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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 27, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. the gun that alec baldwin fired, killing a cinematographer last week, did contain a live round. the assistant director has told police he did not check every chamber of the gun as he should have done. the santa fe district attorney say they're not ruling out criminal negligence. it's a budget bonanza in the uk. or is it? the chancellor has raised the pay of millions of british people, but how much of it will they see amid the rising inflation and the spiralling cost of living? public health experts in the us recommend children aged five to 11 should get the pfizerjab, saying the benefits outweigh the risks. and england and wales will soon be getting a glimpse into how our ancestors lived
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in the wake of the first world war. the 1921 census is finally about to be published. hello. the weapon fired by actor alec baldwin on a film set in new mexico last week contained a live round that killed crew member halyna hutchins. the santa fe�*s county sheriff's office investigating the cinematographer�*s death said today they have recovered that bullet from the shoulder of directorjoel souza, who was also wounded. three weapons and 500 rounds of ammunition have also been recovered from the set, some of which the sheriff suspects are further live rounds. sophie long sent this report from santa fe. it is now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead whilst she was doing herjob. this is believed to be the last photograph of her alive on the set of rust.
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she's in the blue coat and headphones. you can see alec baldwin beyond the camera. he was holding the gun that discharged the fatal shot and severely injured directorjoel souza. we believe that we have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin. the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr souza. we regard this specific spent casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon, he was told it was safe, what's called a cold gun. it wasn't. they are interviewing the many witnesses on set, including the person responsible for the safety of the weapons used, known as the armourer. that was 24—year—old former model hannah gutierrez—reed. all options are on the table like this point. all options are on the table at this point.
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i'm not commenting on charges, whether they will be filed or not, or on whom. the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be allowed on film sets under any circumstances. sophie long, bbc news, santa fe. in just the last hour, a search warrant has been unsealed detailing the account of the assistant director dave halls. let me give you the details, because it is pretty interesting. he told police that the armourer hannah gutierrez—reed who handed him the weapon would ordinarily open it, "spin the drum" to show him the ammo and he would declare it safe. on thursday, however, he said he "couldn't remember" if she had spun the barrel and he could only remember seeing three dummy bullets, identified by a hole in the side of their cartridge.
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he told them he should have checked them all. after the shooting, he took the gun back to gutierrez—reed and had her open it, at which point they realised there were four dummy casings and also the spent shell of the live round baldwin had fired. richard kaplan is a criminal defence attorney. he joins me from los angeles. richard, it is good to have you with us. the sheriff said this afternoon that there was in place and see onset, given that account that i just read, i think that is pre—charitable, but i understand the sheriff is being cautious to we know in this case that there is going to be serious civil liability, board about criminalisty?_ be serious civil liability, board about criminalisty? be serious civil liability, board about criminalis ? ., about criminalisty? good evening and thanks for having _ about criminalisty? good evening and thanks for having me _ about criminalisty? good evening and thanks for having me for— about criminalisty? good evening and thanks for having me for some - about criminalisty? good evening and thanks for having me for some the i thanks for having me for some the terminal investigation is going to move probably at a slow pace at this point. just because the suspects are not going anywhere, they're not really a threat to the community, per se, so i think the new mexico authorities are really going to take their time and really interview everyone and try to determine why this happened. was it an accident
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that could have been prevented? and the question is, was something done that was truly reckless? not within the norms of how guns are handled on these movie sets? the the norms of how guns are handled on these movie sets?— these movie sets? the santa fe da today talked _ these movie sets? the santa fe da today talked about _ these movie sets? the santa fe da today talked about three _ these movie sets? the santa fe da| today talked about three individuals who it would seem to me are in the chain of possession of this weapon, the armourer, the assistant director, who we havejust the armourer, the assistant director, who we have just quoted, and alec baldwin himself. and i guess they are all on the hook here for criminal negligence, but what about him as one of the executive producers, alec baldwin? i do about him as one of the executive producers, alec baldwin?- producers, alec baldwin? i do not believe, i think— producers, alec baldwin? i do not believe, i think in _ producers, alec baldwin? i do not believe, i think in order _ producers, alec baldwin? i do not believe, i think in order of - producers, alec baldwin? i do not believe, i think in order of those i believe, i think in order of those three, alec baldwin is probably the least culpable. clearly he was told weapon was safe, he was doing when he normally does to rehearse, so he was not really involved in the negligence that got them there. when an actor takes
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a producer role, many times that is more to do with getting back and money or different notoriety, but it does not believe in your response village on the set, so it really would depend upon what his contract said and what his response abilities were on that set. if you was truly an actor who happened to get producer credit, i don't think that's enough to get to, liability. we have heard from other actors onset and camera operators who said there were corners that were cut, they were things they did not like about the way things were operating onset. will that sort of thing be taken into account by the da as she pieces together whether there is criminal nojed steer? —— negligence here? i criminal no jed steer? -- negligence here? , , , ., ., here? i believe she is going to look at the totality _ here? i believe she is going to look at the totality of _ here? i believe she is going to look at the totality of the _ here? i believe she is going to look at the totality of the circumstance. | at the totality of the circumstance. and clearly if there warning signs not adhered to and not given the right amount of attention, that goes
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to the reckless nature of what was going on on the set. i think those are factors, but we really need to realise so many people on that set and so many of them have been interviewed, and some probably have not, what truly happened, we may not know for sure for some apparently the camera was not running at the time of the incident. you the camera was not running at the time of the incident.— time of the incident. you work in la. time of the incident. you work in la, i am time of the incident. you work in la. i am sure — time of the incident. you work in la, i am sure you _ time of the incident. you work in la, i am sure you are _ time of the incident. you work in la, i am sure you are involved . time of the incident. you work in la, i am sure you are involved a | la, i am sure you are involved a lot in film sets and legal issues around films. three weapons, one plastic, one a prop number one a 45 colt revolver, rounds recovered, presuming some of them live rounds, is there ever a situation where live rounds should be on a film set in your view? rounds should be on a film set in yourview? in rounds should be on a film set in your view?— rounds should be on a film set in our view? , ., , ., ., ., your view? in my opinion, that would robabl your view? in my opinion, that would probably rrot — your view? in my opinion, that would probably not make _ your view? in my opinion, that would probably not make any _ your view? in my opinion, that would probably not make any sense. - your view? in my opinion, that would probably not make any sense. to - your view? in my opinion, that would l probably not make any sense. to have a life round on a movie set, there is really no situation one would expect that. i understand they are in the middle of a desert or
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somewhere, a ranch, in new mexico, and maybe there's a lot of down set on a movie set, may be people were shooting safely, i don't know. and shooting safely, i don't know. and the safety standard you have talked about, how high is divorce for that? be no allegiance standard for criminal negligence, it is not to be what they call reckless —— it has got to be. you are doing something dangerous, you have an operation to do something safe. obviously an accident could happen, if a gun may have any sugar that was a bit too loose, so to speak, and a hairtrigger dash a trigger. it may stack up against the person, to say that they were warned and they continued to do the things the same way. that may piece up to
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willful disregard support and when they piece it together, they will... presumably the 90 people onset, not necessarily in the church where the shooting happened, but those people onset had seen things in recent weeks and the way the set had been operated, they would be crucial witnesses, with a?— operated, they would be crucial witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would — witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would be _ witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would be part _ witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would be part of _ witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would be part of the - witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would be part of the theme i witnesses, with a? yeah, i believe that would be part of the theme of the prosecution if they were to go after the armour or if they went after the armour or if they went after any of the producers, criminally, they would —— that would be their theme, that there warning signs, corners cut, that that put everybody unnoticed, we have to be safer, and they did not abide by that, but it really goes to who want. ., that, but it really goes to who want. . . . , that, but it really goes to who want. . . ., , ., ., that, but it really goes to who want. . . ., ., ., ., want. yeah, clearly a long way to go in that investigation. _ want. yeah, clearly a long way to go in that investigation. richard - in that investigation. richard kaplan, thank you for giving your
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expertise. a us vaccine advisory panel has recommended to the fda that the covid vaccine "should" be given to five to ii—year—olds. the recommended dose is a third of what adults would be given, and trials have shown it is 90% effective. the committee said it believes the benefits of the vaccines outweigh the risks. children currently account for a disproportionate number of cases in the united states right now. there have been almost 118,000 child covid cases in just the last week alone and i million cases in the last six weeks. there still has to be a full fda review of this decision and it is yet to be signed of by the cdc. but anthony fauci says he is optimistic children could start getting the shots as early as next week. i'm joined now by dr ofer levy, who's on the fda advisory panel. you were there yesterday and you are asked to take a vote on this. what was in your thinking?— asked to take a vote on this. what was in your thinking? thank you for that. it was in your thinking? thank you for that- it was — was in your thinking? thank you for that. it was very _ was in your thinking? thank you for that. it was very interesting - that. it was very interesting deliberation, and for our advisory committee, for us fda, it is always the same full survey to safety and efficacy for stub vaccines, we give
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to healthy people, so they better be safe, and we carefully reviewed all the publicly validated regarding the safety of it ministering to speiser mrna vaccine to five and the efficacy, reducing the risk of systematic disease in those children. ~ ., , systematic disease in those children. . , ,, children. where there any dissenting voices on the — children. where there any dissenting voices on the panel? _ children. where there any dissenting voices on the panel? it _ children. where there any dissenting voices on the panel? it was - children. where there any dissenting voices on the panel? it was a - children. where there any dissenting voices on the panel? it was a very i voices on the panel? it was a very substantial _ voices on the panel? it was a very substantial discussing, _ voices on the panel? it was a very substantial discussing, because . voices on the panel? it was a very - substantial discussing, because some parents may say, look, we understand vaccines are important, but very young people are not a very high risk of severe covid and that is true, yet nevertheless in the united states alone, hundreds of children have died of covid, including several hundred in this age range of five to ii several hundred in this age range of five to 11 years of age, and tens of thousands have been hospitalised or have had some somatic infection, and children may also spread the disease, the infection, to order individuals —— some infection. for all these reasons, and after reviewing the safety data and by the way pfizer did a dose ranging study indicating that one third of the
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aduu indicating that one third of the adult dose is the same and effective dosein adult dose is the same and effective dose in this age group, we felt the evidence of benefit outweighed the risks. ' . ., . , evidence of benefit outweighed the risks. ' evidence of benefit outweighed the risks. the efficacy, as you say, is very good. _ risks. the efficacy, as you say, is very good. but — risks. the efficacy, as you say, is very good, but what _ risks. the efficacy, as you say, is very good, but what about - very good, but what about myocarditis, the inflammation of the heart that we know some older children of had that have taken a vaccine? did that play on your mind? yes, that was a very important part of the liberation and fda model lists model that based on the data and we looked at it very carefully — how many cases of covid, severe covid, covid hospitalisation and death would be prevented by it ministering this vaccine and how many of myocarditis may be seen? we would point out with the lower dose of the vaccine and in the fact that in general five to ii of the vaccine and in the fact that in general five to 11 euros ten to be at lower risks of other types of myocarditis and infectious myocarditis, overall, wejudge the benefit of rated risk in this age group —— i might add that my
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personal view is that the personal action should be made available. parents should make that determination for their child, especially if they have any co—morbid conditions, but personally i do not favour a mandate, and several other committee members stressed that as well. that was not our purview, but we did express our opinions on that. we our purview, but we did express our opinions on that.— opinions on that. we have only 'ust started that — opinions on that. we have only 'ust started that saving i opinions on that. we have only 'ust started that saving 12 i opinions on that. we have only 'ust started that saving 12 to i started that saving 12 to 17—year—olds in this country and i i7—year—olds in this country and i do not think we are anywhere near a debate on younger children, but it stands to reason you are going to be the world's test case. the evidence of how effective it is will become clear pretty quickly according to anthony fauci. i clear pretty quickly according to anthony fauci.— clear pretty quickly according to anthony fauci. i think that that is ri t ht, anthony fauci. i think that that is ritht, i anthony fauci. i think that that is right. i think _ anthony fauci. i think that that is right, ithinkthat_ anthony fauci. i think that that is right, i think that american - anthony fauci. i think that that is l right, i think that american parents have a range of opinions on this, some parents cannot wait to give their child the immunisation, all of my children immunised, including my 14—year—old son, but other parents might take a more cautious fuel. we
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will continue to monitor and collect safety surveillance data and if there is any signal that will be responded to properly. i believe the public of scene that already with the other vaccines. bud public of scene that already with the other vaccines.— public of scene that already with the other vaccines. and what are you sa int to the other vaccines. and what are you saying to children, _ the other vaccines. and what are you saying to children, finally, _ the other vaccines. and what are you saying to children, finally, to - saying to children, finally, to parents of children who are 11 years old, who might be 12 over the next few months? should they get it or wait for the full dose?— wait for the full dose? yeah, it is a tood wait for the full dose? yeah, it is a good question, _ wait for the full dose? yeah, it is a good question, but i _ wait for the full dose? yeah, it is a good question, but i am - wait for the full dose? yeah, it is a good question, but i am not. wait for the full dose? yeah, it is a good question, but i am not a i wait for the full dose? yeah, it is i a good question, but i am not a big believer in waiting. we are in the middle of a pandemic now for some just yesterday, over moo americans died, just yesterday, of covid, many more hospitalised, so i do not believe this is the time to wait. doctor levy, thank you very much for your expertise. good to have you on the programme. your expertise. good to have you on the programme-— your expertise. good to have you on the programme. thank you, christian, and honour- — stay with us on bbc news. still to come: how the soon—to—be—released 1921 census
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gives up a glimpse into what life after the first world war was really like. it cost "eye—watering" sums of money, but failed to achieve its "main objective". that's the damning verdict of a cross party group of mps about the nhs test and trace programme in england. the group condemned a reliance on what it called "over priced consultants" and said the programme failed to help cut covid infections. here's the chair of the house of commons public accounts committee, dame meg hillier. test and trace was allocated £37 billion over two years, and for that money, it promised bold outcomes which it failed to deliver on, notably preventing two lockdowns, even though it was one of its main aims. one of the shocking things about the test and trace programme was it delivered all these test to people but only 14% were actually registered, so it does not know whether the others have been used, registered, whether or not they are sitting on people's sideboards, unopened, and whether that information is important whether, one, we learn from this pandemic but
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also at the time that we prevented ongoing transmission. the british chancellor rishi sunak spoke of "a new age of optimism" today, as he set out an economic plan, which was much brighter than many might have feared. there was extra spending for the health service, a boost to all departmental budgets for the next three years, pay rises for millions of workers and investment for the government's levelling up agenda in the north of the country. it wasn't all milk and honey. inflation, he said, will rise by an average of 4% over the next year, which will raise fresh concerns about the cost of living, particularly for poorer families who've been hit by a £20 a week cut in universal credit. the uk economy will rebound, said mr sunak, to pre—covid levels by 2022. so each government department is getting a real terms rise in spending, with overall expenditure totalling £150 billion.
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that's just over $200 billion over the course of the parliament. funding for science and research, a government priority, will rise to £5.9 billion or $8 billion a year by 2025. but ahead of the crucial cop26 climate conference in glasgow, he announced a cut in air passenger duty for internal uk flights and a freeze on fuel duty paid by motorists. here's a bit of what the chancellor had to say. help for working families for the cost of living because we will always give people the support they need and the tools to build a better life for themselves. and levelling up. because for too long, far too long, the location of your birth has determined too much of your future, because the awesome power of opportunity shouldn't be available only to a wealthy few but be the birthright of every child in an independent and prosperous united
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kingdom! the british chancellor rishi sunak. i'm joined by our political correspondent rob watson. there is practically no government in the west pulling in the purse strings, all keen to support the recovery, rob. where has all that talk of austerity gone? it is just a different world, isn't it? it is absolutely — different world, isn't it? it is absolutely gone, _ different world, isn't it? it 3 absolutely gone, christian, and i guess if you think and to be question of british politics would be, post brexit, post pandemic, what kind of uk economic model will we get? low tax? high tax? and it seems that it get? low tax? high tax? and it seems thatitis get? low tax? high tax? and it seems that it is more of the latter, but come and you knew there was a bug coming, one cannot help wondering, will the real conservative —— conservative party please stand up? right at the end of his budget,
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where rishi sunak announced the huge amount of spending, highest taxes since the early 1950s, at the end of it, he said, but of course i do believe in lower taxes, but not quite right yet!— do believe in lower taxes, but not quite right yet! listen, i could not to into quite right yet! listen, i could not go into the _ quite right yet! listen, i could not go into the micro, _ quite right yet! listen, i could not go into the micro, but _ quite right yet! listen, i could not go into the micro, but i _ quite right yet! listen, i could not go into the micro, but i want - quite right yet! listen, i could not go into the micro, but i want to i quite right yet! listen, i could not. go into the micro, but i want to say macro for our world viewers. ahead of the cop 26 somet and boris johnson's appearance there, where he is going to rattle the can and say, you've got to support the move to more sustainable production of energy and the way that people adapt to climate change, they could hurley do that by not announcing, as they did today, restoring the foreign aid budget to 0.7% of gross national income, so they have done that, albeit with some caveats.- albeit with some caveats. yes, absolutely. — albeit with some caveats. yes, absolutely. a _ albeit with some caveats. yes, absolutely, a huge _ albeit with some caveats. yes, absolutely, a huge caveat, - albeit with some caveats. 1a: absolutely, a huge caveat, which is that it depends on all these economic forecasts, and
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keep the answers short, essentially with the government are saying, is, look, if borrowing does go down, if the economy continues to grow, hopefully by 2a, 25, things would get back to the 0.7%, but you will of noticed a lot of caveats there and all these forecasts turning out to where they are supposed to. the un is calling for greater ambition in government budgets. this is the verdict of independent climate change think tank e3g, it says, "the chancellor has not invested enough in the net zero it says... for all the spin, all the fine talk we have had from the prime minister, the verdict is, we are not doing enough, rob.— minister, the verdict is, we are not doing enough, rob. yes, that is the verdict, doing enough, rob. yes, that is the verdict. and — doing enough, rob. yes, that is the verdict, and when _ doing enough, rob. yes, that is the verdict, and when the _ doing enough, rob. yes, that is the verdict, and when the government |
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verdict, and when the government laid out its path to zero last week, a similar criticism was made, that there was fantastic, this incredibly ambitious target, but an awful lot of work was left to the private sector, to finance a lot of the changes that are going to be need to be made, and that is a criticism that has resurfaced today, which is it is all very well to have a fantastic ambition, but you want to know how it is going to be paid for, and exactly when and how it is going to happen. rab and exactly when and how it is going to ha- ten. .,, . ., ., very much indeed for that —— rob watson. a country gripped by a deadly virus, a fuel crisis, rising temperatures — you'd think i was describing our lives today in 2021, but in fact this was the state of britain a century ago. how do we know? well, because the details are contained in the 1921 census, which is about to be made public for the first time and will be available in digital format from january. it's a crucial part of the country's history, a snapshot of life
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in england and wales, just after world war i and amid the spanish flu pandemic. audrey collins is a family history specialist at the national archives and joins us now. you are the right person to speak to! it is almost like back to the future reading this. they were wearing masks, there was a fuel crisis. what else did you glean from this senses?— crisis. what else did you glean from this senses? there are always going to be historical _ this senses? there are always going to be historical parallels, _ this senses? there are always going to be historical parallels, so - this senses? there are always going to be historical parallels, so i- to be historical parallels, so i think the global pandemic was maybe one that we had not anticipated, it is always interesting looking at old records like the senses, because we are looking at people that are like us but not like us, we can identify with the things we have seen, but at the same time, when you look at the details, you can seejust the same time, when you look at the details, you can see just how different their lives were in many ways — the size of their families, thejobs ways — the size of their families, the jobs that people did — so family
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historians in particular are absently fascinated by this, but it is very appealing to all kinds of researchers —— absolutely. people just curious! researchers -- absolutely. people just curious!— just curious! why is it so special, this? it just curious! why is it so special, this? it is — just curious! why is it so special, this? it is 100 _ just curious! why is it so special, this? it is 100 years _ just curious! why is it so special, this? it is 100 years old. - just curious! why is it so special, this? it is 100 years old. are - this? it is 100 years old. are we not allowed to see it for 100 years? why is it not more valuable than the 1931 census of the 1941 senses? that is a very good _ 1931 census of the 1941 senses? t'isgt is a very good question for some first of all census records are was closed because confidentiality was promised. because if you are the government, your gathering information and some of it is quite personal, names, birth dates, relationships, get accurate records, you need to promise that this information is not going to be made available to all and sundry, so we have a closure period of 100 years on the census. all the censuses
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onwards are governed by the 1920 census act, which is quite rotund this. other countries are different as well. some countries have a shorter closure period and some countries guarantee, and jollity by complete destroying the censuses, so the information is never open to anybody. i the information is never open to an bod . ~ �* the information is never open to an bod . ., �* anybody. i think i'm right in saying the 31 census _ anybody. i think i'm right in saying the 31 census was _ anybody. i think i'm right in saying the 31 census was lost _ anybody. i think i'm right in saying the 31 census was lost in _ anybody. i think i'm right in saying the 31 census was lost in a - anybody. i think i'm right in saying the 31 census was lost in a fire - the 31 census was lost in a fire and we did not have one in 1941 because of the war. the one staggering figure in the census thatjumped up to me, three quarters of a million children recorded with father dead. really underlines the tragic waste of the first world war succulent thatis of the first world war succulent that is one of the things that we know the figures are, but it is only when we get to the individual yellow neck household returns that you what shape a family is. -- what sha te what shape a family is. -- what sha -e a what shape a family is. -- what shape a family _ what shape a family is. -- what shape a family is. _ what shape a family is. -- what shape a family is. quite - what shape a family is. -- what shape a family is. quite a - what shape a family is. -- what
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shape a family is. quite a few. what shape a family is. -- what i shape a family is. quite a few with father dead, and quite a lot with mother dead because the flu pandemic saw off a lot of them. find mother dead because the flu pandemic saw off a lot of them.— saw off a lot of them. and the first time respondents _ saw off a lot of them. and the first time respondents could _ saw off a lot of them. and the first time respondents could select - time respondents could select divorce? . time respondents could select divorce? , , ., , divorce? yes, the first time it was included in _ divorce? yes, the first time it was included in the _ divorce? yes, the first time it was included in the syste _ divorce? yes, the first time it was included in the syste six _ included in the syste six officially, people had been previous leaping down in previous census years. if you look at the figures for divorce in england and wells, it had gone up astronomically —— england and wales. it shot up. it was a fairly constant number for the first decade, and that in 1917, it shot upwards, so it was very noticeable, if you look at a graph of it, so obviously it was a category that had to be taken notice of. ., . �* , category that had to be taken notice of. ., . ~ , ., , of. how exciting! audrey collins, thank ou of. how exciting! audrey collins, thank you for— of. how exciting! audrey collins, thank you for coming _ of. how exciting! audrey collins, thank you for coming on - of. how exciting! audrey collins, thank you for coming on the - thank you for coming on the programme to explain it to us.
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if you are interested in family genealogy, it will be shown on the website. if you are missing a gap on the family history, it may soon be plugged. hello. whilst parts of eastern england have seen temperatures up to 18 degrees today in some occasional sunshine, such a different story across southern southwestern parts of scotland and cumbria, a met office amber warning for heavy rain that continues through the night and into tomorrow. rain totals mounting — just look at the rainfall picture as it's developed through today, look at the rain continuing across many of the same areas. so as those totals mount, the risk of flooding and disruption will increase. so this is the picture through the night. this weather system is not moving, it is impacting more of northwest wales. further north in scotland, in northern ireland, you may catch a shower but actually quite a bit of dry weather. some spots dipping into single figures. to the south of this area of rain, a lot of cloud around, wind,
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but temperatures staying well above average for the time of year. winds continue to be strong with this weather system tomorrow, particularly through the irish sea, still impacting cumbria, more of southern and central scotland and more of wales. some rain also pushing in towards cornwall and devon as we go on through the day. eastern parts of england still may see some very mild sunny spells, a few showers elsewhere for scotland and indeed for northern ireland. and into thursday evening, it is still raining in northwest england, more of wales as well, so again we may start to see some impacts of the rain continues in wales. another pulse of rain overnight into friday through northern ireland, on friday across scotland, but the main weather front with all the rain is moving east at this stage. it will bring some outbreaks of showery rain across parts of eastern england on friday, and behind it, it will be much drier to end the day. but the problems with flooding after all the rain, and particularly in southwest scotland and cumbria, will continue after the rain has ended. low pressure still close by at the weekend.
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on saturday, that will bring a weather front northwards, so outbreaks of rain pushing northeastwards across the uk on saturday. some fair skies either side of it, though a few showers may follow on behind. another thing about the weather over the weekend, it is turning a bit cooler, so temperatures just dropping closer to the averages for the time of year. and that same area of low pressure will feed in another weather system our way on sunday. and the rain on this could be heavier. the winds around it could be stronger as well. very unsettled still into the weekend. it will be turning cooler.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers here in the uk and around the world. criminal charges against alec baldwin are not ruled out as police say the gun that he fired killing a cinematographer on the side of the film rust contained a live round. the uk chancellor promises a post number one age of optimism as he delivers his budget. raise the pay of millions of britons but at a time of higher taxes and rising inflation. could a us tax on billionaires proposed by leading democrat be stymied after the idea was loaded? a democrat senator has poured cold water on the plan. concrete can we consume 4.1 billion tonnes of it every year and it is catastrophic for the climate. we meet the canadian makers of a carbon neutral
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alternative and they say won't cost us the earth. welcome back. billy had the democrats sketched out the new plans to text the country public billionaires and suddenly there appeared a familiar roadblock in the shape ofjoe mansion committed to progress senator from west virginia who today tells reporters he doesn't like the new plan because it unfairly targets a specific group of people, namely the super rich. most senate democrats see the new tax is the best way to pay for the sprawling agenda of domestic spending that the president is so desperate for congress to approve. so go with this new tax effect? most certainly not you or me. unless you are one of the 700 americans who has more than $1 billion in assets or has earned over $100 million a year,
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three times in a row. the blame of the via capital gains tax on tradable assets, attacks and unrealized profits, think stocks, bonds, buildings that you might not even have solved yet. ? sold yet. a 15% minimum tax rate on all corporations which would close the loopholes that businesses exploit to pay little to no federal tax and the tax would become collated on the prophets, corporations report to their shareholders. prophets, corporations report to theirshareholders. not prophets, corporations report to their shareholders. not what they report to the us tax authorities. let's bring in a who served as national political director for hillary clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. i don't know whether a billionaire tax is illegal, it has to be tested in law. but it doesn't matter. because a senator does not really like it and if he does not like it he does not tend to happen. that's for the negotiation is right now. you are coming into the final daysin now. you are coming into the final days in the last couple of weeks has
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been really try to figure out where are those lines? certainlyjoe manchin coming into state to say that's an issue, you are starting to see that now things are really coming together at the end. i think it's a little bit surprising to a lot of folks on the democratic party at the billionaire tax did not make it at this point. but reality is reality and there is an election coming up not too long from here on tuesday of next week the president was in virginia out there and so right now it democrats need to do is show they are together, show that they can pass something and ifjoe manchin is not on board it will not be in the agreement we are going to see today or in the next couple of days. see today or in the next couple of da s. , ., ., . see today or in the next couple of das. .,. i, ., days. they announced yesterday that within a social _ days. they announced yesterday that within a social spending _ days. they announced yesterday that within a social spending plan - days. they announced yesterday that within a social spending plan there i within a social spending plan there is $500 billion for climate change provision. and he would dearly love to carry that paper with him to glasgow when he walks up here on sunday. the trouble is the democrats keep setting themselves deadlines, their own deadlines that keep missing and you say it's close but
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when you put all there's a really important details to be hammered out. . . important details to be hammered out. , . ., , out. there is and what i say it is close it's always _ out. there is and what i say it is close it's always close _ out. there is and what i say it is close it's always close until - out. there is and what i say it is close it's always close until you | close it's always close until you finally reach that last number. that last hour. and partly what is important to hear right now is democrats do need to be talking about positive momentum moving forward. the worst thing at this point in this negotiation is to hear some sort of concern or caution coming from the white house are coming from the white house are coming from the white house are coming from anyone in the senate or in the house. so what you are seeing is a narrative of, we are almost there so we are going to go from arm's—length to hands length to an hour, to until this deal is done. because that momentum is notjust important for the negotiation itself, but important for democrats as you go into an election cycle next week, as the president continues to be out there on the stump talking about his ability to move things in the right direction for his agenda.— for his agenda. deadlines focus minds, there's _ for his agenda. deadlines focus minds, there's no _ for his agenda. deadlines focus minds, there's no doubt. - for his agenda. deadlines focus minds, there's no doubt. the i minds, there's no doubt. the progressives could hand him a win if
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they would only agree to the bipartisan info structure of bill which everybody is on board with what they want both things the same time to want to pass one without the really important social spending bill. here's a representative talking earlier, she has mellowed. yesterday she was saying framework deal, that won't cut it, it is in agreement. this is what she was saying a short time ago. xyour saying a short time ago. your tosition saying a short time ago. your position still— saying a short time ago. your position still has _ saying a short time ago. your position still has not - saying a short time ago. your position still has not changed of a framework— position still has not changed of a framework is _ position still has not changed of a framework is not _ position still has not changed of a framework is not enough - position still has not changed of a framework is not enough to - position still has not changed of a framework is not enough to vote i position still has not changed of a i framework is not enough to vote on the bipartisan — framework is not enough to vote on the bipartisan package _ framework is not enough to vote on the bipartisan package because - framework is not enough to vote on. the bipartisan package because there will be _ the bipartisan package because there will be if— the bipartisan package because there will be if they— the bipartisan package because there will be if they consistently— the bipartisan package because there will be if they consistently as - the bipartisan package because there will be if they consistently as we - will be if they consistently as we want _ will be if they consistently as we want to — will be if they consistently as we want to be — will be if they consistently as we want to be followed _ will be if they consistently as we want to be followed both - will be if they consistently as we want to be followed both bills. i will be if they consistently as we i want to be followed both bills. we are willing — want to be followed both bills. we are willing to — want to be followed both bills. we are willing to commit _ want to be followed both bills. we are willing to commit if— want to be followed both bills. we are willing to commit if there - want to be followed both bills. we are willing to commit if there is i are willing to commit if there is agreement— are willing to commit if there is agreement on _ are willing to commit if there is agreement on the _ are willing to commit if there is agreement on the senate - are willing to commit if there is i agreement on the senate moving forward _ agreement on the senate moving forward and — agreement on the senate moving forward and the _ agreement on the senate moving forward and the president - agreement on the senate moving forward and the president has. agreement on the senate moving forward and the president has an| forward and the president has an ironclad — forward and the president has an ironclad commitment _ forward and the president has an ironclad commitment from - forward and the president has an ironclad commitment from all. forward and the president has an ironclad commitment from all 50 senators— ironclad commitment from all 50 senators we _ ironclad commitment from all 50 senators we will— ironclad commitment from all 50 senators we will vote _ ironclad commitment from all 50 senators we will vote both - ironclad commitment from all 50 senators we will vote both of- ironclad commitment from all 50 i senators we will vote both of them out of _ senators we will vote both of them out of the — senators we will vote both of them out of the house. _ senators we will vote both of them out of the house. we _ senators we will vote both of them out of the house. we want to - senators we will vote both of them out of the house. we want to vote| out of the house. we want to vote both of— out of the house. we want to vote both of them — out of the house. we want to vote both of them out _ out of the house. we want to vote both of them out of— out of the house. we want to vote both of them out of the _ out of the house. we want to vote both of them out of the house. i both of them out of the house. conmrentator— both of them out of the house. commentator said _ both of them out of the house. commentator said today- both of them out of the house. i commentator said today commit it like a rubiks cube you get it fixed on one side, and then the arizona senator has gone haywire and then progresses and the other side you
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and round we go.— progresses and the other side you and round we go. there's no doubt that over the _ and round we go. there's no doubt that over the course _ and round we go. there's no doubt that over the course of _ and round we go. there's no doubt that over the course of time - and round we go. there's no doubt that over the course of time this i that over the course of time this has always been the process is to get to the very end. that's why the deadlines matter. there is a looming november election coming around the corner, there is a looming december three deadline for the senate in terms of the debt limit and all of that. the deadlines are real, and what you will be getting is seeing people understand we have to move forward and that this president needs to be able to have something on the table to move at this very moment in order to continue to really have physician out there. hat really have physician out there. not 'ust crucial really have physician out there. not just crucial to what he's doing and glasgow but crucial to virginia with that as of the vital governor's race. neck and neck with glen the republican at the moment, it's too close to call. last night by was in virginia stumping for terry, trying to tie his opponent to donald trump. extremism can come in many forms. it can come _ extremism can come in many forms. it can come in— extremism can come in many forms. it can come in the range of a mob
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driven— can come in the range of a mob driven to — can come in the range of a mob driven to assault the capital, it can come — driven to assault the capital, it can come in a smile and a fleece vest _ can come in a smile and a fleece vest. ~ , , .., can come in a smile and a fleece vest. ~ , , .. ., vest. with the republican the one that smiles _ vest. with the republican the one that smiles it _ vest. with the republican the one that smiles it has _ vest. with the republican the one that smiles it has a _ vest. with the republican the one that smiles it has a fleece - vest. with the republican the one that smiles it has a fleece vest. i | that smiles it has a fleece vest. i don't know whether that's naughty or not because he has stared quite a tight line that's. he has not stopped with donald trump and i don't think virginians are buying it. he pulls quite well on business, and of course of the democrats could pass their business package then to beat terry will be doing a bit better. so beat terry will be doing a bit better. ., beat terry will be doing a bit better, ., , , beat terry will be doing a bit better. ., , , ., , better. so to be interesting to see in these final— better. so to be interesting to see in these final days. _ better. so to be interesting to see in these final days. what you - better. so to be interesting to see in these final days. what you can l in these final days. what you can see out of the polling certainly which is why you heard biden talking in the way he did, is blinking trump to the republicans as much as possible. it's also biden to be on the side of the united the country, bringing people together and really painting terry's opponent as divisive. and that is really the trump message here. what you have heard is a real understanding of, that this election will determine what midterms are going to look like. also determine how much trump
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can hurt or help in those midterms. people are going to be looking very much into what the data looks at, what mobilisation and what messages worked. as the go to the final days because it does set the tone for the midterms and who wins? no doubt that the terms for the negotiations happening right now and that will continue to happen over the next year as we go into the midterm cycle. year as we go into the midterm cle. . . , year as we go into the midterm cle. . ., , ., , ., ., cycle. virginia was a state that bite into it _ cycle. virginia was a state that bite into it by _ cycle. virginia was a state that bite into it by ten _ cycle. virginia was a state that bite into it by ten points, - cycle. virginia was a state that bite into it by ten points, it. cycle. virginia was a state that | bite into it by ten points, it will tell whether driving into that next week. lovely to see you, thank you very much for your thoughts this evening. moldovan officials argued to hold a fresh round of negotiations with russia public state energy giant today admitted gas prices in the country. mulled over relies heavily on russian gas and the greater state of emergency last week after failing to agree a new deal with moscow. they have threatened to cut the gas supply if the country is not signed. from the moldovan capital steve rosenberg reports. once in moscow's
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orbit, moldova has been looking for a new direction. tilting from russia towards the west. it's government wants to move closer to the eu, but there is a problem. all of the gas here comes from russia. so what do you do if moscow turns off the tab? it is threatening to if moldova does not sign a new contract at a higher price. the russians have already cut supplies by a third. just business, or is it? supplies by a third. just business, orisit? ~, supplies by a third. just business, orisit? my supplies by a third. just business, orisit? , , supplies by a third. just business, orisit? ._ ,, ., , or is it? basically russia is trying to tunish or is it? basically russia is trying to punish moldovan _ or is it? basically russia is trying to punish moldovan citizens - or is it? basically russia is trying . to punish moldovan citizens because they decided to vote against a pro—russian party at the parliamentary elections. it's pure politics and nothing more. that's pure fantasy, thinks the russian state energy giant. they say they will gladly pump gas if there's a deal and if moldova settles its
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debt. �* . deal and if moldova settles its debt. �* , , debt. but is the kremlin using enert debt. but is the kremlin using energy as _ debt. but is the kremlin using energy as a — debt. but is the kremlin using energy as a weapon? - debt. but is the kremlin using energy as a weapon? vladimir debt. but is the kremlin using - energy as a weapon? vladimir putin recently called the accusation nonsense and table title. russia says it never mixes pipelines and politics but if you've got a lot of gas that gives you a lot of influence and a lot of power. if you are a country like moldova which has been getting all of its gas from russia but now wants a closer relationship with europe that can give you a lot of trouble. moldova has declared a state of emergency. this crisis centre is making sure that the gas keeps flowing. the country is seeking alternative sources in europe, but it is bad timing. sources in europe, but it is bad timint. �* . sources in europe, but it is bad timint. �* , ., , sources in europe, but it is bad timint. h ., , ., timing. it's the worst time to have a tas timing. it's the worst time to have a gas crest — timing. it's the worst time to have a gas crest that _ timing. it's the worst time to have a gas crest that home _ timing. it's the worst time to have a gas crest that home from the . a gas crest that home from the prices — a gas crest that home from the prices are — a gas crest that home from the prices are higher than ever. can moldova get — prices are higher than ever. ce”! moldova get all the gas it prices are higher than ever. cari moldova get all the gas it needs at a price you can afford to pay if you
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don't get a deal with russia? itrefoil. don't get a deal with russia? well, ou see don't get a deal with russia? well, you see the — don't get a deal with russia? well, you see the gas — don't get a deal with russia? well, you see the gas prices _ don't get a deal with russia? well, you see the gas prices today. - don't get a deal with russia? well, you see the gas prices today. we don't _ you see the gas prices today. we don't know— you see the gas prices today. we don't know how high or how low they will be _ don't know how high or how low they will be in _ don't know how high or how low they will be in two months or in five months. — will be in two months or in five months, right? sol will be in two months or in five months, right? so i cannot tell you whether— months, right? so i cannot tell you whether this price is affordable. in this whether this price is affordable. this town to whether this price is affordable. in this town to a less gas means whether this price is affordable. ii�*u this town to a less gas means long queues at the propane station. some of these cars have been waiting for three hours for fuel. for a government is to set a pro—european course there is a danger here. admitted gas crisis
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moldovan spencer to question the direction their country is taking. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moldova. this could be a which are defined by gas shortages, we will see. the take a look at the other stories of the day. sudan has been suspended from all african union activities fellow think that monday and a takeover. they called the coup unconstitutional and said the ban remain in place and still the civilian authority had their power was restored. demonstrations are continuing in the capital. france threatening to impose sanctions on the uk of progress is not made a route over fishing waters between the two countries. the situation does not improve france it would step up order checks on british goods and prevent british boats from docking at french ports. in india an independent panel will investigate allegations that the government used by were against journalists, allegations that the government used by were againstjournalists, critics and politicians. the opposition leader rahul gandhi is said to be among those targeted with the pegasus spyware. the supreme courts of the alleged violation of privacy
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needed to be examined as it affected people's rights and freedoms. still to come. the austrian footballer has come out as gay, the only top—level male player in the world to do so. climate protesters from the campaign group insulate bridge and have attempted to block two major roads into london today after warning its nonviolent civil resistance will continue. in the 50 people were arrested, greg mckenzie has the details. horns beep. rush—hour, and once again one of london's main arteries is blocked by protesters. theiraim, simply bring traffic to a standstill. my patients are not going to be, you know, happy about this because you are blocking me. people need us, and you are blocking
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us from getting to them. but their protests have angered many ordinary people simply trying to get to work. one man spraying ink in the faces of those who had glued themselves to the floor. they have done this 15 times all over the capital. they are now being spoken to by the police and they will be removed. many of them have glued themselves to the floor. why are you doing this? we've got cold homes, people are dying in cold homes, fuel poverty, and what is coming down the line is unbearable to think about. despite a number of injunctions granted to prevent these actions they have failed to stop the protesters. in dartford on the m25 a second action was staged causing misery to all of those stuck in the tailbacks. they are obnoxious and holding up traffic, obnoxiously holding up medical services. so i was just giving them a taste of their own medicine.
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the police have made a number of arrests and both scenes were cleared within a matter of hours. but the environment group say they will be back until the government agrees to insulate all uk homes by 2030 to cut carbon emissions. greg mckenzie, bbc news. the australian footballerjosh cavallo has revealed he is gay making the the only active top—level male professional player in the world to be open about his homosexuality. he's been talking to bbc world news about his decision to go public. ii bbc world news about his decision to to tublic. . , ., ., go public. if the decision that took a lont go public. if the decision that took a long time _ go public. if the decision that took a long time for— go public. if the decision that took a long time for myself. _ go public. if the decision that took a long time for myself. it - go public. if the decision that took a long time for myself. it was - go public. if the decision that took a long time for myself. it was a i a long time for myself. it was a long period of my life that brought me sadness and took me to a dark place. it was over six years of pain and i'm so happy and excited to put that to rest today. today it's so
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positive, it's my freedom day and i've never been this happy in my entire life. very happy with my decision to come out and i hope that one day i can inspire someone from the younger generation or someone else behind the phone that is struggling and sees my story and sees that it is ok. we are in 2021, it's a different time to what it was before. it's more accepting and i've been nothing but giving good things by the public. i hope that one day someone else can follow my lead and come out as well and is just normal, it becomes normal. playing football does not matter who you are, everyone is welcomed.- does not matter who you are, everyone is welcomed. jack, hello, nice to see — everyone is welcomed. jack, hello, nice to see you. _ everyone is welcomed. jack, hello, nice to see you. it's _ everyone is welcomed. jack, hello, nice to see you. it's pretty - nice to see you. it's pretty depressing to me that it is even a story, someone coming out these days. but i suppose that is the way because project and no footballers do. oh, jack, ithink
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because project and no footballers do. oh, jack, i think you because project and no footballers do. oh, jack, ithink you might because project and no footballers do. oh, jack, i think you might have muted yourself, can we try that again? muted yourself, can we try that atain? ., ,, again? there we are. second time luc . i again? there we are. second time lucky- i would _ again? there we are. second time lucky. i wouldjust _ again? there we are. second time lucky. i would just saying - again? there we are. second time lucky. i would just saying it's i again? there we are. second time lucky. i would just saying it's so i lucky. i would 'ust saying it's so depressing. _ lucky. i would just saying it's so depressing, this, _ lucky. i would just saying it's so depressing, this, in _ lucky. i would just saying it's so depressing, this, in a _ lucky. i would just saying it's so depressing, this, in a way? i i lucky. i would just saying it's so i depressing, this, in a way? i think one of the — depressing, this, in a way? i think one of the things _ depressing, this, in a way? i think one of the things that _ depressing, this, in a way? i think one of the things that is _ depressing, this, in a way? i think one of the things that is an - depressing, this, in a way? i think one of the things that is an issue i one of the things that is an issue with coming out is that sometimes people come up with compassion and love state should not be an issue but for lgbtq plus people coming out inside of sport is still a really big thing to do. if you feel comfortable in yourself, got to feel like something you are able to do and for a long time gay and bisexual men in football felt like they faced a choice, they can either be their authentic selves or they can succeed in football, but you cannot do both. and that he historically has been the narrative. what we have seen todayisis the narrative. what we have seen today is is a false choice and does not have to be that way. that's why this is such a significant milestone. i5 this is such a significant milestone.— this is such a significant milestone. ., '. , milestone. is part of the difficulty here that he _ milestone. is part of the difficulty here that he and _ milestone. is part of the difficulty here that he and others _ milestone. is part of the difficulty here that he and others had i milestone. is part of the difficulty here that he and others had is i here that he and others had is because of their own lived experience is in the sport? is that in the dressing room or out on the
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page in front of the supporters? i think is a mix of both, if you can't see it you can't be at and i know growing up i and otherfootball fans will look at the sport and not see anyone that was like you. you would not see anyone that shared her story. he would feel like you could not be your authentic self. i think football has made a lot of progress over the past five or six years and obviously talking specifically about the men's game, not about the women's game where there was a lot more out role models. we see more inclusive supporters groups come up is willing to share their story and now we see josh is willing to share their story and now we seejosh doing as well. he is a must the vanguard of the new generation of people in football who are able to say, do you know what, i met an elite level, i'm absolutely succeeding in sports, and i happen to be gay. in those two things can coexist. it to be gay. in those two things can coexist. . to be gay. in those two things can coexist. , ., , ., coexist. it is the only one currently _ coexist. it is the only one currently playing - coexist. it is the only one currently playing who i coexist. it is the only one currently playing who has coexist. it is the only one i currently playing who has come coexist. it is the only one _ currently playing who has come out. who has been public about it. statistically it is impossible,
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that. it stands to reason is statistically impossible he's the only gay footballer in the sport, so how was the professional body reacting to this today because of the great thing to see is that everyone from juventus to arsenal and gary, and the tottenham hotspur stadium and full of support and praise forjosh which is great. the narrative historically is if someone does this, or comes out that they may be shunned or ostracised. that is not been — may be shunned or ostracised. that is not been the _ may be shunned or ostracised. t'isgt is not been the case which is brilliant to see. we need to look at now is what happens next. if there is a gay person in football who inspired by the sink is going to a club are they going to feel welcome to there? are they going to feel like they can be their true self? this homophobic language at a grassroots level is, are we able to tackle it? it's great thatjosh has done this, a huge step forward for the sport and received nothing but praise, but football culture also is to keep moving forward as well. it really depends, i suppose that others might take this, it's which
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country you are in, what your family background is, what yourfriends thing and i guess what your team—mates think as well. thing and i guess what your team-mates think as well. there's so much that goes _ team-mates think as well. there's so much that goes into _ team-mates think as well. there's so much that goes into coming - team-mates think as well. there's so much that goes into coming out i team-mates think as well. there's so much that goes into coming out and i much that goes into coming out and sometimes the temptation is to separate from society. one of the dichotomies and all of this is there are people who are not out to their friends, not after their family members, another college but able to go to inclusive clubs and we have got loads of them in the uk where they can be out and their true selves in football. football might be the only space they can be gay or bisexual openly and not have to worry about questions about their personal life and so that's an interesting part of football that does not get spoken about enough. this goes beyond football, there will be people who never and kicked the ball in their life we don't care about the beautiful game will read the story and they could be a counters, which is come up acres and will be more confident being themselves today as a result of this story from the other side of the
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world down australia. they can only be a good thing. hostel]! world down australia. they can only be a good thing-— be a good thing. well done, josh and thank ou be a good thing. well done, josh and thank you very _ be a good thing. well done, josh and thank you very much _ be a good thing. well done, josh and thank you very much jack _ be a good thing. well done, josh and thank you very much jack for - thank you very much jack for coming on. thanks. we consume more than 4.1 billion tonnes of concrete every year. more than any other material except water. the cement industry pumped up more co2 each year than any other state other than the china and the united states. we are to meet our zero carbon target the wrong need to find a better way to build its roads, bridges and office blocks. one way to d carbonates concrete is to replace the cement with other materials and our next guest is the chief executive of a firm doing just that. in fact his concrete needs co2 which we will come to in a second. chris is with us from montr al, good to have you with us. talk to me about the processing ordinary concrete manufacturer that is so carbon intensive. manufacturer that is so carbon intensive-— manufacturer that is so carbon intensive. , . , ., intensive. yes them a place that the carbon comes _
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intensive. yes them a place that the carbon comes from _ intensive. yes them a place that the carbon comes from is _ intensive. yes them a place that the carbon comes from is the _ intensive. yes them a place that the carbon comes from is the actual i carbon comes from is the actual manufacturing of cement. they the heat of the limestone and a kill into a very high temperature using fossilfuels so co2 into a very high temperature using fossil fuels so co2 emitted from the fossil fuels so co2 emitted from the fossil fuels so co2 emitted from the fossil fuels being fossil fuels so co2 emitted from the fossilfuels being burned but also with they're actually doing is driving till you know, carbon monoxide up with the calcium oxide that will initially become cement. the chemical process produces co2 while you are making cement. and he cement is a key ingredient in concrete and this you use another technology. 50 concrete and this you use another technology-— concrete and this you use another technolot . . ., ., ., technology. so we have heat and a lot of water- _ technology. so we have heat and a lot of water. how _ technology. so we have heat and a lot of water. how do _ technology. so we have heat and a lot of water. how do you _ technology. so we have heat and a. lot of water. how do you replace it? waste by—product. that is what 250 million tonnes of it worldwide. including in the uk and typically is not a lot of uses. it generally ending up as a road base underneath the tarmac and otherwise it ends up in a landfill so not a lot of uses
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or high—value. we take that and grind it down to our committed to the size we need and replace cement in the concrete next. he cement is gone from a concrete to eliminate all of those emissions, we use a waste by—product of which there's very few uses. i5 waste by-product of which there's very few uses-— very few uses. is that 'ust as robust? t i very few uses. is that 'ust as robust? i mean, i very few uses. is that 'ust as robust? i mean, doesi very few uses. is thatjust as robust? i mean, does the i very few uses. is that just as i robust? i mean, does the concrete last as long as the concrete we are making at the moment? absolutely. chemically the _ making at the moment? absolutely. chemically the same _ making at the moment? absolutely. chemically the same composition i making at the moment? absolutely. | chemically the same composition we just took a different path to get there. instead of during a normal concrete manufacturing they had water into the concrete and it undergoes a process that allows the concrete to get hard over 28 days. to me quickly how it eats co2. irate to me quickly how it eats c02. we use to me quickly how it eats c02. - use carbonation. we put the proponents that would make into a chamber and then add to co2 in their
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of the co2 actually reacts with the steel that makes concrete. to of the c02 actually reacts with the steel that makes concrete. to take the c02 from _ steel that makes concrete. to take the c02 from another— steel that makes concrete. to take i the c02 from another manufacturing the co2 from another manufacturing process? the c02 from another manufacturing trocess? .. the c02 from another manufacturing trocess? ,, , ., . the c02 from another manufacturing trocess? ~ , ., . ,, ., ., process? like biogenic like ethanol fermentation _ process? like biogenic like ethanol fermentation as _ process? like biogenic like ethanol fermentation as an _ process? like biogenic like ethanol fermentation as an example. i process? like biogenic like ethanolj fermentation as an example. could also come from direct air capture. are you carbon neutral? irate also come from direct air capture. are you carbon neutral?— are you carbon neutral? we are actually carbon _ are you carbon neutral? we are actually carbon negative. i are you carbon neutral? we are actually carbon negative. we i are you carbon neutral? we are i actually carbon negative. we limited all the emissions. you actually carbon negative. we limited all the emissions.— all the emissions. you are there in canada, all the emissions. you are there in canada. very _ all the emissions. you are there in canada, very quickly _ all the emissions. you are there in canada, very quickly because i all the emissions. you are there in canada, very quickly because havej canada, very quickly because have about 30 seconds left, china and india, they are the biggest consumers of concrete, are they looking at what are doing? yes. we are doint looking at what are doing? yes. we are doing a — looking at what are doing? yes. we are doing a plan _ looking at what are doing? yes. we are doing a plan right— looking at what are doing? yes. we are doing a plan right now - looking at what are doing? yes. we are doing a plan right now for a i are doing a plan right now for a large indian steel company as a matter of fact. we also looking at doing 141 in china.— doing 141 in china. very good to talk to you. _ doing 141 in china. very good to talk to you, maybe _ doing 141 in china. very good to talk to you, maybe one - doing 141 in china. very good to| talk to you, maybe one solution doing 141 in china. very good to i talk to you, maybe one solution to the enormous problem that we face with the emissions we are putting into the planet. going to be in glasgow next week bringing you all
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the details from the cop 26 summit so i won't be here tomorrow, james reynolds will be here i will see from glasgow. hello there. we really did see both faces of autumn on wednesday. for much of central and eastern england, it was very warm for the time of year. there were glimpses of sunshine as well, as you can see from whitstable, kent. different story for further north and west, particularly for parts of cumbria, where there was some heavy rain and river levels are now starting to swell. now, it does look likely that rain will continue throughout the day on thursday, so the met office has issued an amber warning for south—west scotland and cumbria. due to the intensity of the rainfall, there could be some issues with localised flooding or transport difficulties. now, you can see the extent of that rain feeding in from the west, and we can push it all the way down to the azores. that's where this mild air is coming from, this southerly flow, so we still continue, at the moment, to the south and east
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of that weather front, to see some mild weather conditions. so again, another day of contrast on thursday. central, eastern england will be dry with glimpses of sunshine. our wet weather will just pivot a little into west wales and cornwall as we go through the day and bring some showery outbreaks of rain into eastern scotland. behind it, a little bit fresher, but top temperatures are likely at 17 or 18 degrees by thursday afternoon. by the time we get to friday, looks likely that frontal system is starting to lose the sting in its tail a little. it's weakening off and it's going to drift its way steadily east, so there could be showery outbreaks of rain clearing away from eastern england and south—east england. some lingering maybe into the far north—east of scotland. behind it, a drier, slightly brighter story. top temperatures of 16 celsius by friday afternoon. now, as we head into the weekend, it looks likely to be a pretty unsettled one, i'm afraid, with showers or longer spells of rain. this first frontal system moving in from the atlantic with an area
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of low pressure tucking in behind. that will bring a spell of wet and windy weather as it pushes its way steadily north and east. behind it, if you start off wet, you should see a slightly brighter afternoon, but those temperatures starting to fall away just a touch. we're looking at highs of 10—15 degrees. still low pressure with us, though, for the second half of the weekend. it has the potential to bring yet more wet weather in. now, the position of this low is still potentially subject to change so you'll need to keep abreast of the forecast as we get into the weekend. but a spell of wet and windy weather will push its way once again steadily north and east, allowing for some brighter conditions to follow behind. the winds very much a feature with gusts in excess of 30—40 mph, maybe stronger on exposed coasts. now, temperatures will be a little bit more subdued again — 10—14 celsius the high. the low tucks in behind, stays up into the north on monday. plenty of isobars on the chart. and as the front eases away, monday is going to be a case of sunny spells and scattered showers.
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some of those showers merging together for longer spells of rain and, again, those temperatures are falling away as the wind direction swings round to more of a northerly. just a maximum on monday of 13 degrees. so, the beginning of november, the jet stream is way to the south of the uk with that low pressure with us. that means we're on the cooler side of the jet. however, into next week, it looks likely that the jet stream will then deflect right across the british isles. and what that will do is continue to bring the threat of more low pressures, some rain at times, strong winds, and it will continue to feel cooler than of late.
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tonight at ten: a big spending chancellor delivers a budget which he claims will bring an age of optimism. in the red box, plans for a thumping £150 billion of extra spending over three years to fund new measures. fuel duty, cut. air passenger duty, cut. alcohol duty, cut. the biggest cut to business rates in 30 years. growth up, jobs up, wages up. on welfare, universal credit will now be adjusted, so that working people will be able to keep more of their benefit. with inflation set to rise to 4% and experts warning that living standards are unlikely to improve, labour was critical. in the long story of this parliament, never has a chancellor asked the british people to pay so much for so little.

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