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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  October 27, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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the chancellor promises an economy fit for a new age of optimism with an extra £150 billion of spending over three years. every government department will get an increase in funding as rishi sunak pledges to invest rather than cut back. this budget helps with the cost of living, this budget levels up to a high—wage, high—skilled, high—productivity economy, this budget builds a stronger economy for the british people and i commend it to the house. with inflation due to rise to 4% for the next year, labour says the budget does little for struggling families. in the long story of this parliament, never has a chancellor asked the british people to pay so much for so little. among today's announcements, universal credit will be adjusted
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so that people will pay back less for every extra pound earned. some of the businesses in england hit hardest by the pandemic, retail, hospitality and leisure, will have their business rates halved for a year. rishi sunak has shown himself again to be a big spender with expensive promises and high taxes to cover the price tags as well. promises and high taxes to cover the price tags as well. coming up on sportsday later in the hour on the bbc news channel: we hear from josh cavallo, the only current top—flight player in men's football to come out as gay. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the chancellor has promised a post—covid age of optimism as he delivered his budget. rishi sunak has committed
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to a spending increase of £150 billion over three years with the economy forecast to return to pre—covid levels by next year. he forecast that inflation is likely rise above 4% next year, though the government's own budget watchdog suggests it could rise higher still. growth is forecast to be 6.5% this year but may then fall as low as 1.3% after 2023. after much criticism for reversing the £20 weekly boost to universal credit, the chancellor has announced the the universal credit taper rate will be cut by 8 percentage points. that means rather than than losing 63p in benefits for every extra pound you earn, you will only lose 55p. a one—year 50% cut in business rates in england has been pledged for some of the businesses hit hardest by the pandemic — retail, hospitality and leisure. and just days before the uk hosts the global climate summit cop26 in glasgow, air passenger duty on uk flights will be cut and duty on fuel
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will remain unchanged. labour has criticised the budget for a lack of action on climate change or help for struggling families. our political editor laura kuenssberg is at westminster. budgets are always big, important days, notjust because of all the political hullabaloo, but because it is a moment where what the politicians are my really do have impacts on our lives and often very quickly. this was a day when rishi sunak showed himself again to be fond of spending public money. he had a bit more to play with because the economy seems to be in better shape than had been expected, but it was not exactly the kind of budget you might expect from someone who likes to see themselves as a light touch tory. the real question with inflation on the horizon, about whether all his good sounding promises will really match what they
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feel like in real life. will the real rishi sunak reveal himself? what were the secret is in his red box. the economy never stops. it is perpetual motion pushing politicians in unexpected directions. as he marches on from the worst of the pandemic emergency could he use today's grand occasion to break the course. fiur could he use today's grand occasion to break the course.— to break the course. our plan is workinu. to break the course. our plan is working- cash _ to break the course. our plan is working. cash is _ to break the course. our plan is working. cash is not _ to break the course. our plan is working. cash is not as - to break the course. our plan is working. cash is not as tight - to break the course. our plan is working. cash is not as tight as| to break the course. our plan is i working. cash is not as tight as he thou~ht, working. cash is not as tight as he thought. but _ working. cash is not as tight as he thought. but he — working. cash is not as tight as he thought, but he cannot _ working. cash is not as tight as he thought, but he cannot escape - working. cash is not as tight as he| thought, but he cannot escape the fact money will not stretch as far. inflation is on his way to 4%. the inflation is on his way to 496. the pressures — inflation is on his way to 496. the pressures caused _ inflation is on his way to 4%. tue: pressures caused by inflation is on his way to 4%. tte: pressures caused by supply inflation is on his way to 4%. tt2 pressures caused by supply change and energy prices will take months to ease. it would be irresponsible for anyone to pretend that we can solve this overnight. but where the government can ease these pressures we will act. find government can ease these pressures we will act. �* ., . ., we will act. and the chancellor wants you _ we will act. and the chancellor wants you and _ we will act. and the chancellor wants you and his _ we will act. and the chancellor wants you and his party - we will act. and the chancellor wants you and his party to - we will act. and the chancellorl wants you and his party to know we will act. and the chancellor - wants you and his party to know that he would never now splurge cash
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without restriction.— without restriction. higher borrowing _ without restriction. higher borrowing today _ without restriction. higher borrowing today is - without restriction. higher borrowing today is just - without restriction. higherl borrowing today isjust high borrowing today is just high interest rates and even higher taxes tomorrow. so we need to strengthen our public finances, so that when the next crisis comes we have the fiscal space to act. today i am publishing a new charter for budget responsibility. fix, publishing a new charter for budget responsibility-— publishing a new charter for budget responsibility. a new gimmick, with a return of rules _ responsibility. a new gimmick, with a return of rules to _ responsibility. a new gimmick, with a return of rules to get _ responsibility. a new gimmick, with a return of rules to get national- a return of rules to get national debt on the way down as a share of the economy, and for tax, not borrowing, to cover daily costs. but out in the real world the damage to the economy from the pandemic is smaller than expected, so whether it is for the police, the courts, health, defence, orany other is for the police, the courts, health, defence, or any other kind of public service, whitehall�*s wallet will be more generous to every corner of government in the next three years.— next three years. there will be a real terms _ next three years. there will be a real terms rise _ next three years. there will be a real terms rise in _ next three years. there will be a real terms rise in overall- next three years. there will be a i real terms rise in overall spending for every single department. if anybody still doubts it, today's
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budget confirms the conservatives are the real party of public services. are the real party of public services-— are the real party of public services. ,, . . ., are the real party of public services. ,, . . . , ., , services. quite a claim, given years of tory squeeze. — services. quite a claim, given years of tory squeeze, and _ services. quite a claim, given years of tory squeeze, and tension - services. quite a claim, given years of tory squeeze, and tension as - services. quite a claim, given years of tory squeeze, and tension as the chancellor cut taxes on some flights and froze duty on fueljust days before the government hosts a climate conference in glasgow. but this seeming generosity is not completely straightforward. there were wild cheers for the chancellor, allowing some families on universal credit to keep more of their cash, even though it will not cover what many more have already lost. this is a £2 billion — many more have already lost. this is a £2 billion tax _ many more have already lost. this is a £2 billion tax cut _ many more have already lost. this is a £2 billion tax cut for _ many more have already lost. this is a £2 billion tax cut for the _ many more have already lost. this is a £2 billion tax cut for the lowest - a £2 billion tax cut for the lowest paid workers in our country, it supports working families, it helps with the cost of living and it rewards work.— with the cost of living and it rewards work. , . , ., , , rewards work. this was a high spend, hiuh rewards work. this was a high spend, hi . h tax rewards work. this was a high spend, high tax budget. _ rewards work. this was a high spend, high tax budget, not _ rewards work. this was a high spend, high tax budget, not that _ rewards work. this was a high spend, high tax budget, not that you - rewards work. this was a high spend, high tax budget, not that you would l high tax budget, not that you would believe it from this. but government has limits, government _ believe it from this. but government has limits, government should - believe it from this. but government has limits, government should have| has limits, government should have limits. if this seems a controversial statement to make,
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then i am all the more glad for saying it because that means it needed saying and it is what we believe. my goal is to reduce taxes by the end of this parliament. i want taxes to be going down, not up. this budget levels up to a higher wage, higherskill, higher wage, higher skill, higher productivity wage, higherskill, higher productivity economy, this budget bill is a stronger economy for the british people and i commend it to the house. the british people and i commend it to the house. ., ., , the house. the commons, some in masks, still _ the house. the commons, some in masks, still stopped _ the house. the commons, some in masks, still stopped by _ the house. the commons, some in masks, still stopped by covid. - the house. the commons, some in masks, still stopped by covid. i- the house. the commons, some in| masks, still stopped by covid. i was rutted this masks, still stopped by covid. i was gutted this morning _ masks, still stopped by covid. i was gutted this morning to _ masks, still stopped by covid. tm; gutted this morning to test positive for covid. the gutted this morning to test positive for covid. ., ,., ., gutted this morning to test positive for covid. ., ., , for covid. the labour leader stuck at home, for covid. the labour leader stuck at home. the _ for covid. the labour leader stuck at home, the shadow _ for covid. the labour leader stuck at home, the shadow chancellor l for covid. the labour leader stuckj at home, the shadow chancellor a last—minute standing, even though it seemed like she had been practising for years. at seemed like she had been practising for ears. �* ., , seemed like she had been practising for ears. �* ,, , seemed like she had been practising for ears. �* ~ for years. at least the bankers on short-haul _ for years. at least the bankers on short- haul flights _ for years. at least the bankers on short-haul flights sipping - for years. at least the bankers on - short-haul flights sipping champagne short—haul flights sipping champagne will be cheering this budget today. but today working people are being asked to pay more for less for three simple reasons. economic
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mismanagement and unfair tax systems and a waste on spending. each of these problems is down to ii and a waste on spending. each of these problems is down to 11 years of conservative failure. the smaller arties of conservative failure. the smaller parties also — of conservative failure. the smaller parties also showed _ of conservative failure. the smaller parties also showed big _ of conservative failure. the smaller parties also showed big resistance. | parties also showed big resistance. this budget could have been an opportunity to do things differently, to get a grip on the cost of— differently, to get a grip on the cost of living crisis. but this budget— cost of living crisis. but this budget does not signal recovery, it signalled _ budget does not signal recovery, it signalled that the chancellor is dragging us into another winter of discontent. ~ ., ~ ., , discontent. working families the [en . th discontent. working families the lenath and discontent. working families the length and breadth _ discontent. working families the length and breadth of _ discontent. working families the length and breadth of wales - discontent. working families the length and breadth of wales andj discontent. working families the - length and breadth of wales and the uk that are suffering like never before, there is a complete disconnect.— before, there is a complete disconnect. �* ,, �*, disconnect. but downing street's double act hopes _ disconnect. but downing street's double act hopes there _ disconnect. but downing street's double act hopes there is - disconnect. but downing street's double act hopes there is plenty| disconnect. but downing street's i double act hopes there is plenty to toast. a tricky business. higher duties on stronger booze, lower charges unless heavy bruise. yet the teetotal chancellor pulled a pint without taking a sip. perfect. plenty of pressure still ahead, reluctant to celebrate too soon.
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the chancellor has made much in his budget of how much more money will be spent by the government, but how will it all be paid for? our economics editor faisal islam has been looking at the numbers. injusta injust a few in just a few months the economic picture has changed spectacularly, and that can be seen on any high street. people have returned, some businesses have not, many that have cannot get enough staff to deal with the rebound and prices are going up. that everyday picture is seen in all the charts and forecasts underpinning this budget and spending review. first the state of the economy, it has rebounded faster than expected from the depths of the lockdown. but growth is forecast to remain pretty sluggish. the improvement in the forecast means the chancellor can borrow less money than he thought six months ago, with borrowing reduced every year and getting down by 2025 to its lowest levels for a quarter of a century, a
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spectacular turnaround from the depths of the pandemic. the first job of any chancellor is custodian of the public finances, to show they can keep borrowing under control. rishi sunak was not able to do that during the pandemic, so he is making up during the pandemic, so he is making up for it now. yet at the same time he wants spending to increase under partners that otherwise would have been cut and also to help with the cost of living issues, and that means although a reluctant taxman, he is also a record one. this chancellor _ he is also a record one. this chancellor has _ he is also a record one. this chancellor has also - he is also a record one. this chancellor has also raised . he is also a record one. tt 3 chancellor has also raised more in tax in 2021 than any chancellor has ever raised in a single year going back to 1993 when it took norman lamont and ken clarke to raise as much tax in a single year as this chancellor has raised. th much tax in a single year as this chancellor has raised.— chancellor has raised. in other words is this _ chancellor has raised. in other words is this chart _ chancellor has raised. in other words is this chart showing - chancellor has raised. in other| words is this chart showing the proportion of tax taken by the government at its highest levels since the post—war labour government of clement attlee. all that adds to a warning spike in inflation above
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4% amid record fuel and domestic energy crisis. 496 amid record fuel and domestic energy crisis-— energy crisis. inflation is set to rise well above _ energy crisis. inflation is set to rise well above 496 _ energy crisis. inflation is set to rise well above 496 in _ energy crisis. inflation is set to rise well above 496 in the - energy crisis. inflation is set to rise well above 496 in the first i energy crisis. inflation is set to i rise well above 496 in the first part rise well above 4% in the first part of next year, the highest it has been for some time. put that together with slow growth, increases in tax and so on, and over the next four orfive years our in tax and so on, and over the next four or five years our average will barely see any improvement in our living standards. that is after a decade of very poor increases. i am really sorry to say that actually we will not be feeling much better off over the next several years. so the economy is — over the next several years. so the economy is doing _ over the next several years. so the economy is doing much _ over the next several years. so the economy is doing much better- over the next several years. so the j economy is doing much better than last year, but it is not back to normal and a long—term plan for a new economy of high wages and high skills is still a few years away at best. faisal islam, bbc news. faisal islam, bbc news. one of the big announcements today was on universal credit. the government has been under pressure since it ended the £20 boost to the benefit earlier this month. today the chancellor announced
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a cut to the taper rate. that's the rate at which universal credit is reduced once a claimant starts to earn above a certain threshold. currently if you earn an extra pound you lose 63p in benefit. that will be cut to 55p in every pound, allowing people to keep more of their money as they start to earn more. but campaigners say the amount doesn't address wider issues of cost of living and those who can't work. our home editor mark easton has been talking to people in wolverhampton. britain has among the worst inequality in the developed world. one person in six lives in poverty. so what do the chancellor's repeated promises to level up the mean for those on low incomes in places like wolverhampton? giovanni nursed his mum until her death last april. now living alone, depression and stress have stopped him working. having seen the £20 covid benefits uplift removed, he is left with 60 quid a week to cover everything, as the cost—of—living soars. it's very, very hard. you know, i don't even
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put the heating on. i have to sit like this with my fleece on every day. you know, you're frightened to even put the water, run the water in the tap. low paid workers will now keep more of their universal credit, but that won't help giovanni, with the chancellor resisting calls to remove vat from fuel bills. the chancellor needs to address these things. why are you doing this? why are you making people suffer? for those on low incomes, this budget is relatively good news if you're working. there's changes to universal credit and the national living wage. but for those who are unable to work or who are looking for a job, a winter ahead. it is a swings and roundabouts budget, but is delighted by the focus on encouraging people into work. currently on universal credit, she says the chancellor has made it easier for her to take the plunge and set up her own business. work, to me, i mean, it gives me, what i'm
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saying, it's great that i can treat my children, and you know, i just want to work. i'm pro—work. so, this change to the universal credit and to the national living wage, good news for you? good news for me, good news. shukdev has three part—time jobs, but her mental and physical health are not great. she carries on because she doesn't want to claim benefits, and needs every pennyjust to get by. i've been borrowing money off friends, and i have to keep a roof over my head. sometimes i don't sleep. i can't sleep, i'm thinking all the time. and sometimes my body is not functioning properly at work. i felt tired all the time. for her, today's budget has made the option of working a bit less increasingly remote. you know, you've got to get up and go. you've got no choice. if i don't go to work, i can't pay my bills. it's very hard and they need to start—
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it's very hard and they need to start listening to what we are doing and experience what we are going through — and experience what we are going through. get him to spend a week here _ through. get him to spend a week here on — through. get him to spend a week here. on your budget? and see how you cope _ here. on your budget? and see how you cope. for here. on your budget? and see how ou coe. ., here. on your budget? and see how ou co le. ., ., , ., here. on your budget? and see how ou coe. ., ., ., , you cope. for those on low incomes buduet you cope. for those on low incomes budget can — you cope. for those on low incomes budget can be _ you cope. for those on low incomes budget can be life _ you cope. for those on low incomes budget can be life changing, - you cope. for those on low incomes budget can be life changing, for- budget can be life changing, for good and ill. some of the most eye—catching measures affecting business were aimed at retail, hospitality and leisure, among the sectors hit hardest by the pandemic. shops, pubs and gyms in england will be among businesses to get a 50% cut in their business rates. and the way alcohol is taxed is to be simplified. some drinks will be taxed more but duty on draught beers will be reduced by 5%. our consumer affairs correspondent colleta smith has the details. chancellor is like making popular announcements about alcohol. a penny here, 5p there, but this budget is bringing in some much bigger
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changes. the way that we drink has changed totally.— changes. the way that we drink has changed totally. prosecco and carver have made sparkling _ changed totally. prosecco and carver have made sparkling wine _ changed totally. prosecco and carver have made sparkling wine much - changed totally. prosecco and carver| have made sparkling wine much more accessible and affordable, and that's a great thing. at accessible and affordable, and that's a great thing.— accessible and affordable, and that's a great thing. at the moment, sarklin: that's a great thing. at the moment, sparkling wine _ that's a great thing. at the moment, sparkling wine is _ that's a great thing. at the moment, sparkling wine is charged _ that's a great thing. at the moment, sparkling wine is charged at - that's a great thing. at the moment, sparkling wine is charged at a - that's a great thing. at the moment, sparkling wine is charged at a much i sparkling wine is charged at a much higher rate than normal wine. the amount of duty we play on different alcohol is a really complicated system, and today's plan is to simplify that. and it means that there will be less duty to pay on things like champagne and other popular drinks, wines, beers, but it could well mean that we end up paying more in some ciders and fortified wines. but will those savings be passed on to customers? t savings be passed on to customers? i would hope that they have there are significant savings, that they can be passed onto consumers, but there are other challenges we are trying to accommodate at the moment, and you know, the changes with just bringing wine into the country, it's becoming more expensive. itrai’ihe bringing wine into the country, it's becoming more expensive. wine is now the most popular _ becoming more expensive. wine is now the most popular drink— becoming more expensive. wine is now the most popular drink in _ becoming more expensive. wine is now the most popular drink in the _ becoming more expensive. wine is now the most popular drink in the uk, - the most popular drink in the uk, wherever it is drunk. so the most popular drink in the uk, wherever it is drunk.— the most popular drink in the uk, wherever it is drunk. so many deals at the supermarket, _
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wherever it is drunk. so many deals at the supermarket, it's _ wherever it is drunk. so many deals at the supermarket, it's not - wherever it is drunk. so many deals at the supermarket, it's not that. at the supermarket, it's not that expensive — at the supermarket, it's not that expensive. it�*s at the supermarket, it's not that expensive-_ at the supermarket, it's not that exensive. �*, , ., ., , ., expensive. it's starting to become a bit of a necessity _ expensive. it's starting to become a bit of a necessity to _ expensive. it's starting to become a bit of a necessity to people - expensive. it's starting to become a bit of a necessity to people to - bit of a necessity to people to relax. , ., :: , ., . ., relax. there is a 5096 tax cut for retail and _ relax. there is a 5096 tax cut for retail and hospitality _ relax. there is a 5096 tax cut for retail and hospitality coming - relax. there is a 5096 tax cut for retail and hospitality coming in, | retail and hospitality coming in, which is a big relief for andy. nobody wants to work all day and night to not make anything. it's not why we do it. being able to know that you can have this reduction is good. it's a very positive. there will be a lot of businesses relieved to hear that. will be a lot of businesses relieved to hear that-— will be a lot of businesses relieved to hear that. changes in booze duty don't kick in — to hear that. changes in booze duty don't kick in until _ to hear that. changes in booze duty don't kick in until2023, _ to hear that. changes in booze duty don't kick in until2023, but - to hear that. changes in booze duty don't kick in until 2023, but those i don't kick in until 2023, but those serving it and drinking it are hoping to pay less as a result. collette smith, bbc news, manchester. the chancellor has also promised record funding to the devolved administrations. there's an increase to scottish government funding in each year of an average of £4.6 billion, £2.5 billion for the welsh government, and 1.6 billion for the northern ireland executive. in a moment we will hear from hywel griffith in wales and emma vardy in northern ireland but first here is our scotland editor, sarah smith. that's £4.6 billion a year on top
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of what the scottish government was already expecting in the form of the block grant, and unusually, it includes direct treasury funding for projects in scotland, like upgrading some town centres, even an electric car grand prix in the western isles. and the chancellor specifically said this budget shows the financial value to scotland of remaining in the united kingdom. well, the snp say it was a missed opportunity, the money should have been spent on green projects, like a carbon capture and storage facility near aberdeen, and that the uk government's missing out on green economic opportunities, especially as, just over there, next week, glasgow will be hosting the cup 26 environmental conference. in the welsh government building behind me, they will be going through these numbers line by line, but one figure that stands out is the extra {2.5 billion a year that will come to wales. however, the labour ministers here say they already see gaps in the funding. they point to the lack of new money to deal with the problem of coal tip safety,
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a question really of who pays for wales's industrial past. then there is the row over european funding. the chancellor saying today that, over time, new money from the uk will match what was spent here. the question really isn't over how much is spent, though, but who controls it. under the european scheme, it was the welsh labour government. under the new shared prosperity fund, the checks will be written in downing street, and the uk government is keen for people here in wales to know that. a headline for northern ireland is the cut in air passenger duty, something businesses who have been calling for a while, the idea being that lower prices could improve northern ireland's flight connections with the rest of the uk. now, there is also money coming from the government's levelling up fund, which is going to pay for a range of projects in northern ireland, things like extending cycle lanes across belfast. now, stormont�*s department of finance is still trying to reassess exactly what the impact will be of the extra £1.6 billion a year that the chancellor has said northern ireland will be able to
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spend on local services, but such is the concern here at the moment about the state of northern ireland's health service, stormont�*s finance minister is currently trying to persuade the executive that any extra funds should all go to health, even if it means other departments missing out. some of the main measures in today's budget had been announced earlier in the week, including extra money for the nhs, a rise in the national living wage and public sector pay rises. but let's take a look at some of the new announcements. on schools, there was a surprise additional £1.8 billion for education recovery in england, although that's significantly less than asked for by the government's education catch—up tsar, kevan collins. £5 billion was announced for the removal of unsafe cladding for the highest—risk buildings following the grenfell tower tragedy. that will be raised through an extra levy on large construction companies. on housing, more than £11 billion was announced to build up to 180,000 affordable homes, with brownfield sites targeted for development. and on foreign aid, the chancellor
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said he expected uk contributions to return to 0.7% of the national income by 2024—25. let's talk now to our economics editor, faisal islam. the chancellor sounded very optimistic in the commons today but there are more pessimistic views about the economic outloook, not least from the the office for budget responsibility. so many measures but so much hinges on quite tricky assumptions about where the economy will go after the extraordinary 18 months we've had. at first, they must feel vindication for the rescue efforts that it has helped create the space for extra borrowing and therefore more spending. the economy has rebounded faster than expectations, and that they see as vindication. going forward, the growth rate are pretty low, pretty sluggish, 1.3%, 1.6%.
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that would be disappointed, certainly no sign of a new era of high skill, high wage productivity economics in that. and the obr point to, yes, a hangoverfrom the pandemic that affects 2% of the long run growth, but they say that brexit, they still stick by the idea that brexit will affect it more than that, by 4%, and they also say that leaving the eu has also been compounded some of the supply chain challenges we have had. a number of issues going on, lots of measures. the chancellor is keen to point out that he thinks measures he has taken will increase long—term growth and that the obr forecast may prove pessimistic. he doesn'tjust as i have this change in the economy, he really needs it to make the numbers work. . ~ really needs it to make the numbers work. ., ,, , ., if you want to find out eight ways today's budget will directly affect you, from universal credit changes to the price of a drink, visit our website at bbc.co.uk/news or you can use the bbc news app.
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police investigating the killing of a cinematographer on set with a gun by the actor alex baldwin say they believe the weapon contained a live round. the hollywood star had been told the weapon was safe. he's a co—producer of the film rust, and there are reports of complaints about safety standards in the days and hours before halyna hutchins was killed. sophie long is in santa fe for us, where the police have just held a press conference. sophie. fiona, the sheriff has just finished speaking to reporters here, and he began by offering his condolences to the hutchins family. he stressed this is an ongoing investigation but he did say, to him, the facts are clear. alec baldwin had been holding a functional weapon that had fired a live round. we also confirmed that they removed a lead bullet from the shoulder of the director, and they believe that was the same bullet that killed halyna hutchins. it is
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now nearly a week since 42—year—old halyna hutchins was shot dead doing herjob. this is believed to be the last photograph of her alive on the set of the film rust. alec baldwin was holding the gun that discharge the fatal shot and severely injured the fatal shot and severely injured the director. brute the fatal shot and severely in'ured the director.— the director. we believe that we have in our— the director. we believe that we have in our possession - the director. we believe that we have in our possession the - the director. we believe that we i have in our possession the firearm that was fired by mr baldwin, the actual lead projectile that was fired has been recovered from the shoulder of mr sousa. we regard this specific spend casing and recovered projectile to be the live round that was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. ~ �* . was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. ~ ~ . a, was fired from the revolver by mr baldwin. . ~ . 1, ., , baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the _ baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon, _ baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon, he - baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon, he was - baldwin. when alec baldwin was handed the weapon, he was told baldwin. when alec baldwin was i handed the weapon, he was told it was safe, what is called a cold gun. it wasn't. they are interviewing the many witnesses on set, including the person responsible for the safety of the weapons used, known as the armourer. that was 24—year—old
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former model honegger terrace read. all options are on the table like this point _ all options are on the table like this point. i'm not commenting on charges, _ this point. i'm not commenting on charges, whether they will be fired or not. _ charges, whether they will be fired or not. and — charges, whether they will be fired or not, and on whom. the answer is, we cannot_ or not, and on whom. the answer is, we cannot answer that question yet until we _ we cannot answer that question yet until we complete a more thorough investigation. the until we complete a more thorough investigation-— investigation. the tragedy has left holl ood investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving _ investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving and _ investigation. the tragedy has left hollywood grieving and reignited i investigation. the tragedy has left i hollywood grieving and reignited the debate about whether real guns and ammunition should ever be allowed on film sets under any circumstances. loan, news, santa fe. let's take a look at the latest uk coronavirus figures. there were nearly 44,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — down around 5,000 on the same time last week. it means an average of 43,959 new cases were reported per day in the last week. there were 8,801 people in hospital with covid as of yesterday. 207 deaths were reported of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. it follows unusually low reported figures over the weekend. on average in the past week, 144 related deaths were recorded every day. it comes as over 6.7 million people are reported to have received their booster jab.
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this includes third doses for those with certain health conditions. let's take a brief look at some of today's other news. insulate britain climate change protesters have caused more disruption on roads in and around london. police were sent to unglue members of the group from a major route in acton, where seventeen people were arrested. 32 arrests were also made in kent, after demonstrators blocked a road near the dartford crossing. almost 200 drink spiking incidents have been reported to police forces across the uk over the past two months. the national police chiefs' council said there have been 198 confirmed reports of drinks being tampered with in september and october across various parts of england, scotland, wales, and northern ireland, plus 24 reports of people being injected. a group of mps has heavily criticised the test and trace programme in england. the public accounts committee said it failed to break covid—19 transmission chains despite costing eye—watering sums of money. the uk health security agency insists test and trace has
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played an essential role in combating the pandemic. england's cricketers continued their strong start to the men's t20 world cup with a 8 wicket victory over bangladesh. having restricted them to just 124, england comfortably chased the total to win — jason roy top scoring with 61. in their match against namibia, scotland only managed moments ago, scotland lost their match against namibia. they were out for 109—8. there may be made 115 — six. some final thoughts from our political editor, laura kuenssberg. how would you sum up the budget presented today, laura? that chancellor — presented today, laura? that chancellor wanted _ presented today, laura? that chancellor wanted to - presented today, laura? tngt chancellor wanted to open a new chapter after the worst days of the pandemic, and as a conservative chancellor, you might have expected him to say, ok, the emergency is over, so let's pull back and stop asking people to pay so much tax,
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let's stop the state growing, let's stop spending so much of tax payers' money, but in fact he has done the opposite. he has carried on spending and spending will keep going up in every sikh a bit of the government. he is also putting taxes up, and they will hit record levels, and therefore he is absolutely not going to please everybody in the conservative party, but for now, even though he likes to style himself as conservative with traditional instincts, he and boris johnson are presiding over an era of big government that looks like it is going to stay until at least the next general election. so, in political terms, one former minister evenjoked political terms, one former minister even joked that it felt like a labour budget. rishi sunak might not like the sound of that, but the political choices he and boris johnson have made today add up to something that looks rather different to a traditional conservative budget. and that seeming generosity that he would no doubt like the public to believe, that commitment to spending on public services, that might not be
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matched by a feeling that everything is rosy, because inflation is going to be felt by firms and families across the land, and that is just not something that even the mighty treasury is able to control.- treasury is able to control. laura, at westminster, _ treasury is able to control. laura, at westminster, thank _ treasury is able to control. laura, at westminster, thank you. - treasury is able to control. laura, at westminster, thank you. shall| treasury is able to control. laura, i at westminster, thank you. shall we take a look at the weather? nick miller is here. those places that saw sunshine, up to around 18 celsius. more significantly, how much rain is falling across parts of southern scotland, especially south—west scotland, especially south—west scotland, and cumbria. an amber warning in cumbria, where we will see more than 200 millimetres of rain in the wettest areas. this is what was happening today. this wet weather continuing to feeding across many of the same places. as it rains, rain totals mount, and the risk of flooding and disruption increases. that's what happened, this is what is coming tonight. the rain still in many of the same areas, easing away from northern ireland, unto north—west wales. a
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few showers either side. single figures in scotland, but for most, another very mild night. it is windy as well. there are gales through the irish sea. still raining tomorrow across many of the same areas, pushing on some more over wales, feeding further north through scotland again, cornwall and devon could see some rain out of this. central and eastern parts of england still mainly dry, a lot of cloud, but sunny spells lifting temperatures again to 17 or 18 celsius in a few spots. thursday evening, very little changes with this area of rain. the pulse of rain to northern ireland on thursday night, on friday feeding across scotland. at this stage, though, parts of eastern england see a bit of showery rain, and by the end of friday it is much drier, where it is so very wet at the moment. that's not the end of it, because low pressure is still close by into the weekend and will generate further areas of rain. this is one coming in on saturday. a few locations for the
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weekend, but you get the idea, we

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