't mentioned and they were the ones that need it. there's an - weren't mentioned and they were the ones that need it. there's an awful i ones that need it. there's an awful lot of— ones that need it. there's an awful lot of people — ones that need it. there's an awful lot of people looking _ ones that need it. there's an awful lot of people looking after- ones that need it. there's an awful lot of people looking after familiesi lot of people looking after families who are _ lot of people looking after families who are hot — lot of people looking after families who are not able _ lot of people looking after families who are not able to _ lot of people looking after families who are not able to afford - lot of people looking after families who are not able to afford help - lot of people looking after families| who are not able to afford help and things. _ who are not able to afford help and things. and — who are not able to afford help and things. and this _ who are not able to afford help and things, and this is _ who are not able to afford help and things, and this is all— who are not able to afford help and things, and this is all adding - who are not able to afford help and things, and this is all adding to - things, and this is all adding to the cost — things, and this is all adding to the cost of— things, and this is all adding to the cost of your— things, and this is all adding to the cost of your money, - things, and this is all adding to the cost of your money, you i things, and this is all adding to - the cost of your money, you know, if you need _ the cost of your money, you know, if you need to — the cost of your money, you know, if you need to get _ the cost of your money, you know, if you need to get someone _ the cost of your money, you know, if you need to get someone in - the cost of your money, you know, if you need to get someone in to- the cost of your money, you know, if you need to get someone in to help, i you need to get someone in to help, you need to get someone in to help, you cant— you need to get someone in to help, you can't afford _ you need to get someone in to help, you can't afford it _ you need to get someone in to help, you can't afford it because _ you can't afford it because everything _ you can't afford it because everything is _ you can't afford it because everything is going - you can't afford it because everything is going up, . you can't afford it because i everything is going up, food, petrol. — everything is going up, food, petrol, everything. _ everything is going up, food, petrol, everything. one- everything is going up, food, petrol, everything.— everything is going up, food, petrol, everything. one of the big ro osals petrol, everything. one of the big preposats is _ petrol, everything. one of the big proposals is something _ petrol, everything. one of the big proposals is something called - petrol, everything. one of the big l proposals is something called draft release, served in the tap means it will be cheaper.— will be cheaper. what is it mean . uestion will be cheaper. what is it mean question mark _ will be cheaper. what is it mean question mark depending - will be cheaper. what is it mean question mark depending on - will be cheaper. what is it mean i question mark depending on the will be cheaper. what is it mean - question mark depending on the brew is whether— question mark depending on the brew is whether they freeze the price increase — is whether they freeze the price increase the prices, we are not sure what _ increase the prices, we are not sure what the _ increase the prices, we are not sure what the breweries will do and i'm sure we _ what the breweries will do and i'm sure we will get letters of them informing us what will happen and hopefully— informing us what will happen and hopefully we can do price freezing, 10p doesn't sound like a lot of money, — 10p doesn't sound like a lot of money, but over a period of time it
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goes _ money, but over a period of time it goes a _ money, but over a period of time it goes a tong — money, but over a period of time it goes a long way when it adds up. so goes a long way when it adds up. sc if goes a long way when it adds up. s: if you goes a long way when it adds up. for if you thought there goes a long way when it adds up. sr if you thought there from burnley yesterday but really, who stands to gain and who stands to lose from this budget? then speak to the resolution foundation. so much to digestive what the chancellor announced yesterday. i wonder first of all about who are the winners and losers in this budget? it of all about who are the winners and losers in this budget?— losers in this budget? it was actually a — losers in this budget? it was actually a much _ losers in this budget? it was actually a much bigger- losers in this budget? it was i actually a much bigger budget losers in this budget? it was - actually a much bigger budget than many— actually a much bigger budget than many of— actually a much bigger budget than many of us expected and a lot of policy— many of us expected and a lot of policy and — many of us expected and a lot of policy and the first chance the chancellor has got to point the way to where _ chancellor has got to point the way to where we are heading for a post— pandemic— to where we are heading for a post— pandemic economy and although he said he _ pandemic economy and although he said he wants to be a low tax chancellor and the prime minister told us _ chancellor and the prime minister told us he — chancellor and the prime minister told us he wants a high wage economy, actually if we step back and say _ economy, actually if we step back and say what did the budget show, it shows— and say what did the budget show, it shows will— and say what did the budget show, it shows will be a high tax on slightly higher— shows will be a high tax on slightly higher spending economy than we thought— higher spending economy than we thought and taxes will have gone up try the _ thought and taxes will have gone up by the equivalent of £3000 per household by the middle of the decade — household by the middle of the decade since borisjohnson became prime _ decade since borisjohnson became prime minister, so quite a big change — prime minister, so quite a big change to— prime minister, so quite a big
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change to the economy and probably the right— change to the economy and probably the right choice to make as an ageing — the right choice to make as an ageing society, but a big choice. you talk— ageing society, but a big choice. you talk about the tax burden being put on all of us. the highest level since the 19505. what does it tell us about the chancellor's thinking about the economy and how much money he needs to make offers to prevent a repeat of what we have just been through? it repeat of what we have 'ust been throu~h? , ., repeat of what we have 'ust been throu~h? i. . repeat of what we have 'ust been throu~h? . , i, through? if you want physical conservatism _ through? if you want physical conservatism and _ through? if you want physical conservatism and you - through? if you want physical conservatism and you want i through? if you want physicalj conservatism and you want to through? if you want physical - conservatism and you want to see debt falling as the chancellor says he does _ debt falling as the chancellor says he does 7 — debt falling as the chancellor says he does ? fiscal conservatism. and as we _ he does ? fiscal conservatism. and as we are _ he does ? fiscal conservatism. and as we are an— he does ? fiscal conservatism. and as we are an ageing society and we spend _ as we are an ageing society and we spend more — as we are an ageing society and we spend more on health over time and if you _ spend more on health over time and if you are _ spend more on health over time and if you are a — spend more on health over time and if you are a slow growth economy, you end _ if you are a slow growth economy, you end up — if you are a slow growth economy, you end up with higher taxes and that is— you end up with higher taxes and that is basically the inexorable logic— that is basically the inexorable logic the — that is basically the inexorable logic the chancellor has followed to .et logic the chancellor has followed to get away _ logic the chancellor has followed to get away he wants to be despite saying _ get away he wants to be despite saying he — get away he wants to be despite saying he wants to be a low tax chancellor, he is properly one of the biggest tax increasing in chancellors than any of us have seen in our— chancellors than any of us have seen in our lifetimes and it's because of longer—term changes to our society and because we want to see debt falling _ and because we want to see debt falling but we also want to make sure we — falling but we also want to make sure we are not getting the growth
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that would make it easier to get spending — that would make it easier to get spending into our public services. yes, _ spending into our public services. yes. high — spending into our public services. yes, high tax and high inflation. we know prices are going up and just about everything now and that means according to your research that incomes will stagnate and we will feel it in our pocket, won't we? the chancellor — feel it in our pocket, won't we? the chancellor had _ feel it in our pocket, won't we? the chancellor had some good news for the public— chancellor had some good news for the public finances yesterday. lower borrowing _ the public finances yesterday. lower borrowing because the economy is doing _ borrowing because the economy is doing slightly better than we thought six months ago and that's a really— thought six months ago and that's a really good — thought six months ago and that's a really good news but good news for the public— really good news but good news for the public finances was not good news _ the public finances was not good news for — the public finances was not good news for household finances because higher— news for household finances because higher inflation that help the chancellor with the borrowing figures — chancellor with the borrowing figures is hurting household budgets and that— figures is hurting household budgets and that is why the office for budget— and that is why the office for budget responsibility expects household incomes and wages to actually— household incomes and wages to actually not grow at all in the next year. _ actually not grow at all in the next year. so _ actually not grow at all in the next year, so that's really bad news for everyone — year, so that's really bad news for everyone worrying about their own budgets _ everyone worrying about their own bud . ets. . everyone worrying about their own buduets. . . everyone worrying about their own buduets. , . ., everyone worrying about their own buduets. , . . ., ., everyone worrying about their own buduets. , ., ., ., ., , ., , budgets. yes, and a lot of questions about what the _ budgets. yes, and a lot of questions about what the chancellor's - about what the chancellor's priorities might be. some of the headline giveaways, may be cutting the price of pussetto and reducing the price of pussetto and reducing the amount of duty or tax paid on a
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domestic flight, are they the right priority is given the scale of the challenge ahead, is he focusing on the right things? i challenge ahead, is he focusing on the right things?— the right things? i think reforming alcohol duty _ the right things? i think reforming alcohol duty reflects _ the right things? i think reforming alcohol duty reflects the _ the right things? i think reforming alcohol duty reflects the strength | alcohol duty reflects the strength of the _ alcohol duty reflects the strength of the individual drinks involved is a sensible — of the individual drinks involved is a sensible reform and has been due for quite _ a sensible reform and has been due for quite a — a sensible reform and has been due for quite a number of years, but overall— for quite a number of years, but overall although he announced a number— overall although he announced a number of small tax cuts yesterday, you list _ number of small tax cuts yesterday, you list two — number of small tax cuts yesterday, you list two of them but there were cuts to _ you list two of them but there were cuts to the — you list two of them but there were cuts to the bank levy on bank surcharge _ cuts to the bank levy on bank surcharge for corporation tax profits, — surcharge for corporation tax profits, but thanks have welcomed business _ profits, but thanks have welcomed business rate cuts for hospitality and leisure businesses but those are relatively— and leisure businesses but those are relatively small compared to the big tax rises _ relatively small compared to the big tax rises going on in those our national— tax rises going on in those our national insurance and income tax going _ national insurance and income tax going up— national insurance and income tax going up in— national insurance and income tax going up in april and in 2023 a large— going up in april and in 2023 a large increase in corporation tax and in _ large increase in corporation tax and in the — large increase in corporation tax and in the end of those big tax rises _ and in the end of those big tax rises swamp all of the smaller tax cuts _ rises swamp all of the smaller tax cuts. �* rises swamp all of the smaller tax cuts. . . . , . ., ., cuts. and fundamentally a lot of this was leaked _ cuts. and fundamentally a lot of this was leaked during _ cuts. and fundamentally a lot of this was leaked during the - cuts. and fundamentally a lot of this was leaked during the weekj this was leaked during the week including the rise in the national living wage and all the people i've been speaking to this week in places like bury but also in burnley tell
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me, it's fine that wages are going up me, it's fine that wages are going up and they welcome that, but it is swallowed up by rising petrol prices, rising food prices and gas bills and therefore at the end of it all they feel worse off not better. the big picture of where we are now as we _ the big picture of where we are now as we are _ the big picture of where we are now as we are coming out of a big pandemic— as we are coming out of a big pandemic induced a downturn and heading _ pandemic induced a downturn and heading into a cost of living crunch this autumn because of the rising inflation — this autumn because of the rising inflation you talk about and rising energy— inflation you talk about and rising energy bills and transport costs that i_ energy bills and transport costs that i don't think we should downplay the significant increase in the national living wage that the chancellor has announced, over 6% increase _ chancellor has announced, over 6% increase for— chancellor has announced, over 6% increase for 2,000,000 workers will make _ increase for 2,000,000 workers will make a _ increase for 2,000,000 workers will make a big _ increase for 2,000,000 workers will make a big difference to their pay packet~ _ make a big difference to their pay packet. yes, too much of that will be eaten— packet. yes, too much of that will be eaten out by high inflation, but the other— be eaten out by high inflation, but the other owners on the national living _ the other owners on the national living wage will see the lower earning — living wage will see the lower earning rises next year, so it's a bil earning rises next year, so it's a big change — earning rises next year, so it's a big change made on the national living _ big change made on the national living wage and a welcome one. and we will hear — living wage and a welcome one. fific we will hear from him living wage and a welcome one. a"ic we will hear from him a little later. it's good to have your thoughts this morning. thank you so
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much, the chief executive of the resolution foundation. in places like this there is a lot of debate about how much benefit they will really feel from the chancellor's announcement yesterday and it takes announcement yesterday and it takes a little while to filter through, and some of the changes don't come in until 2023 so there is a while to wait for those but nonetheless there are some chunks of cash being spent in bury, in burnley and they will feel the benefits of a national living wage rise but still questions about whether the priorities of the chancellor or right or whether we will feel better off given the price of everything right now seems to be going in one direction and that is up. absolutely and a lot of people will 'ust up. absolutely and a lot of people willjust see _ up. absolutely and a lot of people willjust see that _ up. absolutely and a lot of people willjust see that straight - up. absolutely and a lot of people willjust see that straight away - will just see that straight away rather than think about the long term. then, thanks, we will speak later. holly has the sport. what goes up must come down. for manchester city we have a league cup without them. it's only been five years. it's quite an unusual thing.
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you think manchester city will get through, or even win it, that is the assumption. 2016 was the last time they got knocked out by manchester united and donald trump had not even been elected and it felt like they were part of the furniture. that means there will be a new name on the league cup for the first time since 2018. the holders were beaten 5—3 on penalties by west ham. said benrahma scored the winning spot—kick to send them into the quarter—finals. it wasn't quite the same liverpool side that thrashed manchester united at the weekend. but this brilliant backheel flick from divock 0rigi sealed the victory as they beat championship side preston 2—0. brentford, tottenham, and leicester are also through to the last 8. a busy night in scotland in the premiership — and an emotional one as fans paid tribute to former rangers and scotland manager walter smith, who died this week. a minute's
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silence was held just before kick—off in all games to honour smith, who also managed everton during his long career. a5 for the football, leaders rangers came from 2 —0 down to draw with aberdeen at ibrox. celtic beat hibs 3—1 to go second. for all the results you can visit the bbc sport website. in spain, barcelona have sacked manager ronald koeman afterjust14 months in the job. it came after they lost to rayo vallecano last night and are down in 9th place in la liga. koeman had been on borrowed time for quite a while — and a defeat to rivals real madrid at the weekend certainly didn't help. they did of course lose star man lionel messi in the summer, with the club facing huge financial problems. former player xavi has been tipped to take over. to cricket and the t20 world cup continues later, as australia play sri lanka. the aussies next opponents will be the in form england on saturday.
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jason roy hit a half—century yesterday as they thrashed bangladesh by eight wickets in dubai to maintain their perfect start to the tournament. we push each other as hard as we possibly can be pushed. we don't really rest on any game, we treat every single team with the respect they deserve and we go out and we try and play our best cricket, no matter who we are playing against — it's irrelevant. so, yeah, there's no chance we rest on our laurels — we go out there and we give it our all _ but another difficult day for scotland, who lost three wickets in the first over against namibia — before sliding to their second consecutive defeat. the scots now have a week to prepare before facing new zealand. i think we just needed a little bit of time to reflect on that, which we will do as a group, and we'll look to see where we can improve — there's probably a couple of areas.
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0bviously being a few wickets down early doesn't make things easy, so... but i don't think we have to go searching too much, we just have to keep sort of backing our skills and keep being clear with the game plans. and bad news for another scot. andy murray has been knocked out of the vienna open. he lost in straight sets to spanish teenager carlos alcaraz in their second round match. british number one cameron norrie plays felix auger aliassime this afternoon. now i saw you both getting a little jumpy about a certain story in the papers earlier. here are your kangaroos. so much fun. if you missed this earlier, amateur golfer wendy powick on the gold coast in australia ready to drive, when a group of kangaroos charged up the fairway looking for front row seats. we've been talking about this and i think it's a bit intimidating. you don't want to get in a boxing match.
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that is charlie's years of experience. i said that is charlie's years of experience. isaid not that is charlie's years of experience. i said not to mess with a kangaroo. the opening shot reminded me of that scene from jurassic park, when they first see them, the dinosaurs gambling over them, the dinosaurs gambling over the hill. taste them, the dinosaurs gambling over the hill. ~ ., the hill. we need to get the theme music for that. _ the hill. we need to get the theme music for that. i _ the hill. we need to get the theme music for that. i don't _ the hill. we need to get the theme music for that. i don't think - the hill. we need to get the theme music for that. i don't think we - music for that. i don't think we have the rights. she music for that. i don't think we have the rights.— music for that. i don't think we have the riahts. ., ., , . , , have the rights. she does absolutely the riaht have the rights. she does absolutely the right thing- _ have the rights. she does absolutely the right thing. they _ have the rights. she does absolutely the right thing. they come _ have the rights. she does absolutely the right thing. they come along - have the rights. she does absolutely| the right thing. they come along and she raises our club. shejust the right thing. they come along and she raises our club. she just stands there and they kind of hang around, take a look, but then theyjust carry on on their way. i’m take a look, but then they 'ust carry on on their way. i'm trying to think what — carry on on their way. i'm trying to think what i _ carry on on their way. i'm trying to think what i would _ carry on on their way. i'm trying to think what i would do. _ carry on on their way. i'm trying to think what i would do. i _ carry on on their way. i'm trying to think what i would do. i don't - carry on on their way. i'm trying to| think what i would do. i don't think i would be standing there. i don't think i would run, but i might slowly back away.— think i would run, but i might slowly back away. think i would run, but i might slowl backawa . ~ ., ., , slowly back away. also note from my file on kangaroo _ slowly back away. also note from my file on kangaroo safety _ slowly back away. also note from my file on kangaroo safety issues, - slowly back away. also note from my file on kangaroo safety issues, you i file on kangaroo safety issues, you cannot out run a kangaroo. flan file on kangaroo safety issues, you cannot out run a kangaroo. cant cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that — cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that file? _ cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that file? i _ cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that file? i don't - cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that file? i don't know i cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that file? i don't know a | cannot out run a kangaroo. can i borrow that file? i don't know a lot about this. , u. borrow that file? i don't know a lot about this. , .. ., about this. they can go approximately - about this. they can go approximately 32mph, | about this. they can go - approximately 32mph, nearly about this. they can go _ approximately 32mph, nearly 40mph. did you just make that up? might even be slightly more than that but my guess is that you would not be able to outrun a kangaroo. i
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my guess is that you would not be able to outrun a kangaroo.- able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get — able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get out _ able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get out run _ able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get out run it, _ able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get out run it, outbox - able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get out run it, outbox it. able to outrun a kangaroo. i don't think i get out run it, outbox it or| think i get out run it, outbox it or out golf it. think i get out run it, outbox it or out golf it— out golf it. just en'oy the view, that is all h out golf it. just en'oy the view, that is all that — out golf it. just enjoy the view, that is all that matters. - out golf it. just enjoy the view, that is all that matters. a - out golf it. just enjoy the view, that is all that matters. a red l that is all that matters. a red kangaroo, annoyingly, holly, he has plucked a number out of ? behave. these red kangaroos can reach beads of 35mph. these red kangaroos can reach beads of 35mh. ., ., these red kangaroos can reach beads of35mh. ., ., i. ,, ., these red kangaroos can reach beads of35mh. ., ., ,, ., . of 35mph. how do you know about kangaroos? _ of 35mph. how do you know about kangaroos? and _ of 35mph. how do you know about kangaroos? and they _ of 35mph. how do you know about kangaroos? and they can - of 35mph. how do you know about kangaroos? and they can cover. of 35mph. how do you know about kangaroos? and they can cover 25| kangaroos? and they can cover 25 feet in a single _ kangaroos? and they can cover 25 feet in a single leap _ kangaroos? and they can cover 25 feet in a single leap and _ kangaroos? and they can cover 25 feet in a single leap and jump - kangaroos? and they can cover 25 feet in a single leap and jump six| feet in a single leap and jump six feet in a single leap and jump six feet high. he has a book on kangaroos. ijust picked up information along the way about other things, kangaroos, information along the way about otherthings, kangaroos, other other things, kangaroos, other things otherthings, kangaroos, other things as well. and the weather. i am going to leave you caucusing there. you made yourself love with that comment. ? you made yourself love. did you hear that charlie is so wise. he love. did you hear that charlie is so wise. . , love. did you hear that charlie is so wise. , , , . so wise. he is very wise. i agree with holly- _
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i start on a more serious note because the met office has two amber weather warnings in force for heavy rain across south—west scotland and also cumbria and an amber weather warning means there is an increased likelihood of impacts due to severe weather on your plans, so it might be the risk of flooding or some travel disruption as well and further heavy rain is coming in the same areas. it's courtesy of the same areas. it's courtesy of the same friend that has been with us for a few days and if you look at the isobars it will be a windy day. we've seen large rainfall totals building across the areas with weather warnings and also across scotland and also northern ireland. this band of rain will move further north getting into scotland and southern and eastern parts and into northern ireland and also through wales and the south—west, quite a bit of cloud and some sunshine and
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to the north and the rest of scotland, drier than it has been and we're looking at but also showers and these black circles represent the strength of wind you can expect, so it will be noticeable again today. temperature wise we still are above average between 12 and 17 and as you know the average by day is roughly ten between 1a north to south. through the evening and overnight we will have the rain around and still in similar areas and we have the first band, then the second band across scotland and it will be another mild one between eight and 13 as the overnight lows and the average overnight is five to seven so we are way above that. tomorrow we start with a first band of rain and it will push east and we still have the rain coming in across northern ireland, scotland and england and that will drift north and east and later in the day in the
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west, there will be sunshine and showers and temperatures slipping a bit and we are looking between 11 and 15 and into the weekend we have the nicks system coming our way producing rain moving west to east and breezy conditions and this rain will continue to journey east through saturday but it will be slow to play in the far south—east and the far north of scotland and behind it a lot of dry weather but some showers coming in, especially in the west and these are our temperatures between ten and 1a , so almost bang on for this stage in october and it will be the end of october by then. don't forget first thing on sunday morning you have to put your clocks back an hour so you get an extra hourin back an hour so you get an extra hour in bed, but then you have the nicks system coming in and bringing all the rain and the rain will be falling in similar areas to today and it will be followed by some heavy showers, so the weather
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certainly for the next few days for some of us is very unsettled and very wet. some of us is very unsettled and ve wet. . ., . ,, , ., "all i want to do is play football and be treated equally" — that was the message from josh cavallo, as he became the only current male professional footballer in the world to come out as gay. in a video clip posted online, the 21—year—old adelaide united midfielder admitted he'd struggled for too long, unable to be himself. lets take a look. there's something personal that i need to share with everyone. i'm a footballer, and i'm gay. growing up, i always felt the need to hide myself because i was ashamed, ashamed i would never be able to do what i love and be gay. you know, hiding who i truly am to pursue a dream i always wished for as a kid. all i want to do is play football and be treated equally.
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we can talk tojosh in adelaide. hello to you and thanks forjoining us. i know we are at opposite ends of the world and the day, but thank you. listen, iwatch of the world and the day, but thank you. listen, i watch the video and i thought, i wonder how he felt, knowing that that was going to go on and how people would react and the response has been overwhelmingly positive, hasn't it? it’s response has been overwhelmingly positive, hasn't it?— positive, hasn't it? it's been unbelievable, _ positive, hasn't it? it's been unbelievable, to _ positive, hasn't it? it's been unbelievable, to tell - positive, hasn't it? it's been unbelievable, to tell you - positive, hasn't it? it's beenj unbelievable, to tell you the positive, hasn't it? it's been - unbelievable, to tell you the truth, i am overwhelmed and i'm extremely happy with the response it received. it is something that we need to stamp out in the world of football and its time in 2021 to make a change and involve our football game. change and involve our football came. ~ , ., change and involve our football came.~ , ., change and involve our football came. ~ , ., ~ change and involve our football came.~ , ., ~ . game. why do you think you are the first? the first — game. why do you think you are the first? the first one _ game. why do you think you are the first? the first one who _ game. why do you think you are the first? the first one who is _ first? the first one who is currently playing now. we know footballers who are gay who came out after they finish their careers but
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not while they were in the peak and moving up towards the peak, and i won't say you are at your peak, of course. , , . . , course. definitely. when i was curowin course. definitely. when i was growing up — course. definitely. when i was growing up as _ course. definitely. when i was growing up as a _ course. definitely. when i was growing up as a kid, _ course. definitely. when i was growing up as a kid, dreamingj course. definitely. when i was i growing up as a kid, dreaming of being a professional footballer i did know that i was gay and i did struggle with my sexuality and that was something i was scared to do. i didn't want to play football and be gay because i've never seen it done before and i feel the gay because i've never seen it done before and ifeel the pain gay because i've never seen it done before and i feel the pain of that little kid and i still do to this day and i want to tell my story for the younger generations, but also the younger generations, but also the people going through what i'm going through who find themselves stuck in the same shadow and it is ok and there's no need to hide away and you can be a role model for these people and that is someone i didn't have. josh, this is charlie. it's really lovely to see you smiling because i am a little bit mindful that in the clip we saw which you posted online, my
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impression, and that was a very important moment for you, my suspicion is that you felt a lot of weight on your shoulders at that point and it was quite a sombre, serious message and it's an important thing you did, and i'm looking at you now thinking it looks like a load has been lifted. how has it been inside your own head? today i woke up and i closed the old book and opened the real book on me and i've never smiled this much in my life and i had the best sleep last night knowing i could be myself and not live a life of lies, so my cheeks are very sore today but it's a good thing to have.— a good thing to have. that's really lovel to a good thing to have. that's really lovely to have. _ a good thing to have. that's really lovely to have. can _ a good thing to have. that's really lovely to have. can i _ a good thing to have. that's really lovely to have. can i get _ a good thing to have. that's really lovely to have. can i get you - a good thing to have. that's really lovely to have. can i get you to i lovely to have. can i get you to reflect on some of what you say. you alluded to the fact that you were worried that your career as a footballer, your progression in your industry, would have been hampered if you had spoken sooner. now that
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you have done this and you are having this wonderful moment we are all part of an away, is there a bit of you thinking, i shouldn't have waited so long. i could have done it sooner. that's not a criticism, but do you reflect on that a little bit? definitely. everybody goes through their personal stages on their personaljourneys and i've come a long way to get to where i am today and it wasn't something i thought overnight, i want to do this today stop it was a long process and journey to get to where i am. it is something you cannot rush and it has to happen naturally and it'sjust funny because in the normal world being gay, it's fine and i want to make it fine in football. it's not seenin make it fine in football. it's not seen in football and there are very talented kids out there who could potentially be someone who is gay and has a lot of talent that could be the next lionel messi or ronaldo and they turn away from the sport because they are scared that people will think of them differently or they won't fit into what a regular
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player would do or a straight personality is only allowed in football, so it's really good for the diversity of the sport and to show it doesn't matter who you are or what upbringing you have, that you will get accepted and look at the response i received. it you will get accepted and look at the response i received.- the response i received. it was amazing- _ the response i received. it was amazing- i— the response i received. it was amazing. i know— the response i received. it was amazing. i know you _ the response i received. it was amazing. i know you have - the response i received. it was amazing. i know you have a . the response i received. it was - amazing. i know you have a match coming up in about three orfour weeks, the team will have a match and i'm really interested in how supportive your team—mates have been, and also behind the scenes, because it's notjust the footballers that we all see on the pitch, it is the whole industry, for want of a better word.— want of a better word. definitely. the first people _ want of a better word. definitely. the first people that _ want of a better word. definitely. the first people that came - want of a better word. definitely. the first people that came ? - want of a better word. definitely. the first people that came ? that| want of a better word. definitely. | the first people that came ? that i came out to where my two coaches and i had a meeting with then five weeks ago and i sat them down and i told them because they made me feel comfortable and i felt safe around them and they reassured me and said, you are still the same person and we love you for who you are and it doesn't matter if you're gay or straight, that'sjust
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doesn't matter if you're gay or straight, that's just one doesn't matter if you're gay or straight, that'sjust one part doesn't matter if you're gay or straight, that's just one part of the and we just want you to be happy and that is something that encouraged me to come in to my team—mates. yesterday was a very scary day for me and i came out to my team—mates in front of my peers and these team—mates are more than just work colleagues, they are my brothers and i was tired of lying to them and having to be on the pitch and think, in the changing room and dressing room, about the conversations i will make—up because i have to rely and act like i am straight and just those worries i had on the field, it's good to put it to rest and put it to bed and there are things i don't want anyone to experience because it's a lonely journey and something that people struggle with, so i'm very pleased and privileged to have the world platform to do this.— and privileged to have the world platform to do this. there will be a eriod of platform to do this. there will be a period of time _ platform to do this. there will be a period of time now, _ platform to do this. there will be a period of time now, i _ platform to do this. there will be a period of time now, i suspect, - platform to do this. there will be a l period of time now, i suspect, when there is going to be a lot of attention on you and on how you
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play. that is a reality check, because of what has happened now, the thing you want most of all is to be another bloke on the pitch kicking a ball. but my hunch is there will be a moment in time that you will get a lot of attention as to how you have played on the day. definitely. and i think it will involve my performances because i told my coaches for a five weeks ago and i went and trained and i felt like there was so much weight off my shoulders so to know that my folks are my friends, my family and my team—mates, even the world knows now and i can't imagine what it will be like to be on the pitch and train and play so i'm really excited to do that and i'm really pleased with how everything went down. josh. that and i'm really pleased with how everything went down.— everything went down. josh, it's been really _ everything went down. josh, it's been really lovely _ everything went down. josh, it's been really lovely catching - everything went down. josh, it's been really lovely catching up i everything went down. josh, it's i been really lovely catching up with you this morning. a delight. and your smile has lit up our morning. it is five to seven, and you are mid—afternoon, so it's been really nice. thank you. mid-afternoon, so it's been really nice. thank you.—
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mid-afternoon, so it's been really nice. thank you. thank you, both. and aood nice. thank you. thank you, both. and good luck- — nice. thank you. thank you, both. and good luck. thanks. _ nice. thank you. thank you, both. and good luck. thanks. the - nice. thank you. thank you, both. and good luck. thanks. the fact i nice. thank you. thank you, both. | and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smilin: and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so _ and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so much _ and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so much and _ and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so much and for- and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so much and for me - and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so much and for me it i and good luck. thanks. the fact he is smiling so much and for me it is| is smiling so much and for me it is the message about the weight lifted and the supporters out there, so, brilliant. josh cavallo. we will be back with the headlines at seven. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the duchess of cornwall has paid tribute to people whose lives have been "brutally ended" — as she called for action to prevent violence against women. speaking at an event in euston she said the names of women who'd died in violent circumstances — including sarah everard — should never be forgotten. she also said survivors of abuse should be supported to end stigma and isolation. it is, as almost all women know, a deeply disturbing experience to be sexually harassed. yet, somehow, a culture of silence has grown up in which these women conceal their experiences of such offences. why?
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there are, of course, many explanations — but there is one significant reason on which we are focusing today. shame. talks to save one of surrey�*s main bus operations have collapsed ? putting more than a hundred jobs and 1a routes at risk. arriva plans to close its depot in guildford in december, due to falling passenger numbers. but surrey council says many residents rely on the service to get them to work, school and medical appointments. london has been ranked as number 11 in a list of the uk's greenest cities, behind sheffield, edinburgh and cardiff. the study by natwest and the university of southampton ranked cities according to issues such as green space, energy use, recycling and the way we commute. a0 years after they first broke into the top ten charts, duran duran are back with a new album — their 15th. they've been talking to bbc london about it — how they made it, and coming up with new ideas.
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just sitting there in the back of our minds, waiting to come out. that's true — and, actually, when we get together something... something special always happens. you know, we have an amazing cast of people around us on this record, but there's something, actually, when the four of us get together, there's a real... there's a spark, yeah. more on tonight's programme. turning to the tube now... there are minor delays on the circle, district and metropolitan lines — the district line slow between tower hill and earls court, and turnham green and richmond — engineering works have overrun. time for the weather now with gillian brown. hello there, good morning to you. well, another very mild day on the cards across the capital today. plenty of cloud around, but also some clear spells out there already this morning, but we'll start to see something a little bit brighter coming through this afternoon. it is going to feel blustery again today, though, on this southerly breeze, but very mild — temperatures around 17 celsius.
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so some clear skies for a time tonight before this band of rain starts to push in from the west, so a very wet start to the day as we head towards dawn on friday. temperatures around maybe 11 or 12 celsius overnight. so a change is on the cards as we head towards tomorrow — this band of rain really going to be with us the best part of the day, and pretty cloudy skies, as well. and as we head towards the weekend there's some more rain in the forecast, as well. i'll be back in half an hour — don't forget, lots more over on our website, including all the information on how good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a £150 billion spending spree from the chancellor — but a warning that high taxes and inflation mean living standards won't improve. and what does that mean for places like burnley, or here in bury? two towns singled out in
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the chancellor's speech yesterday. how do changes in westminster affect people here? i'll speak to the chancellor in the next half hour. we'll bring you analysis and reaction to the budget throughout the morning, including an interview with the chancellor rishi sunak live at 7.30. police say the gun fired on a film set by actor alec baldwin, killing a colleague, contained a live round. lam iamon i am on the uk's new pallett ship, the sir david attenborough, which is making a brief stop here in greenwich in london before it begins its long journey to antarctica. it's a league cup without manchester city. the holders have been knocked out for the first time in five years — in a penalty shoot—out with west ham. today the met office has two weather warnings, heavy rain for south—west scotland and cumbria. the risk of
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disruption and flooding. generally today will be windy and mild for the time of year. all the details in nine minutes. it's thursday, the 28th of october. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has outlined a £150 billion spending spree over three years, in his budget. but there are warnings that rising inflation and high taxation could mean no improvement in living standards. our political correspondent, chris mason has the story. any budget is a delicate mix of ingredients. first comes the chancellor's address to the commons. then it's a selling job. here we go. taxes on alcohol are being simplified... cheers! ..so a trip to a brewery was in order. to rishi! and the chancellor is out and about again this morning in what is so often a crucial time after any budget — the day after —
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as people start to plough through the budget documents to ferret out the details that weren't mentioned in the speech. the chancellor got some really good news for the public finances yesterday. lower borrowing because the economy is doing slightly better and we all thought the six months ago. that is really good news, but good news for public finances was not good news household finances because higher inflation actually helps the chancellor it with his borrowing figures is obviously hurting household budgets and that's why the office for budget responsibility expects household incomes and actually wages to actually not grow at all next year so that is really bad news for everyone worrying about their own budget. here are the key things we learnt. the economy is doing better than some thought, and the government's going to spend the extra money that it raises in taxes. prices are going up — and are likely to for some time. the recent cut in universal credit won't be reversed, but workers who get it will be able to keep more
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of it as they earn more. and there'll be a 50% discount in business rates in england for the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors — starting next year. the reason that the chancellor has had to set tax levels at the highest level since the early 19505 is because of the government's lamentable record on growth in the last 11 years. where there are chances, as the economy recovers, to cut taxes — as we've shown - through our action on business rates today and as we've shown i through universal credit taper relief, as well — we will do that, i and i suspect that over the course of budgets to come between now and the next election, _ as the chancellor hinted, - we will look to ease the burden of taxation on the public. and the analysis is onlyjust beginning. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. where are we with that analysis? let's get more reaction now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming.
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it takes a couple of days but is a picture emerging? because what we do know is the chancellor is spending a lot of money, but what appears to be emerging is that people are not going to feel much better off. there is a few things _ going to feel much better off. there is a few things going _ going to feel much better off. there is a few things going on _ going to feel much better off. there is a few things going on there. i going to feel much better off. ii—ii” is a few things going on there. if you look at the budget document and read the tables, which is always a good thing to do the next day you will see the main thing happening here is that the economy is performing better than people expected at the start of the year, plus if you add in all of those extra taxes that the chancellor raised earlier in the year, like the increase in corporation tax that is coming up, with a new and social care levy, that gives them about £50 million a extra to spend and he is spending quite a lot of that on government departments so they can pay for public services. he is spending a bit helping with the cost of living, by increasing universal credit for some people, and freezing fuel duty. but those are actually quite small measures when you compare it to what he is raising in
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taxes from health and social care levy. that is the main thing i get from reading this budget, the biggest thing this year was not in this, it was the announcement on health and social care levy earlier this year. but you also have to read another document that comes alongside the budget, from the office for budget responsibility, and they do the economic forecast. the thing thatjumps out in the document is that they say at some point in the next year inflation could peak at 5% and i just wonder, is that the thing that people are really going to notice in their daily lives? just the price of things going up by quite a lot, rather than any of the measures that are in the budget. i think back to the things we have talked about the last few months. the queues at petrol stations, the massive increase in gas prices, read a shortage of c02. those are all things that blueing as a result of the global economy, rather than as a result of any decisions the government took.- result of any decisions the government took. result of any decisions the covernment took. . «a , . ben will be speaking to the chancellor, rishi sunak, at 7:30.
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he will be putting some thoughts about how this will feel for people to him at 7:30am. and also going to speak to the shadow chancellor rachel reeves in about five minutes. the duchess of cornwall has paid tribute to people whose lives have been "brutally ended" — as she called for action to prevent violence against women. speaking at an event in london last night, she said we need to "try and get the men in our lives to participate in building a shameless society". sarah everard, sabina nessa, wenjing lin, geetika goyal and bennylyn burke are names which, with all the others, must never be forgotten. each one of these women endured unimaginable torment. and their loved ones who are left behind continue to suffer in the wake of their deaths. ministers are expected to meet today to discuss the future of the covid travel red list. the government is believed to be considering a further reduction in the number of countries
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on the list — or even scrap it altogether. such a move would end the need for quarantine hotels. police in the united states investigating the accidental killing of a cinematographer on a film set in new mexico, say they believe the weapon used by the actor alec baldwin contained a live round. reports have now emerged about safety concerns on set in the days before halyna hutchins was killed. our us correspondent sophie long reports. it is now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead while she was doing herjob. these are the last pictures of the cinematographer alive on the set of rust. she's in the blue coat and headphones. you can see alec baldwin beyond the camera. he was holding the gun that fired the shot that killed halyna and severely injured directorjoel souza. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr souza.
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we regard this specific spent casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon by assistant director dave halls, he was told it was safe — what's called a cold gun. the person responsible forfirearms on the set was the armoury — on the set was the armourer — 24—year—old hannah gutierrez—reed. she's admitted ammunition was not secure, but says she checked the guns and found no live rounds. all three are cooperating fully with the investigation. all options are on the table at this point. i'm not commenting on charges — whether they will be filed or not, or on whom. so the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving, and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be allowed on film sets under any circumstances. sophie long, bbc news.
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100 years after the poppy appeal was first launched, thousands of fundraisers will once again take to the streets in support of the royal british legion. last year, face—to—face collections were cancelled for the first time in history because of covid restrictions. the charity supports serving and former military personnel and their families. cute baby animal alert coming up now. north yorkshire has a very special new resident — an endangered black rhino, born at flamingo land on sunday. here he is taking his first steps. we will just we willjust hold on the shot. keepers say they're pleased with the calf�*s progress. he's the first black rhino to be born in europe this year. there arejust 3,000 left in the wild. when you read into that i thought you were going to pay if you don't want to see a cute animal, look away now. ., , . ~ .,
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now. you might be that kind of erson. now. you might be that kind of person- you — now. you might be that kind of person. you might _ now. you might be that kind of person. you might be. - now. you might be that kind of person. you might be. some i now. you might be that kind of- person. you might be. some people don't want to _ person. you might be. some people don't want to see _ person. you might be. some people don't want to see cute _ person. you might be. some people don't want to see cute animals. i person. you might be. some people. don't want to see cute animals. some --eole don't want to see cute animals. some people want — don't want to see cute animals. some people want to _ don't want to see cute animals. some people want to see _ don't want to see cute animals. some people want to see uncute _ don't want to see cute animals. srns people want to see uncute animals. anyway, gorgeous. carol is keeping us up—to—date with the weather. we have some and their warnings. that wave you have been talking about in last week, the wavefront where it hangs, this is causing problems —— amber warnings. hangs, this is causing problems -- amber warnings.— hangs, this is causing problems -- amber warnings. that is right on all counts. amber warnings. that is right on all counts- the — amber warnings. that is right on all counts. the met _ amber warnings. that is right on all counts. the met office _ amber warnings. that is right on all counts. the met office has - amber warnings. that is right on all counts. the met office has two i amber warnings. that is right on all. counts. the met office has two macro amber _ counts. the met office has two macro amber weather warnings in force for heavy— amber weather warnings in force for heavy rain _ amber weather warnings in force for heavy rain across south—west scotland _ heavy rain across south—west scotland and cumbria. a lot of rain here in— scotland and cumbria. a lot of rain here in the — scotland and cumbria. a lot of rain here in the last few days. there is more _ here in the last few days. there is more to— here in the last few days. there is more to come today. the rainfall totals _ more to come today. the rainfall totals are — more to come today. the rainfall totals are really mounting up. amber weather— totals are really mounting up. amber weather warning means an increased likelihood _ weather warning means an increased likelihood of impact due to severe weather, — likelihood of impact due to severe weather, such as travel disruption or indeed — weather, such as travel disruption or indeed we could see some flooding _ or indeed we could see some flooding. you can see where the rain lingers— flooding. you can see where the rain lingers today, it gets into parts of scotland. — lingers today, it gets into parts of scotland, also parts of wales and the south—west as well as areas covered — the south—west as well as areas covered by— the south—west as well as areas
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covered by those amber weather warning — covered by those amber weather warning is — covered by those amber weather warning is. i decide, variable amounts _ warning is. i decide, variable amounts of cloud, some sunshine, brighter— amounts of cloud, some sunshine, brighter day— amounts of cloud, some sunshine, brighter day for the rest of scotland and northern ireland than of late _ scotland and northern ireland than of late but there will still be showers _ of late but there will still be showers around and it will be windy. gusty _ showers around and it will be windy. gusty winds — showers around and it will be windy. gusty winds today. temperatures above _ gusty winds today. temperatures above average for the time of year, 12 to 17 _ above average for the time of year, 12 to 17 degrees. through this evening — 12 to 17 degrees. through this evening and overnight, here is our band _ evening and overnight, here is our band of— evening and overnight, here is our band of rain. — evening and overnight, here is our band of rain, still falling in similar— band of rain, still falling in similar places. the second one coming — similar places. the second one coming in _ similar places. the second one coming in across northern ireland and also — coming in across northern ireland and also scotland and it will still be a windy night. it won't be cold, temperatures falling to between eight _ temperatures falling to between eight and 13 degrees. at this time of year— eight and 13 degrees. at this time of year we — eight and 13 degrees. at this time of year we would be looking at five to seven _ of year we would be looking at five to seven is — of year we would be looking at five to seven is the average, so those temperatures still higher than we would _ temperatures still higher than we would expect by night. tomorrow, our first weather _ would expect by night. tomorrow, our first weather front, the offending one bringing all this rain at the moment, — one bringing all this rain at the moment, slowly pushes the swiss. our second _ moment, slowly pushes the swiss. our second british north was at least was behind it and you can see something brighter coming our way with some — something brighter coming our way with some sunshine from the west. there _ with some sunshine from the west. there will— with some sunshine from the west. there will still be some showers, as temperatures 11 to 15, so slippin- there will still be some showers, as temperatures 11 to 15, so slippin- a temperatures 11 to 15, so slipping a little bit _
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temperatures 11 to 15, so slipping a little bit. . ~ , ., . temperatures 11 to 15, so slipping a little bit. . ~ . ., little bit. thank you so much for keein: little bit. thank you so much for keeping us _ little bit. thank you so much for keeping us updated _ little bit. thank you so much for keeping us updated with - little bit. thank you so much for keeping us updated with those i keeping us updated with those warnings. see you later. as we've been hearing, the chancellor, rishi sunak, has delivered a budget which he says will prepare for a new post—covid economy. it includes a spending increase of £150 billion over the next three years. let's get reaction now from the shadow chancellor rachel reeves, who joins us from westminster. rachel reeves, good morning. good morninu. rachel reeves, good morning. good morning- only— rachel reeves, good morning. good morning. only reacted _ rachel reeves, good morning. good morning. only reacted in _ rachel reeves, good morning. good morning. only reacted in the - rachel reeves, good morning. good i morning. only reacted in the commons esterda morning. only reacted in the commons yesterday to — morning. only reacted in the commons yesterday to the _ morning. only reacted in the commons yesterday to the speech. _ morning. only reacted in the commons yesterday to the speech. the _ yesterday to the speech. the analysis is coming through the day after and in the papers but also the institute for fiscal studies has said this budget is more like gordon brown's, former leader of the labour party, former prime minister, than that of george osborne's. this is a much more labour type budget in terms of taxation than a conservative one. surely that is a good thing from your point of view.
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of course i welcome the increases in spending on public services and after the last ten, 11 years of austerity, we certainly needed those increases to start to reverse some of those cuts. but if you look at the cost of living, which is a real challenge for families and pensioners around the country right now, if you look at the tax system, which burdens working people and gives a tax cut, if you look at, by the end of parliament is set to just be 1.3%. i don't think this is the sort of budget that gordon brown would have delivered. certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered if i had been delivering it yesterday. delivered ifi had been delivering it yesterday-— delivered ifi had been delivering it esterda . ~ . . it yesterday. what are the top three thin . s ou it yesterday. what are the top three things you would — it yesterday. what are the top three things you would definitely - it yesterday. what are the top three things you would definitely not... i things you would definitely not... you would like to see reversed? i you would like to see reversed? i think the key thing is a tax cut you would like to see reversed? i think the key thing is a tax cut for bankers yesterday. over the period of this spending review, tax cut for
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bankers where £4 million. we wouldn't have done the cut to domestic flight air passenger duty. ifind it astonishing domestic flight air passenger duty. i find it astonishing that the week before the cop26 conference in glasgow this government are prioritising travel by air domestically rather than travel by train. and ifi domestically rather than travel by train. and if i were chancellor, i would be doing much more to get a grip of some of the wasteful spending. £3.5 billion in contracts to friends and donors of the conservative party. £250 million on a vanity yacht project. the test and trace the system, £37 billion that the public accounts committee said treated taxpayers like they were an atm machine, so plenty of things that labour would have done differently in the budget. the key thing for me is about tackling the cost of living crisis that families and pensioners are going to be
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experiencing this winter. the thing with budgets. _ experiencing this winter. the thing with budgets, as _ experiencing this winter. the thing with budgets, as you _ experiencing this winter. the thing with budgets, as you are - experiencing this winter. the thing with budgets, as you are aware, i with budgets, as you are aware, there are always phrases, there are always tight lines that make the headlines. when you say tax cuts for bankers, that is not what the chancellor said. can you explain that and while you interpret it with a catchphrase line or a throwaway line as tax cuts for bankers? the surcharge _ line as tax cuts for bankers? the surcharge on _ line as tax cuts for bankers? t"te: surcharge on banks has line as tax cuts for bankers? t"t9 surcharge on banks has been line as tax cuts for bankers? “"tt9: surcharge on banks has been reduced during the course of this parliament, so if you look at the office for budget responsibility or at the treasury documents, the announcement yesterday amounted to a tax cut of £1 billion per year for banks, compared to what they were going to be paying under the previous plans. that is £4 billion during the course of this spending review. £4 billion could have been spent on reducing vat, and gas and electricity bills. could have done that four times over. it could have reversed the cuts to universal
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credit. it could have undone some of the damage that the increase in national insurance increases will do. ,, :, national insurance increases will do, ,, ., , national insurance increases will do. ,, :, , , national insurance increases will do. ,, :, ,:, do. shall we pick up on universal credit? the _ do. shall we pick up on universal credit? the government - do. shall we pick up on universall credit? the government obviously very aware of the backlash of the removal or the ending of the £20 per week uplift of universal credit. and it has made some changes which will affect some people who have universal credit by looking at the tapering tax assistance. yes. universal credit by looking at the tapering tax assistance.- universal credit by looking at the tapering tax assistance. yes. so 6 million people _ tapering tax assistance. yes. so 6 million people are _ tapering tax assistance. yes. so 6 million people are affected - tapering tax assistance. yes. so 6 million people are affected by i tapering tax assistance. yes. so 6 million people are affected by the| million people are affected by the £20 per week cut to universal credit, and 1.9 million people benefit from the announcement yesterday, so less than a third of people who lose out from the cut to universal credit will get something back, although not the full amount, from the changes announced yesterday. it is a case of taking with one hand... giving with one hand and then taking much more with the other, and of the £6 billion taken out of universal credit, less
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than half of that was re—announced yesterday, so people aren't the lowest incomes in our country and on modest incomes by seeing their incomes cut at the time when gas and electricity bills are going up, when the cost billing of our cars is going up, when food prices are going up. so this is a worrying time for many families, also for many pensioners, who are disproportionate amount of their household budgets on gas and electricity bills. which is why i recommended that the government reduce vat on gas and electricity bills from 5% currently to 0% for the next six months. that would be at a cost of £1 billion, so just a quarter of the tax cut from bankers could have been used to cut that vat bill on gas and electricity bills. that would have been my priority is a chancellor, to help people with the cost of living
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crisis and not give a tax cut to bankers or, indeed, to reduce air passenger duty on domestic flights when we should be encouraging people to use trains for those journeys are. to use trains for those 'ourneys are. :, y :, to use trains for those 'ourneys are. :, , :, , to use trains for those 'ourneys are. :, y:, , to use trains for those 'ourneys are. :, ,:, , , are. could you give us some insight into how the _ are. could you give us some insight into how the machinations - are. could you give us some insight into how the machinations of- into how the machinations of parliament work. traditionally we were all expecting sir keir starmer to stand and respond to the, and we head up the last moment that he has and is isolating and of course we hope he is well. when we saw ed miliband, former leader of the labour party, and then you respond instead of keir starmer to the budget, how much notice did you get at what was the preparation like that? it at what was the preparation like that? :, , :, :, at what was the preparation like that? :, :, , , that? it was quite a date yesterday. at 11:45am. — that? it was quite a date yesterday. at 11:45am. 45 — that? it was quite a date yesterday. at 11:45am, 45 minutes— that? it was quite a date yesterday. at 11:45am, 45 minutes before i that? it was quite a date yesterday. at 11:45am, 45 minutes before the l at 11:45am, 45 minutes before the start of the budget debate, i was told that keir starmer had tested positive for covid and i had 45 minutes to get ready to respond to
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the chancellor in the debate. now, my background is working as an economist and i certainly put that to good use yesterday in those 45 minutes of prep time and then also whilst i was in the chamber of trying to work out what the chancellor was saying and what it actually meant for family finances and business finances. not much time to prepare, but i hope i did a good job subbing for my boss keir starmer in unpicking some of the announcements the chancellor made yesterday. t announcements the chancellor made esterda . ::. announcements the chancellor made esterda . :. :, announcements the chancellor made esterda . :, , :, yesterday. i can tell from your smile you _ yesterday. i can tell from your smile you actually _ yesterday. i can tell from your smile you actually really i yesterday. i can tell from your i smile you actually really enjoyed it. smile you actually really en'oyed it. ~ it. well... | laughter i am not sure i would go that far. there was a lot of braying from the tory benches which i haven't ever experienced anything like. but it was a privilege, it is a privilege to respond to the budget. i hope that in the next parliament i will get to deliver the budget as a labour chancellor. that would be a huge privilege for me.— huge privilege for me. rachel reeves, shadow _ huge privilege for me. rachel reeves, shadow chancellor, l huge privilege for me. rachel i reeves, shadow chancellor, thank huge privilege for me. rachel - reeves, shadow chancellor, thank you
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very much for your time this morning. very much for your time this morning-— lam seeing i am seeing a rather dramatic image on our monitors here. i will explain first. it first made headlines after thousands of people voted to name it boaty mcboatface — and now britain's newest polar research ship is ready to set sail for its maiden voyage to antarctica. the vessel, which was instead named the rrs sir david attenborough, is currently being displayed on the river thames. our global science correspondent, rebecca morelle, is on board and joins us now. good morning. it is a very dramatic skyline behind you. what setting. absolutely beautiful here this morning on board the sir david attenborough which, as you say, is the uk's very new, very big and very impressive new polar ship and it is making a brief stop here in london. it sailed along the thames last night, it really was quite a sight and it is moored now next to the cutty sark, which you can just see
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the sales glimpsing through the sunrise. it is going to be a chance for the public to come down to greenwich and take a look at this ship but they will not have long to do it because, really, this ship is getting ready for its main journey. it will be heading down thousands of miles to antarctica, where it will begin its research. it's the most advanced polar ship ever to set sail. named after sir david attenborough, it tookjust four years to build. now it's getting ready for its first voyage to antarctica. seeing the ship amongst the ice, it will be absolutely remarkable. and it's something we are all really looking forward to. working in the antarctic, sometimes you might think you get used to it, but every time it still amazes us. this is a state—of—the—art research ship, and here on the top deck is the helipad so scientists and the crew can be brought to and from the ship while she's at sea. in here, you have the living quarters — a cosy cabin for two — because the crew on here can stay
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on board for two months at a time. there's room for 30 crew and 60 scientists on the ship. and this is the all—important coffee shop — where, after a hard day of polar research, the crew can come in and take a bit of a break. this big hole in the middle of the ship goes all the way from the sea up to here. it's called a moon pool, and it means that scientists can access the ocean with their instruments, whatever the weather. the moon pool is really significant because it means we can get these really valuable data points. the southern ocean is one of these places that we don't have very many observations from because it's so difficult to get there. and the southern ocean might feel really far away from us here in the uk, but it's really important for our climate as a whole. it takes up a lot of the carbon dioxide and the heat that we put into the atmosphere. it's notjust the water — scientists will be studying every aspect of this rapidly changing ecosystem, from the animals that live there to the creatures they feed on and the nature of the ice itself.
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this ship will transform our understanding of the poles. the beauty of this ship is that we can bring lots of scientists from different diverse disciplines together on the same ship with lots of brilliant state—of—the—art facilities for each of those groups. so we can bring biologists, chemists, geologists, physicists all together. and that's really important when we're addressing issues around the environment. and, of course, you can't come on board without mentioning boaty mcboatface. it's what the public voted to call the ship. but instead, the's been given to this — a mini submarine — and soon it's going to be heading off to explore the antarctic ocean. the sir david attenborough will head off in a few weeks, stopping at the falklands on the way to antarctica. and the man it's named after has recorded a special message for when it sets sail. david attenborough: your attention, please. any personnel on board not sailing with the vessel, please disembark.
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it's amazing to hear that message from sir david attenborough reverberating around the ship. i am joined by professor damejayne francis, director of the british antarctic survey. the ship has come here ahead of the un climate summits starting in a few days. how important is it, having a ship to understand what is happening in the polar regions? taste understand what is happening in the polar regions?— polar regions? we know they are chanauin polar regions? we know they are changing because _ polar regions? we know they are changing because of— polar regions? we know they are changing because of climate i polar regions? we know they are i changing because of climate warming but this— changing because of climate warming but this ship will be a game changer for us _ but this ship will be a game changer for us because it is packed with the latest _ for us because it is packed with the latest state—of—the—art scientific equipment so we will be able to go places— equipment so we will be able to go places we — equipment so we will be able to go places we have never been before, we will be _ places we have never been before, we will be able _ places we have never been before, we will be able to do science we have never _ will be able to do science we have never been — will be able to do science we have never been able to do before, so we were _ never been able to do before, so we were really— never been able to do before, so we were really be able to do some really — were really be able to do some really detailed new science to try
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to understand how antarctica in particular— to understand how antarctica in particular is being affected by climate — particular is being affected by climate change. it particular is being affected by climate change.— particular is being affected by climate change. particular is being affected by climate chance. , ,, , : :, climate change. it feels like such a far-off region- _ climate change. it feels like such a far-off region. it _ climate change. it feels like such a far-off region. it affect _ climate change. it feels like such a far-off region. it affect us - climate change. it feels like such a far-off region. it affect us here, i far—off region. it affect us here, the changes happening in the south of. : , ,:, , , the changes happening in the south of. : , , :, , , :, the changes happening in the south of. : , ,:, , , :, :, the changes happening in the south of. : , , :, :, :, of. absolutely. it is remote, a long way away. — of. absolutely. it is remote, a long way away. people _ of. absolutely. it is remote, a long way away, people only _ of. absolutely. it is remote, a long way away, people only see - of. absolutely. it is remote, a long way away, people only see it i of. absolutely. it is remote, a long way away, people only see it on i of. absolutely. it is remote, a long| way away, people only see it on the tv most— way away, people only see it on the tv most of— way away, people only see it on the tv most of the time but what happens on and _ tv most of the time but what happens on and tried _ tv most of the time but what happens on and tried us all, even in london, because _ on and tried us all, even in london, because those great ice sheets in antarctica — because those great ice sheets in antarctica hold 70% of the well's freshwater and if they start melting... well, they are melting, sea level— melting... well, they are melting, sea level is— melting... well, they are melting, sea level is gradually rising already. _ sea level is gradually rising already, the coastal regions of the world _ already, the coastal regions of the world are — already, the coastal regions of the world are at threat and all the people — world are at threat and all the people that live in them. that is because — people that live in them. that is because of— people that live in them. that is because of the great ice sheets melting — because of the great ice sheets melting l— because of the great ice sheets meltinu. :. :. r' because of the great ice sheets meltin.. :, :, :, because of the great ice sheets meltin.. :, :, , melting. i have ask about boaty mcboatface- — melting. i have ask about boaty mcboatface. not _ melting. i have ask about boaty mcboatface. not the _ melting. i have ask about boaty mcboatface. not the name i melting. i have ask about boaty mcboatface. not the name of i melting. i have ask about boaty i mcboatface. not the name of the ship now, the name of the little submarine. what will it be doing? it will be quite busy.— will be quite busy. absolutely. i call this the _ will be quite busy. absolutely. i call this the mother _ will be quite busy. absolutely. i call this the mother ship, i will be quite busy. absolutely. i call this the mother ship, and i will be quite busy. absolutely. i. call this the mother ship, and the mothership has lots of these more submarines, robotics, drones, little
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bits of— submarines, robotics, drones, little bits of remote equipment that will be sent_ bits of remote equipment that will be sent out from the ship and they will be _ be sent out from the ship and they will be collecting data. so if you like. _ will be collecting data. so if you like. the — will be collecting data. so if you like, the mothership can stay static. — like, the mothership can stay static, and we will send out lots of little _ static, and we will send out lots of little drones, automated equipment, so we _ little drones, automated equipment, so we will— little drones, automated equipment, so we will be able to collect masses of data. _ so we will be able to collect masses of data, particularly about the ocean — of data, particularly about the ocean which we really need to understand to understand the change --oin understand to understand the change going on— understand to understand the change going on there. it understand to understand the change going on there-— going on there. it will be heading to antarctica _ going on there. it will be heading to antarctica really _ going on there. it will be heading to antarctica really soon, - going on there. it will be heading to antarctica really soon, a - going on there. it will be heading to antarctica really soon, a few. to antarctica really soon, a few weeks. ~ , ,., , to antarctica really soon, a few weeks. ~ , , ., , to antarctica really soon, a few weeks. , , ., , ., , weeks. absolutely. really, really excitina . weeks. absolutely. really, really exciting- at _ weeks. absolutely. really, really exciting. at long, _ weeks. absolutely. really, really exciting. at long, long _ weeks. absolutely. really, really exciting. at long, long last - weeks. absolutely. really, really exciting. at long, long last the i exciting. at long, long last the ship _ exciting. at long, long last the ship is — exciting. at long, long last the ship is going to antarctica. we will be going _ ship is going to antarctica. we will be going to the dock to wave it up and that— be going to the dock to wave it up and that will be a really special date _ and that will be a really special date. ., , ,., and that will be a really special date. ., ., ., ., ,, and that will be a really special date. ., ., ., ., date. professor francis, thank you very much- _ date. professor francis, thank you very much- i _ date. professor francis, thank you very much. ithink— date. professor francis, thank you very much. i think that _ date. professor francis, thank you very much. i think that is - date. professor francis, thank you very much. i think that is the - date. professor francis, thank you | very much. i think that is the sense you get from being here on board the ship, just how excited the team are to be going down there, the crew on board, the scientists, they can't wait to get started and you have the added complications of trying to operate polar ship during a pandemic. the testing on board is very important, quarantine before they go. it will be an absolutely fantastic expedition when it starts.
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thank you very much, very dramatic images there from the banks of the thames. thank you. you images there from the banks of the thames. thank you.— thames. thank you. you can't not smile with — thames. thank you. you can't not smile with that _ thames. thank you. you can't not smile with that behind _ thames. thank you. you can't not smile with that behind you. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the duchess of cornwall has called for action to "break the wall of silence" for women who've survived abuse. speaking at an event in euston, she paid tribute to victims of male violence. she said survivors also needed to know they were not alone and to end the stigma of abuse. it is, as almost all women know, a deeply disturbing experience to be sexually harassed. yet, somehow, a culture of silence has grown up in which these women conceal their experiences of such offences. why? there are, of course, many explanations — but there is one significant reason
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on which we are focusing today. shame. talks to save one of surrey s main bus operations have collapsed, putting more than 100 jobs and ia routes at risk. arriva plans to close its depot in guildford in december, due to falling passenger numbers. but surrey council says many residents rely on the service to get them to work, school and medical appointments. london has been ranked as number 11 in a list of the uk's greenest cities, behind sheffield, edinburgh and cardiff. the study by natwest and the university of southampton ranked cities according to issues such as green space, energy use, recycling and the way we commute. a0 years after they first broke into the top ten charts, duran duran are back with a new album, their 15th. they've been talking to bbc london about it — how they made it, and coming up with new ideas.
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just sitting there in the back of our minds, waiting to come out. that's true — and, actually, when we get together something... something special always happens. you know, we have an amazing cast of people around us on this record, but there's something, actually, when the four of us get together, there's a real... there's a spark, yeah. more on tonight's programme. turning to the tube now. there are minor delays on the district and metropolitan lines, the district line slow between tower hill and earls court, and turnham green and richmond, engineering works have overrun. time for the weather now with gillian brown. i'll be back in an hour. hello there, good morning to you. well, another very mild day on the cards across the capital today. plenty of cloud around, but also some clear spells out there already this morning, but we'll start to see something a little bit brighter coming through this afternoon. it is going to feel blustery again today, though, on this southerly breeze,
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but very mild — temperatures around 17 celsius. so some clear skies for a time tonight before this band of rain starts to push in from the west, so a very wet start to the day as we head towards dawn on friday. temperatures around maybe 11 or 12 celsius overnight. so a change is on the cards as we head towards tomorrow — this band of rain really going to be with us the best part of the day, and pretty cloudy skies, as well. and as we head towards the weekend there's some more rain in the forecast, as well. i'll be back in an hour. don't forget lots more over on our website. now, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. let's get more now on the details of rishi sunak�*s big—spending budget. ben is with the chancellor in bury. you are at a market this morning in bury, and this is the reality check about what things will cost. yes. about what things will cost. yes, the cost of _ about what things will cost. yes, the cost of living _
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about what things will cost. yes, the cost of living is _ about what things will cost. yes, the cost of living is a _ about what things will cost. yes, the cost of living is a huge - about what things will cost. 1913 the cost of living is a huge issue now and something the chancellor talked about in that statement delivering his budget. let's speak to him and i'm delighted to say rishi sunak is with us. good morning and let's start with the cost of living because we are here in a market and many people will see the price of food going up, petrol going up, gas prices going up. why was there no specific support or measure to help people with the cost of living yesterday?— living yesterday? first of all i talked about _ living yesterday? first of all i talked about it _ living yesterday? first of all i talked about it at _ living yesterday? first of all i talked about it at the - living yesterday? first of all i i talked about it at the beginning living yesterday? first of all i - talked about it at the beginning of the budget speech, and to provide some _ the budget speech, and to provide some context and reassurance about what is _ some context and reassurance about what is going on and it's largely the result— what is going on and it's largely the result of two global forces, the rapid _ the result of two global forces, the rapid reopening of economy is putting — rapid reopening of economy is putting pressure on supply chains but what — putting pressure on supply chains but what is happening with energy prices _ but what is happening with energy prices l _ but what is happening with energy prices i could wave a wand and make these _ prices i could wave a wand and make these global problems disappear but i these global problems disappear but i can't _ these global problems disappear but i can't end _ these global problems disappear but i can't and i want to be upfront and these _ i can't and i want to be upfront and these pressures will be with us for a while _ these pressures will be with us for a while but — these pressures will be with us for a while but people should have reassurance because of the plan we put in _ reassurance because of the plan we put in place — reassurance because of the plan we put in place a year ago to ensure our economy is recovering strongly and more — our economy is recovering strongly and more people are in work and wages _ and more people are in work and wages are — and more people are in work and wages are rising we can face the future _ wages are rising we can face the future with a bit more confidence
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and yesterday we did take action and we froze _ and yesterday we did take action and we froze fuel duty, especially when fuel prices— we froze fuel duty, especially when fuel prices are at a ten year high but we _ fuel prices are at a ten year high but we also _ fuel prices are at a ten year high but we also cut the tax on the lowest — but we also cut the tax on the lowest paid people which will make an enormous difference. you lowest paid people which will make an enormous difference.— lowest paid people which will make an enormous difference. you say they are out of your _ an enormous difference. you say they are out of your control— an enormous difference. you say they are out of your control and _ an enormous difference. you say they are out of your control and the - an enormous difference. you say they are out of your control and the ob - are out of your control and the 0b are out of your control and the 0b are are saying it could get as high as 5% in inflationary terms, so when they are at that level it has huge implications for all of us. does it worry you that they will go higher before they fall?— before they fall? inflation and interest rates _ before they fall? inflation and interest rates are _ before they fall? inflation and interest rates are something i j before they fall? inflation and - interest rates are something i have to look— interest rates are something i have to look at— interest rates are something i have to look at in— interest rates are something i have to look at in myjob as chancellor be concerned about myjob is to protect— be concerned about myjob is to protect the country the best i can for those — protect the country the best i can for those risks and challenges and that is— for those risks and challenges and that is why— for those risks and challenges and that is why it's important we have strong _ that is why it's important we have strong public finances and yesterday we set _ strong public finances and yesterday we set out _ strong public finances and yesterday we set out new rules for borrowing and debt _ we set out new rules for borrowing and debt to — we set out new rules for borrowing and debt to get them back in a tfetter— and debt to get them back in a better place and that is how we build _ better place and that is how we build resilience against things like that and _ build resilience against things like that and protect people and the economy— that and protect people and the economy through the tough times if they come _ economy through the tough times if they come along but crucially we
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took action yesterday for millions of the _ took action yesterday for millions of the lowest paid people and we froze _ of the lowest paid people and we froze fuel— of the lowest paid people and we froze fuel duty and invested in things— froze fuel duty and invested in things like lorry facilities to attract _ things like lorry facilities to attract drivers into the profession so where — attract drivers into the profession so where we can make a difference, the government will act. fine so where we can make a difference, the government will act.— the government will act. one of the wa s to the government will act. one of the ways to make _ the government will act. one of the ways to make a _ the government will act. one of the ways to make a difference - the government will act. one of the ways to make a difference could - the government will act. one of the i ways to make a difference could have been cutting vat on fuel bills and home energy bills. why didn't you do that? ibis home energy bills. why didn't you do that? �* , ., , , home energy bills. why didn't you do that? ~ , ., , , , , that? as many independent experts and think tanks _ that? as many independent experts and think tanks have _ that? as many independent experts and think tanks have pointed - that? as many independent experts and think tanks have pointed out. and think tanks have pointed out it's hot— and think tanks have pointed out it's not a — and think tanks have pointed out it's not a well targeted measure that has— it's not a well targeted measure that has people living in large homes — that has people living in large homes with large energy bills would disproportionately benefit and where we want _ disproportionately benefit and where we want to target sporty is on those who are _ we want to target sporty is on those who are a _ we want to target sporty is on those who are a bit more vulnerable and that is— who are a bit more vulnerable and that is why— who are a bit more vulnerable and that is why we announced half £1,000,000,000 as something all the household _ £1,000,000,000 as something all the household support fund which will provide _ household support fund which will provide £150 for about 3,000,000 of our most _ provide £150 for about 3,000,000 of our most vulnerable households to help them — our most vulnerable households to help them with some of the higher bills through the winter period and ithink— bills through the winter period and i think that is more targeted approach to get help to those who need _ approach to get help to those who need it _ approach to get help to those who need it. not a large vat cut, but the bulk— need it. not a large vat cut, but the bulk of— need it. not a large vat cut, but the bulk of the benefit of which would — the bulk of the benefit of which would end up going to people with large _ would end up going to people with large homes, big bills, who prodded
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only the _ large homes, big bills, who prodded only the help. you large homes, big bills, who prodded only the help-— only the help. you like to talk a lot about cutting _ only the help. you like to talk a lot about cutting taxes. - only the help. you like to talk a lot about cutting taxes. the - only the help. you like to talk a lot about cutting taxes. the ob | only the help. you like to talk a i lot about cutting taxes. the ob r lot about cutting taxes. the 0b r says you've raised more tax this year than any chancellor since 1993. are you happy to have that title? no, and i acknowledge that yesterday during _ no, and i acknowledge that yesterday during the _ no, and i acknowledge that yesterday during the budget and i was very clear— during the budget and i was very clear about it. during the budget and i was very clearabout it. i'm during the budget and i was very clear about it. i'm not happy about that and _ clear about it. i'm not happy about that and l'm — clear about it. i'm not happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it but _ that and i'm not comfortable about it but it _ that and i'm not comfortable about it but it is — that and i'm not comfortable about it but it is the result of the country— it but it is the result of the country and the economy suffering and economic shock the likes of which _ and economic shock the likes of which we — and economic shock the likes of which we hadn't seen in 300 years and our— which we hadn't seen in 300 years and our response to that to help get the country— and our response to that to help get the country through it, a plan which as we _ the country through it, a plan which as we saw— the country through it, a plan which as we saw yesterday has really worked — as we saw yesterday has really worked with the economy recovering now and _ worked with the economy recovering now and many more people in work, so it's as _ now and many more people in work, so it's as a _ now and many more people in work, so it's as a result — now and many more people in work, so it's as a result of that but i was clear— it's as a result of that but i was clear about _ it's as a result of that but i was clear about what i believe to be the ti l ht clear about what i believe to be the right path _ clear about what i believe to be the right path is going forward from here _ right path is going forward from here we — right path is going forward from here. we have funded public services and are _ here. we have funded public services and are investing in future growth but from — and are investing in future growth but from this point on i said my priority— but from this point on i said my priority is— but from this point on i said my priority is to be able to cut taxes for people — priority is to be able to cut taxes for people and we took the first step on— for people and we took the first step on thatjourney for people and we took the first step on that journey yesterday by cutting _ step on that journey yesterday by cutting taxes for millions of the lowest — cutting taxes for millions of the lowest paid and i think it's the right—
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lowest paid and i think it's the right thing to do.— right thing to do. inflation is a hue right thing to do. inflation is a huge problem _ right thing to do. inflation is a huge problem because - right thing to do. inflation is a huge problem because it - right thing to do. inflation is a huge problem because it is i right thing to do. inflation is a huge problem because it is a l right thing to do. inflation is a - huge problem because it is a spiral, isn't it? prices in the shops go up and we ask for more money to pay for it and businesses have to put up their prices to pay the higher wages and we see that with the living wage announcement. how do you break the cycle and stop inflation going up and interest rates going up and prices going up and wages going up? it's important on the national living — it's important on the national living wage announcement, and i would _ living wage announcement, and i would categorise it differently to you and — would categorise it differently to you and it's important for people to understand — you and it's important for people to understand that we have a target for the national living wage to reach two thirds of the median earnings by 2024 and _ two thirds of the median earnings by 2024 and the low pay commission who is an independent group of economists, business groups and trade _ economists, business groups and trade unions make a recommendation to the _ trade unions make a recommendation to the government about what the minimum — to the government about what the minimum wage should be and we accepted — minimum wage should be and we accepted that and it will go up to £9 50 _ accepted that and it will go up to £9 50 next year, a £1000 pay rise for those _ £9 50 next year, a £1000 pay rise for those people, and largely the increase — for those people, and largely the increase is— for those people, and largely the increase is in line with the rates we saw— increase is in line with the rates we saw before coronavirus which were about _ we saw before coronavirus which were about 5.5%, so it's not out of line with _ about 5.5%, so it's not out of line with what — about 5.5%, so it's not out of line with what happened previously but the best— with what happened previously but the best way to avoid what you
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describe — the best way to avoid what you describe happening is to make sure we are _ describe happening is to make sure we are investing in increasing productivity, so it means giving people — productivity, so it means giving people the opportunity to retrain, upscale _ people the opportunity to retrain, upscale and in doing that we can raise _ upscale and in doing that we can raise peoples ability to earn more money. _ raise peoples ability to earn more money, raise companies productivity and that— money, raise companies productivity and that is— money, raise companies productivity and that is the right way to get to the high — and that is the right way to get to the high wage economy and that is exactly— the high wage economy and that is exactly what we did yesterday. i want exactly what we did yesterday. want to exactly what we did yesterday. i want to come onto some of the levelling up in a moment, but you've also promised to lift the pay freeze for public sector workers. no details about how much it will be but you previously said public sector workers will receive a fair and affordable pay rise. so if inflation hits 4%, willie commit to giving them 4% or more, because if you don't, that's a pay cut? ? will you don't, that's a pay cut? ? will you commit?— you don't, that's a pay cut? ? will you commit? the reason i can't give ou a you commit? the reason i can't give you a precise _ you commit? the reason i can't give you a precise number— you commit? the reason i can't give you a precise number because - you commit? the reason i can't give you a precise number because what| you commit? the reason i can't give i you a precise number because what we have in— you a precise number because what we have in this _ you a precise number because what we have in this country for public sector— have in this country for public sector pay— have in this country for public sector pay is a process long established ? do you accept if it is less than— established ? do you accept if it is less than 4% though? it would be wrong _ less than 4% though? it would be wrong for— less than 4% though? it would be wrong for me to speculate the
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independent process and the pay review— independent process and the pay review body will work with individual departments and look at the particular issues and challenges, recruitment, trends, in a given— challenges, recruitment, trends, in a given sector whether that be all the different departments and come to a recommendation which departments will talk to them about, and that— departments will talk to them about, and that is— departments will talk to them about, and that is the normal process. last year we _ and that is the normal process. last year we had — and that is the normal process. last year we had to take some targeted action— year we had to take some targeted action because of the situation we faced _ action because of the situation we faced and — action because of the situation we faced and i'm pleased to say it is over— faced and i'm pleased to say it is over and — faced and i'm pleased to say it is over and we faced and i'm pleased to say it is overand we can faced and i'm pleased to say it is over and we can return to that more normal— over and we can return to that more normal process. over and we can return to that more normal process— over and we can return to that more normal process. without committing to fi . ures normal process. without committing to figures and _ normal process. without committing to figures and l— normal process. without committing to figures and i understand - normal process. without committing to figures and i understand there - normal process. without committing to figures and i understand there is i to figures and i understand there is a process, but do you accept if people aren't offered inflation or above, that equates to a pay cut? you are talking about the mathematical logic, but it's not for me to _ mathematical logic, but it's not for me to provide a recommendation, it is for— me to provide a recommendation, it is for an— me to provide a recommendation, it is for an independent body to look at what _ is for an independent body to look at what is — is for an independent body to look at what is fair and affordable in the context of where we are next year~ _ the context of where we are next year~ we — the context of where we are next year. we don't know exactly what inflation — year. we don't know exactly what inflation is — year. we don't know exactly what inflation is going to be and what wages _ inflation is going to be and what wages are — inflation is going to be and what wages are going to be doing and we don't _ wages are going to be doing and we don't know— wages are going to be doing and we don't know what the conditions for recruitment are going to be in particular— recruitment are going to be in particular sectors. those are all things— particular sectors. those are all things that will go into the independent body's process. it�*s
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independent body's process. it's 'ust the independent body's process. it�*s just the principle of keeping up with prices, but let's move on because i want to talk about levelling up. we are here in barry and i am from burnley and i've spent the week in burnley and i've seen you offered regeneration money to towns, £20,000,000, but when i speak towns, £20,000,000, but when i speak to people in burnley and bury, it's not about hand—outs or grants and it's about creating growth and optimism and a long—term strategy on what we didn't have in your budget yesterday was a long—term plan for places like that. i yesterday was a long-term plan for places like that.— places like that. i would dispute that, places like that. i would dispute that. actually. _ places like that. i would dispute that, actually. i— places like that. i would dispute that, actually. iwould - places like that. i would dispute that, actually. i would say - places like that. i would dispute that, actually. i would say it - places like that. i would dispute that, actually. i would say it is i that, actually. i would say it is about — that, actually. i would say it is about two _ that, actually. i would say it is about two things. the people i speak to when— about two things. the people i speak to when i_ about two things. the people i speak to when i am wondering around wherever— to when i am wondering around wherever l _ to when i am wondering around wherever i happen to be, it's not 'ust wherever i happen to be, it's not just about — wherever i happen to be, it's not just about being in the north, it is also if— just about being in the north, it is also if you — just about being in the north, it is also if you are growing up in a village — also if you are growing up in a village in _ also if you are growing up in a village in the south—west or on the south _ village in the south—west or on the south coast — village in the south—west or on the south coast. people want to feel that opportunity is there for them wherever— that opportunity is there for them wherever they happen to be and i put it down— wherever they happen to be and i put it down to _ wherever they happen to be and i put it down to two things, one is having pride _ it down to two things, one is having pride in _ it down to two things, one is having pride in the — it down to two things, one is having pride in the place you call home and a lot of— pride in the place you call home and a lot of what we announced yesterday, the levelling up fund, things— yesterday, the levelling up fund, things like burnley market, benefiting from £20,000,000
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investment and that will create jobs and it's— investment and that will create jobs and it's about improving the everyday _ and it's about improving the everyday infrastructure of communities are making them richer places— communities are making them richer places to _ communities are making them richer places to live. but communities are making them richer places to live-— places to live. but that is a short-term _ places to live. but that is a short-term thing. - places to live. but that is a short-term thing. that's i places to live. but that is a i short-term thing. that's only places to live. but that is a - short-term thing. that's only one half. the other _ short-term thing. that's only one half. the other half _ short-term thing. that's only one half. the other half is _ short-term thing. that's only one half. the other half is exactly - short-term thing. that's only one half. the other half is exactly as i half. the other half is exactly as you said. — half. the other half is exactly as you said, making sure we drive growth — you said, making sure we drive growth in — you said, making sure we drive growth in every part of the country and we _ growth in every part of the country and we do — growth in every part of the country and we do that by investing in things— and we do that by investing in things like in this area, intercity transport, — things like in this area, intercity transport, so new bus interchanges will come _ transport, so new bus interchanges will come here to ashton under lyme for the _ will come here to ashton under lyme for the greater manchester region which _ for the greater manchester region which i _ for the greater manchester region which i think the mayor welcomed and that will— which i think the mayor welcomed and that will help drive economic growth around _ that will help drive economic growth around manchester and we are replicating that across the cities and as— replicating that across the cities and as we — replicating that across the cities and as we talked about earlier, we are investing in people, to make sure _ are investing in people, to make sure they— are investing in people, to make sure they have the opportunities to up sure they have the opportunities to up skill— sure they have the opportunities to up skill and retrain wherever they are in— up skill and retrain wherever they are in the — up skill and retrain wherever they are in the country.— up skill and retrain wherever they are in the country. when you talk to the traders — are in the country. when you talk to the traders here, _ are in the country. when you talk to the traders here, there _ are in the country. when you talk to the traders here, there was - are in the country. when you talk to the traders here, there was no - the traders here, there was no measure in the budget about taxing online giants and i walked down the high street with lots of empty shops here and amazon made an extra £2,000,000,000 in the pandemic because we were shopping for a moment they paid just short of 4,000,000 in tax. why are you not
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asking online firms to pay more to support places like this? we asking online firms to pay more to support places like this?— support places like this? we are doinu two support places like this? we are doing two things _ support places like this? we are doing two things that _ support places like this? we are doing two things that i - support places like this? we are doing two things that i think - support places like this? we are i doing two things that i think people will be _ doing two things that i think people will be happy to hear. first, next year. _ will be happy to hear. first, next year. for— will be happy to hear. first, next year, for retail, hospitality and leisure — year, for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses we will give them a 50% _ leisure businesses we will give them a 50% discount on their business rates _ a 50% discount on their business rates bill— a 50% discount on their business rates bill up to £110,000, so nine out of— rates bill up to £110,000, so nine out of ten — rates bill up to £110,000, so nine out of ten retail, hospitality and leisure — out of ten retail, hospitality and leisure businesses, cinemas, hotels, pubs, _ leisure businesses, cinemas, hotels, pubs, restaurants, shops, or see a huge _ pubs, restaurants, shops, or see a huge discount on their business rates _ huge discount on their business rates bill~ — huge discount on their business rates bill. it's the biggest tax cut for business rates in a year than we have _ for business rates in a year than we have seen— for business rates in a year than we have seen in— for business rates in a year than we have seen in 30 years so it's very significant — have seen in 30 years so it's very significant help outside of coronavirus but to your other point, we've _ coronavirus but to your other point, we've done — coronavirus but to your other point, we've done exactly that. we already have something called the digital services — have something called the digital services tax on online companies but i've services tax on online companies but we spent— services tax on online companies but we spent a — services tax on online companies but i've spent a lot of time this year working — i've spent a lot of time this year working with my colleagues internationally to create a new global— internationally to create a new global tax treaty which will mean we have companies like the one she described — have companies like the one she described paying the right tax and in the _ described paying the right tax and in the right places and that's taken an enormous amount of work and uk
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leadership— an enormous amount of work and uk leadership on the world stage. this new tax— leadership on the world stage. this new tax treaty has been agreed by 140 countries and will be implemented to make sure we have a consistent— implemented to make sure we have a consistent and sustainable way to do that globally, and i think that is actually— that globally, and i think that is actually a — that globally, and i think that is actually a huge triumph. | that globally, and i think that is actually a huge triumph.- that globally, and i think that is actually a huge triumph. i want to talk about air _ actually a huge triumph. i want to talk about air passenger- actually a huge triumph. i want to talk about air passenger duty - talk about air passenger duty because it's one of the big measures from yesterday and i want to put a scenario to you, because you are cutting the tax on domestic flights. if i was to take a journey from bristol to newcastle and i take the train, its £172 but it will emit 33 kg of carbon, but i've i take the plane it is half the price but it will emit six times as much carbon, so how can it be that you are incentivising taking a plane journey that emit six times as much carbon when it is well served by the train? we are returning to a system we use to have — we are returning to a system we use to have before we had to get rid of it, to have before we had to get rid of it. which— to have before we had to get rid of it. which is— to have before we had to get rid of it, which is not paying air passenger duty on both legs of a journey— passenger duty on both legs of a journey you took within the uk. six
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times journey you took within the uk. times as journey you took within the uk. ’i times as much carbon. journey you took within the uk. six times as much carbon. it _ journey you took within the uk. six times as much carbon. it is - journey you took within the uk. six times as much carbon. it is right i journey you took within the uk. six| times as much carbon. it is right we are consistent _ times as much carbon. it is right we are consistent with _ times as much carbon. it is right we are consistent with the _ are consistent with the environmental goals, so let me talk about— environmental goals, so let me talk about that _ environmental goals, so let me talk about that a little. aviation in general— about that a little. aviation in general only accounts for about 8% of our— general only accounts for about 8% of our overall emissions and that 8%, of our overall emissions and that 8%. a _ of our overall emissions and that 8%, a fraction, just for a 5% comes from _ 8%, a fraction, just for a 5% comes from domestic aviation so it is a tiny part — from domestic aviation so it is a tiny part of— from domestic aviation so it is a tiny part of our emissions. so yes, we are _ tiny part of our emissions. so yes, we are doing — tiny part of our emissions. so yes, we are doing this to support domestic aviation and regional airport— domestic aviation and regional airport who will benefit, but we are also introducing a brand—new band for ultra _ also introducing a brand—new band for ultra long haul travel, so you are right, — for ultra long haul travel, so you are right, those who fly the furthest— are right, those who fly the furthest will pay the highest rates of aviation tax which is consistent with the _ of aviation tax which is consistent with the environmental objectives and it's— with the environmental objectives and it's a — with the environmental objectives and it's a new band that will come into force — and it's a new band that will come into force and yesterday the independent watchdog said our plans independent watchdog said our plans in the _ independent watchdog said our plans in the round will reduce carbon emissions _ in the round will reduce carbon emissions and move us further along the park— emissions and move us further along the park to _ emissions and move us further along the park to net zero. the prime minister— the park to net zero. the prime minister announced a comprehensive net zero _ minister announced a comprehensive net zero strategy to create sustainable aviation fuel so there is a lot— sustainable aviation fuel so there is a lot we — sustainable aviation fuel so there is a lot we are doing to tackle this — is a lot we are doing to tackle this. ., . ., ., ., ., is a lot we are doing to tackle
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this. ., . ., ., ., ,, ., this. chancellor, good to talk to ou this this. chancellor, good to talk to you this morning. _ this. chancellor, good to talk to you this morning. rishi - this. chancellor, good to talk to you this morning. rishi sunak i this. chancellor, good to talk to - you this morning. rishi sunak there, the chancellor, after a busy day of announcements yesterday he will be here in bury for the rest of the day and there will be more from me in bury later. thank you very much. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. important warnings you have to give some of us in the uk. yes, quite right, the met office has two amber weather warnings in force for heavy rain, for south—west scotland and also for cumbria and we have had heavy and persistent rain especially in these areas for the last couple of days and an amber weather warning means there is an increased likelihood of impacts on your plans due to the severe weather, be it flooding, travel disruption, and the weather front responsible for this is still with us today again and there are some unconfirmed reports that around the hollister pass area there has been 307 millimetres of rainfall in 24
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hours up to three am this morning and you can see some of it here. that is just over and you can see some of it here. that isjust over a and you can see some of it here. that is just over a foot of rain in 24 hours and it is still raining and there is more rain to come but we will confirm that when we know ourselves. you can see where the weather front is producing all the rain and some of it gets into wales and south—west england and some of it getting into central, southern and eastern parts of scotland. to the north—west of that, drier and brighter with a few showers for scotland and northern ireland and to the south of it, a fair bit of cloud but nonetheless we will see sunny intervals and these black circles represent the strength of the wind, so it will be fairly windy wherever you are today and it will also be mild for the time of year with temperatures between 12 and 17 . as we head through the evening and overnight we still have the rain, still impacting the kind of areas that it impacts during the day and then we have a second hand joining it coming up from the south and pushing steadily northwards. still windy and these are the overnight
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lows between eight and 13 and they are above average for this stage in october and normally we would be looking at roughly between five and seven, so tomorrow we start with the first band of rain edging east and then we have a second one following in hot pursuit and then it dries out in hot pursuit and then it dries out in the west as things will brighten up in the west as things will brighten up and we will see some sunshine but there will also be showers and it's not going to be as windy. temperatures of anything just slipping a little bit. into the weekend we have the next system coming our way, so friday into saturday a weather front brings rain from the west to east and the spacing on the isobars is wider so it will be breezy rather than windy and there goes the weather front taking the rain with it and lingering across the far south—east and the north—east of scotland the longest. a lot of dry weather around and a few showers, and it will be breezy as well. temperatures more or less bang on average for the time of year and saturday looks like being the driest day of the weekend and don't forget, early on sunday morning put your clocks back an hour
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and then for sunday itself, we have got a weather front coming up from the south—west pushing steadily northwards and heavy showers following behind and the wind picking up and the far north of scotland should stay the driest and temperatures between ten and 14, may 15 . lots of rain. i was going to say thank you, really. it’s lots of rain. i was going to say thank you, really.— lots of rain. i was going to say thank you, really. it's a pleasure. a very heartfelt — thank you, really. it's a pleasure. a very heartfelt thank _ thank you, really. it's a pleasure. a very heartfelt thank you, - thank you, really. it's a pleasure. a very heartfelt thank you, that's| a very heartfelt thank you, that's what i was going to say. thank you, charlie. see you later, carol. i know that if you are a proper football fan, you don't like penalty shoot—outs. i love a penalty shoot—out. i love the drama, i love the emotions, i love how tricky it is, the pressure on the individuals. ijust love is, the pressure on the individuals. i just love the whole thing. haste i just love the whole thing. have ou ever i just love the whole thing. have you ever been — i just love the whole thing. have you ever been involved - i just love the whole thing. have you ever been involved in - i just love the whole thing. have you ever been involved in a - ijust love the whole thing. the you ever been involved in a penalty shoot—out? you ever been involved in a penalty shoot-out?— you ever been involved in a penalty shoot-out?- anyone - you ever been involved in a penalty shoot-out?- anyone who - you ever been involved in a penalty| shoot-out?- anyone who has shoot-out? never. anyone who has ever been in — shoot-out? never. anyone who has ever been in a _ shoot-out? never. anyone who has ever been in a penalty _ shoot-out? never. anyone who has ever been in a penalty shoot - shoot-out? never. anyone who has ever been in a penalty shoot out - ever been in a penalty shoot out there is nothing more stressful and
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if you are a huge football fan in your team being if you are a huge football fan in yourteam being in a if you are a huge football fan in your team being in a penalty shoot comment is not good for the heart. my comment is not good for the heart. my dad can't watch it any more. it’s my dad can't watch it any more. it's called excitement. very rarely i agree with charlie. drama. it is for the fans, and there is no proper way of being a football fan. that the fans, and there is no proper way of being a football fan.— of being a football fan. that is true. of being a football fan. that is true- maybe — of being a football fan. that is true. maybe i— of being a football fan. that is true. maybe ijust _ of being a football fan. that is true. maybe i just get - of being a football fan. that is true. maybe i just get a - of being a football fan. that is true. maybe i just get a bit. true. maybe ijust get a bit stressed. manchester city fans are stressed. manchester city fans are stressed out after watching that penalty shoot—out. phil foden was the only one to miss a penalty but it means they are out of the league cup. that means there will be a new name on the league cup for the first time since 2018. the holders were beaten 5—3 on penalties by west ham. said benrahma scored the winning spot—kick to send them into the quarter—finals. it wasn't quite the same liverpool side that thrashed manchester united at the weekend, but this brilliant backheel flick from divock 0rigi sealed the victory as they beat championship side preston 2—0. brentford, tottenham, and leicester are also
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through to the last eight. a busy night in scotland in the premiership — and an emotional one as fans paid tribute to former rangers and scotland manager walter smith, who died this week. a minute's silence was held just before kick—off in all games to honour smith, who also managed everton during his long career. as for the football, leaders rangers came from 2—0 down to draw with aberdeen at ibrox. celtic beat hibs 3—1 to go second. for all the results you can visit the bbc sport website. in spain, barcelona have sacked manager ronald koeman afterjust over a year in the job. it came after they lost to rayo vallecano last night and are down in 9th place in la liga. koeman had been on borrowed time for quite a while, and a defeat to rivals real madrid at the weekend certainly didn't help. they did of course lose star man
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lionel messi in the summer — with the club facing huge financial problems. former player xavi has been tipped to take over. we heard from josh carvallo a little earlier in the programme. he's become the first current professional male footballer playing in a top division, to come out as gay. the australian midfielder plays for adelaide united in the a—league, and has been priased by players and fans around the world. i've never smiled this much in my life and i had the best sleep last night knowing i could be myself and not live a life of lies, so my cheeks are very sore today but it's a good thing to have.
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look at the response i received. to cricket and the t20 world cup continues later, as australia play sri lanka. the aussies next opponents will be the in form england on saturday. jason roy hit a half—century yesterday as they thrashed bangladesh by 8 wickets in dubai to maintain their perfect start to the tournament. but another difficult day for scotland, who lost three wickets in the first over against namibia — before sliding to their second consecutive defeat. the scots now have a week to prepare before facing new zealand. and bad news for another scot. andy murray has been knocked out of the vienna open. he lost in straight sets to spanish teenager carlos alcaraz in their second round match. british number one cameron norrie plays felix auger aliassime this afternoon. and the shortlist for the bbc women's footballer of the year 2021 has been announced this morning.
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it includes two of the women's super league best strikers — chelsea and australia's sam kerr and arsenal and the netherlands' vivianne miedema. caroline graham hansen, ashley lawrence and alexia putellas complete the list. and you can now vote for your winner on the bbc sport website. you have until monday the eighth of november. it will be a tough competition with a couple of barcelona players in there. they did win the quadruple this year so it will be a tough choice, but the choice is yours at home, so please go and vote. choice is yours at home, so please go and vote-— choice is yours at home, so please go and vote. favourite duran duran track? anything _ go and vote. favourite duran duran track? anything jumping _ go and vote. favourite duran duran track? anything jumping out? - go and vote. favourite duran duran track? anythingjumping out? a - track? anything jumping out? a moment in time? track? anythingjumping out? a moment in time?— track? anythingjumping out? a moment in time? rio. it has to be rio, moment in time? rio. it has to be rio. doesn't _ moment in time? rio. it has to be rio, doesn't it? _ moment in time? rio. it has to be rio, doesn't it? that's— moment in time? rio. it has to be rio, doesn't it? that's the - moment in time? rio. it has to be rio, doesn't it? that's the only . moment in time? rio. it has to be | rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know. i rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know- i bet _ rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know. i bet you _ rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know. i bet you do _ rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know. i bet you do no _ rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know. i bet you do no more. - rio, doesn't it? that's the only one i know. i bet you do no more. if- rio, doesn't it? that's the only one| i know. i bet you do no more. if you -la me i know. i bet you do no more. if you play me a — i know. i bet you do no more. if you play me a lot. _ i know. i bet you do no more. if you play me a lot. i _ i know. i bet you do no more. if you play me a lot, i would _ i know. i bet you do no more. if you play me a lot, i would know. - i know. i bet you do no more. if you play me a lot, i would know. the i play me a lot, i would know. the reflex? wild — play me a lot, i would know. the
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reflex? wild boys? i should have just said it, i said reflex? wild boys? i should have just said it, isaid it reflex? wild boys? i should have just said it, i said it is if i were performing it. it's been 40 years since duran duran first exploded onto the music scene — selling millions of records, performing in stadiums around the world, and earning themselves a star on the hollywood walk of fame. did you enjoy chatting to them? one did you en'oy chatting to them? one ofthe did you enjoy chatting to them? one of the things — did you enjoy chatting to them? que: of the things that did you enjoy chatting to them? i9 of the things that comes across clearly talking to duran duran is that they have done a lot of miles. they have got miles on the clock, and yet, they still get on. there have been some some rows along the way, but the feeling is good when you meet them and they will be performing. and they will be performing. and they will be performing live, which will make a lot of people happy. i went to meet them. can ijust say, for people who don't know, we've been here a while, we've been sitting in this room waiting to get up. there is such a good vibe
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in the room with you four guys. we are super excited to have a new record coming. it's been quite a long road, the last five years. we all know the horrors that we went through for that sort of 18 month period with the pandemic. is it a silly thing to say that the new album, it really does sound like duran duran? no! i mean it really does, it really does. it's a very silly thing to say, but it's true. we want to experiment with music. that's what excites us, finding the new tunes, the kind of musical relationships, new beats, new sounds. but if it doesn't sound like duran duran, fans who we've
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got, who kept us going all these years are not going to like it. do you ever look at what people say about your songs? not really. 0k, here's some nice ones. someone hasjust watched invisible and they've seen the video and whatever and someone writes, "i am 50—something now, it makes me feel 16 again." that's a lovely feeling, isn't it? another one says, "sit down, grand kids. let's see how we really did it in the '80s." that's interesting because that particular video for invisible has no markers of time for a period. i mean, it's a very modern piece, actually. # has the memory gone? # are you feeling numb? # or have i become invisible? what i'm thinking is, though, it's an emotional attachment to all of you and a time and place.
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it was a time for maverick all sorts of things. it was maverick music, maverick fashion design, maverick art and people were really prepared to stick their necks out at the time, and so if you looked at the charts, you'd see all kinds of artists — madonna, fine young cannibals — all kinds of different artists, and none of them were anything like anybody else who was in the charts. and i think that, as music has become slightly more corporate as time has gone by, there has been kind of an encouragement for artists to kind of head for the middle and to do what is proved to be a successful formula. i also know what you mean about the emotional attachment. we go to america and the song rio was so much a part of the american culture that if we don't play that song at the end of the show, there could be a riot.
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# her name is rio and she dances on the sand. that song is a good song. that's a great song. it's not bad. did something happen on board that went wrong in the filming of it? was it... you have got a good story. i was the least — maybe except for nick — the least—experienced yachtsperson that day and, you know, i thought it would be really funny in the last scene to sort ofjust tip andy over the edge of the boat and, you know, let him go. of course that happens and everybody in the boat goes, "no!" # her name is rio, she don't need to understand. no way he was going to sink. he's a geordie — he wasn't going to sink. you can't get rid of him that easily. we came back for a reunion about 12 years ago and he still had _
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a resentment about it. laughter. "haven't you got over that yet?!" do you find over time that there are stories about duran duran, you're thinking, oh, that's never happened, or...? we make them up ourselves. i think it was the first time we were working on the second album in the south of france and you, rog, you had gone out and you were using an air rifle. just practising with an air rifle. and there was a photographer, paparazzi had sort of posted himself in the bushes to try to see whatever we were getting up to, and he managed to get a photo of him and they presented it in one of the papers like he was shooting at the photographer. if only i could have seen him more clearly. you were like, "wow." these were some quite extreme times, and i mean that in the best possible way. # wild boys never lose it. # wild boys never chose this way. we went to new york and we did an appearance at the video shack to go and sign some videos,
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and so many thousands of fans turned up for that event, it blocked the street and they actually got mounted police in to manage the crowd. the strangest thing that happened to me was with my first royalty cheque. i bought this great big house in maida vale in london, which i was never at because i was always on tour while we were recording somewhere, and i came back from the tour, walked into my hallway, went into the kitchen and there was a note saying, "roger, i'm your biggest fan, i'm from italy and i broke into your house and i've been in here for a few days. i haven't taken anything but ijust wanted you to know that i was here." that was probably the strangest one. 0k... top that one? that takes the biscuit. i feel like i've known you for a long time.
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you used to perform at the rum runner in birmingham, right? we were looking for somewhere to play. something that punk rock did — it broke out of all the conventional venues. you really didn't want to be playing where everybody else was. you weren't going to play some public residency so, you know, one afternoon, nick and i, i think we saw a poster for the rum runner and i think it was a bowie night or something. we were like, "why don't we go and check that place out?" we went back that night and it was a friday night and the scene was incredible. it was an incredible crossroads of culture, actually, what was going on at that moment. it was like a micro culture of how society would want to be. you could get in there if you were gay, transgender, black, white, whatever kind of music you're into, as long as it was cool, you could get in there, and everybody really mixed and it was a really cool... a really great place for us to form our sound and our look. can i take you through the look i was sporting in the early days of duran duran? yes, please! before we go any further, did anybody ever stop - you from going in at the door? yes.
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a lot. so the club you were playing at, i couldn't get into. but i'll take you through the outfit, 0k? i was going to say, - if you had a photo we could probably find you... we could tell you why you didn't get in. laughter. there are no photos from those days, as you know. you weren't wearing those socks, were you? so, i'll take you through the outfit, 0k? winkle—picker shoes, purple. silver balloon trousers with, like, about eight buttons up here across the waist. it's a wonder you didn't get in. a donkeyjacket and, on the top, a beret. right. wow. i think it was the donkeyjacket. i think you were confused. and i think you found the perfectjob. balloon pants and a donkeyjacket! definitely not. i'm going to go home and try it on as soon as we finish this. i it's dexys midnight runners, i think was your problem. i think they were right. your outfit didn't sound confused. which is why i was turned away. they look like they get on so well and they are in
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a good place. lovely. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a £150 billion spending spree from the chancellor, but a warning that high taxes and inflation mean living standards won't improve. rishi sunak tells me he is not happy
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at being a high tax chancellor but he defends the impact his budget will have on the rising cost of living. eat less meat and fly less often — that's the advice from leading scientists ahead of a major climate change conference. we'll speak to the government's chief scientific adviser sir patrick vallance later in the programme. good morning. the met office has two weather warnings out at the moment for heavy rain across south—west scotland and cumbria. this could lead to potentially disruption and also flooding. a windy day for all and very mild. all the details later in the programme. good morning. it's thursday, the 28th of october. our main story. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has outlined a £150 billion spending programme over three years in his budget. but there are warnings that rising inflation and high taxation could mean no improvement in living standards. our political correspondent chris mason has the story. any budget is a delicate mix of ingredients.
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first comes the chancellor's address to the commons. then it's a selling job. here we go. taxes on alcohol are being simplified... cheers! ..so a trip to a brewery was in order. to rishi! and the chancellor is out and about again this morning in what is so often a crucial time after any budget — the day after — as people start to plough through the budget documents to ferret out the details that weren't mentioned in the speech. the obr says you have raised more tax this— the obr says you have raised more tax this year— the obr says you have raised more tax this year than any chancellor since _ tax this year than any chancellor since 1993. are you happy to have that title? — since 1993. are you happy to have that title? :, ., ., . ,, :, that title? no, and i acknowledged it yesterday _ that title? no, and i acknowledged it yesterday during _ that title? no, and i acknowledged it yesterday during the _ that title? no, and i acknowledged it yesterday during the budget - that title? no, and i acknowledged it yesterday during the budget and | that title? no, and i acknowledged| it yesterday during the budget and i was very— it yesterday during the budget and i was very clear — it yesterday during the budget and i was very clear about _ it yesterday during the budget and i was very clear about it. _ it yesterday during the budget and i was very clear about it. i'm - it yesterday during the budget and i was very clear about it. i'm not - was very clear about it. i'm not happy— was very clear about it. i'm not happy about— was very clear about it. i'm not happy about that _ was very clear about it. i'm not happy about that and _ was very clear about it. i'm not happy about that and i'm - was very clear about it. i'm not happy about that and i'm not i happy about that and i'm not comfortable _ happy about that and i'm not comfortable about _ happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it - happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it but - happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it but it. happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it but it isj happy about that and i'm not - comfortable about it but it is the result _ comfortable about it but it is the result of— comfortable about it but it is the result of the _ comfortable about it but it is the result of the country— comfortable about it but it is the result of the country and - comfortable about it but it is the result of the country and the - result of the country and the economy— result of the country and the economy is— result of the country and the economy is suffering - result of the country and the economy is suffering and - result of the country and the - economy is suffering and economic shock, _ economy is suffering and economic shock, the — economy is suffering and economic
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shock, the likes _ economy is suffering and economic shock, the likes of— economy is suffering and economic shock, the likes of which _ economy is suffering and economic shock, the likes of which we - economy is suffering and economicl shock, the likes of which we haven't seen _ shock, the likes of which we haven't seen in _ shock, the likes of which we haven't seen in 300 — shock, the likes of which we haven't seen in 300 years, _ shock, the likes of which we haven't seen in 300 years, and _ shock, the likes of which we haven't seen in 300 years, and our- shock, the likes of which we haven'ti seen in 300 years, and our response to that _ seen in 300 years, and our response to that to— seen in 300 years, and our response to that to help — seen in 300 years, and our response to that to help get _ seen in 300 years, and our response to that to help get the _ seen in 300 years, and our response to that to help get the country - to that to help get the country through— to that to help get the country through it _ to that to help get the country through it a _ to that to help get the country through it. a plant _ to that to help get the country through it. a plant which, - to that to help get the country through it. a plant which, as. to that to help get the country i through it. a plant which, as we to that to help get the country - through it. a plant which, as we saw yesterday. _ through it. a plant which, as we saw yesterday. has — through it. a plant which, as we saw yesterday, has really— through it. a plant which, as we saw yesterday, has really worked. - here are the key things we learnt. the economy is doing better than some thought, and the government's going to spend the extra money that it raises in taxes. prices are going up — and are likely to for some time. the recent cut in universal credit won't be reversed, but workers who get it will be able to keep more of it as they earn more. and there'll be a 50% discount in business rates in england for the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors — starting next year. if you look at the cost of living, which _ if you look at the cost of living, which is — if you look at the cost of living, which is a — if you look at the cost of living, which is a real challenge for families— which is a real challenge for families and pensioners around the country— families and pensioners around the country right now, if you look at the tax — country right now, if you look at the tax system, which burdens working — the tax system, which burdens working people and gets a tax cut to bankers, _ working people and gets a tax cut to bankers, or— working people and gets a tax cut to bankers, or if you look at economic growth, _ bankers, or if you look at economic growth, by— bankers, or if you look at economic growth, by the end of this parliament it sets to just be
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growth, by the end of this parliament it sets tojust be 1.3%. certainly— parliament it sets tojust be 1.3%. certainly not the sort of budget i would _ certainly not the sort of budget i would have delivered. the chancellor got some really good news for the public finances yesterday. lower borrowing because the economy's doing slightly better than we all thought six months ago — that's really good news — but good news for public finances, wasn't good news household finances because higher inflation that actually helped the chancellor with his borrowing figures is obviously hurting household budgets and that's why the office for budget responsibility expects household incomes — and, actually, wages — to actually not grow at all next year, so that's really bad news for everyone worrying about their own budgets. and the analysis is onlyjust beginning. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let's get more reaction now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. he has been wading through the red book and the blue book that you saw there. that morning. it has been really interesting. benbury was talking to the chancellor in bury
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market earlier. in talking to the chancellor in bury market earlier.— talking to the chancellor in bury market earlier. in the short term labour i market earlier. in the short term labour l saying — market earlier. in the short term labour i saying that _ market earlier. in the short term labour i saying that the - market earlier. in the short term i labour i saying that the government has made the wrong choices by having a tax cut for banks and also cutting the air passenger duty on domestic flights. they say that that money would instead be better targeted at helping people with the cost of living. then you have the think tanks, like the institute for fiscal studies, who traditionally the morning after the budget do their analysis and they are saying, well, the committee is putting up taxes on the committee is putting up taxes on the average household by thousands and thousands of pounds, inflation is going to go up, potentially as high as 5% next year, and wages and household incomes are not keeping pace with that. so rishi sunak is now this morning having to defend what he did yesterday on the cost of living and he is pointing to things like the extra billions of pounds going into universal credit, the freeze on fuel duty, and the freeze on alcohol duty. over the next few weeks, will that seem like he has
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done enough? the political battle, i wonder, in the longer term, once the turbulence in the global economy and inflation is potentially out of the way, i think could be with his own party, conservative mps, some of whom are not very happy about the idea of a bigger government that takes more in taxes permanently. short—term battle on the cost of living, maybe a longer term battle onjust living, maybe a longer term battle on just how big the government is and how much tax it raises. indeed, thank ou and how much tax it raises. indeed, thank you so — and how much tax it raises. indeed, thank you so much. _ the duchess of cornwall has paid tribute to people whose lives have been "brutally ended" — as she called for action to prevent violence against women. speaking at an event in london last night, she said we need to "try and get the men in our lives to participate in building a shameless society". sarah everard, sabina nessa, wenjing lin, geetika goyal and bennylyn burke are names which, with all the others, must never be forgotten.
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each one of these women endured unimaginable torment. and their loved ones who are left behind continue to suffer in the wake of their deaths. ministers are expected to meet today to discuss the future of the covid travel red list. the government is believed to be considering a further reduction in the number of countries on the list — or even scrap it altogether. such a move would end the need for quarantine hotels. police in the united states investigating the killing of a cinematographer on a film set in new mexico, say they believe the weapon used by the actor alec baldwin contained a live round. reports have now emerged about safety concerns on set in the days before halyna hutchins was killed. our us correspondent sophie long reports. it is now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead while she was doing herjob. these are the last pictures of the cinematographer alive on the set of rust.
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she's in the blue coat and headphones. you can see alec baldwin beyond the camera. he was holding the gun that fired the shot that killed halyna and severely injured directorjoel souza. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr souza. we regard this specific spent casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon by assistant director dave halls, he was told it was safe — what's called a cold gun. the person responsible forfirearms on the set was the armourer — 24—year—old hannah gutierrez—reed. she's admitted ammunition was not secure, but says she checked the guns and found no live rounds. all three are cooperating fully with the investigation. all options are on the table at this point. i'm not commenting on charges —
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whether they will be filed or not, or on whom. so the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving, and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be allowed on film sets under any circumstances. sophie long, bbc news. 100 years after the poppy appeal was first launched, thousands of fundraisers will once again take to the streets in support of the royal british legion. last year, face—to—face collections were cancelled for the first time in history because of covid restrictions. the charity supports serving and former military personnel and their families. the polar research vessel which made headlines when a public vote suggested the name boaty mcboatface, is preparing for her first expedition. the ship, which was instead named the rrs sir david attenborough, is currently in south east london ahead of the upcoming climate change conference,
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which the uk is hosting. the ship is expected to set sail for antarctica next month. it is 13 minutes past eight and time to get updated with the weather. lots of you will be interested in what is going on around the uk, particularly in northern parts. that morning. particularly in northern parts. that morninu. particularly in northern parts. that mornin., :, particularly in northern parts. that mornini_ :, particularly in northern parts. that mornin. :, ~ morning. good morning. the met office has two — morning. good morning. the met office has two amber _ morning. good morning. the met office has two amber when - morning. good morning. the met office has two amber when his i office has two amber when his invoice for heavy rain across south—west scotland and cumbria. i amber whether what he means an increased likelihood of impact on your daily work and whatever you are going to do because of severe weather. it could be flooding or it could be travel disruption, for example. it has been raining heavily and persistently across south—west scotland and cumbria for the last few days but you can see the rain extends today also through parts of wales, south—west england, central and southern and scotland. in the
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midlands into the south—eastern quarter, a fair bit of cloud around but we'll see some sunny intervals and to the north of it, for the rest of scotland and northern ireland, right again prospect than of late but still if you show us. windy with temperatures 12 to 17 degrees, so mild for the time of year. through this evening and overnight our band of rain persists in more or less the same areas as through the day and it isjoined by another one same areas as through the day and it is joined by another one coming same areas as through the day and it isjoined by another one coming in, bringing more rain across northern ireland and also western scotland it will be a mild night once again, eight to 13 degrees being our overnight lows. tomorrow, the first band of rain moving eastwards, followed by the second hand of rain, also moving eastwards, so it will brighten up in the west. there will be a few showers, it won't be as windy, and some of the our old friend of the sun, so a drier day across cumbria and south of scotland compared to what we have been used to. temperatures 11 to 15 degrees, so slipping just a to. temperatures 11 to 15 degrees, so slippin- 'ust a little to. temperatures 11 to 15 degrees, so slipping just a
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to. temperatures 11 to 15 degrees, so slippin- 'ust a little bit. thank you. pleasure. eat less meat and fly less often — that's the advice from chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance, as the uk prepares to host the climate change conference. he joins senior scientists from around the world in calling on leaders to take "urgent action" ahead of the summit, which gets underway in glasgow on sunday. we can speak now to sir patrick, who joins us from the rrs sir david attenborough polar research ship — where he'll be making a special speech later this morning. very good morning to you. probably making reference first to the location you are in because this is an important vessel and it is about to go on an important voyage, all linked to climate change. it’s to go on an important voyage, all linked to climate change.- linked to climate change. it's a wonderful— linked to climate change. it's a wonderful ship _ linked to climate change. it's a wonderful ship and _ linked to climate change. it's a wonderful ship and it _ linked to climate change. it's a wonderful ship and it is - linked to climate change. it's a wonderful ship and it is going i linked to climate change. it�*s — wonderful ship and it is going on, as you say, and important mission, taking a long view of polar research, which the uk has a great history of energy so important from understanding the cryo sphere, as
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shells, through to the current sea level, and of course life. this sort of long—term consistent research endeavour is crucial. indie of long-term consistent research endeavour is crucial.— endeavour is crucial. we are very used to, recently, _ endeavour is crucial. we are very used to, recently, seeing - endeavour is crucial. we are very used to, recently, seeing cute i used to, recently, seeing cute talking to us about these macro and the pandemic. you are in a very different role today. can i ask you, in the clearest possible sense, what is your message to world leaders as we approach this very important conference? the we approach this very important conference?— we approach this very important conference? ~' , , , ' conference? the key message is 1.5 celsius is both _ conference? the key message is 1.5 celsius is both important _ conference? the key message is 1.5 celsius is both important and i celsius is both important and achievable but it requires urgent action, evidence—based, science —based action. we need the collaboration internationally across science to make sure that we get science to make sure that we get science and innovation across the world globally accessible, and we need to build capacity for research and development in those countries which are needed in to the solution. those are the really important messages that leaders need to act on
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site lots of people asking, you have very important people attending in glasgow. what would be a very important people attending in glasgow. what would be— very important people attending in glasgow. what would be a good result in terms of a — glasgow. what would be a good result in terms of a statement, _ glasgow. what would be a good result in terms of a statement, its _ in terms of a statement, its determination, what would be a good result? ~ :, determination, what would be a good result? ~ ., :, ., :: result? well, we have more than 50 countries which _ result? well, we have more than 50 countries which have _ result? well, we have more than 50 countries which have signed - result? well, we have more than 50 countries which have signed up i result? well, we have more than 50 countries which have signed up to i result? well, we have more than 50 countries which have signed up to a | countries which have signed up to a net zero. we need to get that across the globe generally and we need to make sure that is notjust a general pledge, but actually specifically based on plans. we need to move to actual plans. a lot needs to happen this decade, so commitment to 1.5, very clear commitment to producing active plans to do so. then very clear commitment to producing active plans to do so.— active plans to do so. then we look at the un climate _ active plans to do so. then we look at the un climate report _ active plans to do so. then we look at the un climate report which i active plans to do so. then we look. at the un climate report which came out recently, which said very clearly in the starkest possible terms, that the plans of governments around the world to cut carbon are not nearly enough to avert dangerous climate change. this was a seismic
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warning of measures that are being considered are not enough. i warning of measures that are being considered are not enough.- considered are not enough. i think there are three _ considered are not enough. i think there are three things _ considered are not enough. i think there are three things one - considered are not enough. i think there are three things one needs i considered are not enough. i thinkl there are three things one needs to think about. absolutely make sure that the technologies we have today and the natural solutions we have today are implemented as fast as possible. that is critical and there is a way to do that and there is a lot of research and development media. second is we need to invest in the technologies for the future will then continue that and make certain parts of that easier and we also need to accept them has got to be some change in society in terms of the way we consume and the way we contribute to missions and those things together, i think, i contribute to missions and those things together, ithink, i really, really important, and if those i've done and there are clear plans, 1.5 is achievable but it is not achievable without significant action and steep reduction in actions over the period —— emissions to 2030. actions over the period -- emissions to 2030. ~ ., �*, :, :, , to 2030. while that's down for us. peo - le in to 2030. while that's down for us. people in their _ to 2030. while that's down for us. people in their ordinary _ to 2030. while that's down for us. people in their ordinary lives i to 2030. while that's down for us. j people in their ordinary lives going about their business, buying food,
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travelling, what is your message to people about how, even within your own home, your own community, what can change things? it’s own home, your own community, what can change things?— can change things? it's a really important _ can change things? it's a really important question _ can change things? it's a really important question and - can change things? it's a really i important question and ultimately, of course, all the greener choices need to be the easy choice, that is the technology challenge. make the green choice for easier. then there are little things we can all do that may seem tiny individually but you aggregate them across millions and it makes a difference. i cycle to work, i have reduced my meat consumption, i don't fly as much as i used to. doesn't mean i have stopped meat consumption, doesn't mean i will never fly again. stopped meat consumption, doesn't mean i will neverfly again. i am going to but i will reduce those things and i think those aggregate actions across millions make a difference, as well, but on their own they are not sufficient. we need to get the technologies in place and we need to invest in the technologies of the future. really interesting what _ technologies of the future. really interesting what you _ technologies of the future. really interesting what you are - technologies of the future. really interesting what you are saying. i interesting what you are saying. your role, of course, to remind
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people, is the government's chief scientific adviser. i wonder if i could get your thoughts on yesterday's budget, in which rishi sunak, amongst other things talked about domestic flying and announced about domestic flying and announced a 50% cut in air passenger duty. effectively incentivising people to use the plane to get around the uk. what are your thoughts? weill. use the plane to get around the uk. what are your thoughts?— what are your thoughts? well, the first thing to _ what are your thoughts? well, the first thing to say _ what are your thoughts? well, the first thing to say about _ what are your thoughts? well, the first thing to say about the - what are your thoughts? well, the first thing to say about the budget | first thing to say about the budget as i'm very pleased that the science support was very strong and there is a link towards growth of science and spent both in the public sector and private sector, that will be critical for net zero, difficult work pandemic preparedness and all sorts of things. in terms of the future we can see that flying will move to sustainable aviation fuels, electric transport and so on so the future looks different from now but i think it is a personal choice here and my personal choice is to decrease the amount of flying doing. i will repeat the question if i may.
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the chancellor yesterday announced an incentive for flying the chancellor yesterday announced an incentive forflying domestically in the uk. the 50% cut in air passenger duty. was that the right thing to do, given what you have just told us, about personal choices, but also about messaging? feel free to say what you wish, because a lot of people have said, and you will know this very well, there is a real contradiction between the big messages about not playing so much, you have already mentioned that, and then the government, the chancellor saying they should be incentivised within they should be incentivised within the uk. ~ “ they should be incentivised within the uk. ~ ~ ., the uk. well, i thinkl have given m view the uk. well, i thinkl have given my view on _ the uk. well, i thinkl have given my view on the — the uk. well, i thinkl have given my view on the science _ the uk. well, i thinkl have given my view on the science view, i the uk. well, i thinkl have given i my view on the science view, which is consistent with what is in the letter from over 40 science advisers across the world, we are clear that actually these things matter and the reduction. it is important to recognise this is not a uk issue but a global issue and governments across the world to think about what
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actions they will take and i have given you what i think is a consistent science advice which would be given across the world from scientists to leaders, it is up to leaders of course to decide how they want to implement that, and the policy decisions they make. i understand the delicacy around this but your advice to the chancellor would have been, that is not the right thing to do for the global climate, is that right?- right thing to do for the global climate, is that right? well, my advice is that _ climate, is that right? well, my advice is that all _ climate, is that right? well, my advice is that all of _ climate, is that right? well, my advice is that all of us _ climate, is that right? well, my advice is that all of us taking i climate, is that right? well, my i advice is that all of us taking some action to reduce the amount we fly would be beneficial. it is not the only thing. of course lots of other things need to happen, as well. and of course politicians need to make choices based on all sorts of other considerations but that is the science advice in terms of climate and i have been clear about that. i have also been clear that over the longer term it is important that we get to sustainable ways of flying which don't cause carbon emissions and there is a lot of work going on on that. iii and there is a lot of work going on on that. :, and there is a lot of work going on on that. :_ ., :, and there is a lot of work going on on that. :, ., :, :, ~ on that. if i may i want to take this opportunity _ on that. if i may i want to take this opportunity to _ on that. if i may i want to take this opportunity to figure i on that. if i may i want to take this opportunity to figure one i on that. if i may i want to take | this opportunity to figure one a couple of issues to do with the
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pandemic. there have been some differing modelling in relation to where various organisations think that covid rate is going at the moment. can you give us your latest modelling predictions, looking over the next few months?— modelling predictions, looking over the next few months? well, you are riiht, the the next few months? well, you are right, the models _ the next few months? well, you are right, the models are _ the next few months? well, you are right, the models are quite - right, the models are quite uncertain at the moment and we have got variability of modelling input. nobody is really clear which direction this is going on. but they are clear about the two big variables that could change that. one is a waning immunity, so if immunity wanes faster than expected, you will see a bigger increase and thatis you will see a bigger increase and that is why it is so important to get a booster shots in the vulnerable and elderly in particular and the second is a behavioural change, how quickly we return to pre—pandemic behaviours, they make the modelling uncertain and of course what may happen with variants
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that we don't know about. as a result of that, as we aggregate the models, most say it looks fairly flat stop don't expect the very big peaks we have had in the past. it looks fairly flat but at a very high level at the moment, so the high level at the moment, so the high level remains our concern from a high level you can go quite quickly. john inman is been speaking about the children and the fact that there have been high levels there and as immunity builds from vaccination and from infection in that group, there will be a resistance of transmission, so you may expect that to level off and his model suggests decrease and i think we need to monitor this very carefully over the next few weeks and months. people will be familiar _ next few weeks and months. people will be familiar not _ next few weeks and months. people will be familiar not with _ next few weeks and months. people will be familiar not with the - will be familiar not with the precise figures, i know there was a total of 49,000 recently, i think it was 42,000 cases yesterday. when you talk about things flattening out, is it idols acceptable levels when over 40,000 cases per day... do you
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think, as the government chief scientific adviser, those are levels which we can accept and deal with? that is a societal question. they are high levels in those high levels of course translate into levels of hospitalisation, but levels of hospitalisation, but levels of hospitalisation i very much reduced by vaccination. if we had level cases like this without vaccination, look back a year or so, you would have huge levels of hospitalisation of the vaccines are protecting, which is why it is so important to get full vaccination coverage across the vulnerable populations and the adults in particular and the booster doses. in terms of what level you want, the lower the level the better in terms of overall outcome, but there are costs and consequences of decisions in both directions. that is a societal question about what levels are acceptable. i will say this and it is important to make the point, as infection becomes gradually endemic, it will occur
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year on year, we will see this circulating every winter, i suspect, in particular, and so gradually, as immunity bills, the protection will be there, the consequences will be reduced. but we are not there yet. we still have people going into hospital, still a significant risk. sir patrick vallance, i am rather jealous of you on your marvellous location there on board, looking out over the thames. it is location there on board, looking out over the thames.— over the thames. it is wonderful. looks like — over the thames. it is wonderful. looks like a _ over the thames. it is wonderful. looks like a beautiful _ over the thames. it is wonderful. looks like a beautiful day. i over the thames. it is wonderful. looks like a beautiful day. you i over the thames. it is wonderful. i looks like a beautiful day. you have a speech to make later on. thank you for your time this morning.— for your time this morning. thank ou ve for your time this morning. thank you very much- — for your time this morning. thank you very much. it _ for your time this morning. thank you very much. it does _ for your time this morning. thank you very much. it does look- you very much. it does look glorious. — you very much. it does look glorious, can't _ you very much. it does look glorious, can't get - you very much. it does look glorious, can't get better. you very much. it does look. glorious, can't get better sun you very much. it does look- glorious, can't get better sun in the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the duchess of cornwall has called for action to "break the wall of silence" for women who've survived abuse.
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speaking at an event in euston, she paid tribute to those who lost their lives to male violence, and urged women to speak out about their experiences to end the stigma of abuse. it is, as almost all women know, a deeply disturbing experience to be sexually harassed. yet, somehow, a culture of silence has grown up in which these women conceal their experiences of such offences. why? there are, of course, many explanations — but there is one significant reason on which we are focusing today. shame. talks to save one of surrey s main bus operations have collapsed, putting more than 100 jobs and 14 routes at risk. arriva plans to close its depot in guildford in december, due to falling passenger numbers. but surrey council says many residents rely on the service to get them to work, school and medical appointments. london has been ranked as number 11 in a list of the uk's greenest cities, behind sheffield,
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edinburgh and cardiff. the study by natwest and the university of southampton ranked cities according to issues such as green space, energy use, recycling and the way we commute. 40 years after they first broke into the top ten charts, duran duran are back with a new album — their 15th. they've been talking to bbc london about it — how they made it, and coming up with new ideas. just sitting there in the back of our minds, waiting to come out. that's true — and, actually, when we get together something... something special always happens. you know, we have an amazing cast of people around us on this record, but there's something, actually, when the four of us get together, there's a real... there's a spark, yeah. more on tonight's programme. turning to the tube now. the problems on the district line have cleared up, but the metropolitan line still has minor delays between moor park
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and watford, amersham and chesham and for all the latest travel news, tune into your bbc local radio station. time for the weather now with gillian brown. hello there, good morning to you. well, another very mild day on the cards across the capital today. plenty of cloud around, but also some clear spells out there already this morning, but we'll start to see something a little bit brighter coming through this afternoon. it is going to feel blustery again today, though, on this southerly breeze, but very mild — temperatures around 17 celsius. so some clear skies for a time tonight before this band of rain starts to push in from the west, so a very wet start to the day as we head towards dawn on friday. temperatures around maybe 11 or 12 celsius overnight. so a change is on the cards as we head towards tomorrow — this band of rain really going to be with us the best part of the day, and pretty cloudy skies, as well. and as we head towards the weekend there's some more rain in the forecast, as well. i'll be back in half an hour and don't forget, lots more over on our website. now it's back to charlie and naga.
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bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one today. gethin and gemma can tell us what they have lined up. looking very relaxed. look at that. nice to have the team back together and up pleasure to have gemma here today. i'm joined by gemma atkinson. coming up on morning live... it's the seasonal disorder that a third of us suffer from. as the clocks go back, dr xand's here to explain why you don't have to grin and bear the winter blues. yes, it is a real medical condition, and i_ yes, it is a real medical condition, and i will— yes, it is a real medical condition, and i will be — yes, it is a real medical condition, and i will be explain how to get treatment, diagnosis and some simple affordable _ treatment, diagnosis and some simple affordable tips on how to boost your mood _ affordable tips on how to boost your mood. he _ affordable tips on how to boost your mood. , , . mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile. — mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile. he _ mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile, he is _ mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile, he is a _ mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile, he is a winner. - mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile, he is a winner. he's i mood. he himself is medicine, with that smile, he is a winner. he's put| that smile, he is a winner. he's put a smile on — that smile, he is a winner. he's put a smile on my _ that smile, he is a winner. he's put a smile on my face. _ and one man who'lll certainly put a smile on your face is mr motivator.
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he meets the inspirational people i bringing people with disabilitiesl together through the power of music. also coming up, one in four of us will need a blood transfusion at some point in our lives but for some living with sickle cell disease it's a part of everyday life. sabrina grant finds out why more donors are urgently needed and gives blood for the very first time. plus, with the decade's biggest climate change summit- just around the corner, presenter— chris bavin tells us why going green doesn't have to cost the earth — - and could even save you some cash. also today, it's the show that brings the wonders of mother nature to our front room. ahead of tonight's autumnwatch we're heading outdoors to the windy isle of mull to find out what megan mccubbin and the team have in store. and, it may be chilly outside but chef anna haugh has l a dish to warm you up. she shares the secrets - to making the perfect stew, including why you should never eat it straightaway _ that is where i am going wrong.” that is where i am going wrong. always scoff at. it's hard not to. you want to eat it. top tips at 9:15
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am. , ., . ~ , you want to eat it. top tips at 9:15 am. , ., , .," you want to eat it. top tips at 9:15 am. gemma, the trick is, make two big batches — am. gemma, the trick is, make two big batches and _ am. gemma, the trick is, make two big batches and you _ am. gemma, the trick is, make two big batches and you can _ am. gemma, the trick is, make two big batches and you can have - am. gemma, the trick is, make two big batches and you can have the i big batches and you can have the first batch, then you put the second batch away, so that taste good. i might have to make for batches. batch away, so that taste good. i - might have to make for batches. make as much as you — might have to make for batches. make as much as you want. _ might have to make for batches. make as much as you want. why _ might have to make for batches. make as much as you want. why not? - might have to make for batches. make as much as you want. why not? goodl as much as you want. why not? good ti -. thank as much as you want. why not? good tip- thank yom _ as much as you want. why not? good tip. thank you. you _ as much as you want. why not? good tip. thank you. you are _ as much as you want. why not? good tip. thank you. you are welcome. - tip. thank you. you are welcome. have a good _ tip. thank you. you are welcome. have a good one. _ then has been on the market in bury this morning on the reason is that everyone has been doing the maths. all of the think tanks are doing their maths and real people in their homes are doing their maths because of what rishi sunak told us yesterday and what he has been telling you today.— yesterday and what he has been telling you today. that's right. we aet telling you today. that's right. we net the bi telling you today. that's right. we get the big headline _ telling you today. that's right. we | get the big headline announcement telling you today. that's right. we - get the big headline announcement on budget day but the devil is always on the detail and it takes a day or so for everyone to work out what the announcements really mean for their day—to—day personal finances and we've been doing that and i've been
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chatting to the chancellor in bury this morning about some of the measures he says he has taken to try and ease the squeeze on incomes. we know prices are going up are so many things, whether it's your gas bill, petrol at the four 7 food court and he has said he's taken action to ease that. let's look at some of the detail we got in the budget and what it could mean for our budgets at home. there were changes to the level on universal credit and at the moment the threshold means that the more you work, you lose 63p but it's now being reduced to 55p so it means you keep more of what you own so thatis you keep more of what you own so that is one of the headline announcement even though you know the consular cut the £20 of lift in universal credit being offered to people in the pandemic. he also froze fuel duty which has been frozen for ten years, nearly a decade and he says that will be
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frozen for another year and that is a crucial thing to maybe ease the burden on our pockets. particularly, and some criticism that he did not announce anything that would help ease the burden on gas bills, there was no cut in vat or helping anyone with their day—to—day energy bills and there was also the rise in the minimum wage leaked in the wee 7 in the week, so if you're 23 or over it goes up to £9 50 an hour so they have hailed that as a boost for low—paid workers and there was a big overall in alcohol duty, streamlining the system that means the more alcohol and drink housing, the more alcohol and drink housing, the more alcohol and drink housing, the more you will pay, so good news for things like sparkling wine or rose but not so good for high alcohol ciders or red wine for example. also changes to air passenger duty which have been introduced in the last budget and thatis introduced in the last budget and that is one of the concerns, particularly from the environmental protesters about climate change so they are reducing it on domestic
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flights but not on international flights but not on international flights and we do have a little visitor here this morning, bear with me. i was talking to the chancellor in bury earlier and i to him that there were announcements in some quarters, but he is also taxing people a lot more. an independent observer pointing out that he has raised tax more this year than any other chancellor since 1993, so i put it to him that he was a high tax chancellor and asked him if he really liked that title. the 0b r says you have raised more tax this year than any chancellor since 1993. are you happy to have that title? no, and i acknowledge that yesterday during _ no, and i acknowledge that yesterday during the _ no, and i acknowledge that yesterday during the budget and i was clear about— during the budget and i was clear about it _ during the budget and i was clear about it and i'm not happy about that and — about it and i'm not happy about that and i'm not comfortable about it but _ that and i'm not comfortable about it but it _ that and i'm not comfortable about it but it is — that and i'm not comfortable about it but it is as a result of the country— it but it is as a result of the country on _ it but it is as a result of the country on the economy should suffering — country on the economy should suffering and economic shock the likes of— suffering and economic shock the likes of which we have not seen in 300 years— likes of which we have not seen in 300 years and our response to that to help _ 300 years and our response to that to help get — 300 years and our response to that to help get the country through it,
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a plan _ to help get the country through it, a plan which as we saw yesterday, has really — a plan which as we saw yesterday, has really worked. fine a plan which as we saw yesterday, has really worked.— a plan which as we saw yesterday, has really worked. one of the ways ou could has really worked. one of the ways you could have _ has really worked. one of the ways you could have made _ has really worked. one of the ways you could have made a _ has really worked. one of the ways you could have made a difference l has really worked. one of the ways i you could have made a difference was to cut vat on fuel bills, on home energy bills. why didn't you do that? this energy bills. why didn't you do that? �* , ., , energy bills. why didn't you do that? �* , . , , energy bills. why didn't you do that? ~ , . , , , , that? as many independent experts and think tanks _ that? as many independent experts and think tanks pointed _ that? as many independent experts and think tanks pointed out - that? as many independent experts and think tanks pointed out it's - that? as many independent experts and think tanks pointed out it's not| and think tanks pointed out it's not and think tanks pointed out it's not a particularly well targeted measure because _ a particularly well targeted measure because people living in large homes with large _ because people living in large homes with large energy bills would disproportionately benefit and where we want _ disproportionately benefit and where we want to target support is on those _ we want to target support is on those who— we want to target support is on those who are more vulnerable and that's— those who are more vulnerable and that's why— those who are more vulnerable and that's whyjust over a month ago or around _ that's whyjust over a month ago or around then— that's whyjust over a month ago or around then we announced half £1,000,000,000 in the household support— £1,000,000,000 in the household support fund which will provide £150 for about— support fund which will provide £150 for about 3,000,000 of our most vulnerable — for about 3,000,000 of our most vulnerable households to help them with higher bills for the winter period — with higher bills for the winter period and i think that is a more targeted — period and i think that is a more targeted approach to get help to those _ targeted approach to get help to those who need it, not a large vat cut, the _ those who need it, not a large vat cut, the bulk of the benefit of which — cut, the bulk of the benefit of which would go to people with large homes _ which would go to people with large homes and big bills we don't need the helu — homes and big bills we don't need the helu ~— homes and big bills we don't need the hel. . . homes and big bills we don't need the hel.. . , homes and big bills we don't need the help- -— the help. . that is the chancellor s-ueakin the help. . that is the chancellor speaking to _ the help. . that is the chancellor speaking to me _ the help. . that is the chancellor speaking to me in _ the help. . that is the chancellor speaking to me in bury earlier. l the help. . that is the chancellor i
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speaking to me in bury earlier. you might have to bear with us a minute as we have more company down here on the main street. let me introduce you to marcusjohn, nice to see you. the chancellor talked a lot about levelling up, but i wonder, he is offering grants to various places and bury is one, and burnley is another, but the criticism is it's not about dropping in bits of cash and it should be a long—term strategy and we had no detail. yes. strategy and we had no detail. yes, we have some _ strategy and we had no detail. yes, we have some of _ strategy and we had no detail. yes, we have some of the _ strategy and we had no detail. yes, we have some of the biggest regional divides— we have some of the biggest regional divides ih— we have some of the biggest regional divides in our country in comparison to other— divides in our country in comparison to other developed countries meaning things— to other developed countries meaning things like _ to other developed countries meaning things like how long you live, how much _ things like how long you live, how much you — things like how long you live, how much you can earn and whether you will be _ much you can earn and whether you will be able — much you can earn and whether you will be able to get a job are unequal— will be able to get a job are unequal at across the country and the acid _ unequal at across the country and the acid test of levelling up is whether— the acid test of levelling up is whether it can fix that and the acid test was _ whether it can fix that and the acid test was failed yesterday because we had a _ test was failed yesterday because we had a flurry of piecemeal spending pledges _ had a flurry of piecemeal spending pledges and while some of those will be individually welcome, those projects. — be individually welcome, those projects, collectively doesn't add up projects, collectively doesn't add up to— projects, collectively doesn't add up to the — projects, collectively doesn't add up to the ambition needed to address the scale _ up to the ambition needed to address the scale of— up to the ambition needed to address the scale of those regional inequalities. really, there were
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three _ inequalities. really, there were three ingredients that were missing and the _ three ingredients that were missing and the first was a plan for levelling up and the second was the sustained _ levelling up and the second was the sustained and long—term investment in things— sustained and long—term investment in things like innovation, skills and transport that would improve people's— and transport that would improve people's quality of life and the third _ people's quality of life and the third was— people's quality of life and the third was about substantive devolution, taking power out of whitehall and into town halls to .ive whitehall and into town halls to give communities a say over that money— give communities a say over that money so — give communities a say over that money so they can level up for themselves.— money so they can level up for themselves. ., . ., , themselves. the chancellor says he is offerin: themselves. the chancellor says he is offering regeneration _ themselves. the chancellor says he is offering regeneration grants, - is offering regeneration grants, £20,000,000 targeted and also changing money for transport to devolve more powers as far as transport spending is concerned but there were no announcements on northern powerhouse rail connecting the big cities in the north, no news on whether the h52 eastern leg expansion will go on and what you often find out the budget time that the more interesting stuff is what is not an ounce.— the more interesting stuff is what is not an ounce. absolutely and what was missing — is not an ounce. absolutely and what was missing was _ is not an ounce. absolutely and what was missing was those _ is not an ounce. absolutely and what was missing was those strategic - was missing was those strategic regional— was missing was those strategic regional transport links. we heard nothing _ regional transport links. we heard nothing about the northern powerhouse rail which would connect liverpool. _ powerhouse rail which would connect liverpool, manchester and leeds with a new—
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liverpool, manchester and leeds with a new rail— liverpool, manchester and leeds with a new rail link sorely needed or the h52 eastern leg for yorkshire and hsz eastern leg for yorkshire and that's— hsz eastern leg for yorkshire and that's a _ hsz eastern leg for yorkshire and that's a really big promise which isn't _ that's a really big promise which isn'tiust— that's a really big promise which isn'tjust about that's a really big promise which isn't just about levelling up, that's a really big promise which isn'tjust about levelling up, it's a promise — isn'tjust about levelling up, it's a promise made since 2014 with that northern— a promise made since 2014 with that northern powerhouse agenda. andl northern powerhouse agenda. and i have sent northern powerhouse agenda. and i have spent the _ northern powerhouse agenda. and i have spent the week _ northern powerhouse agenda. and i have spent the week and _ northern powerhouse agenda. jifuc i have spent the week and burnley northern powerhouse agenda. fif1c i have spent the week and burnley and we are here in bury and the chancellor hears today and you speak to anyone in towns like this and they say is not about just to anyone in towns like this and they say is not aboutjust dropping a bit of cash in. we don't need donations or charity, we want a long—term plan and i wonder where in what we heard yesterday there is a focus on creating jobs and growth and those intangible things, that optimism and hope, dare i say it. communities want to level up for themselves and they need to be furnished — themselves and they need to be furnished with the tools to do it and it— furnished with the tools to do it and it requires the transport infrastructure we talked about so they can — infrastructure we talked about so they can access economic image unity. _ they can access economic image unity. see — they can access economic image unity, see relatives, access public services _ unity, see relatives, access public services around the north of england but it also— services around the north of england but it also needs to be about giving them _ but it also needs to be about giving them the _ but it also needs to be about giving them the power to improve their communities to create jobs locally and attract investment.— communities to create jobs locally and attract investment. good to see ou and and attract investment. good to see you and thanks _ and attract investment. good to see you and thanks for _ and attract investment. good to see you and thanks for being _ and attract investment. good to see you and thanks for being with - and attract investment. good to see
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you and thanks for being with us. i you and thanks for being with us. so, lots for us all to digester and it makes teddy days for us to get through all of the pages of the budget documents. you get the headlines in the speech we heard from the chancellor yesterday and i will be speaking to him this morning telling us detail about the announcements and why there was not more specific targeted support but he says overall he is hoping he will be able to start cutting taxes later as things start to improve and has also been hailing big economic growth as some of the forecasts are revising the economy upwards but it's worth saying that is coming from a pretty low base, during the pandemic. a lot of work still ahead as we digester the news from the budget, from the chancellor, yesterday. and my musical compliment has now gone. yesterday. and my musical compliment has now gone-— has now gone. thank goodness. all aood. has now gone. thank goodness. all good- thank _ has now gone. thank goodness. all good- thank you — has now gone. thank goodness. all good. thank you very _ has now gone. thank goodness. all good. thank you very much. - no music accompanying carol and she has some very important information to bring. that wave, that front has
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been causing some problems, hasn't it? it has been with us for a couple of days. currently, the met office has two amber weather warnings in force for heavy rain across south—west scotland and also cumbria. an amber weather warning means there is an increased likelihood of disruption or impacts due to the severe weather and it might be flooding or travel interruptions. and it's because of the weather front, a waving front, and it drips a little bit further south and further north but it's been raining fairly consistency in parts of south—west scotland and north—west england in particular and there are an conformed reports that in the lake district there's been an excess of 300 millimetres, in excess of a foot in the last 24 hours and more rain to come today. as you can see some heavy rain moving across central scotland and through wales
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and south—west england. to the south of that we are looking at brighter skies and still a fair bit of cloud at times and to the north of the band of rain, bright across scotland and northern ireland with a few showers. these black circles indicate the strength of the wind gusts, so wherever you are it will be a windy day. it will also be mild with temperatures between 12 and i7 . with temperatures between 12 and 17 . through the evening and overnight the rain continues to fall in similarareas and overnight the rain continues to fall in similar areas and we have a new weather front in similar areas and we have a new weatherfront bringing in similar areas and we have a new weather front bringing more in similar areas and we have a new weatherfront bringing more rain across northern ireland and scotland and with all of this going on in the wind, it's not going to be a cold night. these are the overnight lows, between eight and 14 and normally at this stage in october it would be between five and 7 . tomorrow he was the first band of rain heading east followed in hot pursuit by the second and also heading eastwards, and it will clear up in the west and still a few showers and it's not going to be as windy as it is today.
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temperatures between 11 and 16 , so slipping by a degree or so and as we head into friday and saturday we have a weather front coming in from the west and that will move eastwards in the isobars are more widely spaced, so rather than being windy it will be breezy and there goes the rain moving from east to west and then lingering longest in the far east and then saturday looks like being the driest day of the weekend but although there will be sunshine behind the rain there will be showers, especially in the west but one thing you will notice is the difference in the temperature. the clocks go back on the early hours of sunday morning, bank one hour and on sunday morning, bank one hour and on sunday itself we have a new weather front moving west and takes the rain with it and it's likely to be persistent and the wind will pick up behind this and temperatures between ten and 14 and a lot of wet weather
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forecast for the next few days. don't blame us, blame brian cox who distracted us. says sorry, to carol. i've done that regularly. you distracted us. says sorry, to carol. i've done that regularly.— i've done that regularly. you were 'ust i've done that regularly. you were just saying — i've done that regularly. you were just saying a _ i've done that regularly. you were just saying a moment _ i've done that regularly. you were just saying a moment ago - i've done that regularly. you were just saying a moment ago that - just saying a moment ago that succession, which we will talk more about, which has huge international acclaim has given you a profile that you may be not had before.- you may be not had before. people said, you may be not had before. people said. you. — you may be not had before. people said. you. 0. _ you may be not had before. people said. you. 0. l— you may be not had before. people said, you, o, i know— you may be not had before. people said, you, o, i know you, - you may be not had before. people said, you, o, i know you, and - you may be not had before. people said, you, o, i know you, and now| you may be not had before. people| said, you, o, i know you, and now| have— said, you, o, i know you, and now| have lost— said, you, o, i know you, and now| have lost my— said, you, o, i know you, and now| have lost my anonymity. in practical terms, do have lost my anonymity. in practical terms. do people — have lost my anonymity. in practical terms, do people shout _ have lost my anonymity. in practical terms, do people shout at _ have lost my anonymity. in practical terms, do people shout at you - have lost my anonymity. in practical terms, do people shout at you in . have lost my anonymity. in practical| terms, do people shout at you in the street? , . r' terms, do people shout at you in the street? , . ,~' ., terms, do people shout at you in the street? , . ., ., street? they asked me to say a certain thing. _ street? they asked me to say a certain thing. ok. _ street? they asked me to say a certain thing. ok. we - street? they asked me to say a certain thing. ok. we can't - street? they asked me to say a certain thing. ok. we can't say| certain thing. ok. we can't say here. it reminds _ certain thing. ok. we can't say here. it reminds me _ certain thing. ok. we can't say here. it reminds me of - certain thing. ok. we can't say here. it reminds me of the - certain thing. ok. we can't say - here. it reminds me of the phrase, the careful— here. it reminds me of the phrase, the careful what _ here. it reminds me of the phrase, the careful what you _ here. it reminds me of the phrase, the careful what you wish - here. it reminds me of the phrase, the careful what you wish for. - here. it reminds me of the phrase, the careful what you wish for. i - the careful what you wish for. i don't know about that. you may be right _ don't know about that. you may be riuht. �* . ,., ., ~' don't know about that. you may be riuht. �* . i don't know about that. you may be| right-_ i suppose right. i've read the book. i suppose ou are right. i've read the book. i suppose you are right- _
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right. i've read the book. i suppose you are right- i— right. i've read the book. i suppose you are right. iwill— right. i've read the book. i suppose you are right. i will accept - right. i've read the book. i suppose you are right. i will accept that. - you are right. i will accept that. you _ you are right. i will accept that. you have — you are right. i will accept that. you have written your life story which will talk about in a moment but for those who have not seen succession, we will see a little bit now. i need to talk to the top 12 shareholders in the next 30 minutes. an emergency board meeting, asap, and they will be rolling through until next week7, ok because what you do, imagine most of that is obvious and in train, right7 largely on hand. largely in hand. great. and in terms of cooperation? it's war! good. yeah. but, we throw them this. i will step back as ceo. are you sure? well, obviously on operational matters i will expect to have informal input. you are menacing. yes, apparently. as i said _ you are menacing. yes, apparently. as i said with — you are menacing. yes, apparently. as i said with a book, you said in
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the book, because you seem like an eisner person. i don't know you but you seem a good enough guy, but you say that sometimes it can be distressingly easy to put on logan's skin. and he's such a nasty character and yet you find it very easy to step into it. the character and yet you find it very easy to step into it.— easy to step into it. the rule in actin: is easy to step into it. the rule in acting is that — easy to step into it. the rule in acting is that you _ easy to step into it. the rule in acting is that you never - easy to step into it. the rule in acting is that you neverjudge i easy to step into it. the rule in i acting is that you neverjudge the character — acting is that you neverjudge the character. you present them as he is or his _ character. you present them as he is or his humanity, and everybody goes, what a _ or his humanity, and everybody goes, what a horrible guy, but all he is trying _ what a horrible guy, but all he is trying to— what a horrible guy, but all he is trying to do— what a horrible guy, but all he is trying to do is find a successor for his business. that's all he's trying to do _ his business. that's all he's trying to do he — his business. that's all he's trying to do he is— his business. that's all he's trying to do. he is not particularly 7 he is bruce, — to do. he is not particularly 7 he is bruce, on— to do. he is not particularly 7 he is bruce, on a maniac, a mega maniac, — is bruce, on a maniac, a mega maniac, he _ is bruce, on a maniac, a mega maniac, he is all of those things and probably not very nice 7 he is brisk _ and probably not very nice 7 he is brisk but — and probably not very nice 7 he is brisk. but that is not the way i work — brisk. but that is not the way i work i— brisk. but that is not the way i work ltry— brisk. but that is not the way i work. i try to get in inside the guy and find _ work. i try to get in inside the guy and find out — work. i try to get in inside the guy and find out where he's coming from what is _ and find out where he's coming from what is life _ and find out where he's coming from what is life is about and why he has arrived _ what is life is about and why he has arrived at _ what is life is about and why he has arrived at this point. that is part of the _ arrived at this point. that is part of the art — arrived at this point. that is part of the art as— arrived at this point. that is part of the art as acting. it is arrived at this point. that is part of the art as acting.— of the art as acting. it is the displacement _ of the art as acting. it is the displacement that _ of the art as acting. it is the displacement that you -
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of the art as acting. it is the | displacement that you relate of the art as acting. it is the . displacement that you relate to of the art as acting. it is the - displacement that you relate to with your own childhood. xties. displacement that you relate to with your own childhood.— your own childhood. yes. the irony of this whole _ your own childhood. yes. the irony of this whole thing _ your own childhood. yes. the irony of this whole thing was _ your own childhood. yes. the irony of this whole thing was when - your own childhood. yes. the irony of this whole thing was when we i of this whole thing was when we started — of this whole thing was when we started the show, the character came from ou bec— started the show, the character came from qu bec and when i first was approached i suggest maybe he could have a _ approached i suggest maybe he could have a scottish thing and jesse armstrong said, no, he has to be america — armstrong said, no, he has to be america. , , , armstrong said, no, he has to be america. ,, ~ , ., , ., america. jesse armstrong being a uenius america. jesse armstrong being a genius writer- _ america. jesse armstrong being a genius writer. he _ america. jesse armstrong being a genius writer. he really _ america. jesse armstrong being a genius writer. he really is - america. jesse armstrong being a genius writer. he really is a - genius writer. he really is a uenius. genius writer. he really is a genius- i— genius writer. he really is a genius. i said _ genius writer. he really is a genius. i said fine, - genius writer. he really is a genius. i said fine, that - genius writer. he really is a genius. i said fine, that is l genius writer. he really is a i genius. i said fine, that is ok. genius writer. he really is a - genius. i said fine, that is ok. i played — genius. i said fine, that is ok. i played it— genius. i said fine, that is ok. i played it american and in the first episode _ played it american and in the first episode they said he was born in ou bec, — episode they said he was born in qu bec, canada and i thought, vermont, _ qu bec, canada and i thought, vermont, i_ qu bec, canada and i thought, vermont, i will get away with it. i played _ vermont, i will get away with it. i played it— vermont, i will get away with it. i played it like that. and for nine episodes — played it like that. and for nine episodes i _ played it like that. and for nine episodes i was playing it like that and then— episodes i was playing it like that and then finally frank, the guy who plays— and then finally frank, the guy who plays frank, he was there a minute ago _ plays frank, he was there a minute ago he _ plays frank, he was there a minute ago. he said, they have done sinking session— ago. he said, they have done sinking session and — ago. he said, they have done sinking session and they have changed your birthplace — session and they have changed your birthplace. i said what do you mean? he said. _ birthplace. i said what do you mean?
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he said. you — birthplace. i said what do you mean? he said, you are no longer born in ou bec _ he said, you are no longer born in qu bec. well, where i from? and he looked _ qu bec. well, where i from? and he looked at _ qu bec. well, where i from? and he looked at his — qu bec. well, where i from? and he looked at his device and said i can't — looked at his device and said i can't remember. oh, yes, somewhere dundee. _ can't remember. oh, yes, somewhere dundee, scotland. and i said, but that's— dundee, scotland. and i said, but that's where i'm from. and i sent to jesse. _ that's where i'm from. and i sent to jesse. what — that's where i'm from. and i sent to jesse, what the hell is going on question— jesse, what the hell is going on question and we thought it would be a little _ question and we thought it would be a little surprise. i said it's a hell— a little surprise. i said it's a hell of— a little surprise. i said it's a hell of a _ a little surprise. i said it's a hell of a surprise after nine episodes _ hell of a surprise after nine episodes to find you are born in a different— episodes to find you are born in a different place. he said, you left very early— different place. he said, you left very early and went to canada. there was a _ very early and went to canada. there was a form _ very early and went to canada. there was a form of— very early and went to canada. there was a form of kindle transport at the beginning of the war that people forget _ the beginning of the war that people forget about where kids were sent to tran ? _ forget about where kids were sent to tran ? to _ forget about where kids were sent to tran 7 to canada. 30 forget about where kids were sent to tran ? to canada.— tran ? to canada. so that takes us nicel to tran ? to canada. so that takes us nicely to the _ tran ? to canada. so that takes us nicely to the book _ tran ? to canada. so that takes us nicely to the book andrew - tran ? to canada. so that takes us nicely to the book andrew charter| nicely to the book andrew charter right from the beginning your life 7 and you chart right from the beginning your life. it was challenging, the background you are in and you say in the book there is quite a bit of a death in the book. there is loss along the way. at a there is loss along the way. at a very early _ there is loss along the way. at a very early age. _ there is loss along the way. at a very early age, yes. _ there is loss along the way. at a very early age, yes. you - there is loss along the way. at a very early age, yes. you lost -
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there is loss along the way. at a l very early age, yes. you lost your father. very early age, yes. you lost your father- my _ very early age, yes. you lost your father- my dad — very early age, yes. you lost your father. my dad died _ very early age, yes. you lost your father. my dad died when - very early age, yes. you lost your father. my dad died when i - very early age, yes. you lost your father. my dad died when i was i very early age, yes. you lost your i father. my dad died when i was eight and he was only _ father. my dad died when i was eight and he was only 51. _ father. my dad died when i was eight and he was only 51. he _ father. my dad died when i was eight and he was only 51. he had _ and he was only 51. he had pancreatic cancer and he died within three _ pancreatic cancer and he died within three weeks of his diagnosis and my mother— three weeks of his diagnosis and my mother had — three weeks of his diagnosis and my mother had a series of kind of minor and finally— mother had a series of kind of minor and finally a — mother had a series of kind of minor and finally a major mental breakdown, a nervous breakdown and she had _ breakdown, a nervous breakdown and she had to _ breakdown, a nervous breakdown and she had to go into hospital. she had electric— she had to go into hospital. she had electric shock treatment which was fairly primitive in those days and destroyed — fairly primitive in those days and destroyed a lot of her memory and she went _ destroyed a lot of her memory and she went from being something like iost she went from being something like 10st down _ she went from being something like 10st down tojust she went from being something like 10st down to just 6st. i she went from being something like 10st down tojust 6st. i didn't realise — 10st down tojust 6st. i didn't realise it— 10st down tojust 6st. i didn't realise it because i was eight and i did not— realise it because i was eight and i did not know what was going on. i said, _ did not know what was going on. i said. i_ did not know what was going on. i said, i accepted did not know what was going on. i said, iaccepted it, but my did not know what was going on. i said, i accepted it, but my sister is kind _ said, i accepted it, but my sister is kind of— said, i accepted it, but my sister is kind of looked out for me and i 'ust is kind of looked out for me and i just spent— is kind of looked out for me and i just spent my time going from house to house _ just spent my time going from house to house. but i also developed a fierce _ to house. but i also developed a fierce independence. i learnt to look— fierce independence. i learnt to look after— fierce independence. i learnt to look after myself. if no one else was going — look after myself. if no one else was going to look after me, not that they did. _ was going to look after me, not that they did, but i don't, right i will
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do it— they did, but i don't, right i will do it myself. that is me.- they did, but i don't, right i will| do it myself. that is me.- i do it myself. that is me. cute. i was very — do it myself. that is me. cute. i was very cute- _ do it myself. that is me. cute. i was very cute. that _ do it myself. that is me. cute. i was very cute. that is _ do it myself. that is me. cute. i was very cute. that is me i do it myself. that is me. cute. i was very cute. that is me with l do it myself. that is me. cute. i l was very cute. that is me with the uirls. was very cute. that is me with the girls- with — was very cute. that is me with the girls- with your — was very cute. that is me with the girls. with your sisters. _ was very cute. that is me with the girls. with your sisters. you i was very cute. that is me with the girls. with your sisters. you said l girls. with your sisters. you said you spent a lot of time on your own in the cinema. didn't you fall asleep and your sister went mad? i went to see giant and i woke up at four o'clock — went to see giant and i woke up at four o'clock in the morning in the playhouse — four o'clock in the morning in the playhouse in dundee, one of the larger— playhouse in dundee, one of the larger cinemas, 3,000 seats so i woke _ larger cinemas, 3,000 seats so i woke up— larger cinemas, 3,000 seats so i woke up in— larger cinemas, 3,000 seats so i woke up in this empty cinema and i ranand— woke up in this empty cinema and i ran and broke out of the cinema and i run _ ran and broke out of the cinema and i run along _ ran and broke out of the cinema and i run along the high street in dundee — i run along the high street in dundee and i passed the tardis, you know, _ dundee and i passed the tardis, you know. the _ dundee and i passed the tardis, you know, the police boxes and i heard, where _ know, the police boxes and i heard, where are _ know, the police boxes and i heard, where are you going, young man? i was terrified. he said, are you brian— was terrified. he said, are you brian cox? _ was terrified. he said, are you brian cox? your sister is looking for you _ brian cox? your sister is looking for you and _ brian cox? your sister is looking for you and is extremely angry. you better— for you and is extremely angry. you better get— for you and is extremely angry. you better get home. i said, sorry, 0fficer— better get home. i said, sorry, officer and _ better get home. i said, sorry, officer and i ran off and got home. one of— officer and i ran off and got home. one of the — officer and i ran off and got home. one of the things i love about the book and i'm trying to work out how to say this, but you are quite
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outspoken about fellow actors. i am. i am, sometimes _ outspoken about fellow actors. i am. i am, sometimes but _ outspoken about fellow actors. i am. i am, sometimes but i _ outspoken about fellow actors. i am. i am, sometimes but i balance i outspoken about fellow actors. i am. i am, sometimes but i balance that l i am, sometimes but i balance that by being _ i am, sometimes but i balance that by being equally, i think, outspoken about— by being equally, i think, outspoken about my— by being equally, i think, outspoken about my own inadequacies. i think if you're _ about my own inadequacies. i think if you're going to do a book and there's— if you're going to do a book and there's a — if you're going to do a book and there's a certain amount of criticism, _ there's a certain amount of criticism, up with what happens, people _ criticism, up with what happens, people change. some people behave like certain things at certain times and then— like certain things at certain times and then they grow out of it, so i thought— and then they grow out of it, so i thought if— and then they grow out of it, so i thought if i— and then they grow out of it, so i thought if i do that i have to be equally— thought if i do that i have to be equally hard on myself. it is thought if i do that i have to be equally hard on myself.- equally hard on myself. it is a fantastic who's _ equally hard on myself. it is a fantastic who's who - equally hard on myself. it is a fantastic who's who of i equally hard on myself. it is a fantastic who's who of the i equally hard on myself. it is a i fantastic who's who of the movie industry going back a long way. starting with watching laurence olivier on stage when you were much younger in your career and then we fast forward and you have people like brad pitt. what is the snapshot of someone like brad pitt? what do you make of him? am of someone like brad pitt? what do you make of him?— of someone like brad pitt? what do you make of him? an incredibly nice man. a you make of him? an incredibly nice man- a very — you make of him? an incredibly nice man- a very nice _ you make of him? an incredibly nice man. a very nice man. _ you make of him? an incredibly nice man. a very nice man. his— you make of him? an incredibly nice man. a very nice man. his passion l you make of him? an incredibly nice | man. a very nice man. his passion is architecture — man. a very nice man. his passion is architecture and he's done a hell of architecture and he's done a hell of
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a lot of— architecture and he's done a hell of a lot of work, after the new orleans, _ a lot of work, after the new orleans, what was it, the storm that happened _ orleans, what was it, the storm that happened there and he's done a lot of rebuilding. katrina, that's right — of rebuilding. katrina, that's right he _ of rebuilding. katrina, that's right. he was responsible for a lot of houses — right. he was responsible for a lot of houses there. he's a really interesting guy and quite modest. and i_ interesting guy and quite modest. and i have — interesting guy and quite modest. and i have seen him develop as an actor _ and i have seen him develop as an actor he's— and i have seen him develop as an actor. he's become a really extraordinary actor now. you approach _ extraordinary actor now. you approach the _ extraordinary actor now. you approach the idea _ extraordinary actor now. grit. approach the idea about being disrespectful, pretty people who look good on camera who then become actors, and you refer to brad pitt and kee arnie reeves and you see them develop rather than actors getting the fame 7 keanu read. figs getting the fame 7 keanu read. as blanche dubois says in a streetcar named _ blanche dubois says in a streetcar named desire, you are always depending on the kindness of strangers and that is what happens to actors —
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strangers and that is what happens to actors. they are there to be bought, — to actors. they are there to be bought, sold, and given careers. and the pretty— bought, sold, and given careers. and the pretty ones are in with an advantage, and if they are smart enough — advantage, and if they are smart enough they realise they have to step up— enough they realise they have to step up to — enough they realise they have to step up to the plate and a lot of them _ step up to the plate and a lot of them do — step up to the plate and a lot of them do. it's not their fault, they can't _ them do. it's not their fault, they can't help— them do. it's not their fault, they can't help being good—looking. it's the same — can't help being good—looking. it's the same with actresses, isjust can't help being good—looking. it's the same with actresses, is just the way it— the same with actresses, is just the way it is _ the same with actresses, is just the way it is. and there are actors who have _ way it is. and there are actors who have a _ way it is. and there are actors who have a slow, — way it is. and there are actors who have a slow, gradual emergence. somebody— have a slow, gradual emergence. somebody like gene hackman. you wouldn't _ somebody like gene hackman. you wouldn't call him a pretty actor but he's become one of the finest screen actors _ he's become one of the finest screen actors we _ he's become one of the finest screen actors we know. he's become one of the finest screen actors we know— he's become one of the finest screen actors we know. have you worked with gene hackman? _ actors we know. have you worked with gene hackman? sadly _ actors we know. have you worked with gene hackman? sadly not. _ actors we know. have you worked with gene hackman? sadly not. i— actors we know. have you worked with gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i- gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i had. he gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i had- he is — gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i had. he is one _ gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i had. he is one of— gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i had. he is one of those _ gene hackman? sadly not. i wish i had. he is one of those actors, i had. he is one of those actors, isn't he? _ had. he is one of those actors, isn't he? yeah. _ had. he is one of those actors, isn't he? yeah. there - had. he is one of those actors, isn't he? yeah. there is i had. he is one of those actors, isn't he? yeah. there is a i had. he is one of those actors, isn't he? yeah. there is a lot l had. he is one of those actors, | isn't he? yeah. there is a lot of honesty in _ isn't he? yeah. there is a lot of honesty in the _ isn't he? yeah. there is a lot of honesty in the book— isn't he? yeah. there is a lot of honesty in the book and - isn't he? yeah. there is a lot of honesty in the book and you i isn't he? yeah. there is a lot of. honesty in the book and you talk a lot about yourself and family. and the bits of your life that you think you missed out on, focusing on your career and i get the sense there are quite a few regrets there.—
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career and i get the sense there are quite a few regrets there. yeah. the roblem quite a few regrets there. yeah. the problem was. _ quite a few regrets there. yeah. the problem was. we — quite a few regrets there. yeah. the problem was, we all _ quite a few regrets there. yeah. the problem was, we all are _ quite a few regrets there. yeah. the problem was, we all are children. i quite a few regrets there. yeah. the | problem was, we all are children. we all come _ problem was, we all are children. we all come from parents and our parents — all come from parents and our parents form us, our father and mother, — parents form us, our father and mother, they form us in a way and my father— mother, they form us in a way and my father was— mother, they form us in a way and my father was mythical. he was this extraordinary man and he had this kind of— extraordinary man and he had this kind of mythical quality. i could never _ kind of mythical quality. i could never live — kind of mythical quality. i could never live up to that. so i didn't know— never live up to that. so i didn't know how— never live up to that. so i didn't know how to behave like a father. it was hard _ know how to behave like a father. it was hard for — know how to behave like a father. it was hard for me to behave like a father, _ was hard for me to behave like a father, so— was hard for me to behave like a father, so sometimes my children suffered — father, so sometimes my children suffered. ., ., ., ., , suffered. you have two lovely stories. you've _ suffered. you have two lovely stories. you've only - suffered. you have two lovely stories. you've only been i suffered. you have two lovely| stories. you've only been fired once, is that correct? or you had when he wrote the book. i once, is that correct? or you had when he wrote the book.- when he wrote the book. i think once. when he wrote the book. i think once- you _ when he wrote the book. i think once. you were _ when he wrote the book. i think once. you were doing _ when he wrote the book. i think once. you were doing the i when he wrote the book. i think once. you were doing the voice | when he wrote the book. i think l once. you were doing the voice of aslan. once. you were doing the voice of asian and _ once. you were doing the voice of asian and you — once. you were doing the voice of aslan. and you were _ once. you were doing the voice of aslan. and you were fired - once. you were doing the voice of aslan. and you were fired and i once. you were doing the voice of. aslan. and you were fired and liam neeson took it over.— neeson took it over. much better than i would _ neeson took it over. much better than i would have _ neeson took it over. much better than i would have been. - neeson took it over. much better than i would have been. you i neeson took it over. much better than i would have been. you felt| neeson took it over. much better. than i would have been. you felt it was a divine _ than i would have been. you felt it was a divine retribution _ than i would have been. you felt it was a divine retribution because i was a divine retribution because yourson was a divine retribution because your son was born. yes was a divine retribution because your son was born.— was a divine retribution because your son was born. yes and this was a 'ob, i your son was born. yes and this was a job. i was — your son was born. yes and this was a job. i was being — your son was born. yes and this was ajob, i was being paid _ your son was born. yes and this was a job, i was being paid for— your son was born. yes and this was ajob, i was being paid for it, - a job, i was being paid for it, which —
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a job, i was being paid for it, which was _ a job, i was being paid for it, which was great and it was a voice and i_ which was great and it was a voice and i got — which was great and it was a voice and i got to— which was great and it was a voice and i got to go to new zealand but also my— and i got to go to new zealand but also my wife was heavily pregnant and about — also my wife was heavily pregnant and about to give birth. she was rightly— and about to give birth. she was rightly annoyed with me, terribly annoyed — rightly annoyed with me, terribly annoyed with me for doing it. she was raging. _ annoyed with me for doing it. 61a: was raging, wasn't she? annoyed with me for doing it. she was raging, wasn't she? i - annoyed with me for doing it. she was raging, wasn't she? i was i annoyed with me for doing it. she | was raging, wasn't she? i was able to net was raging, wasn't she? i was able to get back — was raging, wasn't she? i was able to get back to _ was raging, wasn't she? i was able to get back to the _ was raging, wasn't she? i was able to get back to the birth, _ was raging, wasn't she? i was able to get back to the birth, but i i was raging, wasn't she? i was able to get back to the birth, but i get l to get back to the birth, but i get preoccupied in this business, you do, preoccupied in this business, you do. i_ preoccupied in this business, you do. i go — preoccupied in this business, you do. i go off— preoccupied in this business, you do, i go off into dreamland and i sometimes i have this problem of being _ sometimes i have this problem of being absent, that i'm not present enough _ being absent, that i'm not present enough. and i think it is a defence mechanism — enough. and i think it is a defence mechanism. when writing the book i realised _ mechanism. when writing the book i realised it's — mechanism. when writing the book i realised it's a defence mechanism from _ realised it's a defence mechanism from childhood that made me just say, from childhood that made me just say. i— from childhood that made me just say, i can't — from childhood that made me just say, i can't deal with this, so i say, ican't deal with this, so i shall— say, i can't deal with this, so i shall absent myself.— say, i can't deal with this, so i shall absent myself. have you worked on that? yes- — shall absent myself. have you worked on that? yes. i'm _ shall absent myself. have you worked on that? yes. i'm getting _ shall absent myself. have you worked on that? yes. i'm getting better- shall absent myself. have you worked on that? yes. i'm getting better at i on that? yes. i'm getting better at it but we had _ on that? yes. i'm getting better at it but we had a _ on that? yes. i'm getting better at it but we had a tragedy _ on that? yes. i'm getting better at it but we had a tragedyjust - it but we had a tragedyjust recently _ it but we had a tragedyjust recently. my father—in—law passed away _ recently. my father—in—law passed away last — recently. my father—in—law passed away last weekend. i�*m recently. my father-in-law passed
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away last weekend.— recently. my father-in-law passed away last weekend._ he | recently. my father-in-law passed i away last weekend._ he was away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was a wonderful— away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was a wonderful man _ away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was a wonderful man and _ away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was a wonderful man and i _ away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was a wonderful man and i adored - away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was a wonderful man and i adored him i away last weekend. i'm sorry. he was| a wonderful man and i adored him and i said _ a wonderful man and i adored him and i said goodbye to him and we sang together— i said goodbye to him and we sang together on zoom, and my wife, when she came _ together on zoom, and my wife, when she came into london for a brief time _ she came into london for a brief time and — she came into london for a brief time and i've got to go to the funeral— time and i've got to go to the funeral tomorrow, and she came in and i_ funeral tomorrow, and she came in and i didn't— funeral tomorrow, and she came in and i didn't quite 7 she said, are you going— and i didn't quite 7 she said, are you going to— and i didn't quite 7 she said, are you going to give me a hug? and i said, _ you going to give me a hug? and i said. oh. — you going to give me a hug? and i said, oh, yeah, but i was kind of poll— said, oh, yeah, but i was kind of poll axed — said, oh, yeah, but i was kind of poll axed for a minute. it'sjust one of— poll axed for a minute. it'sjust one of those things that happens. i thought. _ one of those things that happens. i thought, of course, and then it was fine _ thought, of course, and then it was fine. . ., i. thought, of course, and then it was fine. . ., y., , ., thought, of course, and then it was fine. . . ,. , ., ., fine. can i ask you question what ou said fine. can i ask you question what you said you _ fine. can i ask you question what you said you were _ fine. can i ask you question what you said you were singing. i fine. can i ask you question what you said you were singing. a - fine. can i ask you question what you said you were singing. a lot| fine. can i ask you question what i you said you were singing. a lot of people have suffered loss, and it's one of those things we are talking about a bit. did you say you sang? it was on face time, and he was such a wonderful— it was on face time, and he was such a wonderful man, he was a my father—in—law and so long, it's been good _ father—in—law and so long, it's been good to—
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father—in—law and so long, it's been good to know ? he was a rainy and. just amazing and this was my last memory— just amazing and this was my last memory of— just amazing and this was my last memory of him and it was a beautiful memory— memory of him and it was a beautiful memory and — memory of him and it was a beautiful memory and i said to my wife, can you come — memory and i said to my wife, can you come back, she said stay away, she didn't _ you come back, she said stay away, she didn't say come back because i had all_ she didn't say come back because i had all these junkets but i cancelled their mum was prepared, she said. _ cancelled their mum was prepared, she said, no, stay and also you have had your— she said, no, stay and also you have had your goodbye, which was great. did you _ had your goodbye, which was great. did you sing that knowing you were saying goodbye? yes. did you sing that knowing you were saying goodbye?— did you sing that knowing you were saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you _ saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you can _ saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you can do _ saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you can do in _ saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you can do in life - saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you can do in life is - saying goodbye? yes. yes. and it's the least you can do in life is to - the least you can do in life is to be positive, especially at the end of it _ be positive, especially at the end of it. . , , ' of it. on a slightly different theme, of it. on a slightly different theme. i — of it. on a slightly different theme, ijust _ of it. on a slightly different theme, i just wanted - of it. on a slightly different theme, i just wanted to - of it. on a slightly different| theme, ijust wanted to ask of it. on a slightly different - theme, i just wanted to ask you about alec baldwin. it is theme, i just wanted to ask you about alec baldwin. it is terrible. you have worked _ about alec baldwin. it is terrible. you have worked on _ about alec baldwin. it is terrible. you have worked on many, - about alec baldwin. it is terrible. you have worked on many, manyj about alec baldwin. it is terrible. - you have worked on many, many film sets and you will have an insight that a lot of people don't have. you will have looked at it, i'm sure and we will be careful around what we say. still subject to investigation,
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but what are your thoughts around that? , but what are your thoughts around that? . ., , ., that? the thing is it was a low-budget _ that? the thing is it was a low-budget film, - that? the thing is it was a low-budget film, so - that? the thing is it was a low-budget film, so it - that? the thing is it was a | low-budget film, so it was that? the thing is it was a - low-budget film, so it was probably low—budget film, so it was probably low—budget film, so it was probably low staff _ low—budget film, so it was probably low staff i— low—budget film, so it was probably low staff. i know they had problems with the _ low staff. i know they had problems with the staff. some of the staff went _ with the staff. some of the staff went off — with the staff. some of the staff went off and left and they brought in a lot— went off and left and they brought in a lot of— went off and left and they brought in a lot of non— union people. not on that side, _ in a lot of non— union people. not on that side, not on the armouries side, _ on that side, not on the armouries side, but _ on that side, not on the armouries side, but there was something that went on_ side, but there was something that went on with that gone and i don't know_ went on with that gone and i don't know what— went on with that gone and i don't know what it was. i have been told what _ know what it was. i have been told what it _ know what it was. i have been told what it was — know what it was. i have been told what it was but i can't tell you what — what it was but i can't tell you what it — what it was but i can't tell you what it was but i can't tell you what it was here. i will tell you afterwards. but they are so particular about weapons. they do that, _ particular about weapons. they do that, they— particular about weapons. they do that, they open it, they handed you. the armourers are excellent. i've never _ the armourers are excellent. i've never had — the armourers are excellent. i've never had excellent and i've fired a lot of— never had excellent and i've fired a lot of guns— never had excellent and i've fired a lot of guns in my time and never had a problem _ lot of guns in my time and never had a problem but this was unbelievable. unbelievable and alec, who was a friend. _ unbelievable and alec, who was a friend. i_ unbelievable and alec, who was a friend, ijust can't imagine what it has done — friend, ijust can't imagine what it has done to— friend, ijust can't imagine what it has done to him. he is 68 and in the
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last ten— has done to him. he is 68 and in the last ten years he's got five kids which _ last ten years he's got five kids which was _ last ten years he's got five kids which was a whole new life for him, late in— which was a whole new life for him, late in life _ which was a whole new life for him, late in life and ijust feel terrible _ late in life and ijust feel terrible for him. and, of course, i feel awful— terrible for him. and, of course, i feel awful for that poor girl. it�*s feel awful for that poor girl. it's been feel awful for that poor girl. it�*s been interesting getting your thoughts. we spoke about so much and it's been a realjoy talking to you. and you too. brian cox's autobiography 'putting the rabbit in the hat�* i will be quick about it. i was out with— i will be quick about it. i was out with albert — i will be quick about it. i was out with albert finney and he said, lads, _ with albert finney and he said, lads, just— with albert finney and he said, lads, just get the rabbit out the hat _ lads, just get the rabbit out the hat and — lads, just get the rabbit out the hat and a _ lads, just get the rabbit out the hat. and a friend of mine who was on the show. _ hat. and a friend of mine who was on the show, said we've got to get the rabhit— the show, said we've got to get the rabbit into — the show, said we've got to get the rabbit into the hat.— rabbit into the hat. that's why it's called that- _ rabbit into the hat. that's why it's called that. and _ rabbit into the hat. that's why it's called that. and that _ rabbit into the hat. that's why it's called that. and that was - rabbit into the hat. that's why it's called that. and that was just - rabbit into the hat. that's why it's called that. and that wasjust one called that. and that was just one name drop.
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this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones with the latest headlines at nine. after yesterday's budget a leading think—tank is warning that households could see their tax rise by several thousand pounds over the next five years. labour warns more needs to be done to help ordinary people, but the chancellor says things are improving. yes, we are doing this to support domestic aviation and regional airports who will benefit for this, but we're also introducing a brand—new band for ultra long—haul travel, so you're right — those who fly the farthest will pay the highest rate of apd. so we can face the future with a bit more _ so we can face the future with a bit more confidence.— more confidence. that would have been my priority _ more confidence. that would have been my priority as _ more confidence. that would have been my priority as chancellor, i more confidence. that would have been my priority as chancellor, to | been my priority as chancellor, to help you with living costs, not give
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a tax cut to bankers or indeed to reduce air passenger duty

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