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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 27, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines... police in the us state of new mexico say it's too early to say whether they will bring charges in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer on a film set last week. halyna hutchins was killed when the hollywood actor alec baldwin accidentally shot her. boost business, and help the economy emerge from the government pandemic. of the opposition accused the government of having no plan to deal with the rising cost of living. new details have emerged about afghanistan's former president's afg hanistan�*s former president's claimed afghanistan's former president's claimed he had to flee in august has been rejected by his own former chief of staff. and australian soccer starjosh cavallo has become the only top level male professional player to come out as gay.
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technically it is still budget data format, so that's what we will focus on in the papers. with me are polly mackenzie, chief executive of the think tank demos, and tom newton dunn, who's chief political commentator at times radio. there's only one story in town, the budget. the ft�*s headline, rishi sunak promises a post—>> kevin: age of optimism. the yorkshire post receives... the metro shows a picture of the chancellor and prime minister, and points, the biggest tax cut for 50 years. the ice as the chancellor is taking the tax burden back to the 1950s. —— the
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eye. the guardian reports that rishi sunak plans to cut taxes before the next general election after limiting his budget helped to deal with a crisis. the telegraph says the chancellor has taken spending to its highest levels since the 1970s. there's also a warning about households facing a squeeze from inflation and flat wages. the mere�*s headline is champagne for rich, as the cost of living is set to soar. the times mentions an extra £150 billion republic services and 2 million households to recover from the fallen universal credit. i wonder where we are. let's go to the daily telegraph which to begin with paraphrases shirley bassi. "hey big spenders." paraphrases shirley bassi. "hey big senders." , ., .,
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paraphrases shirley bassi. "hey big senders.“ , . ., ., spenders." there is a headline on the telegraph _ spenders." there is a headline on the telegraph which _ spenders." there is a headline on the telegraph which is _ spenders." there is a headline on the telegraph which is my - spenders." there is a headline on i the telegraph which is my favourite, you can see it, the tories nightmare conversion to brown is and can only end in catastrophe. the telegraph basically aren't very happy by this. high spending, high taxes, high borrowing. what's to like if you're a centre—right newspaper editor? this is not a tory budget, i think it's very clearfrom this is not a tory budget, i think it's very clear from pretty much the first few sentences when the chancellor announced a huge amount of extra public spending by a sizeable chunk, 10—15% once we crunched all the numbers. he also said he wanted to shrink the size. there's quite a ring of making it virtuous, but not yet.— there's quite a ring of making it virtuous, but not yet. what's going on? the conservatives _ virtuous, but not yet. what's going on? the conservatives are - virtuous, but not yet. what's going on? the conservatives are trying . virtuous, but not yet. what's going | on? the conservatives are trying to navi . ate on? the conservatives are trying to navigate this _ on? the conservatives are trying to navigate this fundamental - on? the conservatives are trying to navigate this fundamental dilemma about_ navigate this fundamental dilemma about what kind of party they want
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to he _ about what kind of party they want to be. margaret thatcher was a small state deregulating prime minister, and a _ state deregulating prime minister, and a lot_ state deregulating prime minister, and a lot of people still in the conservative party idealise that as a sort _ conservative party idealise that as a sort of _ conservative party idealise that as a sort of ideological vision of conservatism. but actually, overthe conservatives's 200 year history as the most _ conservatives's 200 year history as the most successful political party of the _ the most successful political party of the world, most times they've not been the _ of the world, most times they've not been the ideological winners, they've — been the ideological winners, they've been fair weather friends of political _ they've been fair weather friends of political trends and done what is needed — political trends and done what is needed to hold onto power. and at the moment, what's needed is to hold onto that _ the moment, what's needed is to hold onto that electoral coalition boris johnson _ onto that electoral coalition boris johnson put together in 2019, bringing — johnson put together in 2019, bringing traditional conservatives together— bringing traditional conservatives together with disenfranchised left behind _ together with disenfranchised left behind voters in the midlands in the north, _ behind voters in the midlands in the north, that — behind voters in the midlands in the north, that former redwall who want a different— north, that former redwall who want a different kind of britain. because of brexit. — a different kind of britain. because of brexit, they've been brought out of brexit, they've been brought out of the _ of brexit, they've been brought out of the labour folder, what they want is big _
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of the labour folder, what they want is big spending — and that's what boris _ is big spending — and that's what borisjohnson wants to is big spending — and that's what boris johnson wants to give them, and sunak— boris johnson wants to give them, and sunak has delivered for his prime — and sunak has delivered for his prime minister. precisely what boris johnson _ prime minister. precisely what boris johnson has promised, which isjust bucket— johnson has promised, which isjust bucket loads of money. but he wasn't uncomfortable. he's talked about as a gonion— uncomfortable. he's talked about as a gordon brown character, and he reminded — a gordon brown character, and he reminded me of gordon brown, doling out pots— reminded me of gordon brown, doling out pots of— reminded me of gordon brown, doling out pots of cash. but gordon brown was sort _ out pots of cash. but gordon brown was sort of— out pots of cash. but gordon brown was sort of awkward and that was his managen _ was sort of awkward and that was his manager. sunak seemed to love handing — manager. sunak seemed to love handing out these pots of money. at one point— handing out these pots of money. at one point he might mention teesside and pointed up to his colleague who was pointing over to rachel reeves on the _ was pointing over to rachel reeves on the opposite benches when he mounts _ on the opposite benches when he mounts democrat announced money for her constituency. he didn't seem like a _ her constituency. he didn't seem like a guy— her constituency. he didn't seem like a guy who didn't want to be spending — like a guy who didn't want to be spending his money, even though at the end _ spending his money, even though at the end he _ spending his money, even though at the end he said, "oh by the way, i'll the end he said, "oh by the way, i'll ahsently — the end he said, "oh by the way, i'll absently cut taxes and reduce the size — i'll absently cut taxes and reduce the size of— i'll absently cut taxes and reduce the size of the state at some point later once — the size of the state at some point later once morality kicks in." {cf later once morality kicks in." ccp in ower
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later once morality kicks in." ccp in power since — later once morality kicks in." (iii in power since 1949, later once morality kicks in." (1(1i in power since 1949, they may have that title of most successful political party of all time, as you quoted, and its site. let's look at reality on the daily telegraph. "households face big squeeze from inflation and stagnant wages." there was action on — inflation and stagnant wages." there was action on universal— inflation and stagnant wages." there was action on universal credit, - inflation and stagnant wages." there was action on universal credit, for i was action on universal credit, for the lowest earners to keep eight more pants in the pound. that'll help some. that will help others, as well, others on the lowest of wages. but for the vast majority of everybody else, there really wasn't much help for the cost of living at all. feel dirty was frozen but not decreased, and i think it's a bit of a bet from the prime minister, looking at what is undoubtedly a
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cost—of—living crisis. some of it imposed by him and the prime minister and their tax rises. the bet certainly has to be, this crisis will have to go away a little bit at least so people are feeling less anxious and keeping all their money. at the moment we aren't spending. as we were discussing earlier, if people are getting quite angry about this cost—of—living crisis and mps here they are packing their bags, chancellors will have to do my democratics budget which comes in six months�* time, in march, and we are looking forward to already. then they will have to slash the cash on helping people with income tax, and such. , ., .,, helping people with income tax, and such. ,, such. the times also has spending in the headline. — such. the times also has spending in the headline, sunak's_ such. the times also has spending in the headline, sunak's spending - such. the times also has spending in | the headline, sunak's spending spree the headline, sunak�*s spending spree there. polly, how significant is it
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to universal credit? it�*s there. polly, how significant is it to universal credit?— to universal credit? it's very. he held on _ to universal credit? it's very. he held on to— to universal credit? it's very. he held on to keep _ to universal credit? it's very. he held on to keep the - to universal credit? it's very. he held on to keep the £20 - to universal credit? it's very. he| held on to keep the £20 rise. hes— held on to keep the £20 rise. he's not— held on to keep the £20 rise. he's not spending as much money as he saved _ he's not spending as much money as he saved from abolishing that £20 uplift, _ he saved from abolishing that £20 uplift, but — he saved from abolishing that £20 uplift, but he is spending quite a lot of— uplift, but he is spending quite a lot of money on two significant reforms — lot of money on two significant reforms - _ lot of money on two significant reforms — allowing people to keep £5 more _ reforms — allowing people to keep £5 more in _ reforms — allowing people to keep £5 more in work allowances before they lose any— more in work allowances before they lose any of— more in work allowances before they lose any of their benefits, which is a reat— lose any of their benefits, which is a real incentive for people to work, and also _ a real incentive for people to work, and also as— a real incentive for people to work, and also as tom said, reducing the amount— and also as tom said, reducing the amount of— and also as tom said, reducing the amount of benefits tapered away for every _ amount of benefits tapered away for every pound you earn. but that doesn't — every pound you earn. but that doesn't necessarily help with the cost—of—living crisis because, of course, — cost—of—living crisis because, of course, not _ cost—of—living crisis because, of course, not everybody is working. there _ course, not everybody is working. there is _ course, not everybody is working. there is a — course, not everybody is working. there is a huge chunk of people who aren't— there is a huge chunk of people who aren't expected to work because they have caring _ aren't expected to work because they have caring responsibilities, disabled children — all because they themselves have a health condition,
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maybe _ themselves have a health condition, maybe they are waiting for elective treatment— maybe they are waiting for elective treatment from the nhs with some of the biggest backlogs in the nhs's history~ _ the biggest backlogs in the nhs's history. so it's not as simple as saying. — history. so it's not as simple as saying. as _ history. so it's not as simple as saying, as they've tried to, everything will be fine because we are putting up wages and everyone can work — are putting up wages and everyone can work. there are lots of people of working — can work. there are lots of people of working age who can't work whom the government don't expect to work - and _ the government don't expect to work - and those — the government don't expect to work — and those people have votes too, as do— — and those people have votes too, as do pensioners who don't work and aren't— as do pensioners who don't work and aren't affected by these changes. and if— aren't affected by these changes. and if that inflation — which economic— and if that inflation — which economic forecasters are debating — the general— economic forecasters are debating — the general consensus of this inflation _ the general consensus of this inflation purrs we're going through at the _ inflation purrs we're going through at the moment will be temporary. but we are _ at the moment will be temporary. but we are all— at the moment will be temporary. but we are alljust keeping our fingers crossed _ we are alljust keeping our fingers crossed because if it doesn't come back in_ crossed because if it doesn't come back in the — crossed because if it doesn't come back in the mid part of next year, as the _ back in the mid part of next year, as the supply chain chaos post pandemic— as the supply chain chaos post pandemic works itself out, then we are in_ pandemic works itself out, then we are in an _ pandemic works itself out, then we are in an entirely different situation and everything about the forecasts— situation and everything about the forecasts will have to be rethought.
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there's _ forecasts will have to be rethought. there's a _ forecasts will have to be rethought. there's a real danger that government policy may have to change quite dramatically, including on interest— quite dramatically, including on interest rates in order to get inflation _ interest rates in order to get inflation back under control. shirley— inflation back under control. shirley bassi also channelled here. "big spenders sunak takes tax burden back to the 1960s." "green groups... with the un climate summit in glasgow only days away. supposedly people will fly to glasgow and not go by train, because it�*s cheaper? i go by train, because it's cheaper? i think we have to wait for april for this to kick in. fair think we have to wait for april for this to kick in.— this to kick in. fair enough. you would be _ this to kick in. fair enough. you would be mistaken _ this to kick in. fair enough. you would be mistaken for - this to kick in. fair enough. you would be mistaken for thinking | this to kick in. fair enough. you i would be mistaken for thinking this was a budget that wasn�*t just five days away from the biggest climate change summit of all time, with 130 world leaders all arriving from everywhere else. that�*s to encourage internal business, but it did go up,
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to be fair to the chancellor, for very long haulflights. but fuel duty was frozen, that is the biggest green tax you could impose, he decided not to because of the political calculation that with petrol at an all—time high, you simple he cannot pay democrats people to pay even more debate —— for that. people to pay even more debate —— forthat. every people to pay even more debate —— for that. every government in the world, if it wants to move away from a carbon economy onto a low carbon economy, it will be expected to be difficult. in it takes clinical courage — that simply wasn�*t there in this budget. the government has announced a lot of green investment, lots of hope but lots of little mum —— lots democrat little money behind it. -- lots democrat little money behind it. , ., , -- lots democrat little money behind it. , ., ., it
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it. this was not a green start? it wasn't. sunak— it. this was not a green start? it wasn't, sunak didn't _ it. this was not a green start? it wasn't, sunak didn't even - it. this was not a green start? it l wasn't, sunak didn't even mention climate _ wasn't, sunak didn't even mention climate change. and that is concerning, it is a shock that we risk in _ concerning, it is a shock that we risk in our— concerning, it is a shock that we risk in our economy that would absolutely blow the pandemic and its scarring _ absolutely blow the pandemic and its scarring effects out of the water. if scarring effects out of the water. if we _ scarring effects out of the water. if we allow — scarring effects out of the water. if we allow climate change to run away _ if we allow climate change to run away out — if we allow climate change to run away out of control, it's not about the costs — away out of control, it's not about the costs of— away out of control, it's not about the costs of preventing it now — the costs _ the costs of preventing it now — the costs of— the costs of preventing it now — the costs of dealing with it if it happened would be so much greater. in happened would be so much greater. in this _ happened would be so much greater. in this was _ happened would be so much greater. in this was the crucial decade, the crucial— in this was the crucial decade, the crucial week for sorting out international policy for the next decade — international policy for the next decade. so this really was a missed opportunity, i think, decade. so this really was a missed opportunity, ithink, for decade. so this really was a missed opportunity, i think, for rishi sunak— opportunity, i think, for rishi sunak to _ opportunity, i think, for rishi sunak to prove he can be a green chancellon — sunak to prove he can be a green chancellor. there wasn't talk of greening — chancellor. there wasn't talk of greening the tax revenue, changing how we _ greening the tax revenue, changing how we price our roads, how we move to electric— how we price our roads, how we move to electric vehicles. there has been
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a lot of— to electric vehicles. there has been a lot of announcements in recent weeks _ a lot of announcements in recent weeks around transition spending, the heating building strategy, for example — the heating building strategy, for example. nevertheless to go through an entire _ example. nevertheless to go through an entire budget in the week of cop 26 without— an entire budget in the week of cop 26 without mentioning climate change - ithink— 26 without mentioning climate change — i think that is worrying, for anybody— — i think that is worrying, for anybody who cares about actually trying _ anybody who cares about actually trying to — anybody who cares about actually trying to prevent that crisis perhaps _ trying to prevent that crisis perhaps dust from happening. "sunak toes on perhaps dust from happening. "sunak goes on spending _ perhaps dust from happening. "sunak goes on spending spree" _ perhaps dust from happening. "sunak goes on spending spree" - _ perhaps dust from happening. "sunak goes on spending spree" - yorkshire | goes on spending spree" — yorkshire to get £200 million share from the government�*s levelling up fund. tom, you�*re quite good at monitoring what i say, you notice the correction on yours? i say, you notice the correction on ours? , , , ' yours? this is the first £1.7 billion from _ yours? this is the first £1.7 billion from the _ yours? this is the first £1.7| billion from the chancellor's yours? this is the first £1.7 - billion from the chancellor's £5 billion from the chancellor�*s £5 billion from the chancellor�*s £5 billion levelling up fund, the money he was allocating today. it was like a machine gun spring money all
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around the chamber, a lot of those backbenchers behind him cheering him on whatever their constituency popped up. a lot went to redwall seats, about three different projects going to stoke seats, stoke—on—trent which the tories won all three chairs. it�*s pork barrel politics, but if all politics is local and you get papers like the yorkshire post heavy on their front page, tonnes of money coming to yorkshire? that works. this is disgraceful bribery of the electorate — the electorate were saying, look, just over the boundary, that�*s red car, they are getting kinds of money because we don�*t they have a tory mp. we want that money. there�*s lots of money for the transport infrastructure network in the midwest before. no new money, a lot of this is money
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that we knew was coming, it�*s just allocation day, or name check today as tory mps would prefer to call it. let�*s look at the mirror, which sees things differently as you�*d expect from a left—leaning paper. the banker�*s mirror, "champagne for rich, real pain for poor." is that the right way to see it? the mirror is drawin: the right way to see it? the mirror is drawing attention _ the right way to see it? the mirror is drawing attention to _ the right way to see it? the mirror is drawing attention to a _ the right way to see it? the mirror is drawing attention to a reformed | is drawing attention to a reformed alcohol— is drawing attention to a reformed alcohol duty, which includes a cut to the _ alcohol duty, which includes a cut to the tax— alcohol duty, which includes a cut to the tax on sparkling wine. george osborne _ to the tax on sparkling wine. george osborne invented this tactic, as tom was talking _ osborne invented this tactic, as tom was talking about earlier, of tiny little _ was talking about earlier, of tiny little cuts — was talking about earlier, of tiny little cuts to beer duty got everyone talking about beer, great politics. _ everyone talking about beer, great politics, massive amounts of attention _ politics, massive amounts of attention for really very small amounts _ attention for really very small amounts of spending. the danger of them _ amounts of spending. the danger of them bringing sparkling wine into is you do— them bringing sparkling wine into is you do open yourself to this dashed up you do open yourself to this dashed up to— you do open yourself to this dashed up to this _ you do open yourself to this dashed up to this more complex medical attack~ _ up to this more complex medical attack. and as we've been talking about, _ attack. and as we've been talking about, wages will still be stagnant
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for 20 _ about, wages will still be stagnant for 20 years, lots of the cost of living is — for 20 years, lots of the cost of living is continuing to go up, we still have — living is continuing to go up, we still have run away house price inflation — still have run away house price inflation which is pushing up the cost of— inflation which is pushing up the cost of decent homes for people, energy— cost of decent homes for people, energy bills, council tax going up 3%, energy bills, council tax going up 3%' which— energy bills, council tax going up 3%, which affects the poorest the most _ 3%, which affects the poorest the most it's— 3%, which affects the poorest the most it's a — 3%, which affects the poorest the most. it's a reasonable criticism that the — most. it's a reasonable criticism that the mirror is making here, and ithink— that the mirror is making here, and i think the — that the mirror is making here, and i think the question is whether that handing out big wads of cash for infrastructure that thomas was talking — infrastructure that thomas was talking about in yorkshire— is that what _ talking about in yorkshire— is that what really — talking about in yorkshire— is that what really lands with those voters? 0r what really lands with those voters? or is it _ what really lands with those voters? or is it that — what really lands with those voters? or is it that sense that it's, you know. — or is it that sense that it's, you know. cash— or is it that sense that it's, you know, cash for champagne, for boris johnson _ know, cash for champagne, for boris johnson and — know, cash for champagne, for boris johnson and his friends whilst individual people suffer? in the gamble — individual people suffer? in the gamble is whether that cost—of—living pinches with people in a sustained manner. if it does, then— in a sustained manner. if it does, then this — in a sustained manner. if it does, then this attack will start to feel very real— then this attack will start to feel very real for people.—
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very real for people. tom's rule about small _ very real for people. tom's rule about small drops _ very real for people. tom's rule about small drops of _ very real for people. tom's rule about small drops of alcohol. very real for people. tom's rule - about small drops of alcohol savings getting large amounts of press coverage is illustrated on ourfinal paper. the metro, borisjohnson and rishi sunak in a brewery in southeast london. "cheers, richie" — beer and champagne will probably be cheaper, madeira, portand beer and champagne will probably be cheaper, madeira, port and other fortified spirits will be more expensive. if you drink madeira, will you be sipping it to save your supply? i will you be sipping it to save your su -l ? ., �* ~' will you be sipping it to save your su--l? .,�* ~ ., will you be sipping it to save your su--l? ~ ., �* supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm sor , supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm sorry. i'm — supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm sorry. i'm a _ supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm sorry, i'm a humble _ supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm sorry, i'm a humble beer- supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm sorry, i'm a humble beer drinkers| supply? i don't drink madeira, i'm i sorry, i'm a humble beer drinkers on sorry, i�*m a humble beer drinkers on celebrating with three pants off the draught. i subscribe with polly on press echo, it�*s pretty widely drunk these days, you can include champagne and that. but it will be a slightly popular cop. or has gone up the most of all of that by £1.09,
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and that probably isn�*t yet a drink of the ordinary bloke. but this is clever politics, it�*s cheap politics. there�*s actually a tax cut here that overall, the amount of takings that the treasury is taking on alcohol goes down a bit. but look at the publicity — the chancellor throws fuel duty, at £7 billion doing it, spending may be a couple hundred million reducing alcohol duty — but where�*s the fuel duty right up? it�*s a few paragraphs in. everybody has their favourite drink, everybody probably buys it if not everybody probably buys it if not every day, every other day. certainly journalists every day, every other day. certainlyjournalists might be certainly journalists might be taken. certainlyjournalists might be taken. everyone knows the costs will be down to a few pants. it�*s quite a good reform because it irons out all
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these ridiculous anomalies on the basis of booze, and if it�*s strong it�*ll cost you more in taxes. you it'll cost you more in taxes. you aet it'll cost you more in taxes. you net the it'll cost you more in taxes. you get the final _ it'll cost you more in taxes. you get the final word, _ it'll cost you more in taxes. you get the final word, back to tom — is press echo of the drink of the people, yes or no? if it is not, what is? i people, yes or no? if it is not, what is?— people, yes or no? if it is not, whatis? .,�* ~ ., , , what is? i don't know, probably cost of coffee. what is? i don't know, probably cost of coffee- just _ what is? i don't know, probably cost of coffee. just cost _ what is? i don't know, probably cost of coffee. just cost a _ what is? i don't know, probably cost of coffee. just cost a coffee. - what is? i don't know, probably cost of coffee. just cost a coffee. very i of coffee. just cost a coffee. very middle-class. — of coffee. just cost a coffee. very middle-class, polly. _ of coffee. just cost a coffee. very middle-class, polly. everybody. of coffee. just cost a coffee. veryj middle-class, polly. everybody is middle-class— middle-class, polly. everybody is middle-class these _ middle-class, polly. everybody is middle-class these days - middle-class, polly. everybody is middle-class these days and - middle-class, polly. everybody is| middle-class these days and their middle—class these days and their beverage — middle—class these days and their beverage choices. middle-class these days and their beverage choices.— middle-class these days and their beverage choices. thank you both so much. beverage choices. thank you both so much- that's — beverage choices. thank you both so much. that's it _ beverage choices. thank you both so much. that's it for _ beverage choices. thank you both so much. that's it for the _ beverage choices. thank you both so much. that's it for the papers - beverage choices. thank you both so much. that's it for the papers this i much. that�*s it for the papers this hour. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with lukwesa burak presenting, the reviewers will be liam thorpe and kate proctor. do join them all if you can. but for now, good night.
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breaking news to give you: barcelona football club has announced this evening that he has set democrats sacked its head coach following a 1-0 sacked its head coach following a 1—0 defeat in all of la liga. now here�*s the rest of your sport. hello, i�*m marc edwards with your sport. defending champions manchester city have been knocked out of the league cup. they were beaten by west ham 5—3 on penalties, after the match finished goalless after 90 minutes at the london stadium. despite starring for city this season, it was phil foden who put his side on the back foot in the shoot—out, blazing the visitors�* first spot kick wide. west ham were flawless with their penalties, and it was said benrahma who sent the hammers into the quarterfinals. breaking city�*s grip on the league cup, which they�*ve won the last four additions and six of the last eight. and joining the hammers, fielding a much—changed side from the one which thrashed
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manchester united in the league last sunday, liverpool are also through to the quarters after winning at preston. takumi minamino gave them the lead just after the hour mark. they made the game safe late on when divock origi produced a brilliant improvised finish. really worth seeing that again — amazing piece of skill. now a quick look at the night�*s other results. last season�*s runners—up spurs won 1—0 at burnley, leicester beat brighton on penalties, while brentford 2—1winners at stoke. there was a minute�*s silence at all the matches at the scottish premiership this evening as a tribute to former rangers and scotland manager walter smith, who passed away yesterday. celtic are nowjust two points behind rangers at the top of the table after beating hibs 3—1, while rangers could only draw 2—2 with aberdeen at emotionally—charged ibrox. elsewhere, quite a win for bottom—side ross county at dundee, winning 5—0. the games between livingston, dundee united, motherwell, st mirren, stjohnston and hearts
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were all draws. england�*s perfect start to the t20 world cup continues after they thrashed bangladesh by eight wickets in abu dhabi. jason roy top—scored with 61 as england chased down their target of 125 with ease. here�*s our sports correspondentjoe wilson. the act of taking the knee has come under renewed scrutiny at this world cup. here�*s what we saw from abu dhabi when wednesday�*s play began. this was the very first time england and bangladesh had met in a t20 international — the cricket format constructed for big shots. rash—hitting can kind of be contagious. the catchers were catching, 2—2 balls. the score was stalling — check your phones. not enough. but bangladesh fans bring huge enthusiasm — and always a tiger. now that�*s the batting they came for, that�*s the spirit they dress for. but in this game of cat—and—mouse, it was bangladesh who were caught again. and gone. score 124, and the game was already
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gone against this england team. jason roy improvises and executed over the ground for 61. england were home in the 15th over. so far, two wins, no doubts. as a cricketer, you always have some horrid, dark thoughts in your mind before the game. "what if this can happen, this can happen?" you have to remind yourself that your training has been so good. so ijust have to keep reminding myself to do what i do in training, and things will be all right. now that is the flag of namibia, and this bowler is ruben trumpleman. a name to haunt scottish cricket — he took three wickets before scotland had scored three runs in the evening game. namibia, the absolute outsiders in this world cup, were left needing 110 to win. the chance of a lifetime — and they took it. joe wilson, bbc news. so another diappointing result for the scots, but their captain is remaining philosophical.
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i think we just need a bit of time to reflect on that, which we will do as a group and we'll look to see where we can improve. there's probably a couple areas. obviously being a few wickets down early doesn't make things easy. we don't have to keep searching too much, which is have to being clear with our game plans. to tennis — and andy murray is out of the vienna open after defeat to spain�*s carlos alcaraz in the second round. it�*s the first time in his career that he�*s lost at the tournament after wins in 2014 and 2016. he did beat alcaraz at indian wells earlier this month, but was unable to repeat that feat here. he lost the first set 6—3 and led 4—2 in the second, but the young spaniard reeled off four consecutive games to close out the match injust over two hours. an australian footballer has become the first current top flight player in the world to announce he�*s gay. midfielderjosh cavallo, who plays for adelaide united in the a league, read out an open letter on a video
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posted on twitter earlier. the 21—year—old said he�*s "finally comfortable" speaking out. it was a very, very long journey to get to this point in my life, you know? i�*m very happy with my decision to come out, and i hope that one day, i can inspire someone in the younger generation or someone else behind the phone that struggling, and see my story and realises that it�*s ok. the world loved this. we�*re in 2021, it�*s a different time to what it was before, it�*s more accepting. and i�*ve been nothing but given good things by the public. when i told my two coaches, i already felt so much better and felt like everything was off my shoulders, and i could perform on a complete different level. so knowing that the world knows now and i�*ve got no more secrets up my sleeve, i don�*t need to hide, i can be my authentic side and it�*s ok — i can�*t imagine what i can bring to the table right now.
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that�*s all the sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the sport team, we�*ll see you soon, bye—bye. hello. 24—hour rain totals have now surpassed 230mm in the wettest parts of the cumbrian hills, and the met office amber warning for rain continues across cumbria and southwest scotland into thursday. there is more rain to come and, as all that water feeds down through the rivers and streams, the risk of flooding and disruption increases from a weather front which is very much still around in the day ahead, pulses of energy running along itjust enhancing the rainfall. so, there will be more rain to come on a very wet day in cumbria, for a time more widely across southern, central and eastern scotland, from the eastern side of northern ireland before it eases here, and pushing into more of northwest england and wales, and southwest england as the day goes on. northern scotland, sunny spells and a chance for showers, brightening up in northern ireland. largely dry through central
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and eastern parts of england. these are your wind speed averages — gusts are high, particularly with the rain band along irish sea coatsts, gusting near 50 mph in places, and the higher temperatures will be those parts of across eastern england that break out into a few sunny spells. we could well see 18 celsius again. there will be further rain overnight thursday into friday, but the idea is it�*s starting to move its way further east on another very mild night. and on friday, that rain will reach into parts of eastern england that have stayed dry through much of the week. there�*ll be another spell of rain moving through scotland — but as it all begins to pull away eastwards, it will be much drier to end friday, and particularly in those areas that have seen so much rain so far this week. at the same time, temperatures are coming down a few degrees. we�*re not finished with the rain, though — low pressure still very much in charge for the weekend, and another band of wet weather will arrive friday night into saturday. now it does look as if it�*s moving a little bit quicker now, this,
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so it will bring a spell of rain overnight into saturday, but clears away more readily on saturday, allowing a drier, brighter day after the rain with a few showers around. and again, notice our temperatures are edging downwards. it looks at this stage as if sunday will be the wetter day of the weekend. as low pressure feeds in yet more rain, some of this will be heavy as it moves its way northwards. the wind starts to pick up again, as well, and even after the rain, there�*ll be some heavy showers around.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i�*m karishma vaswani. the headlines... police in new mexico say they believe a live bullet was fired in the fatal shooting on the set of alec baldwin�*s new movie. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. this is the firearm we believe discharged the bullet. but it�*s too early to say whether they�*ll bring any charges. we�*ll have the latest. also in the programme... in the uk, the government�*s promising a post—covid age of optimism as the 2021 budget is delivered. in a bbc exclusive, new details about the fall of afghanistan. claims by the former president, ashraf ghani, that he had
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to flee the country to save his life are totally rejected

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